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3.
Microbiol Resour Announc ; 10(36): e0005221, 2021 Sep 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34498922

RESUMO

Here, we report the complete genome sequences of two WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) strains, both obtained in 2020 from pediatric patients with fatal respiratory infection in Beijing, China. The double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) genome sequences of BCH2008-1 and BCH2020_1 are 5,229 bp and 5,228 bp long, respectively.

4.
Virol Sin ; 2021 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34523109

RESUMO

Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in children worldwide. In this study, we aimed to describe the aetiology of viral infection of pediatric CAP in Chinese mainland. During November 2014 to June 2016, the prospective study was conducted in 13 hospitals. The hospitalized children under 18 years old who met the criteria for CAP were enrolled. The throat swabs or nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected which were then screened 18 respiratory viruses using multiplex PCR assay. Viral pathogens were present in 56.6% (1539/2721) of the enrolled cases, with the detection rate of single virus in 39.8% of the cases and multiple viruses in 16.8% of the cases. The most frequently detected virus was respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (15.2%, 414/2721). The highest detection rate of virus was in < 6-month-age group (70.7%, 292/413). RSV, human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) and influenza B virus (Flu B) showed the similar prevalence patterns both in north and south China, but HPIVs, Flu A, human bocavirus (HBoV), human adenovirus (HAdV) and human coronaviruses (HCoVs) showed the distinct circulating patterns in north and south China. Human enterovirus/human rhinovirus (HEV/HRV) (27.6%, 27/98), HBoV (18.4%, 18/98), RSV (16.3%, 16/98) and HMPV (14.3%, 14/98) were the most commonly detected viruses in severe pneumonia cases with single virus infection. In conclusion, viral pathogens are frequently detected in pediatric CAP cases and may therefore play a vital role in the aetiology of CAP. RSV was the most important virus in hospitalized children with CAP in Chinese mainland.

5.
Front Cell Infect Microbiol ; 11: 695134, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34368015

RESUMO

The objective of this study was to evaluate the value of molecular methods in the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children. Previously developed mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods combined with quantitative real-time PCR (combined-MS methods) were used to describe the aetiology and evaluate antibiotic therapy in the enrolled children. Sputum collected from 302 children hospitalized with CAP were analyzed using the combined-MS methods, which can detect 19 viruses and 12 bacteria related to CAP. Based on the results, appropriate antibiotics were determined using national guidelines and compared with the initial empirical therapies. Respiratory pathogens were identified in 84.4% of the patients (255/302). Co-infection was the predominant infection pattern (51.7%, 156/302) and was primarily a bacterial-viral mixed infection (36.8%, 111/302). Compared with that using culture-based methods, the identification rate for bacteria using the combined-MS methods (61.8%, 126/204) increased by 28.5% (p <0.001). Based on the results of the combined-MS methods, the initial antibiotic treatment of 235 patients was not optimal, which mostly required switching to ß-lactam/ß-lactamase inhibitor combinations or reducing unnecessary macrolide treatments. Moreover, using the combined-MS methods to guide antibiotic therapy showed potential to decrease the length of stay in children with severe CAP. For children with CAP, quantitative molecular testing on sputum can serve as an important complement to traditional culture methods. Early aetiology elucidated using molecular testing can help guide the antibiotic therapy.


Assuntos
Infecções Comunitárias Adquiridas , Pneumonia , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Bactérias/genética , Criança , Infecções Comunitárias Adquiridas/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Espectrometria de Massas , Pneumonia/tratamento farmacológico
6.
Virol Sin ; 2021 Aug 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34398429

RESUMO

Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major pathogen of acute lower respiratory tract infection among young children. To investigate the prevalence and genetic characteristics of RSV in China, we performed a molecular epidemiological study during 2015-2019. A total of 964 RSV-positive specimens were identified from 5529 enrolled patients during a multi-center study. RSV subgroup A (RSV-A) was the predominant subgroup during this research period except in 2016. Totally, 535 sequences of the second hypervariable region (HVR-2) of the G gene were obtained. Combined with 182 Chinese sequences from GenBank, phylogenetic trees showed that 521 RSV-A sequences fell in genotypes ON1 (512), NA1 (6) and GA5 (3), respectively; while 196 RSV-B sequences fell in BA9 (193) and SAB4 (3). ON1 and BA9 were the only genotypes after December 2015. Genotypes ON1 and BA9 can be separated into 10 and 7 lineages, respectively. The HVR-2 of genotype ON1 had six amino acid changes with a frequency more than 10%, while two substitutions H258Q and H266L were co-occurrences. The HVR-2 of genotype BA9 had nine amino acid substitutions with a frequency more than 10%, while the sequences with T290I and T312I were all from 2018 to 2019. One N-glycosylation site at 237 was identified among ON1 sequences, while two N-glycosylation sites (296 and 310) were identified in the 60-nucleotide duplication region of BA9. To conclusion, ON1 and BA9 were the predominant genotypes in China during 2015-2019. For the genotypes ON1 and BA9, the G gene exhibited relatively high diversity and evolved continuously.

