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2.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 2021 Mar 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33742198

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have reported a modest inverse association between dairy consumption and the risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Whether plasma metabolite profiles associated with dairy consumption reflect this relationship remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to identify the plasma metabolites associated with total and specific dairy consumption, and to evaluate the association between the identified multi-metabolite profiles and T2D. METHODS: The discovery population included 1833 participants from the Prevención con Dieta Mediterránea (PREDIMED) trial. The confirmatory cohorts included 1522 PREDIMED participants at year 1 of the trial and 4932 participants from the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS), Nurses' Health Study II (NHSII), and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study US-based cohorts. Dairy consumption was assessed using validated FFQs. Plasma metabolites (n = 385) were profiled using LC-MS. We identified the dairy-related metabolite profiles using elastic net regularized regressions with a 10-fold cross-validation procedure. We evaluated the associations between the metabolite profiles and incident T2D in the discovery and the confirmatory cohorts. RESULTS: Total dairy intake was associated with 38 metabolites. C14:0 sphingomyelin (positive coefficient), C34:0 phosphatidylethanolamine (positive coefficient), and γ-butyrobetaine (negative coefficient) were associated in a directionally similar fashion with total and specific (milk, yogurt, cheese) dairy consumption. The Pearson correlation coefficients between self-reported total dairy intake and predicted total dairy intake based on the corresponding multi-metabolite profile were 0.37 (95% CI, 0.33-0.40) in the discovery cohort and 0.16 (95% CI, 0.13-0.19) in the US confirmatory cohort. After adjusting for T2D risk factors, a higher total dairy intake-related metabolite profile score was associated with a lower T2D risk [HR per 1 SD; discovery cohort: 0.76 (95% CI, 0.63-0.90); US confirmatory cohort: 0.88 (95% CI, 0.78-0.99)]. CONCLUSIONS: Total dairy intake was associated with 38 metabolites, including 3 consistently associated with dairy subtypes (C14:0 sphingomyelin, C34:0 phosphatidylethanolamine, γ-butyrobetaine). A score based on the 38 identified metabolites showed an inverse association with T2D risk in Spanish and US populations.

3.
Mol Nutr Food Res ; 65(7): e2001141, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33592132

RESUMO

SCOPE: Processed meat intake has been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, little is known about the type of processed meat more particularly responsible for these effects. This study aims to identify novel biomarkers for processed meat intake. METHODS AND RESULTS: In a controlled randomized cross-over dietary intervention study, 12 healthy volunteers consume different processed and non-processed meats for 3 consecutive days each. Metabolomics analyses are applied on post-intervention fasting blood and urine samples to identify discriminating molecular features of processed meat intake. Nine and five pepper alkaloid metabolites, including piperine, are identified as major discriminants of salami intake in urine and plasma, respectively. The associations with processed meat intake are tested for replication in a cross-sectional study (n = 418) embedded within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) cohort. Three of the serum metabolites including piperine are associated with habitual intake of sausages and to a lesser extent of total processed meat. CONCLUSION: Pepper alkaloids are major discriminants of intake for sausages that contain high levels of pepper used as ingredient. Further work is needed to assess if pepper alkaloids in combination with other metabolites may serve as biomarkers of processed meat intake.

4.
J Nutr ; 151(2): 303-311, 2021 02 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33382410

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Walnut consumption is associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, it is unknown whether plasma metabolites related to walnut consumption are also associated with lower risk of cardiometabolic diseases. OBJECTIVES: The study aimed to identify plasma metabolites associated with walnut consumption and evaluate the prospective associations between the identified profile and risk of T2D and CVD. METHODS: The discovery population included 1833 participants at high cardiovascular risk from the PREvención con DIeta MEDiterránea (PREDIMED) study with available metabolomics data at baseline. The study population included 57% women (baseline mean BMI (in kg/m2): 29.9; mean age: 67 y). A total of 1522 participants also had available metabolomics data at year 1 and were used as the internal validation population. Plasma metabolomics analyses were performed using LC-MS. Cross-sectional associations between 385 known metabolites and walnut consumption were assessed using elastic net continuous regression analysis. A 10-cross-validation (CV) procedure was used, and Pearson correlation coefficients were assessed between metabolite weighted models and self-reported walnut consumption in each pair of training-validation data sets within the discovery population. We further estimated the prospective associations between the identified metabolite profile and incident T2D and CVD using multivariable Cox regression models. RESULTS: A total of 19 metabolites were significantly associated with walnut consumption, including lipids, purines, acylcarnitines, and amino acids. Ten-CV Pearson correlation coefficients between self-reported walnut consumption and the plasma metabolite profile were 0.16 (95% CI: 0.11, 0.20) in the discovery population and 0.15 (95% CI: 0.10, 0.20) in the validation population. The metabolite profile was inversely associated with T2D incidence (HR per 1 SD: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.71, 0.97; P = 0.02). For CVD incidence, the HR per 1-SD was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.60, 0.85; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A metabolite profile including 19 metabolites was associated with walnut consumption and with a lower risk of incident T2D and CVD in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk.

