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1.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 2019 Aug 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31413005

RESUMO

To update the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for vaccination in adult patients with autoimmune inflammatory rheumatic diseases (AIIRD) published in 2011. Four systematic literature reviews were performed regarding the incidence/prevalence of vaccine-preventable infections among patients with AIIRD; efficacy, immunogenicity and safety of vaccines; effect of anti-rheumatic drugs on the response to vaccines; effect of vaccination of household of AIIRDs patients. Subsequently, recommendations were formulated based on the evidence and expert opinion. The updated recommendations comprise six overarching principles and nine recommendations. The former address the need for an annual vaccination status assessment, shared decision-making and timing of vaccination, favouring vaccination during quiescent disease, preferably prior to the initiation of immunosuppression. Non-live vaccines can be safely provided to AIIRD patients regardless of underlying therapy, whereas live-attenuated vaccines may be considered with caution. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination should be strongly considered for the majority of patients with AIIRD. Tetanus toxoid and human papilloma virus vaccination should be provided to AIIRD patients as recommended for the general population. Hepatitis A, hepatitis B and herpes zoster vaccination should be administered to AIIRD patients at risk. Immunocompetent household members of patients with AIIRD should receive vaccines according to national guidelines, except for the oral poliomyelitis vaccine. Live-attenuated vaccines should be avoided during the first 6 months of life in newborns of mothers treated with biologics during the second half of pregnancy. These 2019 EULAR recommendations provide an up-to-date guidance on the management of vaccinations in patients with AIIRD.

2.
Arch Dis Child ; 2019 Jun 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31175124

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Recently, in adults, the incidence and severity of fatigue was found to exist rather independently from the somatic diagnosis. Since fatigue is distressing when growing up with a chronic disease, we aim to investigate: (1) the prevalence and extent of fatigue among various paediatric chronic diseases and (2) the effect of fatigue on health-related quality of life (HRQoL). DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study in two children's hospitals. PATIENTS: Children and adolescents 2-18 years of age with cystic fibrosis, an autoimmune disease or postcancer treatment visiting the outpatient clinic. OUTCOME MEASURES: Fatigue and HRQoL were assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) multidimensional fatigue scale (with lower scores indicating more fatigue) and PedsQL generic core scales, respectively. Linear regression analysis and analysis of covariance were used to compare fatigue scores across disease groups and against two control groups. The effect of fatigue on HRQoL was calculated. Data were adjusted for age, sex and reporting method. RESULTS: 481 children and adolescents were assessed (60% participation rate, mean age 10.7±4.9, 42% men). Children and adolescents with chronic disease reported more fatigue than the general population (mean difference -6.6, 95% CI -8.9 to -4.3 (range 0-100)), with a prevalence of severe fatigue of 21.2%. Fatigue scores did not differ significantly between disease groups on any fatigue domain. Fatigue was associated with lower HRQoL on all domains. CONCLUSIONS: Fatigue in childhood chronic disease is a common symptom that presents across disease, age and sex groups. Fatigue affects HRQoL. Our findings underscore the need to systematically assess fatigue. Future studies should determine possible biological and psychosocial treatment targets.

3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31070229

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To compare the total number of adverse events (AEs) before and after mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) infusion in refractory JIA and to evaluate its effectiveness. METHODS: Single-centre Proof of Mechanism Phase Ib, open label intervention study in JIA patients previously failing all biologicals registered for their diagnosis. Six patients received 2 million/kg intravenous infusions of allogeneic bone-marrow derived MSC. In case of ACR-Ped30-response but subsequent loss of response one and maximal two repeated infusions are allowed. RESULTS: Six JIA patients with 9.2 years median disease duration, still active arthritis and damage were included. All had failed methotrexate, corticosteroids and median five different biologicals. MSC were administered twice in three patients. No acute infusion reactions were observed and a lower post-treatment than pre-treatment incidence in AEs was found. The one systemic onset JIA (sJIA) patient had again an evolving macrophage activation syndrome, 9 weeks after tocilizumab discontinuation and 7 weeks post-MSC infusion. Statistically significant decreases were found 8 weeks after one MSC infusion in VAS well-being (75-56), the JADAS-71 (24.5-11.0) and the cJADAS10 (18.0-10.6). CONCLUSION: MSC infusions in six refractory JIA patients were safe, although in sJIA stopping the 'failing' biologic treatment carries a risk of a MAS flare, as the drug might still suppress the systemic features. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Trial register.nl, http://https://www.trialregister.nl, NTR4146.

