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2.
Nutrients ; 13(2)2021 Feb 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33546262

RESUMO

African Americans have higher incidence of, and mortality from, many health-related problems than European Americans. They also have a 15 to 20-fold higher prevalence of severe vitamin D deficiency. Here we summarize evidence that: (i) this health disparity is partly due to insufficient vitamin D production, caused by melanin in the skin blocking the UVB solar radiation necessary for its synthesis; (ii) the vitamin D insufficiency is exacerbated at high latitudes because of the combination of dark skin color with lower UVB radiation levels; and (iii) the health of individuals with dark skin can be markedly improved by correcting deficiency and achieving an optimal vitamin D status, as could be obtained by supplementation and/or fortification. Moderate-to-strong evidence exists that high 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and/or vitamin D supplementation reduces risk for many adverse health outcomes including all-cause mortality rate, adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes, cancer, diabetes mellitus, Alzheimer's disease and dementia, multiple sclerosis, acute respiratory tract infections, COVID-19, asthma exacerbations, rickets, and osteomalacia. We suggest that people with low vitamin D status, which would include most people with dark skin living at high latitudes, along with their health care provider, consider taking vitamin D3 supplements to raise serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels to 30 ng/mL (75 nmol/L) or possibly higher.


Assuntos
/etiologia , Colecalciferol/administração & dosagem , Suplementos Nutricionais , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Deficiência de Vitamina D/etnologia , Deficiência de Vitamina D/epidemiologia , Afro-Americanos , Doença de Alzheimer/etiologia , Doença de Alzheimer/prevenção & controle , Antígenos de Neoplasias , Demência/etiologia , Demência/prevenção & controle , Diabetes Mellitus/etiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Estado Asmático/etiologia , Estado Asmático/prevenção & controle , Vitamina D/análogos & derivados , Vitamina D/sangue , Deficiência de Vitamina D/complicações
3.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 2021 Feb 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33586078

RESUMO

Heavy alcohol consumption in mid-adulthood is an established risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC). Alcohol use in early adulthood is common, but its association with subsequent CRC risk remains largely unknown. We prospectively investigated the association of average alcohol intake in early adulthood (age 18-22) with CRC risk later in life among 191,543 participants of the Nurses' Health Study ([NHS], 1988-2014), NHSII (1989-2015) and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1988-2014). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), which were pooled using random effects models. We documented 2,624 CRC cases. High alcohol consumption in early adulthood (≥ 15 g/day) was associated with a higher CRC risk (multivariable HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.99-1.66, Ptrend = 0.02; Pheterogeneity = 0.44), after adjusting for potential confounding factors in early adulthood. Among never/light smokers in early adulthood, the risk associated with high alcohol consumption in early adulthood was elevated (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.04-2.24), compared with those who had < 1 g/day of alcohol intake. The suggestive higher CRC risk associated with high alcohol consumption in early adulthood was similar in those who had < 15 g/day (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.98-1.86) versus ≥ 15 g/day of midlife alcohol intake (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.89-2.05), compared with nondrinkers in both life stages. The findings from these large prospective cohort studies suggest that higher alcohol intake in early adulthood may be associated with a higher risk of developing CRC later in life.

4.
Nat Med ; 27(2): 333-343, 2021 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33574608

RESUMO

To address how the microbiome might modify the interaction between diet and cardiometabolic health, we analyzed longitudinal microbiome data from 307 male participants in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, together with long-term dietary information and measurements of biomarkers of glucose homeostasis, lipid metabolism and inflammation from blood samples. Here, we demonstrate that a healthy Mediterranean-style dietary pattern is associated with specific functional and taxonomic components of the gut microbiome, and that its protective associations with cardiometabolic health vary depending on microbial composition. In particular, the protective association between adherence to the Mediterranean diet and cardiometabolic disease risk was significantly stronger among participants with decreased abundance of Prevotella copri. Our findings advance the concept of precision nutrition and have the potential to inform more effective and precise dietary approaches for the prevention of cardiometabolic disease mediated through alterations in the gut microbiome.