5.
Circ Res ; 2020 Dec 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33272114

RESUMO

Rationale: Altered lipid metabolism has been implicated in heart failure (HF) development, but no prospective studies have examined comprehensive lipidomics data and subsequent risk of HF. Objective: We aimed to link single lipid metabolites and lipidomics networks to the risk of developing heart failure. Methods and Results: Discovery analyses were based on 216 targeted lipids in a case-control study (331 incident HF cases and 507 controls, matched by age, sex, and study center), nested within the PREDIMED study. Associations of single lipids were examined in conditional logistic regression models. Furthermore, lipidomics networks were linked to HF risk in a multi-step workflow, including machine learning-based identification of the HF-related network-clusters, and regression-based discovery of the HF-related lipid patterns within these clusters. If available, significant findings were externally validated in a subsample of the EPIC-Potsdam cohort (2414 at-risk-participants, including 87 incident HF-cases). After confounder-adjustments, two lipids were significantly associated with HF risk in both cohorts: ceramide 16:0 (HR per SD in PREDIMED 1.28, 95%CI 1.13, 1.47) and phosphatidylcholine 32_0 (HR per SD in PREDIMED 1.23, 95%CI 1.08, 1.41). Additionally, lipid patterns in several network clusters were associated with HF risk in PREDIMED. Adjusted for standard risk factors, an internally cross-validated score based on the significant HF-related lipids that were identified in the network analysis in PREDIMED was associated with a higher HF risk (20 lipids, HR per SD 2.33, 95%CI 1.93, 2.81%). Moreover, a lipid score restricted to the externally available lipids was significantly associated with HF incidence in both cohorts (6 lipids, HRs per SD 1.30, 95%CI 1.14, 1.47 in PREDIMED, and 1.46, 95%CI, 1.17, 1.82 in EPIC-Potsdam). Conclusions: Our study identified and validated two lipid metabolites and several lipidomics patterns as potential novel biomarkers of HF risk. Lipid profiling may capture preclinical molecular alterations that predispose for incident HF.

6.
Nutrients ; 12(12)2020 Dec 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33352682

RESUMO

Circulating levels of branched-chain amino acids, glycine, or aromatic amino acids have been associated with risk of type 2 diabetes. However, whether those associations reflect causal relationships or are rather driven by early processes of disease development is unclear. We selected diabetes-related amino acid ratios based on metabolic network structures and investigated causal effects of these ratios and single amino acids on the risk of type 2 diabetes in two-sample Mendelian randomization studies. Selection of genetic instruments for amino acid traits relied on genome-wide association studies in a representative sub-cohort (up to 2265 participants) of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study and public data from genome-wide association studies on single amino acids. For the selected instruments, outcome associations were drawn from the DIAGRAM (DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis, 74,124 cases and 824,006 controls) consortium. Mendelian randomization results indicate an inverse association for a per standard deviation increase in ln-transformed tyrosine/methionine ratio with type 2 diabetes (OR = 0.87 (0.81-0.93)). Multivariable Mendelian randomization revealed inverse association for higher log10-transformed tyrosine levels with type 2 diabetes (OR = 0.19 (0.04-0.88)), independent of other amino acids. Tyrosine might be a causal trait for type 2 diabetes independent of other diabetes-associated amino acids.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Tirosina/sangue , Adulto , Aminoácidos Aromáticos/sangue , Aminoácidos de Cadeia Ramificada/sangue , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Glicina/sangue , Humanos , Masculino , Análise da Randomização Mendeliana , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos
7.
Diabetes Care ; 43(11): 2660-2667, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32868270