4.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 17(1): 20, 2019 May 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31060557

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This study aims to describe current practice in identifying and measuring health care resource use and unit costs in economic evaluations or costing studies of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: A scoping review was conducted (in July 2018) in PubMed and Embase to identify economic evaluations, costing studies, or resource utilization studies focusing on patients with JIA. Only English language peer-reviewed articles reporting primary research were included. Data from all included full-text articles were extracted and analysed to identify the reported health care resource use items. In addition, the data sources used to obtain these resource use and unit costs were identified for all included articles. RESULTS: Of 1176 unique citations identified by the search, 20 full-text articles were included. These involved 4 full economic evaluations, 5 cost-outcome descriptions, 8 cost descriptions, and 3 articles reporting only resource use. The most commonly reported health care resource use items involved medication (80%), outpatient and inpatient hospital visits (80%), laboratory tests (70%), medical professional visits (70%) and other medical visits (65%). Productivity losses of caregivers were much more often incorporated than (future) productivity losses of patients (i.e. 55% vs. 15%). Family borne costs were not commonly captured (ranging from 15% for school costs to 50% for transportation costs). Resource use was mostly obtained from family self-reported questionnaires. Estimates of unit costs were mostly based on reimbursement claims, administrative data, or literature. CONCLUSIONS: Despite some consistency in commonly included health care resource use items, variability remains in including productivity losses, missed school days and family borne costs. As these items likely substantially influence the full cost impact of JIA, the heterogeneity found between the items reported in the included studies limits the comparability of the results. Therefore, standardization of resource use items and unit costs to be collected is required. This standardization will provide guidance to future research and thereby improve the quality and comparability of economic evaluations or costing studies in JIA and potentially other childhood diseases. This would allow better understanding of the burden of JIA, and to estimate how it varies across health care systems.

5.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 21(1): 125, 2019 May 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31122296

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To describe the 6-year safety and efficacy of etanercept (ETN) in children with extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (eoJIA), enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA), and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) METHODS: Patients who completed the 2-year, open-label, phase III CLinical Study In Pediatric Patients of Etanercept for Treatment of ERA, PsA, and Extended Oligoarthritis (CLIPPER) were allowed to enroll in its 8-year long-term extension (CLIPPER2). Children received ETN at a once-weekly dose of 0.8 mg/kg, up to a maximum dose of 50 mg/week. Efficacy assessments included the JIA core set of outcomes, the JIA American College of Rheumatology response criteria (JIA-ACR), and the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS). Efficacy data are reported as responder analyses using a hybrid method for missing data imputation and as observed cases. Safety assessments included treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs). RESULTS: Out of 127 patients originally enrolled in CLIPPER, 109 (86%) entered CLIPPER2. After 6 years of trial participation (2 years in CLIPPER and 4 years in CLIPPER2), 41 (32%) patients were still taking ETN, 13 (11%) entered the treatment withdrawal phase after achieving low/inactive disease (of whom 7 had to restart ETN), 36 (28%) discontinued treatment for other reasons but are still being observed, and 37 (29%) discontinued treatment permanently. According to the hybrid imputation analysis, proportions of patients achieving JIA ACR90, JIA ACR100, and JADAS inactive disease after the initial 2 years of treatment were 58%, 48%, and 32%, respectively. After the additional 4 years, those proportions in patients who remained in the trial were 46%, 35%, and 24%. Most frequently reported TEAEs [n (%), events per 100 patient-years] were headache [28 (22%), 5.3], arthralgia [24 (19%), 4.6], and pyrexia [20 (16%), 3.8]. Number and frequency of TEAEs, excluding infections and injection site reactions, decreased over the 6-year period from 193 and 173.8, respectively, during year 1 to 37 and 61.3 during year 6. A single case of malignancy (Hodgkin's lymphoma) and no cases of active tuberculosis, demyelinating disorders, or deaths were reported. CONCLUSIONS: Open-label etanercept treatment for up to 6 years was safe, well tolerated, and effective in patients with eoJIA, ERA, and PsA. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: CLIPPER, NCT00962741 , registered 20 August, 2009, CLIPPER2, NCT01421069 , registered 22 August, 2011.

