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1.
Eur J Surg Oncol ; 2020 Jan 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32044202

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: and purpose: For gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis (GCPM), there is no universally accepted prognostic staging system. This study aimed to validate the predictive ability of the 15th peritoneal metastasis staging system (P1abc) of the Japanese Classification of Gastric Carcinoma (JCGC). METHODS: The data of 309 GCPM patients from July 2007 to July 2017 were retrospectively analyzed. This study compared the prognosis prediction performances of P1abc, the previous JCGC PM staging (P123) and Gilly staging systems. RESULTS: The survival curve revealed a significant difference in overall survival (OS) predicted by P1abc, P123 and Gilly staging (all P < 0.05), and the survival of the two adjacent substages were well distinguished by P1abc but not by P123 and Gilly staging. Both P123 and Gilly staging were substituted with P1abc staging in a 2-step multivariate analysis. The results showed that P1abc staging was superior to both P123 and Gilly staging in its discriminatory ability (C-index), predictive accuracy (AIC) and predictive homogeneity (likelihood ratio chi-square). A stratified analysis by different therapies indicated that for the P1a and P1b patients, OS following palliative resection combined with palliative chemotherapy (PRCPC) was better than that after palliative resection (PR) or palliative chemotherapy (PC) alone (P < 0.05). For the P1c patients, OS after receiving PC was significantly superior to that after receiving PRCPC or PR (P = 0.021). CONCLUSION: P1abc staging is superior to P123 and Gilly staging in predicting the survival of GCPM patients. Surgeons can provide these patients with appropriate treatment options according to the corresponding substages within P1abc.

2.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 19(1): 205, 2019 Dec 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31791240

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To determine the indications for adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) in patients with stage IIa gastric cancer (T3N0M0 and T1N2M0) according to the 7th American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC). METHODS: A total of 1593 patients with T3N0M0 or T1N2M0 stage gastric cancer were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database for the period 1988.1-2012.12. Cox multiple regression, nomogram and decision curve analyses were performed. External validation was performed using databases of the Fujian Medical University Union Hospital (FJUUH) (n = 241) and Italy IMIGASTRIC center (n = 45). RESULTS: Cox multiple regression analysis showed that the risk factors that affected OS in patients receiving AC were age > 65 years old, T1N2M0, LN dissection number ≤ 15, tumor size > 20 mm, and nonadenocarcinoma. A nomogram was constructed to predict 5-year OS, and the patients were divided into those predicted to receive a high benefit (points ≤ 188) or a low benefit from AC (points > 188) according to a recursive partitioning analysis. OS was significantly higher for the high-benefit patients in the SEER database and the FJUUH dataset than in the non-AC patients (Log-rank < 0.05), and there was no significant difference in OS between the low-benefit patients and non-AC patients in any of the three centers (Log-rank = 0.154, 0.470, and 0.434, respectively). The decision curve indicated that the best clinical effect can be obtained when the threshold probability is 0-92%. CONCLUSION: Regarding the controversy over whether T3N0M0 and T1N2M0 gastric cancer patients should be treated with AC, this study presents a predictive model that provides concise and accurate indications. These data show that high-benefit patients should receive AC.