8.
Virol Sin ; 36(3): 382-392, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33400092

RESUMO

To investigate the molecular epidemiology and genetic variation of human adenovirus type 7 (HAdV-7) in children with acute respiratory infections (ARI) in China. HAdV-7-positive respiratory samples collected from children with ARI in Beijing, Shijiazhuang, Wenzhou and Guangzhou from 2014-2018 were selected for gene amplification and sequence analysis. Fifty-seven HAdV-7 clinical strains with hexon, penton base and fiber gene sequences were obtained. Meanwhile 17 strains were selected randomly from different cities for whole genome sequencing. Phylogenetic and variation analyses were performed based on the obtained sequences, HAdV-7 prototype strain Gomen (AY594255), vaccine strains (AY495969 and AY594256) and representative sequences of strains. The phylogenetic trees constructed based on whole genome sequences, major capsid protein genes (hexon, penton base and fiber) and the early genes (E1, E2, E3 and E4) were not completely consistent. The HAdV-7 strains obtained in this study always clustered with most of the circulating strains worldwide from the 1980s to the present. Compared with the HAdV-7 prototype strain Gomen (AY594255), some amino acid mutations in loop1 and loop2 of hexon and the RGD loop region of the penton base gene were observed. Recombination analysis showed that partial regions of 55 kDa protein and 100 kDa hexon-assembly associated protein genes among all HAdV-7 strains in this study were from HAdV-16 and HAdV-3, respectively. Our study demonstrated the molecular evolution characteristics of HAdV-7 strains circulating in China and provided basic reference data for the prevention, control and vaccine development of HAdV-7.


Assuntos
Infecções por Adenovirus Humanos , Adenovírus Humanos , Infecções por Adenovirus Humanos/epidemiologia , Adenovírus Humanos/genética , Criança , China/epidemiologia , Evolução Molecular , Genoma Viral , Humanos , Filogenia , Análise de Sequência de DNA
10.
Transl Pediatr ; 9(4): 496-506, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32953547

RESUMO

Background: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), which is associated with acute lower respiratory tract infection (ALRTI), is highly common among children. The burden of RSV varies between countries. In China, the actual burden remains unclear. Thus, this meta-analysis aimed to quantify the positive rate of ALRTI-related RSV infections among Chinese children in recent years. Methods: The PubMed, Web of Science, China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), WanFang, and Chinese BioMedical (CBM) databases were searched to identify relevant cross-sectional studies published between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2018. Subsequently, a meta-analysis was performed using R software. Results: A total of 18 studies involving 66,799 ALRTI cases were finally included in the meta-analysis. Among those ALRTIs cases, the overall positive rate of RSV infection was 16.0% (95% CI: 12.9-19.6%). The rate was significantly higher in children <3 years (19.5%, 95% CI 13.3-27.6%) compared to those ≥3 years (5.6%, 95% CI: 2.3-13.2%; P<0.01). Moreover, stratified analysis revealed that RSV infection was most frequent in children <6 months (31.1%, 95% CI: 21.0-43.5%). The positive detection rate of RSV infection was significantly associated with season (P<0.01), with winter having the highest detection rate (29.0%, 95% CI: 21.3-38.2%), followed by autumn (20.9%, 95% CI: 10.5-37.3%), and summer having the lowest rate (6.4%, 95% CI: 2.3-16.9%). The rate of RSV infection was highest and lowest in November (49.4%, 95% CI: 29.0-70.0%) and June (1.3%, 95% CI: 0.6-2.8%), respectively. When stratified according to geographical region, RSV infections peaked in winter (South: 24.8%, 95% CI: 12.9-42.3%; North: 36.3%, 95% CI: 30.8-42.1%), followed by autumn (South: 13.9%, 95% CI: 6.5-27.4%; North: 32.7%, 95% CI: 20.2-48.3%). Conclusions: In conclusion, our meta-analysis showed that among Chinese children with ALRTI, 16.0% had RSV infection. RSV infection frequently occurred in children under the age of 3 years, especially in those under 6 months. The rate of RSV infections was highest in winter, followed by autumn.