6.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 78(6): 725-728, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31018958
7.
Lancet Child Adolesc Health ; 3(4): 255-263, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30819662

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To our knowledge, the characteristics and burden of childhood arthritis have never been studied on a worldwide basis. We aimed to investigate, with a cross-sectional study, the prevalence of disease categories, treatment methods, and disease status in patients from across different geographical areas and from countries with diverse wealth status. METHODS: In this multinational, cross-sectional, observational cohort study, we asked international paediatric rheumatologists from specialised centres to enrol children with a diagnosis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, according to International League of Associations for Rheumatology criteria, who were seen consecutively for a period of 6 months. Each patient underwent retrospective and cross-sectional assessments, including measures of disease activity and damage and questionnaires on the wellbeing and quality of life of the children. We qualitatively compared the collected data across eight geographical areas, and we explored an association between disease activity and damage and a country's gross domestic product (GDP) with a multiple logistic regression analysis. FINDINGS: Between April 4, 2011, and Nov 21, 2016, 9081 patients were enrolled at 130 centres in 49 countries, grouped into eight geographical areas. Systemic arthritis (125 [33·0%] of 379 patients) and enthesitis-related arthritis (113 [29·8%] of 379) were more common in southeast Asia, whereas oligoarthritis was more prevalent in southern Europe (1360 [56·7%] of 2400) and rheumatoid factor-negative polyarthritis was more frequent in North America (165 [31·5%] of 523) than in the other areas. Prevalence of uveitis was highest in northern Europe (161 [19·1%] of 845 patients) and southern Europe (450 [18·8%] of 2400) and lowest in Latin America (54 [6·4%] of 849), Africa and Middle East (71 [5·9%] of 1209), and southeast Asia (19 [5·0%] of 379). Median age at disease onset was lower in southern Europe (3·5 years, IQR 1·9-7·3) than in other regions. Biological, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs were prescribed more frequently in northern Europe and North America than in other geographical settings. Patients living in countries with lower GDP had greater disease activity and damage than those living in wealthier countries. Damage was associated with referral delay. INTERPRETATION: Our study documents a variability in prevalence of disease phenotypes and disparities in therapeutic choices and outcomes across geographical areas and wealth status of countries. The greater disease burden in lower-resource settings highlights the need for public health efforts aimed at improving equity in access to effective treatments and care for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. FUNDING: IRCCS Istituto Giannina Gaslini.

8.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 58(9): 1607-1616, 2019 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30879080

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: IgA vasculitis (IgAV, formerly known as Henoch-Schönlein purpura) is the most common cause of systemic vasculitis in childhood. To date, there are no internationally agreed, evidence-based guidelines concerning the appropriate diagnosis and treatment of IgAV in children. Accordingly, treatment regimens differ widely. The European initiative SHARE (Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe) aims to optimize care for children with rheumatic diseases. The aim therefore was to provide internationally agreed consensus recommendations for diagnosis and treatment for children with IgAV. METHODS: Recommendations were developed by a consensus process in accordance with the EULAR standard operating procedures. An extensive systematic literature review was performed, and evidence-based recommendations were extrapolated from the included papers. These were evaluated by a panel of 16 international experts via online surveys and subsequent consensus meeting, using nominal group technique. Recommendations were accepted when ⩾80% of experts agreed. RESULTS: In total, 7 recommendations for diagnosis and 19 for treatment of paediatric IgAV were accepted. Diagnostic recommendations included: appropriate use of skin and renal biopsy, renal work-up and imaging. Treatment recommendations included: the importance of appropriate analgesia and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor use and non-renal indications for CS use, as well as a structured approach to treating IgAV nephritis, including appropriate use of CS and second-line agents in mild, moderate and severe disease along with use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and maintenance therapy. CONCLUSION: The SHARE initiative provides international, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of IgAV that will facilitate improvement and uniformity of care.

