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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33531435

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Type 2 diabetes increases risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC), but the association of pre-existing diabetes with CRC survival remains unclear. METHODS: We analyzed survival by diabetes status at cancer diagnosis among 4038 patients with CRC from two prospective U.S. cohorts. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for overall and cause-specific mortality, with adjustment for tumor characteristics and lifestyle factors. RESULTS: In the first 5 years after CRC diagnosis, diabetes was associated with a modest increase in overall mortality in women (HR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.00-1.49), but not in men (HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.62-1.12; P heterogeneity by sex = 0.04). Beyond 5 years, diabetes was associated with substantially increased overall mortality with no evidence of sex heterogeneity; in women and men combined, the HRs were 1.45 (95% CI, 1.09-1.93) during >5 to 10 years and 2.58 (95% CI, 1.91-3.50) during >10 years. Compared with those without diabetes, CRC patients with diabetes had increased mortality from other malignancies (HR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.18-2.67) and cardiovascular disease (HR, 1.93; 95% CI, 1.29-2.91). Only women with diabetes for more than 10 years had increased mortality from CRC (HR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.01-1.76). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients with CRC, pre-existing diabetes was associated with increased risk of long-term mortality, particularly from other malignancies and cardiovascular disease. IMPACT: Our findings highlight the importance of cardioprotection and cancer prevention to CRC survivors with diabetes.

2.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 2021 Feb 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33586078

RESUMO

Heavy alcohol consumption in mid-adulthood is an established risk factor of colorectal cancer (CRC). Alcohol use in early adulthood is common, but its association with subsequent CRC risk remains largely unknown. We prospectively investigated the association of average alcohol intake in early adulthood (age 18-22) with CRC risk later in life among 191,543 participants of the Nurses' Health Study ([NHS], 1988-2014), NHSII (1989-2015) and Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (1988-2014). Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), which were pooled using random effects models. We documented 2,624 CRC cases. High alcohol consumption in early adulthood (≥ 15 g/day) was associated with a higher CRC risk (multivariable HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.99-1.66, Ptrend = 0.02; Pheterogeneity = 0.44), after adjusting for potential confounding factors in early adulthood. Among never/light smokers in early adulthood, the risk associated with high alcohol consumption in early adulthood was elevated (HR 1.53, 95% CI 1.04-2.24), compared with those who had < 1 g/day of alcohol intake. The suggestive higher CRC risk associated with high alcohol consumption in early adulthood was similar in those who had < 15 g/day (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.98-1.86) versus ≥ 15 g/day of midlife alcohol intake (HR 1.35, 95% CI 0.89-2.05), compared with nondrinkers in both life stages. The findings from these large prospective cohort studies suggest that higher alcohol intake in early adulthood may be associated with a higher risk of developing CRC later in life.

3.
PLoS Med ; 18(2): e1003522, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33524029

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Healthy lifestyle and screening represent 2 major approaches to colorectal cancer (CRC) prevention. It remains unknown whether the CRC-preventive benefit of healthy lifestyle differs by endoscopic screening status, and how the combination of healthy lifestyle with endoscopic screening can improve CRC prevention. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We assessed lifestyle and endoscopic screening biennially among 75,873 women (Nurses' Health Study, 1988 to 2014) and 42,875 men (Health Professionals Follow-up Study, 1988 to 2014). We defined a healthy lifestyle score based on body mass index, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, and diet. We calculated hazard ratios (HRs) and population-attributable risks (PARs) for CRC incidence and mortality in relation to healthy lifestyle score according to endoscopic screening. Participants' mean age (standard deviation) at baseline was 54 (8) years. During a median of 26 years (2,827,088 person-years) follow-up, we documented 2,836 incident CRC cases and 1,013 CRC deaths. We found a similar association between healthy lifestyle score and lower CRC incidence among individuals with and without endoscopic screening, with the multivariable HR per one-unit increment of 0.85 (95% CI, 0.80 to 0.90) and 0.85 (95% CI, 0.81 to 0.88), respectively (P-interaction = 0.99). The fraction of CRC cases that might be prevented (PAR) by endoscopic screening alone was 32% (95% CI, 31% to 33%) and increased to 61% (95% CI, 42% to 75%) when combined with healthy lifestyle (score = 5). The corresponding PAR (95% CI) increased from 15% (13% to 16%) to 51% (17% to 74%) for proximal colon cancer and from 47% (45% to 50%) to 75% (61% to 84%) for distal CRC. Results were similar for CRC mortality. A limitation of our study is that our study participants are all health professionals and predominantly whites, which may not be representative of the general population. CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests that healthy lifestyle is associated with lower CRC incidence and mortality independent of endoscopic screening. An integration of healthy lifestyle with endoscopic screening may substantially enhance prevention for CRC, particularly for proximal colon cancer, compared to endoscopic screening alone.