5.
Br J Nutr ; : 1-36, 2021 Jan 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33413729

RESUMO

The long-term inflammatory impact of diet could potentially elevate the risk of periodontal disease through modification of systemic inflammation. The aim of the present study was to prospectively investigate the associations between a food based, reduced rank regression (RRR) derived, empirical dietary inflammatory pattern (EDIP) and incidence of periodontitis. The study population was composed of 34,940 men from the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, who were free of periodontal disease and major illnesses at baseline (1986). Participants provided medical and dental history through mailed questionnaires every 2 years, and dietary data through validated semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaires every 4 years. We used Cox proportional hazard models to examine the associations between EDIP scores and validated self-reported incidence of periodontal disease over a 24-year follow-up period. No overall association between EDIP and the risk of periodontitis was observed; the hazard ratio comparing the highest EDIP quintile (most proinflammatory diet) to the lowest quintile was 0.99 (95% confidence interval: 0.89 -1.10, p-value for trend = 0.97). A secondary analysis showed that among obese non-smokers (i.e. never and former smokers at baseline), the hazard ratio for periodontitis comparing the highest EDIP quintile to the lowest was 1.39 (95% confidence interval: 0.98 -1.96, p-value for trend = 0.03). In conclusion, no overall association was detected between EDIP and incidence of self-reported periodontitis in the study population. From the subgroups evaluated EDIP was significantly associated with increased risk of periodontitis only among nonsmokers who were obese. Hence, this association must be interpreted with caution.

6.
Br J Cancer ; 2021 Jan 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33398066

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Higher dairy intake during adulthood has been associated with lower colorectal cancer risk. As colorectal carcinogenesis spans several decades, we hypothesised that higher dairy intake during adolescence is associated with lower risk of colorectal adenoma, a colorectal cancer precursor. METHODS: In 27,196 females from the Nurses' Health Study 2, aged 25-42 years at recruitment (1989), who had completed a validated high school diet questionnaire in 1998 and undergone at least one lower bowel endoscopy between 1998 and 2011, logistic regression for clustered data was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Colorectal adenomas were diagnosed in 2239 women. Dairy consumption during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk (OR highest vs. lowest [≥4 vs. ≤1.42 servings/day] quintile [95% CI] 0.94 [0.80, 1.11]). By anatomical site, higher adolescent dairy intake was associated with lower rectal (0.63 [0.42, 0.95]), but not proximal (1.01 [0.80, 1.28]) or distal (0.97 [0.76, 1.24]) colon adenoma risk. An inverse association was observed with histologically advanced (0.72 [0.51, 1.00]) but not non-advanced (1.07 [0.86, 1.33]) adenoma. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of younger women, higher adolescent dairy intake was associated with lower rectal and advanced adenoma risk later in life.

7.
Diabetes Care ; 44(3): 663-671, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33441419

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the associations between changes in plant-based diets and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively followed 76,530 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) (1986-2012), 81,569 women in NHS II (1991-2017), and 34,468 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2016). Adherence to plant-based diets was assessed every 4 years with the overall plant-based diet index (PDI), healthful PDI (hPDI), and unhealthful PDI (uPDI). We used multivariable Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs). We pooled results of the three cohorts using meta-analysis. RESULTS: We documented 12,627 cases of type 2 diabetes during 2,955,350 person-years of follow-up. After adjustment for initial BMI and initial and 4-year changes in alcohol intake, smoking, physical activity, and other factors, compared with participants whose indices remained relatively stable (±3%), participants with the largest decrease (>10%) in PDI and hPDI over 4 years had a 12-23% higher diabetes risk in the subsequent 4 years (pooled HR, PDI 1.12 [95% CI 1.05, 1.20], hPDI 1.23 [1.16, 1.31]). Each 10% increment in PDI and hPDI over 4 years was associated with a 7-9% lower risk (PDI 0.93 [0.91, 0.95], hPDI 0.91 [0.87, 0.95]). Changes in uPDI were not associated with diabetes risk. Weight changes accounted for 6.0-35.6% of the associations between changes in PDI and hPDI and diabetes risk. CONCLUSIONS: Improving adherence to overall and healthful plant-based diets was associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes, whereas decreased adherence to such diets was associated with a higher risk.