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: There is sparse evidence for the association of suitable food substitutions for red and processed meat on the risk of type 2 diabetes. We modeled the association between replacing red and processed meat with other protein sources and the risk of type 2 diabetes and estimated its population impact. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The European Prospective Investigation into Cancer (EPIC)-InterAct case cohort included 11,741 individuals with type 2 diabetes and a subcohort of 15,450 participants in eight countries. We modeled the replacement of self-reported red and processed meat with poultry, fish, eggs, legumes, cheese, cereals, yogurt, milk, and nuts. Country-specific hazard ratios (HRs) for incident type 2 diabetes were estimated by Prentice-weighted Cox regression and pooled using random-effects meta-analysis. RESULTS: There was a lower hazard for type 2 diabetes for the modeled replacement of red and processed meat (50 g/day) with cheese (HR 0.90, 95% CI 0.83-0.97) (30 g/day), yogurt (0.90, 0.86-0.95) (70 g/day), nuts (0.90, 0.84-0.96) (10 g/day), or cereals (0.92, 0.88-0.96) (30 g/day) but not for replacements with poultry, fish, eggs, legumes, or milk. If a causal association is assumed, replacing red and processed meat with cheese, yogurt, or nuts could prevent 8.8%, 8.3%, or 7.5%, respectively, of new cases of type 2 diabetes. CONCLUSIONS: Replacement of red and processed meat with cheese, yogurt, nuts, or cereals was associated with a lower rate of type 2 diabetes. Substituting red and processed meat by other protein sources may contribute to the prevention of incident type 2 diabetes in European populations.

8.
Diabetes ; 69(11): 2503-2517, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32816961

RESUMO

The identification of individuals with a high risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D) is fundamental for prevention. Here, we used a translational approach and prediction criteria to identify changes in DNA methylation visible before the development of T2D. Islets of Langerhans were isolated from genetically identical 10-week-old female New Zealand Obese mice, which differ in their degree of hyperglycemia and in liver fat content. The application of a semiexplorative approach identified 497 differentially expressed and methylated genes (P = 6.42e-09, hypergeometric test) enriched in pathways linked to insulin secretion and extracellular matrix-receptor interaction. The comparison of mouse data with DNA methylation levels of incident T2D cases from the prospective European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Potsdam cohort, revealed 105 genes with altered DNA methylation at 605 cytosine-phosphate-guanine (CpG) sites, which were associated with future T2D. AKAP13, TENM2, CTDSPL, PTPRN2, and PTPRS showed the strongest predictive potential (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve values 0.62-0.73). Among the new candidates identified in blood cells, 655 CpG sites, located in 99 genes, were differentially methylated in islets of humans with T2D. Using correction for multiple testing detected 236 genes with an altered DNA methylation in blood cells and 201 genes in diabetic islets. Thus, the introduced translational approach identified novel putative biomarkers for early pancreatic islet aberrations preceding T2D.

9.
Nutrients ; 12(8)2020 Jul 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32731631

RESUMO

Estimated Δ5-desaturase (D5D) and Δ6-desaturase (D6D) are key enzymes in metabolism of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and have been associated with cardiometabolic risk; however, causality needs to be clarified. We applied two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach using a representative sub-cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam Study and public data from DIAbetes Genetics Replication And Meta-analysis (DIAGRAM) and Coronary ARtery DIsease Genome wide Replication and Meta-analysis (CARDIoGRAM) genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Furthermore, we addressed confounding by linkage disequilibrium (LD) as all instruments from FADS1 (encoding D5D) are in LD with FADS2 (encoding D6D) variants. Our univariable MRs revealed risk-increasing total effects of both, D6D and D5D on type 2 diabetes (T2DM) risk; and risk-increasing total effect of D6D on risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). The multivariable MR approach could not unambiguously allocate a direct causal effect to either of the individual desaturases. Our results suggest that D6D is causally linked to cardiometabolic risk, which is likely due to downstream production of fatty acids and products resulting from high D6D activity. For D5D, we found indication for causal effects on T2DM and CAD, which could, however, still be confounded by LD.