4.
Clin Cancer Res ; 2021 Feb 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33632927

RESUMO

PURPOSE: While evidence indicates that Fusobacterium nucleatum may promote colorectal carcinogenesis through its suppressive effect on T-cell-mediated antitumor immunity, the specific T-cell subsets involved remain uncertain. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: We measured F. nucleatum DNA within tumor tissue by quantitative PCR on 933 cases (including 128 F. nucleatum-positive cases) among 4,465 incident colorectal carcinoma cases in two prospective cohorts. Multiplex immunofluorescence combined with digital image analysis and machine learning algorithms for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD45RO (PTPRC isoform), and FOXP3 measured various T-cell subsets. We leveraged data on Bifidobacterium, microsatellite instability (MSI), tumor whole exome sequencing, and M1/M2-type tumor-associated macrophages [by CD68, CD86, IRF5, MAF, and MRC1 (CD206) multimarker assay]. Using the 4,465 cancer cases and inverse probability weighting method to control for selection bias due to tissue availability, multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analysis assessed the association between F. nucleatum and T-cell subsets. RESULTS: The amount of F. nucleatum was inversely associated with tumor stromal CD3+ lymphocytes (multivariable odds ratio, 0.47, 95% confidence interval, 0.28-0.79, for F. nucleatum-high vs. negative category; P trend=0.0004) and specifically stromal CD3+CD4+CD45RO+ cells (corresponding multivariable odds ratio, 0.52, 95% confidence interval, 0.32-0.85; P trend=0.003). These relationships did not substantially differ by MSI status, neoantigen loads, or exome-wide tumor mutational burden. F. nucleatum was not significantly associated with T-cell subset densities in tumor intraepithelial regions or with macrophage densities. CONCLUSIONS: The amount of tissue F. nucleatum is associated with lower densities of stromal memory helper T cells. Our findings provide evidence for the interactive pathogenic roles of microbiota and specific immune cells.

5.
Br J Cancer ; 2021 Jan 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33398066

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Higher dairy intake during adulthood has been associated with lower colorectal cancer risk. As colorectal carcinogenesis spans several decades, we hypothesised that higher dairy intake during adolescence is associated with lower risk of colorectal adenoma, a colorectal cancer precursor. METHODS: In 27,196 females from the Nurses' Health Study 2, aged 25-42 years at recruitment (1989), who had completed a validated high school diet questionnaire in 1998 and undergone at least one lower bowel endoscopy between 1998 and 2011, logistic regression for clustered data was used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Colorectal adenomas were diagnosed in 2239 women. Dairy consumption during adolescence was not associated with colorectal adenoma risk (OR highest vs. lowest [≥4 vs. ≤1.42 servings/day] quintile [95% CI] 0.94 [0.80, 1.11]). By anatomical site, higher adolescent dairy intake was associated with lower rectal (0.63 [0.42, 0.95]), but not proximal (1.01 [0.80, 1.28]) or distal (0.97 [0.76, 1.24]) colon adenoma risk. An inverse association was observed with histologically advanced (0.72 [0.51, 1.00]) but not non-advanced (1.07 [0.86, 1.33]) adenoma. CONCLUSIONS: In this large cohort of younger women, higher adolescent dairy intake was associated with lower rectal and advanced adenoma risk later in life.