8.
PLoS Med ; 17(12): e1003453, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33290392

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) has been consistently associated with a higher risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and premature mortality, whereas evidence for artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) and fruit juices on health is less solid. The aim of this study was to evaluate the consumption of SSBs, ASBs, and fruit juices in association with frailty risk among older women. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed data from 71,935 women aged ≥60 (average baseline age was 63) participating in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), an ongoing cohort study initiated in 1976 among female registered nurses in the United States. Consumption of beverages was derived from 6 repeated food frequency questionnaires (FFQs) administered between 1990 and 2010. Frailty was defined as having at least 3 of the following 5 criteria from the FRAIL scale: fatigue, poor strength, reduced aerobic capacity, having ≥5 chronic illnesses, and weight loss ≥5%. The occurrence of frailty was assessed every 4 years from 1992 to 2014. During 22 years of follow-up, we identified 11,559 incident cases of frailty. Consumption of SSBs was associated with higher risk of frailty after adjustment for diet quality, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, and medication use, specifically, the relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) for ≥2 serving/day versus no SSB consumption was 1.32 (1.10, 1.57); p-value <0.001. ASBs were also associated with frailty [RR ≥2 serving/day versus no consumption: 1.28 (1.17, 1.39); p-value <0.001]. Orange juice was associated with lower risk of frailty [RR ≥1 serving/day versus no consumption: 0.82 (0.76, 0.87); p-value <0.001], whereas other juices were associated with a slightly higher risk [RR ≥1 serving/day versus no consumption: 1.15 (1.03, 1.28); p-value <0.001]. A limitation of this study is that, due to self-reporting of diet and frailty, certain misclassification bias cannot be ruled out; also, some residual confounding may persist. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we observed that consumption of SSBs and ASBs was associated with a higher risk of frailty. However, orange juice intake showed an inverse association with frailty. These results need to be confirmed in further studies using other frailty definitions.

9.
BMJ ; 371: m4141, 2020 12 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33268459

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To study total, processed, and unprocessed red meat in relation to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and to estimate the effects of substituting other protein sources for red meat with CHD risk. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with repeated measures of diet and lifestyle factors. SETTING: Health Professionals Follow-Up Study cohort, United States, 1986-2016. PARTICIPANTS: 43 272 men without cardiovascular disease or cancer at baseline. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was total CHD, comprised of acute non-fatal myocardial infarction or fatal CHD. Cox models were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals across categories of red meat consumption. Substitution analyses were conducted by comparing coefficients for red meat and the alternative food in models, including red meat and alternative foods as continuous variables. RESULTS: During 1 023 872 person years of follow-up, 4456 incident CHD events were documented of which 1860 were fatal. After multivariate adjustment for dietary and non-dietary risk factors, total, unprocessed, and processed red meat intake were each associated with a modestly higher risk of CHD (hazard ratio for one serving per day increment: 1.12 (95% confidence interval 1.06 to 1.18) for total red meat, 1.11 (1.02 to 1.21) for unprocessed red meat, and 1.15 (1.06 to 1.25) for processed red meat). Compared with red meat, the intake of one serving per day of combined plant protein sources (nuts, legumes, and soy) was associated with a lower risk of CHD (0.86 (0.80 to 0.93) compared with total red meat, 0.87 (0.79 to 0.95) compared with unprocessed red meat, and 0.83 (0.76 to 0.91) compared with processed red meat). Substitutions of whole grains and dairy products for total red meat and eggs for processed red meat were also associated with lower CHD risk. CONCLUSIONS: Substituting high quality plant foods such as legumes, nuts, or soy for red meat might reduce the risk of CHD. Substituting whole grains and dairy products for total red meat, and eggs for processed red meat, might also reduce this risk.