10.
Glycobiology ; 2020 06 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32521004

RESUMO

Human protein glycosylation is a complex process, and its in vivo regulation is poorly understood. Changes in glycosylation patterns are associated with many human diseases and conditions. Understanding the biological determinants of protein glycome provides a basis for future diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) allow to study biology via a hypothesis-free search of loci and genetic variants associated with a trait of interest. Sixteen loci were identified by three previous GWAS of human plasma proteome N-glycosylation. However, the possibility that some of these loci are false positives needs to be eliminated by replication studies, which have been limited so far. Here, we use the largest set of samples so far (4,802 individuals) to replicate the previously identified loci. For all but one locus, the expected replication power exceeded 95%. Of the sixteen loci reported previously, fifteen were replicated in our study. For the remaining locus (near the KREMEN1 gene) the replication power was low, and hence replication results were inconclusive. The very high replication rate highlights the general robustness of the GWAS findings as well as the high standards adopted by the community that studies genetic regulation of protein glycosylation. The fifteen replicated loci present a good target for further functional studies. Among these, eight genes encode glycosyltransferases: MGAT5, B3GAT1, FUT8, FUT6, ST6GAL1, B4GALT1, ST3GAL4, and MGAT3. The remaining seven loci offer starting points for further functional follow-up investigation into molecules and mechanisms that regulate human protein N-glycosylation in vivo.

11.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 112(2): 381-388, 2020 08 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32492168

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Acylcarnitines (ACs) play a major role in fatty acid metabolism and are potential markers of metabolic dysfunction with higher blood concentrations reported in obese and diabetic individuals. Diet, and in particular red and processed meat intake, has been shown to influence AC concentrations but data on the effect of meat consumption on AC concentrations is limited. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effect of red and processed meat intake on AC concentrations in plasma and urine using a randomized controlled trial with replication in an observational cohort. METHODS: In the randomized crossover trial, 12 volunteers successively consumed 2 different diets containing either pork or tofu for 3 d each. A panel of 44 ACs including several oxidized ACs was analyzed by LC-MS in plasma and urine samples collected after the 3-d period. ACs that were associated with pork intake were then measured in urine (n = 474) and serum samples (n = 451) from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) study and tested for associations with habitual red and processed meat intake derived from dietary questionnaires. RESULTS: In urine samples from the intervention study, pork intake was positively associated with concentrations of 18 short- and medium-chain ACs. Eleven of these were also positively associated with habitual red and processed meat intake in the EPIC cross-sectional study. In blood, C18:0 was positively associated with red meat intake in both the intervention study (q = 0.004, Student's t-test) and the cross-sectional study (q = 0.033, linear regression). CONCLUSIONS: AC concentrations in urine and blood were associated with red meat intake in both a highly controlled intervention study and in subjects of a cross-sectional study. Our data on the role of meat intake on this important pathway of fatty acid and energy metabolism may help understanding the role of red meat consumption in the etiology of some chronic diseases. This trial was registered at Clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03354130.


Assuntos
Carnitina/análogos & derivados , Produtos da Carne/análise , Adulto , Animais , Carnitina/sangue , Carnitina/química , Carnitina/urina , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Metabolômica , Estudos Prospectivos , Suínos
12.
Diabetes Care ; 43(3): 661-668, 2020 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31915204

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Plasma protein N-glycan profiling integrates information on enzymatic protein glycosylation, which is a highly controlled ubiquitous posttranslational modification. Here we investigate the ability of the plasma N-glycome to predict incidence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs; i.e., myocardial infarction and stroke). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Based on the prospective European Prospective Investigation of Cancer (EPIC)-Potsdam cohort (n = 27,548), we constructed case-cohorts including a random subsample of 2,500 participants and all physician-verified incident cases of type 2 diabetes (n = 820; median follow-up time 6.5 years) and CVD (n = 508; median follow-up time 8.2 years). Information on the relative abundance of 39 N-glycan groups in baseline plasma samples was generated by chromatographic profiling. We selected predictive N-glycans for type 2 diabetes and CVD separately, based on cross-validated machine learning, nonlinear model building, and construction of weighted prediction scores. This workflow for CVD was applied separately in men and women. RESULTS: The N-glycan-based type 2 diabetes score was strongly predictive for diabetes risk in an internal validation cohort (weighted C-index 0.83, 95% CI 0.78-0.88), and this finding was externally validated in the Finland Cardiovascular Risk Study (FINRISK) cohort. N-glycans were moderately predictive for CVD incidence (weighted C-indices 0.66, 95% CI 0.60-0.72, for men; 0.64, 95% CI 0.55-0.73, for women). Information on the selected N-glycans improved the accuracy of established and clinically applied risk prediction scores for type 2 diabetes and CVD. CONCLUSIONS: Selected N-glycans improve type 2 diabetes and CVD prediction beyond established risk markers. Plasma protein N-glycan profiling may thus be useful for risk stratification in the context of precisely targeted primary prevention of cardiometabolic diseases.