6.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33418133

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The etiology of diverticulitis is poorly understood. The long-held belief that constipation and low-fiber diet are risk factors for diverticulosis has recently been challenged by studies that suggest that more frequent bowel movements predispose to diverticulosis. We aim to prospectively explore the association between bowel movement frequency and incident diverticulitis. DESIGN: We studied participants of the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and Health Professional Follow-up Study (HPFS). Participants' medical history, lifestyle factors and diet were used in Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios(HRs) and 95% confidence intervals(CI). RESULTS: In the NHS during over 24 years of follow-up encompassing 1,299,922 person-years, we documented 5,214 incident cases of diverticulitis, and in the HPFS over 14 years encompassing 368,661 person-years of follow-up, we documented 390 incident cases of diverticulitis. We observed an inverse association between the frequency of bowel movements and risk of diverticulitis. In the NHS, compared with women who had daily bowel movements, those with more than once daily bowel movements had a HR of 1.30 (95% CI, 1.19, 1.42) and those with less frequent bowel movements had a HR of 0.89 (95% CI, 0.82, 0.95; p-trend < 0.0001). In the HPFS, the corresponding HRs were 1.29 (95% CI, 1.04, 1.59) and 0.61 (95% CI, 0.36, 1.03; p-trend = 0.003). The association between bowel movements and diverticulitis was not modified by categories of age, BMI, physical activity, laxative use or fiber intake. CONCLUSION: More frequent bowel movements appear to be a risk factor for subsequent diverticulitis both in men and women. Further studies are needed to understand the potential mechanisms that may underlie this association.

7.
BMC Med ; 19(1): 18, 2021 Jan 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33504335

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Sex hormones have been suggested to play a role in colorectal cancer (CRC), but their influence on early initiation of CRC remains unknown. METHODS: We retrospectively examined the associations with risk of CRC precursors, including conventional adenomas and serrated polyps, for plasma estrone, estradiol, free estradiol, testosterone, free testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), and the ratio of estradiol to testosterone among 5404 postmenopausal women from the Nurses' Health Study I and II. Multivariable logistic regression was used to calculate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Given multiple testing, P < 0.005 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: During 20 years of follow-up, we documented 535 conventional adenoma cases and 402 serrated polyp cases. Higher concentrations of SHBG were associated with lower risk of conventional adenomas, particularly advanced adenomas (multivariable OR comparing the highest to the lowest quartile, 0.40, 95% CI 0.24-0.67, P for trend < 0.0001). A nominally significant association was found for SHBG with lower risk of large serrated polyps (≥ 10 mm) (OR, 0.47, 95% CI 0.17-1.35, P for trend = 0.02) as well as free estradiol and free testosterone with higher risk of conventional adenomas (OR, 1.54, 95% CI 1.02-2.31, P for trend = 0.03 and OR, 1.33, 95% CI 0.99-1.78, P for trend = 0.03, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest a potential role of sex hormones, particularly SHBG, in early colorectal carcinogenesis.