11.
Pediatr Investig ; 4(1): 1-4, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32851334
12.
Biomed Res Int ; 2020: 5217039, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32714979

RESUMO

Accumulating evidence so far has shown that EBV's miRNAs have been found to be involved in cancer progression. However, the comprehensive EBV miRNA expression profiles and their biological significance in EBV-associated diseases are not well documented. A comprehensive profiling of EBV-encoded miRNAs expressed in CAEBV, EBV-HLH, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients was constructed, and the results showed that miR-BART19-3p was upregulated in all these diseases. Ectopic expression of miR-BART19-3p induced EBV-negative cell proliferation and suppressed cell apoptosis. Molecularly, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) was identified to be a direct target of miR-BART19-3p, and APC mRNA expression was inversely correlated with miR-BART19-3p in CAEBV samples. Our results demonstrated that miR-BART19-3p contributes to the tumorigenesis of EBV-associated diseases and may be a potential therapeutic target.


Assuntos
Infecções por Vírus Epstein-Barr/genética , Infecções por Vírus Epstein-Barr/virologia , Herpesvirus Humano 4/fisiologia , MicroRNAs/genética , Oncogenes , Apoptose/genética , Linhagem Celular Tumoral , Proliferação de Células/genética , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Regulação da Expressão Gênica , Humanos , MicroRNAs/metabolismo , Regulação para Cima/genética
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 420, 2020 Jun 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32546135

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mycoplasma pneumoniae (M. pneumoniae) is an important pathogen of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children. The coinfection rate of M. pneumoniae pneumonia (MPP) can reach 52% in some areas, but the effects of coinfection with different pathogens have not been clearly recognized. METHODS: The cases of MPP hospitalized in Beijing Children's Hospital from 1/1/2014 to 12/31/2016 were screened. MPP patients coinfected with Human adenovirus (HAdV) were categorized into the research group. Patients with single M. pneumoniae infection were categorized into the control group, matching the research group by age and admission time with a ratio of 1:3. Clinical manifestations, laboratory examinations, and disease severity were compared between these two groups. RESULTS: A total of 2540 hospitalized MPP cases were screened in Beijing Children's Hospital, among which thirty cases were enrolled in the research group and ninety cases were enrolled in the control group. The results indicated that patients in the research group had longer hospital stays, longer fever durations and a higher rate of dyspnea, as well as a larger proportion applications of oxygen therapy and noninvasive continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). No obvious differences were found in lab examinations within the two groups. Regarding disease severity, the proportions of extremely severe pneumonia and severe disease defined by the clinical score system were higher in the research group than in the control group. CONCLUSION: Compared with single M. pneumoniae infection, MPP coinfected with HAdV in children was relatively more serious.


Assuntos
Infecções por Adenovirus Humanos/diagnóstico , Adenovírus Humanos/imunologia , Coinfecção/virologia , Mycoplasma pneumoniae/genética , Mycoplasma pneumoniae/imunologia , Pneumonia por Mycoplasma/epidemiologia , Infecções por Adenovirus Humanos/fisiopatologia , Pequim/epidemiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Coinfecção/fisiopatologia , Infecções Comunitárias Adquiridas/virologia , Dispneia , Feminino , Febre , Humanos , Lactente , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pneumonia por Mycoplasma/fisiopatologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
14.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 387, 2020 May 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32473625

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To compare the clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs) caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and human rhinovirus (HRV) and to explore the relationship between the development of recurrent wheezing/asthma and RSV/ HRV infections in infancy. METHODS: Retrospective study was conducted to compare the clinical characteristics of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs). Hospitalized patients with ALRTIs from March 2007 to December 2016 were screened. Single RSV cases (s-RSV), single HRV cases (s-HRV), and cases who had co-infection with the two viruses were enrolled. Follow-up was performed to determine whether either specific respiratory virus infection was related to subsequent development of recurrent wheezing/asthma. RESULTS: The s-RSV children were the youngest (P = 0.021), they experienced the most serious condition (P < 0.001) and respiratory failure (P < 0.001), they also required highest demand of oxygen therapy (P < 0.001). And in s-RSV group, the incidence of development of recurrent wheezing was significantly higher in subgroup with the family history of wheezing than that without (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: The s-RSV cases suffered from the worst severity of illness, respiratory failure and required highest demand of oxygen therapy. Recurrent wheezing was more common in s-RSV group with family history of wheezing than those without.