13.
Diabetologia ; 62(12): 2211-2221, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31501920

RESUMO

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study aimed to evaluate associations of height as well as components of height (sitting height and leg length) with risk of type 2 diabetes and to explore to what extent associations are explainable by liver fat and cardiometabolic risk markers. METHODS: A case-cohort study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam study comprising 26,437 participants who provided blood samples was designed. We randomly selected a subcohort of 2500 individuals (2029 diabetes-free at baseline and with anamnestic, anthropometrical and metabolic data for analysis). Of the 820 incident diabetes cases identified in the full cohort during 7 years of follow-up, 698 remained for analyses after similar exclusions. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, potential lifestyle confounders, education and waist circumference, greater height was related to lower diabetes risk (HR per 10 cm, men 0.59 [95% CI 0.47, 0.75] and women 0.67 [0.51, 0.88], respectively). Leg length was related to lower risk among men and women, but only among men if adjusted for total height. Adjustment for liver fat and triacylglycerols, adiponectin and C-reactive protein substantially attenuated associations between height and diabetes risk, particularly among women. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: We observed inverse associations between height and risk of type 2 diabetes, which was largely related to leg length among men. The inverse associations may be partly driven by lower liver fat content and a more favourable cardiometabolic profile.


Assuntos
Estatura/fisiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Estilo de Vida , Circunferência da Cintura , Adulto , Idoso , Doenças Cardiovasculares/etiologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/etiologia , Escolaridade , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 2(3): e190896, 2019 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30901045

RESUMO

Importance: Inflammatory processes have been suggested to have an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC) etiology. Chemerin is a recently discovered inflammatory biomarker thought to exert chemotactic, adipogenic, and angiogenic functions. However, its potential link with CRC has not been sufficiently explored. Objective: To evaluate the prospective association of circulating plasma chemerin concentrations with incident CRC. Design, Setting, and Participants: Prospective case-cohort study based on 27 548 initially healthy participants from the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam cohort who were followed for up to 16 years. Baseline study information and samples were collected between August 23, 1994, and September 25, 1998. Recruitment was according to random registry sampling from the geographical area of Potsdam, Germany, and surrounding municipalities. The last date of study follow-up was May 10, 2010. Statistical analysis was conducted in 2018. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incident CRC, colon cancer, and rectal cancer. Baseline chemerin plasma concentrations were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: A random subcohort of 221 incident CRC cases and 2329 participants free of CRC with available blood sample measurements were included in the analysis. The participants' mean (SD) age was 50 (9) years, 62.1% were female, and 16.5% had a body mass index greater than 30. In multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models taking into account established CRC risk factors, higher chemerin concentrations were associated with a greater risk of CRC, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 1.81 (95% CI, 1.08-3.05; P for trend = .007) for the highest chemerin quartile vs the lowest. Analyses by cancer subsite indicated a stronger association with colon cancer (HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.18-4.34 for the highest quartile vs the lowest; P for trend = .005) compared with rectal cancer (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 0.57-2.85; P for trend = .35). The association was particularly strong for proximal colon cancer (HR, 3.97; 95% CI, 1.51-10.50; P for trend = .001). Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that the association between chemerin concentration and the risk of incident CRC was linear and independent of established CRC risk factors. Further studies are warranted to evaluate chemerin as a novel immune-inflammatory agent in colorectal carcinogenesis.