8.
Int J Cancer ; 148(1): 57-66, 2021 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32638350

RESUMO

The influence of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on risk of colorectal cancer precursors remains largely unknown. We examined the associations of erythrocyte PUFAs, including n-3 and n-6 PUFAs, with risk of colorectal conventional adenomas and serrated polyps in 4517 participants from three US prospective cohorts who had provided a blood sample and undergone at least one endoscopic examination. We calculated the multivariable odds ratios (ORs) per 1 SD increment in individual PUFAs and the ratio of n-6/n-3 PUFAs. We considered P < .005 statistically significant to account for multiple testing. During a median of 20 years of follow-up, we documented 493 conventional adenomas and 316 serrated polyps. After adjusting for various CRC risk factors, no associations for PUFAs achieved the stringent statistical significance for either conventional adenomas or serrated polyps (ORs per 1 SD ranged from 0.90 to 1.14). Some associations achieved nominal significance (P < .05), including the association of dihomogammalinolenic acid (DGLA) (20:3, n-6) with lower risk of conventional adenomas (OR = 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.83-1.00), total n-6 PUFAs with higher risk of proximal serrated polyps (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.01-1.74) and eicosadienoic acid (20:2, n-6) and DGLA with lower risk of advanced adenomas (OR = 0.83; 95% CI = 0.71-0.97 and OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.72-0.98, respectively). Our findings indicate that erythrocyte PUFAs in a typical American diet are unlikely to have a substantial influence on risk of colorectal cancer precursors. The subgroup associations require further confirmation.

9.
Int J Cancer ; 2020 Dec 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33341092

RESUMO

Branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), including leucine, isoleucine and valine, may potentially influence cancer progression by various mechanisms including its role in insulin resistance. However, the association of BCAAs with survival among patients with established colorectal cancer (CRC) remains unclear. We evaluated the associations between postdiagnostic BCAA intake with CRC-specific mortality and overall mortality among 1674 patients with nonmetastatic CRC in the Nurses' Health Study and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Patients completed a validated food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated using Cox proportional-hazards regression model after adjustment for tumor characteristics and potential confounding factors. Comparing the highest with the lowest quartile intake of postdiagnostic total BCAA, the multivariable HRs were 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-1.85, P for trend = .46 across quartiles) for CRC-specific mortality and 1.30 (95% CI, 1.01-1.69, P for trend = .04) for all-cause mortality. The multivariable HRs (the highest vs the lowest quartile) for all-cause mortality were 1.33 (95% CI, 1.03-1.73, Ptrend = .02) for valine, 1.28 (95% CI, 0.99-1.66, P for trend = .05) for leucine and 1.25 (95% CI, 0.96-1.61, P for trend = .06) for isoleucine. No statistically significant associations with each of the BCAA intake were observed for CRC-specific mortality (all P for trend > .30). Our findings suggest positive associations between higher intake of dietary BCAAs and risk of all-cause mortality in CRC patients. These findings need to be confirmed and potential mechanisms underlying this association need to be elucidated.

10.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2020 Sep 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33225344

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The influence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) duration on cancer incidence remains poorly understood. METHODS: We prospectively followed for cancer incidence 113 429 women in the Nurses' Health Study (1978-2014) and 45 604 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1988-2014) who were free of diabetes and cancer at baseline. Cancer incidences were ascertained by review of medical records. RESULTS: In the multivariable-adjusted model incident, T2D was associated with higher risk of cancers in the colorectum, lung, pancreas, esophagus, liver, thyroid, breast, and endometrium. The pooled hazard ratios (HRs) ranged from 1.21 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.06 to 1.38) for colorectal cancer to 3.39 (95% CI = 2.24 to 5.12) for liver cancer. For both composite cancer outcomes and individual cancers, the elevated risks did not further increase after 8 years of T2D duration. The hazard ratio for total cancer was 1.28 (95% CI = 1.17 to 1.40) for T2D duration of 4.1-6.0 years, 1.37 (95% CI = 1.25 to 1.50) for 6.1-8.0 years, 1.21 (95% CI = 1.09 to 1.35) for 8.1-10.0 years, and 1.04 (95% CI = 0.95 to 1.14) after 15.0 years. In a cross-sectional analysis, a higher level of plasma C-peptide was found among participants with prevalent T2D of up to 8 years than those without T2D, whereas a higher level of HbA1c was found for those with prevalent T2D of up to 15 years. CONCLUSIONS: Incident T2D was associated with higher cancer risk, which peaked at approximately 8 years after diabetes diagnosis. Similar duration-dependent pattern was observed for plasma C-peptide. Our findings support a role of hyperinsulinemia in cancer development.