10.
NPJ Breast Cancer ; 6(1): 61, 2020 Nov 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33298962

RESUMO

Adolescent drinking is associated with higher risks of proliferative benign breast disease (BBD) and invasive breast cancer (BC). Furthermore, adolescent nut and fiber consumptions are associated with lower risks of benign lesions and premenopausal BC. We hypothesize that diet (nuts, fiber) may mitigate the elevated BBD risk associated with alcohol. A prospective cohort of 9031 females, 9-15 years at baseline, completed questionnaires in 1996-2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2010, 2013, and 2014. Participants completed food frequency questionnaires in 1996-2001. In 2005, participants (>=18 years) began reporting biopsy-confirmed BBD (N = 173 cases). Multivariable logistic regression estimated associations between BBD and cross-classified intakes (14-17 years) of alcohol and peanut butter/nuts (separately, total dietary fiber). Only 19% of participants drank in high school; drinking was associated with elevated BBD risk (OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.20-2.56; p = 0.004) compared to nondrinkers. Participants consuming any nuts/butter had lower BBD risk (OR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.45-0.90; p = 0.01) compared to those consuming none. Participants in top 75% fiber intake had lower risk (OR = 0.57, 95% CI: 0.40-0.81; p = 0.002) compared to bottom quartile. Testing our hypothesis that consuming nuts/butter mitigates the elevated alcohol risk, analyzing alcohol and nuts combined found that those who consumed both had lower risk (RR = 0.47, 95% CI: 0.24-0.89; p = 0.02) compared to drinkers eating no nuts. Our analysis of alcohol and fiber together did not demonstrate risk mitigation by fiber. For high school females who drink, their BBD risk may be attenuated by consuming nuts. Due to modest numbers, future studies need to replicate our findings in adolescent/adult females. However, high school students may be encouraged to eat nuts and fiber, and to avoid alcohol, to reduce risk of BBD and for general health benefits.

11.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2020 Dec 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33367714

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Increased body mass index (BMI) is associated with higher postmenopausal breast cancer risk and lower premenopausal breast cancer risk. Less is known about the central adiposity-breast cancer risk association, particularly for tumor subtypes. METHODS: We used prospective waist (WC) and hip circumference (HC) measures in the Nurses' Health Studies. We examined associations of WC, HC and waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) with breast cancer independent of BMI, by menopausal status. Cox proportional hazards models estimated the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) adjusting for breast cancer risk factors, with and without BMI. RESULTS: Adjusting for BMI, WC, and HC were not associated and WHR was positively associated with premenopausal breast cancer risk (WHR, quintile 5 vs. 1: HRQ5vQ1, BMI-adjusted=1.27, 95%CI = 1.04-1.54, p-trend = 0.01); particularly for, estrogen receptor-negative (ER-)/ progesterone receptor-negative (PR-) and basal-like breast cancers. Premenopausal WC, HC, and WHR were not associated with postmenopausal breast cancer risk, with or without BMI adjustment. Postmenopausal WC, HC, and WHR were each positively associated with postmenopausal breast cancer (eg, WC HRQ5vsQ1=1.59, 95%CI = 1.36-1.86); after adjustment for BMI, only WC remained statistically significant (HRQ5vsQ1, BMI-adjusted=1.38, 95%CI = 1.15-1.64, p-trend = 0.002). In postmenopausal women, associations were stronger among never users of hormone therapy and for ER+/PR+ breast cancers. CONCLUSIONS: Central adiposity was positively associated with pre- and postmenopausal breast cancers independent of BMI. This suggests that mechanisms other than estrogen may also play a role in the relationship between central adiposity and breast cancer. Maintaining a healthy waist circumference may decrease pre- and postmenopausal breast cancer risk.