9.
Arthritis Rheumatol ; 71(7): 1163-1173, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30848528

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a multifactorial autoinflammatory disease with a historically poor prognosis. With current treatment regimens, approximately half of patients still experience active disease after 1 year of therapy. This study was undertaken to evaluate a treat-to-target approach using recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rIL-1Ra; anakinra) as first-line monotherapy to achieve early inactive disease and prevent damage. METHODS: In this single-center, prospective study, patients with new-onset systemic JIA with an unsatisfactory response to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs received rIL-1Ra monotherapy according to a treat-to-target strategy. Patients with an incomplete response to 2 mg/kg rIL-1Ra subsequently received 4 mg/kg rIL-1Ra or additional prednisolone, or switched to alternative therapy. For patients in whom inactive disease was achieved, rIL-1Ra was tapered after 3 months and subsequently stopped. RESULTS: Forty-two patients, including 12 who had no arthritis at disease onset, were followed up for a median of 5.8 years. The median time to achieve inactive disease was 33 days. At 1 year, 76% had inactive disease, and 52% had inactive disease while not receiving medication. High neutrophil counts at baseline and a complete response after 1 month of rIL-1Ra were highly associated with inactive disease at 1 year. After 5 years of follow-up, 96% of the patients included had inactive disease, and 75% had inactive disease while not receiving medication. Articular or extraarticular damage was reported in <5%, and only 33% of the patients received glucocorticoids. Treatment with rIL-1Ra was equally effective in systemic JIA patients without arthritis at disease onset. CONCLUSION: Treatment to target, starting with first-line, short-course monotherapy with rIL-1Ra, is a highly efficacious strategy to induce and sustain inactive disease and to prevent disease- and glucocorticoid-related damage in systemic JIA.

10.
Ann Rheum Dis ; 78(8): 1019-1024, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30826775

RESUMO

In 2012, a European initiative called Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) was launched to optimise and disseminate diagnostic and management regimens in Europe for children and young adults with rheumatic diseases. Juvenile localised scleroderma (JLS) is a rare disease within the group of paediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD) and can lead to significant morbidity. Evidence-based guidelines are sparse and management is mostly based on physicians' experience. This study aims to provide recommendations for assessment and treatment of JLS. Recommendations were developed by an evidence-informed consensus process using the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedures. A committee was formed, mainly from Europe, and consisted of 15 experienced paediatric rheumatologists and two young fellows. Recommendations derived from a validated systematic literature review were evaluated by an online survey and subsequently discussed at two consensus meetings using a nominal group technique. Recommendations were accepted if ≥80% agreement was reached. In total, 1 overarching principle, 10 recommendations on assessment and 6 recommendations on therapy were accepted with ≥80% agreement among experts. Topics covered include assessment of skin and extracutaneous involvement and suggested treatment pathways. The SHARE initiative aims to identify best practices for treatment of patients suffering from PRDs. Within this remit, recommendations for the assessment and treatment of JLS have been formulated by an evidence-informed consensus process to produce a standard of care for patients with JLS throughout Europe.

11.
Bone Marrow Transplant ; 54(7): 933-942, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30705338

RESUMO

Over the last 20 years, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has been used to treat patients with severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases whose response to standard treatment options has been limited, resulting in a poor long-term prognosis in terms of survival or disability. The vast majority of patients have received autologous HSCT where an increasing evidence-base supports its use in a wide range of autoimmune diseases, particularly relapsing remitting MS, systemic sclerosis and Crohn's disease. Compared with standard treatments for autoimmune diseases, HSCT is associated with greater short-term risks, including a risk of treatment-related mortality and long-term complications. There is a need for a careful appraisal of potential benefits and risks by disease and transplant specialists working closely together with patients and carers to determine individual suitability for HSCT. HSCT should be conducted in accredited transplant centres with robust arrangements for long-term follow-up with both disease and transplant specialists. The aim of this open-access position statement is to provide plainly worded guidance for patients and non-specialist clinicians considering HSCT for an autoimmune disease, especially when treatment abroad is being considered. Recent technical publications in the field have been referenced to support the statement and provide more detail for clinicians advising patients.