Assuntos
Asma/epidemiologia , Infecções por Picornaviridae/complicações , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/complicações , Infecções Respiratórias/complicações , Asma/etiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Lactente , Masculino , Infecções por Picornaviridae/epidemiologia , Sons Respiratórios/etiologia , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/epidemiologia , Infecções Respiratórias/epidemiologia , Infecções Respiratórias/virologia , Estudos Retrospectivos
15.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med ; 202(5): 717-729, 2020 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32543879

RESUMO

Rationale: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of childhood respiratory infections worldwide; however, no vaccine is available, and treatment options are limited. Identification of host factors pivotal to viral replication may inform the development of novel therapies, prophylaxes, or diagnoses.Objectives: To identify host factors involved in RSV replication and to evaluate their potential for disease management.Methods: A gain-of-function screening was performed on the basis of a genome-wide human complementary DNA library screen for host factors involved in RSV replication. The antiviral mechanism of CXCL4 (chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 4) was analyzed. Its clinical role was evaluated via nasopharyngeal aspirates and plasma samples from patients with RSV infection and different disease severities.Measurements and Main Results: Forty-nine host factors restricting RSV replication were identified by gain-of-function screening, with CXCL4 showing the strongest antiviral effect, which was secretion dependent. CXCL4 blocked viral attachment through binding to the RSV main receptor heparan sulfate, instead of through interacting with RSV surface proteins. Intranasal pretreatment with CXCL4 alleviated inflammation in RSV-infected mice, as shown by decreased concentrations of tumor necrosis factor and viral load in BAL fluid samples as well as by viral nucleocapsid protein histological staining in lungs. Compared with non-RSV infections, RSV infections induced elevated CXCL4 concentrations both in plasma and airway samples from mice and pediatric patients. The airway CXCL4 concentration was correlated with viral load and disease severity in patients (P < 0.001).Conclusions: Our results suggest that CXCL4 is an RSV restriction factor that can block viral entry and serve as an indicator of clinical severity in RSV infections.


Assuntos
Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Quimiocinas CXC/metabolismo , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/metabolismo , Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano/genética , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Pré-Escolar , DNA Viral/análise , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Ligantes , Masculino , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/diagnóstico , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/virologia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
16.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 14(4): 452-459, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32267084

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pediatric pneumonia remains a significant health challenge, while the viral risk factors for adverse outcomes in pediatric pneumonia are not yet fully clear. METHODS: A matched case-control study of pediatric patients with pneumonia was carried out in Beijing, China, between 2007 and 2015. The study enrolled 334 intensive care unit patients who developed life-threatening diseases and 522 controls matched to the sex, age, ethnicity, admission dates, and residing district of the cases suffered from pneumonia. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were taken from all participants and tested by PCR for 18 common respiratory viruses. RESULTS: At least, one virus was detected in 257 (77%) of the cases and 409 (78%) of the controls. We observed no difference in the prevalence of 17 respiratory viruses between cases and controls but found a higher frequency of influenza A virus (IFV-A) in the cases than in the controls (7% vs 4%, P = .036). After adjusting for comorbid conditions and a history of reactive airway diseases, IFV-A was associated with an increase in life-threatening pneumonia (adjusted odds ratio = 2.55, 95% CI = 1.24-5.24). Young age and congenital heart disease (aOR = 10.16-10.27, P < .001) were also independent risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: The prevention of IFV infection is critical in decreasing the risk of life-threatening pneumonia in children.

17.
World J Pediatr ; 16(3): 232-239, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32333248

RESUMO

In the early February, 2020, we called up an experts' committee with more than 30 Chinese experts from 11 national medical academic organizations to formulate the first edition of consensus statement on diagnosis, treatment and prevention of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children, which has been published in this journal. With accumulated experiences in the diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19 in children, we have updated the consensus statement and released the second edition recently. The current version in English is a condensed version of the second edition of consensus statement on diagnosis, treatment and prevention of COVID-19 in children. In the current version, diagnosis and treatement criteria have been optimized, and early identification of severe and critical cases is highlighted. The early warning indicators for severe pediatric cases have been summarized which is utmost important for clinical practice. This version of experts consensus will be valuable for better prevention, diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19 in children worldwide.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Coronavirus , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Criança , Consenso , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2
18.
World J Pediatr ; 16(3): 223-231, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32034659