12.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Dec 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33326609

RESUMO

Associations of coffee and tea consumption with lung cancer risk have been inconsistent, and most lung cancer cases investigated were smokers. Included in this study were over 1.1 million participants from 17 prospective cohorts. Cox regression analyses were conducted to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Potential effect modifications by sex, smoking, race, cancer subtype and coffee type were assessed. After a median 8.6 years of follow-up, 20 280 incident lung cancer cases were identified. Compared with noncoffee and nontea consumption, HRs (95% CIs) associated with exclusive coffee drinkers (≥2 cups/d) among current, former and never smokers were 1.30 (1.15-1.47), 1.49 (1.27-1.74) and 1.35 (1.15-1.58), respectively. Corresponding HRs for exclusive tea drinkers (≥2 cups/d) were 1.16 (1.02-1.32), 1.10 (0.92-1.32) and 1.37 (1.17-1.61). In general, the coffee and tea associations did not differ significantly by sex, race or histologic subtype. Our findings suggest that higher consumption of coffee or tea is associated with increased lung cancer risk. However, these findings should not be assumed to be causal because of the likelihood of residual confounding by smoking, including passive smoking, and change of coffee and tea consumption after study enrolment.

13.
Am J Epidemiol ; 2020 Dec 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33350436

RESUMO

Among 626 participants of the Men's Lifestyle Validation Study (2011-2013), we evaluated the validity and reproducibility of a self-administered 152-item semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire (SFFQ) using two 7-day dietary records (7DDRs), four automated self-administered 24-hour dietary recalls (ASA24s), four 24-hour urine samples, one doubly-labeled water measurement (repeated in 104 participants), and two fasting blood samples, collected over 15 months. Compared to 7DDRs, SFFQs underestimated energy intake, macronutrients, and sodium intake, but overestimated some micronutrients. The mean of Spearman correlation coefficients was 0.66 (range 0.38 to 0.88) between 46 energy-adjusted nutrients estimated from 7DDRs and the final SFFQ, de-attenuated for within-person variation in the 7DDRs. These deattenuated correlations were similar using ASA24s as the comparison. Relative to biomarkers, SFFQs underestimated energy, sodium, and protein intakes, and the sodium:potassium ratio. The energy-adjusted correlations between the final SFFQ and the biomarkers were slightly lower than the correlations between the SFFQ and 7DDRs. Using method of triads to calculate validity coefficients (VC), the median VC between SFFQ and true intake was 0.65 and 0.69 using 7DDRs or ASA24s as the third method. These data indicate that this SFFQ provided reasonably valid estimates for a wide range of nutrients when evaluated by multiple comparison methods.

14.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 2020 Nov 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33184623

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Studies have reported a protective relation to cognitive decline with long-term intake of total and individual dietary carotenoids. However, the underlying mechanisms have not yet been clearly established in humans. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prospective association between intakes of total and individual carotenoids and risk of incident Alzheimer dementia (AD) and explore the underlying neuropathological basis. METHODS: Among 927 participants from the Rush Memory and Aging Project who were free from AD at baseline and were followed up for a mean of 7 y, we estimated HRs for AD using Cox proportional hazards models by intakes of energy-adjusted carotenoids. Brain AD neuropathology was assessed in postmortem brain autopsies among 508 deceased participants. We used linear regression to assess the association of carotenoid intake with AD-related neuropathology. RESULTS: Higher intake of total carotenoids was associated with substantially lower hazard of AD after controlling for age, sex, education, ApoE-ε4, participation in cognitively stimulating activities, and physical activity level. Comparing the top and bottom quintiles (median intake: 24.8 compared with 6.7 mg/d) of total carotenoids, the multivariate HR (95% CI) was 0.52 (0.33, 0.81), P-trend < 0.01. A similar association was observed for lutein-zeaxanthin, a weaker linear inverse association was observed for ß-carotene, and a marginally significant linear inverse association was found for ß-cryptoxanthin. Among the deceased participants, consumers of higher total carotenoids (top compared with bottom tertile, 18.2 compared with 8.2 mg/d) had less global AD pathology (b: -0.10; SE = 0.04; P-trend = 0.01). For individual carotenoids, lutein-zeaxanthin and lycopene were inversely associated with brain global pathology, whereas lutein-zeaxanthin showed additional inverse associations with AD diagnostic score, neuritic plaque severity, and neurofibrillary tangle density and severity. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support a beneficial role of total carotenoid consumption, in particular lutein/zeaxanthin, on AD incidence that may be related to the inhibition of brain ß-amyloid deposition and fibril formation.