12.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 58(7): 1188-1195, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30668879

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To provide an overview of the paediatric rheumatology (PR) services in Europe, describe current delivery of care and training, set standards for care, identify unmet needs and inform future specialist service provision. METHODS: An online survey was developed and presented to national coordinating centres of the Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation (PRINTO) (country survey) and to individual PR centres (centre and disease surveys) as a part of the European Union (EU) Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe project. The survey contained components covering the organization of PR care, composition of teams, education, health care and research facilities and assessment of needs. RESULTS: Response rates were 29/35 (83%) for country surveys and 164/288 (57%) for centre surveys. Across the EU, approximately one paediatric rheumatologist is available per million population. In all EU member states there is good access to specialist care and medications, although biologic drug availability is worse in Eastern European countries. PR education is widely available for physicians but is insufficient for allied health professionals. The ability to participate in clinical trials is generally high. Important gaps were identified, including lack of standardized clinical guidelines/recommendations and insufficient adolescent transition management planning. CONCLUSION: This study provides a comprehensive description of current specialist PR service provision across Europe and did not reveal any major differences between EU member states. Rarity, chronicity and complexity of diseases are major challenges to PR care. Future work should facilitate the development, dissemination and implementation of standards of care, treatment and service recommendations to further improve patient-centred health care across Europe.

13.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 58(4): 672-682, 2019 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30535127

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The European Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe initiative aimed to optimize care for children with rheumatic diseases. Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common cause of acquired heart disease in children and an important cause of long-term cardiac disease into adulthood. Prompt diagnosis and treatment of KD is difficult due to the heterogeneity of the disease but is crucial for improving outcome. To date, there are no European internationally agreed, evidence-based guidelines concerning the diagnosis and treatment of KD in children. Accordingly, treatment regimens differ widely. The aim of this study is to provide consensus-based, European-wide evidence-informed recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of children with KD. METHODS: Recommendations were developed using the EULAR's standard operating procedures. An extensive systematic literature search was performed, and evidence-based recommendations were extrapolated from the included papers. These were evaluated by a panel of international experts via online surveys and subsequently discussed in three consensus meetings, using nominal group technique. Recommendations were accepted when ⩾80% agreed. RESULTS: In total, 17 recommendations for diagnosis and 14 for treatment of KD in children were accepted. Diagnostic recommendations included laboratory and imaging workup for complete as well as incomplete KD. Treatment recommendations included the importance of early treatment in both complete and incomplete KD, use of intravenous immunoglobulin, aspirin, corticosteroids for high-risk cases, and other treatment options for those with resistant disease. CONCLUSION: The Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe initiative provides international evidence-based recommendations for diagnosing and treating KD in children, facilitating improvement and uniformity of care.

14.
Rheumatology (Oxford) ; 58(4): 656-671, 2019 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30535249

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The European initiative Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe (SHARE) aimed to optimize care for children with rheumatic diseases. Systemic vasculitides are very rare in children. Consequently, despite recent advances, paediatric-specific information is sparse. The lack of evidence-based recommendations is an important, unmet need. This study aimed to provide recommendations for diagnosing and treating children with rare forms of childhood systemic vasculitis. METHODS: Recommendations were developed by a consensus process in accordance with the European League Against Rheumatism standard operating procedures. A systematic literature review informed the recommendations, which were devised and evaluated by a panel of experts via an online survey, and two consensus meetings using nominal group technique. Recommendations were accepted when ⩾ 80% of experts agreed. RESULTS: Ninety-three relevant articles were found, and 78 recommendations were accepted in the two consensus meetings. General, cross-cutting recommendations and disease-specific statements regarding the diagnosis and treatment of childhood-onset PAN, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, microscopic polyangiitis, eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and Takayasu arteritis are provided. CONCLUSION: These Single Hub and Access point for paediatric Rheumatology in Europe recommendations were formulated through an evidence-based consensus process to support uniform, high-quality standard of care for children with rare forms of paediatric systemic vasculitis.