11.
Nat Rev Clin Oncol ; 2020 Nov 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33219329

RESUMO

The incidence of early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC), which occurs in individuals <50 years of age, has been increasing worldwide and particularly in high-income countries. The reasons for this increase remain unknown but plausible hypotheses include greater exposure to potential risk factors, such as a Western-style diet, obesity, physical inactivity and antibiotic use, especially during the early prenatal to adolescent periods of life. These exposures can not only cause genetic and epigenetic alterations in colorectal epithelial cells but also affect the gut microbiota and host immunity. Early-onset CRCs have differential clinical, pathological and molecular features compared with later-onset CRCs. Certain existing resources can be utilized to elucidate the aetiology of early-onset CRC and inform the development of effective prevention, early detection and therapeutic strategies; however, additional life-course cohort studies spanning childhood and young adulthood, integrated with prospective biospecimen collections, omics biomarker analyses and a molecular pathological epidemiology approach, are needed to better understand and manage this disease entity. In this Perspective, we summarize our current understanding of early-onset CRC and discuss how we should strategize future research to improve its prevention and clinical management.

12.
J Natl Cancer Inst ; 2020 Nov 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33136160

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The role of poor diet quality in the rising incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) diagnosed under age 50 has not been explored. Based on molecular features of early-onset CRC, early-onset adenomas are emerging surrogate endpoints. METHODS: In a prospective cohort study (Nurses' Health Study II), we evaluated two empirical dietary patterns (Western and prudent) and three recommendation-based indexes (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension [DASH], Alternative Mediterranean Diet [AMED], and Alternative Healthy Eating Index [AHEI]-2010) with risk of early-onset adenoma overall and by malignant potential (high-risk: ≥1 cm, tubulovillous/villous histology, high-grade dysplasia, or ≥ 3 adenomas), among 29474 women with ≥1 lower endoscopy before age 50 (1991-2011). Multivariable logistic regressions were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: We documented 1157 early-onset adenomas with 375 of high-risk. Western diet was positively, whereas prudent diet, DASH, AMED, and AHEI-2010 were inversely associated with risk of early-onset adenoma. The associations were largely confined to high-risk adenomas (OR [95% CI] for the highest versus lowest quintile: Western = 1.67 [1.18 to 2.37]; prudent = 0.69 [0.48 to 0.98]; DASH = 0.65 [0.45 to 0.93]; AMED = 0.55 [0.38 to 0.79]; AHEI-2010 = 0.71 [0.51 to 1.01]; all P  trend≤.03), driven by those identified in the distal colon and rectum (all P  trend≤.04 except AMED: Ptrend=.14). CONCLUSION: Poor diet quality was associated with an increased risk of early-onset distal and rectal adenomas of high malignant potential. These findings provide preliminary but strong support to the role of diet in early-onset CRC.

13.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(12): 2693-2701, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33055203

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Studies have shown an inverse association between use of glucosamine and chondroitin supplements and colorectal cancer risk. However, the association with the precursor lesion, colorectal adenoma and serrated polyp, has not been examined. METHODS: Analyses include 43,163 persons from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS), Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS), and NHS2 who reported on glucosamine/chondroitin use in 2002 and who subsequently underwent ≥1 lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. By 2012, 5,715 conventional (2,016 high-risk) adenomas were detected, as were 4,954 serrated polyps. Multivariable logistic regression for clustered data was used to calculate OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI). RESULTS: Glucosamine/chondroitin use was inversely associated with high risk and any conventional adenoma in NHS and HPFS: in the pooled multivariable-adjusted model, glucosamine + chondroitin use at baseline was associated with a 26% (OR = 0.74; 95% CI, 0.60-0.90; P heterogeneity = 0.23) and a 10% (OR = 0.90; 95% CI, 0.81-0.99; P heterogeneity = 0.36) lower risk of high-risk adenoma and overall conventional adenoma, respectively. However, no association was observed in NHS2, a study of younger women (high-risk adenoma: OR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.82-1.45; overall conventional adenoma: OR = 1.00; 95% CI, 0.86-1.17), and effect estimates pooled across all three studies were not significant (high-risk: OR = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.63-1.10; P heterogeneity = 0.03; overall conventional adenoma: OR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.85-1.02; P heterogeneity = 0.31). No associations were observed for serrated polyps. CONCLUSIONS: Glucosamine/chondroitin use was associated with lower risks of high-risk and overall conventional adenoma in older adults; however, this association did not hold in younger women, or for serrated polyps. IMPACT: Our study suggests that glucosamine and chondroitin may act on early colorectal carcinogenesis in older adults.