Assuntos
Quimiocinas/sangue , Neoplasias Colorretais/sangue , Neoplasias Colorretais/epidemiologia , Peptídeos e Proteínas de Sinalização Intercelular/sangue , Adulto , Biomarcadores/sangue , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
16.
Diabetes ; 68(1): 188-197, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30396904

RESUMO

Recent studies suggest that insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP-2) may protect against type 2 diabetes, but population-based human studies are scarce. We aimed to investigate the prospective association of circulating IGFBP-2 concentrations and of differential methylation in the IGFBP-2 gene with type 2 diabetes risk.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/sangue , Proteína 2 de Ligação a Fator de Crescimento Semelhante à Insulina/sangue , Adulto , Idoso , Glicemia/metabolismo , Metilação de DNA/fisiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Estudos Prospectivos
17.
Eur J Nutr ; 58(4): 1673-1686, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29761319

RESUMO

PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to investigate the association between the previously identified Gaussian graphical models' (GGM) food intake networks and risk of major chronic diseases as well as intermediate biomarkers in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam cohort. METHODS: In this cohort analysis of 10,880 men and 13,340 women, adherence to the previously identified sex-specific GGM networks as well as principal component analysis identified patterns was investigated in relation to risk of major chronic diseases, using Cox-proportional hazard models. Associations of the patterns with intermediate biomarkers were cross-sectionally analyzed using multiple linear regressions. RESULTS: Results showed that higher adherence to the GGM Western-type pattern was associated with increased risk (Hazard Ratio: 1.55; 95% CI 1.13-2.15; P trend = 0.004) of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in women, whereas adherence to a high-fat dairy (HFD) pattern was associated with lower risk of T2D both in men (0.69; 95% CI 0.54-0.89; P trend < 0.001) and women (0.71; 95% CI: 0.53, 0.96; P trend = 0.09). Among PCA patterns, HFD pattern was associated with lower risk of T2D (0.74; 95% CI 0.58-0.95; P trend < 0.001) in men and bread and sausage pattern was associated with higher risk of T2D (1.79; 95% CI 1.29-2.48; P trend < 0.001) in women. Moreover, The GGM-HFD pattern was positively associated with HDL-C in men and inversely associated with C-reactive protein in women. CONCLUSION: Overall, these results show that GGM-identified networks reflect dietary patterns, which could also be related to risk of chronic diseases.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Dieta/métodos , Modelos Estatísticos , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Adulto , Biomarcadores/sangue , Doenças Cardiovasculares/sangue , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/sangue , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias/sangue , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
18.
Int J Epidemiol ; 47(6): 2070-2081, 2018 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29982629

RESUMO

Background: Metabolite networks are suggested to reflect biological pathways in health and disease. However, it is unknown whether such metabolite networks are reproducible across different populations. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate similarity of metabolite networks in four German population-based studies. Methods: One hundred serum metabolites were quantified in European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam (n = 2458), EPIC-Heidelberg (n = 812), KORA (Cooperative Health Research in the Augsburg Region) (n = 3029) and CARLA (Cardiovascular Disease, Living and Ageing in Halle) (n = 1427) with targeted metabolomics. In a cross-sectional analysis, Gaussian graphical models were used to construct similar networks of 100 edges each, based on partial correlations of these metabolites. The four metabolite networks of the top 100 edges were compared based on (i) common features, i.e. number of common edges, Pearson correlation (r) and hamming distance (h); and (ii) meta-analysis of the four networks. Results: Among the four networks, 57 common edges and 66 common nodes (metabolites) were identified. Pairwise network comparisons showed moderate to high similarity (r = 63-0.96, h = 7-72), among the networks. Meta-analysis of the networks showed that, among the 100 edges and 89 nodes of the meta-analytic network, 57 edges and 66 metabolites were present in all the four networks, 58-76 edges and 75-89 nodes were present in at least three networks, and 63-84 edges and 76-87 edges were present in at least two networks. The meta-analytic network showed clear grouping of 10 sphingolipids, 8 lyso-phosphatidylcholines, 31 acyl-alkyl-phosphatidylcholines, 30 diacyl-phosphatidylcholines, 8 amino acids and 2 acylcarnitines. Conclusions: We found structural similarity in metabolite networks from four large studies. Using a meta-analytic network, as a new approach for combining metabolite data from different studies, closely related metabolites could be identified, for some of which the biological relationships in metabolic pathways have been previously described. They are candidates for further investigation to explore their potential role in biological processes.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento/metabolismo , Doenças Cardiovasculares , Redes e Vias Metabólicas , Metaboloma , Metabolômica , Neoplasias , Idoso , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/metabolismo , Correlação de Dados , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Metabolômica/métodos , Metabolômica/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Neoplasias/metabolismo , Distribuição Normal , Inquéritos Nutricionais/estatística & dados numéricos
19.
Am J Clin Nutr ; 107(1): 113-119, 2018 01 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29381787