15.
PLoS One ; 13(12): e0208534, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30532219

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective was to predict insufficient response to 3 months methotrexate (MTX) in DMARD naïve rheumatoid arthritis patients. METHODS: A Multivariable logistic regression model of rheumatoid arthritis patients starting MTX was developed in a derivation cohort with 285 patients starting MTX in a clinical multicentre, stratified single-blinded trial, performed in seven secondary care clinics and a tertiary care clinic. The model was validated in a validation cohort with 102 patients starting MTX at a tertiary care clinic. Outcome was insufficient response (disease activity score (DAS)28 >3.2) after 3 months of MTX treatment. Clinical characteristics, lifestyle variables, genetic and metabolic biomarkers were determined at baseline in both cohorts. These variables were dichotomized and used to construct a multivariable prediction model with backward logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The prediction model for insufficient response in the derivation cohort, included: DAS28>5.1, Health Assessment Questionnaire>0.6, current smoking, BMI>25 kg/m2, ABCB1 rs1045642 genotype, ABCC3 rs4793665 genotype, and erythrocyte-folate<750 nmol/L. In the derivation cohort, AUC of ROC curve was 0.80 (95%CI: 0.73-0.86), and 0.80 (95%CI: 0.69-0.91) in the validation cohort. Betas of the prediction model were transformed into total risk score (range 0-8). At cutoff of ≥4, probability for insufficient response was 44%. Sensitivity was 71%, specificity 72%, with positive and negative predictive value of 72% and 71%. CONCLUSIONS: A prognostics prediction model for insufficient response to MTX in 2 prospective RA cohorts by combining genetic, metabolic, clinical and lifestyle variables was developed and validated. This model satisfactorily identified RA patients with high risk of insufficient response to MTX.


Assuntos
Antirreumáticos/uso terapêutico , Artrite Reumatoide/tratamento farmacológico , Metotrexato/uso terapêutico , Subfamília B de Transportador de Cassetes de Ligação de ATP/genética , Adulto , Área Sob a Curva , Artrite Reumatoide/patologia , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Ácido Fólico/análise , Ácido Fólico/sangue , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas Associadas à Resistência a Múltiplos Medicamentos/genética , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Prognóstico , Curva ROC , Fatores de Risco , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 16(1): 77, 2018 Dec 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30526605

RESUMO

The Paediatric Rheumatology European Society (PReS) has over many years, developed a portfolio of educational activities to address increasing educational needs of workforce and support young clinicians to acquire skills to develop new knowledge and deliver clinical care in the future. These educational activities aim to facilitate growth of paediatric rheumatology and ultimately improve the clinical care for children and families. This article describes the current portfolio of PReS educational activities and their relevance to the international paediatric rheumatology community.


Assuntos
Educação Médica/métodos , Pediatria/educação , Reumatologia/educação , Criança , Europa (Continente) , Humanos
17.
Arthritis Res Ther ; 20(1): 285, 2018 12 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30587248