15.
Cancer Res ; 80(22): 5134-5143, 2020 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33188079

RESUMO

Fruits and vegetables contain many bioactive components that may contribute to improved survival after diagnosis of breast cancer, however, evidence to date is insufficient. We prospectively assessed the associations of postdiagnostic fruit and vegetable consumption with breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality among 8,927 women with stage I-III breast cancer identified during follow-up of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS; 1980-2010) and NHSII (1991-2011), using a validated food frequency questionnaire completed every 4 years after diagnosis. We prospectively documented 2,521 deaths, including 1,070 from breast cancer through follow-up until 2014 in the NHS and 2015 in the NHSII. Total fruit and vegetable and total vegetable consumption was related to lower all-cause [HRQ5vsQ1, 0.82; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.71-0.94; P trend = 0.004, and HRQ5vsQ1, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72-0.97; P trend = 0.001, respectively], but not breast cancer-specific mortality. Total fruit consumption was not related to breast cancer-specific or all-cause mortality. Greater intake of green leafy and cruciferous vegetables was associated with lower all-cause mortality. Each 2 servings/week of blueberries was associated with a 25% (HR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.60-0.94) lower breast cancer-specific and a 17% (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.72-0.96) lower all-cause mortality. In contrast, higher fruit juice consumption was associated with higher breast cancer-specific (HRQ5vsQ1, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.09-1.63; P trend = 0.002) and all-cause mortality (HRQ5vsQ1, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.04-1.36; P trend = 0.003). Apple juice largely accounted for these higher risks and orange juice was not associated with risk. Higher postdiagnostic fruit and vegetable consumption among breast cancer survivors was not associated with breast cancer-specific mortality. However, our findings suggest that higher vegetable consumption, particularly green leafy and cruciferous vegetables, was associated with better overall survival among patients with breast cancer. Higher fruit juice consumption, but not orange juice, was associated with poorer breast cancer-specific and all-cause survival. SIGNIFICANCE: A large-scale study shows that high fruit and vegetable consumption may be associated with better overall survival among breast cancer patients, while high fruit juice consumption may be associated with poorer porgnosis.

16.
JAMA ; 324(18): 1855-1868, 2020 11 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33170239

RESUMO

Importance: The benefits of vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids, and exercise in disease prevention remain unclear. Objective: To test whether vitamin D, omega-3s, and a strength-training exercise program, alone or in combination, improved 6 health outcomes among older adults. Design, Setting, and Participants: Double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 × 2 × 2 factorial randomized clinical trial among 2157 adults aged 70 years or older who had no major health events in the 5 years prior to enrollment and had sufficient mobility and good cognitive status. Patients were recruited between December 2012 and November 2014, and final follow-up was in November 2017. Interventions: Participants were randomized to 3 years of intervention in 1 of the following 8 groups: 2000 IU/d of vitamin D3, 1 g/d of omega-3s, and a strength-training exercise program (n = 264); vitamin D3 and omega-3s (n = 265); vitamin D3 and exercise (n = 275); vitamin D3 alone (n = 272); omega-3s and exercise (n = 275); omega-3s alone (n = 269); exercise alone (n = 267); or placebo (n = 270). Main Outcomes and Measures: The 6 primary outcomes were change in systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), and incidence rates (IRs) of nonvertebral fractures and infections over 3 years. Based on multiple comparisons of 6 primary end points, 99% confidence intervals are presented and P < .01 was required for statistical significance. Results: Among 2157 randomized participants (mean age, 74.9 years; 61.7% women), 1900 (88%) completed the study. Median follow-up was 2.99 years. Overall, there were no statistically significant benefits of any intervention individually or in combination for the 6 end points at 3 years. For instance, the differences in mean change in systolic BP with vitamin D vs no vitamin D and with omega-3s vs no omega-3s were both -0.8 (99% CI, -2.1 to 0.5) mm Hg, with P < .13 and P < .11, respectively; the difference in mean change in diastolic BP with omega-3s vs no omega-3s was -0.5 (99% CI, -1.2 to 0.2) mm Hg; P = .06); and the difference in mean change in IR of infections with omega-3s vs no omega-3s was -0.13 (99% CI, -0.23 to -0.03), with an IR ratio of 0.89 (99% CI, 0.78-1.01; P = .02). No effects were found on the outcomes of SPPB, MoCA, and incidence of nonvertebral fractures). A total of 25 deaths were reported, with similar numbers in all treatment groups. Conclusions and Relevance: Among adults without major comorbidities aged 70 years or older, treatment with vitamin D3, omega-3s, or a strength-training exercise program did not result in statistically significant differences in improvement in systolic or diastolic blood pressure, nonvertebral fractures, physical performance, infection rates, or cognitive function. These findings do not support the effectiveness of these 3 interventions for these clinical outcomes. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01745263.