RESUMO

Background: High iron load and red meat consumption could increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). As red meat is the main source of heme iron, which is in turn a major determinant of increased iron load, adverse cardiometabolic effects of meat consumption could be mediated by increased iron load. Objective: The object of the study was to assess whether associations between red meat consumption and CVD risk are mediated by iron load in a population-based human study. Design: We evaluated relations between red meat consumption, iron load (plasma ferritin), and risk of CVD in the prospective EPIC-Heidelberg Study using a case-cohort sample including a random subcohort (n = 2738) and incident cases of myocardial infarction (MI, n = 555), stroke (n = 513), and CVD mortality (n = 381). Following a 4-step mediation analysis, associations between red meat consumption and iron load, red meat consumption and CVD risk, and iron load and CVD risk were assessed by multivariable regression models before finally testing to which degree associations between red meat consumption and CVD risk were attenuated by adjustment for iron status. Results: Red meat consumption was significantly positively associated with ferritin concentrations and MI risk [HR per 50 g daily intake: 1.18 (95% CI: 1.05, 1.33)], but no significant associations with stroke risk and CVD mortality were observed. While direct associations between ferritin concentrations and MI risk as well as CVD mortality were significant in age- and sex-adjusted Cox regression models, these associations were substantially attenuated and no longer significant after multivariable adjustment for classical CVD risk factors. Strikingly, ferritin concentrations were positively associated with a majority of classical CVD risk factors (age, male sex, alcohol intake, obesity, inflammation, and lower education). Conclusion: Increased ferritin concentrations may be a marker of an overall unfavorable risk factor profile rather than a mediator of greater CVD risk due to meat consumption.


Assuntos
Doenças Cardiovasculares/mortalidade , Ferro/sangue , Carne Vermelha/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Idoso , Biomarcadores/sangue , Índice de Massa Corporal , Colesterol/sangue , Estudos de Coortes , Dieta , Feminino , Ferritinas/sangue , Seguimentos , Humanos , Ferro/administração & dosagem , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Transferrina/metabolismo , Triglicerídeos/sangue
20.
Sci Rep ; 7(1): 14171, 2017 10 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29075000

RESUMO

The adipokines chemerin and omentin-1 have been suggested to influence cardiovascular function. The study aimed to investigate the longitudinal association between chemerin, omentin-1 concentrations and risk of incident heart failure (HF), respectively. We conducted a case-cohort study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Potsdam cohort (n = 27548) including a randomly drawn subsample and all incident HF cases during a mean follow-up of 8.2 ± 1.5 years. A total of 212 incident HF cases and 2168 individuals free of HF cases were included in the study. After multivariable adjustment for established cardiovascular risk factors chemerin was strongly associated with risk of HF (HR per doubling chemerin: 4.91; 95%-CI: 2.57-9.39; p < 0.0001). Omentin-1 was not significantly related to HF risk in the overall study population. However, the association between omentin-1 and HF risk was modified by prevalent coronary heart disease (CHD), showing that the shape of the association was linear in participants without prevalent CHD (HR doubling omentin-1: 2.11; 95%-CI: 1.36-3.27; p linear = 0.0009) and U-shaped in participants with pre-existing CHD (p non-linear = 0.006). Our study provides first evidence for a strong positive association between chemerin and risk of HF. The association between the adipokine omentin-1 and risk of HF may differ according to pre-existing CHD.


Assuntos
Quimiocinas/sangue , Citocinas/sangue , Insuficiência Cardíaca/sangue , Peptídeos e Proteínas de Sinalização Intercelular/sangue , Lectinas/sangue , Biomarcadores/sangue , HDL-Colesterol/sangue , Estudos de Coortes , Doença das Coronárias/sangue , Doença das Coronárias/complicações , Feminino , Proteínas Ligadas por GPI/sangue , Insuficiência Cardíaca/etiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco
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