14.
Cancer Immunol Res ; 2020 Oct 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33023967

RESUMO

Macrophages are among the most common cells in the colorectal cancer microenvironment, but their prognostic significance is incompletely understood. Using multiplexed immunofluorescence for CD68, CD86, IRF5, MAF, MRC1 (CD206), and KRT (cytokeratins) combined with digital image analysis and machine learning, we assessed the polarization spectrum of tumor-associated macrophages in 931 colorectal carcinomas. We then applied Cox proportional hazards regression to assess prognostic survival associations of intraepithelial and stromal densities of M1-like and M2-like macrophages while controlling for potential confounders, including stage and microsatellite instability status. We found that high tumor stromal density of M2-like macrophages was associated with worse cancer-specific survival, whereas tumor stromal density of M1-like macrophages was not significantly associated with better cancer-specific survival. High M1:M2 density ratio in tumor stroma was associated with better cancer-specific survival. Overall macrophage densities in tumor intraepithelial or stromal regions were not prognostic. These findings suggested that macrophage polarization state, rather than their overall density, was associated with cancer-specific survival, with M1- and M2-like macrophage phenotypes exhibiting distinct prognostic roles. These results highlight the utility of a multimarker strategy to assess the macrophage polarization at single-cell resolution within the tumor microenvironment.

15.
Diabetes Care ; 43(11): 2675-2683, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32873589

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To examine whether proinflammatory and hyperinsulinemic diets are associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively followed 74,767 women from the Nurses' Health Study (1984-2016), 90,786 women from the Nurses' Health Study II (1989-2017), and 39,442 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1986-2016). Using repeated measures of food-frequency questionnaires, we calculated empirical dietary inflammatory pattern (EDIP) and empirical dietary index for hyperinsulinemia (EDIH) scores, which are food-based indices that characterize dietary inflammatory or insulinemic potential based on circulating biomarkers of inflammation or C-peptide. Diagnoses of type 2 diabetes were confirmed by validated supplementary questionnaires. RESULTS: We documented 19,666 incident type 2 diabetes cases over 4.9 million person-years of follow-up. In the pooled multivariable-adjusted analyses, individuals in the highest EDIP or EDIH quintile had 3.11 times (95% CI 2.96-3.27) and 3.40 times (95% CI 3.23-3.58) higher type 2 diabetes risk, respectively, compared with those in the lowest quintile. Additional adjustment for BMI attenuated the associations (hazard ratio 1.95 [95% CI 1.85-2.05] for EDIP and hazard ratio 1.87 [95% CI 1.78-1.98] for EDIH), suggesting adiposity partly mediates the observed associations. Moreover, individuals in both highest EDIP and EDIH quintiles had 2.34 times higher type 2 diabetes risk (95% CI 2.17-2.52), compared with those in both lowest quintiles, after adjustment for BMI. CONCLUSIONS: Higher dietary inflammatory and insulinemic potential were associated with increased type 2 diabetes incidence. Findings suggest that inflammation and hyperinsulinemia are potential mechanisms linking dietary patterns and type 2 diabetes development.