Assuntos
Colecalciferol/uso terapêutico , Suplementos Nutricionais , Ácidos Graxos Ômega-3/uso terapêutico , Nível de Saúde , Treinamento de Resistência , Vitaminas/uso terapêutico , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Transtornos Cognitivos/prevenção & controle , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Seguimentos , Fraturas Ósseas/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Hipertensão/terapia , Imunidade , Masculino , Aptidão Física , Resultado do Tratamento
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33219162

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We investigated the associations of post-diagnostic dietary glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), insulin index (II), and insulin load (IL) with breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. METHODS: Among 8,932 women with stage I-III breast cancer identified in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) (1980-2010) and NHSII (1991-2011), we prospectively evaluated the associations between post-diagnostic GI, GL, II, and IL, and breast cancer-specific and all-cause mortality. Participants completed a validated food frequency questionnaire every four years after diagnosis. RESULTS: During follow-up by 2014 in the NHS and 2015 in the NHSII, 2,523 deaths, including 1,071 from breast cancer were documented. Higher post-diagnostic GL was associated with higher risk of both breast cancer-specific mortality (HRQ5vsQ1=1.33, 95%CI=1.09-1.63; Ptrend=0.008) and all-cause mortality (HRQ5vsQ1=1.26, 95%CI=1.10-1.45; Ptrend=0.0006). Higher all-cause mortality was also observed with higher post-diagnostic GI (HRQ5vsQ1=1.23, 95%CI=1.08-1.40; Ptrend=0.001), II (HRQ5vsQ1=1.20, 95%CI=1.04-1.38; Ptrend=0.005), and IL (HRQ5vsQ1=1.23, 95%CI=1.07-1.42; Ptrend=0.0003). The associations were not modified by insulin receptor or estrogen receptor status of the tumor, or body mass index. CONCLUSION: We found that higher dietary GL, reflecting postprandial glucose response, after a breast cancer diagnosis was associated with higher risk of breast cancer-specific mortality. Higher dietary GI, GL, II, and IL after a breast cancer diagnosis were associated with higher risk of death from any cause. IMPACT: These results suggest that carbohydrate quantity and quality may be important in breast cancer prognosis.