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The availability of methotrexate and the introduction of multiple biological agents have revolutionized the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Several international and national drug registries have been implemented to accurately monitor the long-term safety/efficacy of these agents. This report aims to present the combined data coming from Pharmachild/PRINTO registry and the national registries from Germany (BiKeR) and Sweden. METHODS: Descriptive statistics was used for demographic, clinical data, drug exposure, adverse events (AEs) and events of special interest (ESIs). For the Swedish register, AE data were not available. RESULTS: Data from a total of 15,284 patients were reported: 8274 (54%) from the Pharmachild registry and 3990 (26%) and 3020 (20%) from the German and the Swedish registries, respectively. Pharmachild children showed a younger age (median of 5.4 versus 7.6 years) at JIA onset and shorter disease duration at last available visit (5.3 versus 6.1-6.8) when compared with the other registries. The most frequent JIA category was the rheumatoid factor-negative polyarthritis (range of 24.6-29.9%). Methotrexate (61-84%) and etanercept (24%-61.8%) were the most frequently used synthetic and biologic disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs), respectively. There was a wide variability in glucocorticoid use (16.7-42.1%). Serious AEs were present in 572 (6.9%) patients in Pharmachild versus 297 (7.4%) in BiKeR. Infection and infestations were the most frequent AEs (29.4-30.1%) followed by gastrointestinal disorders (11.5-19.6%). The most frequent ESIs were infections (75.3-89%). CONCLUSIONS: This article is the first attempt to present a very large sample of data on JIA patients from different national and international registries and represents the first proposal for data merging as the most powerful tool for future analysis of safety and effectiveness of immunosuppressive therapies in JIA. REGISTRY REGISTRATION: The Pharmachild registry is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov ( NCT01399281 ) and at the European Network of Centres for Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacovigilance (ENCePP) ( http://www.encepp.eu/encepp/viewResource.htm?id=19362 ). The BiKeR registry is registered at ENCePP ( http://www.encepp.eu/encepp/viewResource.htm?id=20591 ).

19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30358135

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The implementation of value based healthcare (VBHC) in inflammatory arthritis (IA) requires a standardized set of modifiable outcomes and risk-adjustment variables that is feasible to implement worldwide. METHODS: The International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) assembled a multidisciplinary working group, consisting of 24 experts from six continents, including six patient representatives, to develop a Standard Set of outcomes for IA. The process followed a structured approach using a modified Delphi process to reach consensus on 1) conditions covered by the set, 2) outcome domains, 3) outcome measures, 4) risk-adjustment variables. Consensus on decision areas two to four were supported by systematic literature reviews and consultation of experts. RESULTS: The ICHOM IA Standard Set covers patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), axial spondyloarthritis, psoriatic arthritis and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We recommend that the following outcomes be collected at least annually: pain, fatigue, activity limitations, overall physical and mental health impact, work/school/housework ability and productivity, disease activity, and serious adverse events. Validated measures for patient-reported outcomes were endorsed, and linked to common reporting metrics. Age, sex at birth, educational level, smoking status, comorbidities, time since diagnosis, and rheumatoid factor and anti-citrullinated protein antibody lab testing for RA and JIA should be collected as risk-adjustment variables. CONCLUSION: We present the ICHOM IA Standard Set of outcomes that enables healthcare providers to implement the value based healthcare framework and enable comparison of outcomes important to patients with IA. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

20.
J Rheumatol ; 2018 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30275259

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To revise the current juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) classification criteria with an evidence-based approach, using clinical and routine laboratory measures available worldwide, to identify homogeneous clinical groups and to distinguish those forms of chronic arthritis typically seen only in children from the childhood counterpart of adult diseases. METHODS: The overall project consists of 4 steps. This work represents Step 1, a Delphi Web-based consensus and Step 2, an international nominal group technique (NGT) consensus conference for the new provisional Pediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organization JIA classification criteria. A future large data collection of at least 1000 new-onset JIA patients (Step 3) followed by analysis and NGT consensus (Step 4) will provide data for the evidence-based validation of the JIA classification criteria. RESULTS: In Step 1, three Delphi rounds of interactions were implemented to revise the 7 ILAR JIA categories. In Step 2, forty-seven questions with electronic voting were implemented to derive the new proposed criteria. Four disorders were proposed: (a) systemic JIA; (b) rheumatoid factor-positive JIA; (c) enthesitis/spondylitis-related JIA; and (d) early-onset antinuclear antibody-positive JIA. The other forms were gathered under the term "others." These will be analyzed during the prospective data collection using a list of descriptors to see whether the clustering of some of them could identify homogeneous entities. CONCLUSION: An international consensus was reached to identify different proposed homogeneous chronic disorders that fall under the historical term JIA. These preliminary criteria will be formally validated with a dedicated project.

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