16.
JNCI Cancer Spectr ; 4(5): pkaa040, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32923934

RESUMO

Background: Smoking has been associated with worse colorectal cancer patient survival and may potentially suppress the immune response in the tumor microenvironment. We hypothesized that the prognostic association of smoking behavior at colorectal cancer diagnosis might differ by lymphocytic reaction patterns in cancer tissue. Methods: Using 1474 colon and rectal cancer patients within 2 large prospective cohort studies (Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study), we characterized 4 patterns of histopathologic lymphocytic reaction, including tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), intratumoral periglandular reaction, peritumoral lymphocytic reaction, and Crohn's-like lymphoid reaction. Using covariate data of 4420 incident colorectal cancer patients in total, an inverse probability weighted multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was conducted to adjust for selection bias due to tissue availability and potential confounders, including tumor differentiation, disease stage, microsatellite instability status, CpG island methylator phenotype, long interspersed nucleotide element-1 methylation, and KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA mutations. Results: The prognostic association of smoking status at diagnosis differed by TIL status. Compared with never smokers, the multivariable-adjusted colorectal cancer-specific mortality hazard ratio for current smokers was 1.50 (95% confidence interval = 1.10 to 2.06) in tumors with negative or low TIL and 0.43 (95% confidence interval = 0.16 to 1.12) in tumors with intermediate or high TIL (2-sided P interaction = .009). No statistically significant interactions were observed in the other patterns of lymphocytic reaction. Conclusions: The association of smoking status at diagnosis with colorectal cancer mortality may be stronger for carcinomas with negative or low TIL, suggesting a potential interplay of smoking and lymphocytic reaction in the colorectal cancer microenvironment.

17.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev ; 29(11): 2323-2331, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32917664

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Higher total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels are associated with improved survival among patients with colorectal cancer, but the relationships between circulating vitamin D binding protein (VDBP), and bioavailable or free 25(OH)D, and colorectal cancer survival remain unknown. METHODS: We examined the associations between prediagnostic plasma levels of vitamin D-related markers and survival among 603 White participants diagnosed with colorectal cancer from two prospective U.S. cohorts. Plasma VDBP and total 25(OH)D were directly measured, while bioavailable and free 25(OH)D was calculated using a validated formula on the basis of total 25(OH)D, VDBP, and albumin levels. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate HRs for overall and colorectal cancer-specific mortality, with adjustment for other prognostic markers and potential confounders. RESULTS: Higher VDBP levels were associated with improved overall (P trend = 0.001) and colorectal cancer-specific survival (P trend = 0.02). Compared with patients in the lowest quartile, those in the highest quartile of VDBP had a multivariate HR of 0.58 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.41-0.80] for overall mortality and 0.58 (95% CI, 0.37-0.91) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality. The results remained similar after further adjustment for total 25(OH)D levels. In contrast, neither bioavailable nor free 25(OH)D levels were associated with overall or colorectal cancer-specific mortality (all P trend > 0.15). CONCLUSIONS: Prediagnostic circulating concentrations of VDBP were positively associated with survival among patients with colorectal cancer. IMPACT: The clinical utility of VDBP as a prognostic marker warrants further exploration, as well as research into underlying mechanisms of action.

18.
Cancer Causes Control ; 31(10): 891-904, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32743740

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Although a growing body of evidence supports an early-life contribution to prostate cancer (PCa) development, few studies have investigated early-life diet, and only three have examined early-life dairy product intake, a promising candidate risk factor because of its known/suspected influence on insulin-like growth factor levels and height. METHODS: We used recalled dietary data from 162,816 participants in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study to investigate associations for milk, cheese, ice cream, total dairy, and calcium intake at ages 12-13 years with incident total (n = 17,729), advanced (n = 2,348), and fatal PCa (n = 827) over 14 years of follow-up. We calculated relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by Cox proportional hazards regression. RESULTS: We observed suggestive positive trends for milk, dairy, and calcium intake with total and/or advanced PCa (p-trends = 0.016-0.148). These trends attenuated after adjustment for additional components of adolescent diet, particularly red meat and vegetables/potatoes. In contrast, suggestive inverse trends were observed for cheese and ice cream intake with total and/or advanced PCa (p-trends = 0.043-0.153), and for milk, dairy, and calcium intake with fatal PCa (p-trend = 0.045-0.117). CONCLUSION: Although these findings provide some support for a role of adolescent diet in increasing PCa risk, particularly for correlates of milk intake or overall dietary patterns, our protective findings for cheese and ice cream intake with PCa risk and mortality, and for all dairy products with PCa mortality, suggest alternative explanations, such as the influence of early-life socioeconomic status, and increased PCa screening, earlier detection, and better PCa care.