RESUMO

Since the outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus infection (2019-nCoV) in Wuhan City, China, by January 30, 2020, a total of 9692 confirmed cases and 15,238 suspected cases have been reported around 31 provinces or cities in China. Among the confirmed cases, 1527 were severe cases, 171 had recovered and been discharged at home, and 213 died. And among these cases, a total of 28 children aged from 1 month to 17 years have been reported in China. For standardizing prevention and management of 2019-nCoV infections in children, we called up an experts' committee to formulate this experts' consensus statement. This statement is based on the Novel Coronavirus Infection Pneumonia Diagnosis and Treatment Standards (the fourth edition) (National Health Committee) and other previous diagnosis and treatment strategies for pediatric virus infections. The present consensus statement summarizes current strategies on diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of 2019-nCoV infection in children.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , COVID-19 , Criança , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle
19.
BMC Infect Dis ; 19(1): 729, 2019 Aug 20.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31429710

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: No comparison data have been reported on viral and epidemiological profiles of hospitalized children with severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) in Beijing or Shanghai, China. METHODS: We collected 700 nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPA) from hospitalized children with SARI in Beijing (northern China) and Shanghai (southern China). Multiple respiratory viruses (including 15 common viruses) were screened by validated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or real-time reverse transcription-PCR assays and confirmed by sequencing. Demographic data and the distribution of viral infections were also examined. RESULTS: Of 700 samples, 547 (78.1%) tested positive for viral infections. The picornaviruses (PIC), which included rhinovirus (RV) and enterovirus (EV), were the most common (34.0%), followed by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) (28.3%), human bocavirus (HBoV) (19.1%), adenovirus (ADV) (13.7%), human coronaviruses (HCoV) (10.7%), influenza A and B (8.9%), parainfluenza virus (PIV 1-3) (7.9%), and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) (5.0%). PIC (RV/EV) and RSV were the most prevalent etiological agents of SARI in both cities. The total and age-matched prevalence of RSV, HCoV, and hMPV among SARI children under 5 years old were significantly higher in Beijing than in Shanghai. Different age and seasonal distribution patterns of the viral infections were found between Beijing and Shanghai. CONCLUSIONS: Viral infection was tested and shown to be the most prevalent etiological agent among children with SARI in either the Beijing or the Shanghai area, while showing different patterns of viral and epidemiological profiles. Our findings provide a better understanding of the roles of geographic location and climate in respiratory viral infections in hospitalized children with SARI.


Assuntos
Infecções Respiratórias/epidemiologia , Infecções Respiratórias/virologia , Infecções por Adenoviridae/epidemiologia , Infecções por Adenoviridae/virologia , Pequim/epidemiologia , Pré-Escolar , China/epidemiologia , Feminino , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Influenza Humana/epidemiologia , Influenza Humana/virologia , Masculino , Infecções por Paramyxoviridae/epidemiologia , Infecções por Paramyxoviridae/virologia , Infecções por Parvoviridae/epidemiologia , Infecções por Parvoviridae/virologia , Infecções por Picornaviridae/epidemiologia , Infecções por Picornaviridae/virologia , Prevalência , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/epidemiologia , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/virologia , Infecções por Respirovirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Respirovirus/virologia
20.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 25(6): 1127-1135, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31107230

RESUMO

During July 2007-June 2015, we enrolled 4,225 hospitalized children with pneumonia in a study to determine the seasonality of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection in Beijing, China. We defined season as the period during which >10% of total PCRs performed each week were RSV positive. We identified 8 distinctive RSV seasons. On average, the season onset occurred at week 41 (mid-October) and lasted 33 weeks, through week 20 of the next year (mid-May); 97% of all RSV-positive cases occurred during the season. RSV seasons occurred 3-5 weeks earlier and lasted ≈6 weeks longer in RSV subgroup A-dominant years than in RSV subgroup B-dominant years. Our analysis indicates that monitoring such RSV subgroup shifts might provide better estimates for the onset of RSV transmission. PCR-based tests could be a flexible or complementary way of determining RSV seasonality in locations where RSV surveillance is less well-established, such as local hospitals throughout China.


Assuntos
Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/epidemiologia , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/virologia , Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano , Estações do Ano , Adolescente , Adulto , Pequim/epidemiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , História do Século XXI , Hospitalização , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Avaliação de Resultados da Assistência ao Paciente , Vigilância da População , Infecções por Vírus Respiratório Sincicial/história , Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano/classificação , Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano/genética , Vírus Sincicial Respiratório Humano/isolamento & purificação , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
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