18.
J Am Coll Cardiol ; 76(19): 2181-2193, 2020 Nov 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33153576

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Inflammation plays an important role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) development. Diet modulates inflammation; however, it remains unknown whether dietary patterns with higher inflammatory potential are associated with long-term CVD risk. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to examine whether proinflammatory diets are associated with increased CVD risk. METHODS: We prospectively followed 74,578 women from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) (1984-2016), 91,656 women from the NHSII (1991-2015), and 43,911 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2016) who were free of CVD and cancer at baseline. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaires every 4 years. The inflammatory potential of diet was evaluated using a food-based empirical dietary inflammatory pattern (EDIP) score that was pre-defined based on levels of 3 systemic inflammatory biomarkers. RESULTS: During 5,291,518 person-years of follow-up, we documented 15,837 incident CVD cases, including 9,794 coronary heart disease (CHD) cases and 6,174 strokes. In pooled analyses of the 3 cohorts, after adjustment for use of anti-inflammatory medications and CVD risk factors including body mass index, a higher dietary inflammatory potential, as indicated by higher EDIP scores, was associated with an increased risk of CVD (hazard ratio [HR] comparing the highest to lowest quintiles: 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.31 to 1.46; p for trend <0.001), CHD (HR: 1.46; 95% CI: 1.36 to 1.56; p for trend <0.001), and stroke (HR: 1.28; 95% CI: 1.17- to 1.39; p for trend <0.001). These associations were consistent across cohorts and between sexes, and they remained significant after further adjustment for other dietary quality indices. In a subset of study participants (n = 33,719), a higher EDIP was associated with a higher circulating profile of proinflammatory biomarkers, lower levels of adiponectin, and an unfavorable blood lipid profile (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Dietary patterns with a higher proinflammatory potential were associated with higher CVD risk. Reducing the inflammatory potential of the diet may potentially provide an effective strategy for CVD prevention.

19.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2020 Nov 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33136160

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The role of poor diet quality in the rising incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosed under age 50 has not been explored. Based on molecular features of early-onset CRC, early-onset adenomas are emerging surrogate endpoints. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study (Nurses' Health Study II), we evaluated two empirical dietary patterns (Western and prudent) and three recommendation-based indexes (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH], Alternative Mediterranean Diet [AMED], and Alternative Healthy Eating Index [AHEI]-2010) with risk of early-onset adenoma overall and by malignant potential (high-risk: ≥1 cm, tubulovillous/villous histology, high-grade dysplasia, or ≥ 3 adenomas), among 29474 women with ≥1 lower endoscopy before age 50 (1991-2011). Multivariable logistic regressions were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: We documented 1157 early-onset adenomas with 375 of high-risk. Western diet was positively, whereas prudent diet, DASH, AMED, and AHEI-2010 were inversely associated with risk of early-onset adenoma. The associations were largely confined to high-risk adenomas (OR [95% CI] for the highest versus lowest quintile: Western = 1.67 [1.18 to 2.37]; prudent = 0.69 [0.48 to 0.98]; DASH = 0.65 [0.45 to 0.93]; AMED = 0.55 [0.38 to 0.79]; AHEI-2010 = 0.71 [0.51 to 1.01]; all P  trend≤.03), driven by those identified in the distal colon and rectum (all P  trend≤.04 except AMED: Ptrend=.14). CONCLUSION: Poor diet quality was associated with an increased risk of early-onset distal and rectal adenomas of high malignant potential. These findings provide preliminary but strong support to the role of diet in early-onset CRC.

20.
Nat Commun ; 11(1): 6074, 2020 11 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33247093

RESUMO

Environmental factors, and in particular diet, are known to play a key role in the development of Coronary Heart Disease. Many of these factors were unveiled by detailed nutritional epidemiology studies, focusing on the role of a single nutrient or food at a time. Here, we apply an Environment-Wide Association Study approach to Nurses' Health Study data to explore comprehensively and agnostically the association of 257 nutrients and 117 foods with coronary heart disease risk (acute myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease). After accounting for multiple testing, we identify 16 food items and 37 nutrients that show statistically significant association - while adjusting for potential confounding and control variables such as physical activity, smoking, calorie intake, and medication use - among which 38 associations were validated in Nurses' Health Study II. Our implementation of Environment-Wide Association Study successfully reproduces prior knowledge of diet-coronary heart disease associations in the epidemiological literature, and helps us detect new associations that were only marginally studied, opening potential avenues for further extensive experimental validation. We also show that Environment-Wide Association Study allows us to identify a bipartite food-nutrient network, highlighting which foods drive the associations of specific nutrients with coronary heart disease risk.

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