Assuntos
Cálcio na Dieta , Laticínios , Neoplasias da Próstata/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Idoso , Animais , Criança , Dieta , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco
19.
BMC Cancer ; 20(1): 817, 2020 Aug 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32854644

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The empirical dietary index for hyperinsulinemia (EDIH) score is a validated food-based dietary score that assesses the ability of whole-food diets to predict plasma c-peptide concentrations. Although the EDIH has been extensively applied and found to be predictive of risk of developing major chronic diseases, its influence on cancer survival has not been evaluated. We applied the EDIH score in a large cohort of colorectal cancer patients to assess the insulinemic potential of their dietary patterns after diagnosis and determine its influence on survival outcomes. METHODS: We calculated EDIH scores to assess the insulinemic potential of post-diagnosis dietary patterns and examined survival outcomes in a sample of 1718 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients in the Nurses' Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study cohorts. Multivariable-adjusted Cox regression was applied to compute hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for colorectal cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality. We also examined the influence of change in diet from pre- to post-diagnosis period, on mortality. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, there were 1008 deaths, which included 272 colorectal cancer-specific deaths (27%). In the multivariable-adjusted analyses, colorectal cancer patients in the highest compared to lowest EDIH quintile, had a 66% greater risk of dying from colorectal cancer: HR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.03, 2.69; and a 24% greater risk of all-cause death: HR, 1.24; 95%CI, 0.97, 1.58. Compared to patients who consumed low insulinemic diets from pre- to post-diagnosis period, patients who persistently consumed hyperinsulinemic diets were at higher risk of colorectal cancer death (HR,1.51; 95%CI, 0.98, 2.32) and all-cause death (HR, 1.31; 95%CI, 1.04, 2.64). CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that a hyperinsulinemic dietary pattern after diagnosis of colorectal cancer is associated with poorer survival. Interventions with dietary patterns to reduce insulinemic activity and impact survivorship are warranted.

20.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila) ; 13(8): 699-706, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32727821

RESUMO

Growing data indicate an association between periodontal disease and the development of cancer. However, the evidence for colorectal cancer has been inconsistent and longitudinal study examining its precursor lesions is lacking. We prospectively collected information on periodontal disease and number of tooth loss in the Nurses' Health Study (1992-2002) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (1992-2010). Polyp diagnosis was acquired via self-reported questionnaires and confirmed through review of medical records. We used logistic regression to calculate the multivariate-adjusted ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CI) with adjustment for smoking and other known risk factors for periodontal disease and colorectal cancer. In this study, we included 17,904 women and 24,582 men. We documented 2,336 cases of serrated polyps and 4,102 cases of conventional adenomas among 84,714 person-endoscopies throughout follow-up. The ORs of serrated polyps and conventional adenomas comparing individuals with and without periodontal disease were 1.17 (95% CI, 1.06-1.29) and 1.11 (95% CI, 1.02-1.19), respectively. Compared with participants without tooth loss, those who lost ≥4 teeth had 20% (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.03-1.39) greater risk of serrated polyps (P trend 0.01). Among never smokers, similar associations with periodontal disease were observed for both serrated polyps (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02-1.41) and conventional adenomas (OR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.00-1.26). History of periodontal disease and possibly higher number of tooth loss may modestly increase the risk of developing colorectal precursor lesions. Our findings advance our understanding of the interplay between oral health, microbiome, and early colorectal carcinogenesis.

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