3.
World J Gastroenterol ; 25(43): 6451-6464, 2019 Nov 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31798281

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Because of the powerful abilities of self-learning and handling complex biological information, artificial neural network (ANN) models have been widely applied to disease diagnosis, imaging analysis, and prognosis prediction. However, there has been no trained preoperative ANN (preope-ANN) model to preoperatively predict the prognosis of patients with gastric cancer (GC). AIM: To establish a neural network model that can predict long-term survival of GC patients before surgery to evaluate the tumor condition before the operation. METHODS: The clinicopathological data of 1608 GC patients treated from January 2011 to April 2015 at the Department of Gastric Surgery, Fujian Medical University Union Hospital were analyzed retrospectively. The patients were randomly divided into a training set (70%) for establishing a preope-ANN model and a testing set (30%). The prognostic evaluation ability of the preope-ANN model was compared with that of the American Joint Commission on Cancer (8th edition) clinical TNM (cTNM) and pathological TNM (pTNM) staging through the receiver operating characteristic curve, Akaike information criterion index, Harrell's C index, and likelihood ratio chi-square. RESULTS: We used the variables that were statistically significant factors for the 3-year overall survival as input-layer variables to develop a preope-ANN in the training set. The survival curves within each score of the preope-ANN had good discrimination (P < 0.05). Comparing the preope-ANN model, cTNM, and pTNM in both the training and testing sets, the preope-ANN model was superior to cTNM in predictive discrimination (C index), predictive homogeneity (likelihood ratio chi-square), and prediction accuracy (area under the curve). The prediction efficiency of the preope-ANN model is similar to that of pTNM. CONCLUSION: The preope-ANN model can accurately predict the long-term survival of GC patients, and its predictive efficiency is not inferior to that of pTNM stage.

4.
BMC Cancer ; 19(1): 1127, 2019 Nov 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31752770

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR), lymphocyte to monocyte ratio (LMR), and neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) reflect the systematic inflammatory response, with some evidence revealing that they are associated with poorer survival in patients with gastric cancer. However, the effect of the white blood cell to hemoglobin ratio (WHR) on the long-term prognosis of patients with gastric cancer has not been reported. Therefore, we sought to characterize the effect of WHR on long-term survival after radical gastrectomy and compare its value with that of other preoperative inflammation-based prognostic scores (PIPS). METHODS: Data from 924 patients with a diagnosis of nonmetastatic gastric adenocarcinoma who underwent surgical resection between December 2009 and May 2013 were included in this study. RESULTS: The optimal cutoff values for the WHR, PLR, LMR, and NLR were 2.855, 133.03, 3.405, and 2.61, respectively. Patients with an increased WHR (53% vs. 88.1%, p < 0.001), PLR (60.9% vs 75.6%, p < 0.001) and NLR (56.7% vs 72.8%, p < 0.001) and a decreased LMR (54% vs 74.5%, p < 0.001) had a significantly decreased 5-year OS. However, the stratified analysis showed that only the WHR predicted a significant 5-year survival rate difference at each stage as follows: stage I (82.7% vs 94.3%, p = 0.005), stage II (71.3% vs 90.2%, p = 0.001) and stage III (38.2% vs 58.1%, p < 0.001). The time-ROC curve showed that the predictive value of the WHR was superior to that of the PLR, LMR, and NLR during follow-up. The WHR (0.624) C-index was significantly greater than the PLR (0.569), LMR (0.584), and NLR C-indexes (0.56) (all P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Compared with other PIPS, the WHR had the most powerful predictive ability when used for the prognosis of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma.

5.
Surg Endosc ; 2019 Nov 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31720795

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Well-designed retrospective studies (RSs) and small-sample prospective studies (PSs) evaluating the efficacy of interventions have received much attention. This study was designed to evaluate the differences between well-designed RSs and small-sample randomized controlled trials based on the efficacy of laparoscopic distal gastrectomy (LDG) and open distal gastrectomy (ODG) for advanced gastric cancer (GC). METHODS: The clinicopathological data of 1360 patients with GC who underwent DG were analysed. After propensity score matching (1:1), 380 cases (ODG = 190, LDG = 190) were finally selected in a RS. Meanwhile, data from 120 patients (ODG = 60, LDG = 60) who enrolled in a PS were analysed. RESULTS: In the PS, the LDG group had less intraoperative blood loss, shorter time to first flatus, and shorter time to fluid diet than the ODG group. In the RS, the LDG group had less intraoperative blood loss, and a shorter postoperative hospital stay than the ODG group. In the PS, the 3-year overall survival (OS) rate was 83.3% in the LDG group and 83.2% in the ODG group (p = 0.877). In the RS, the 3-year OS rate was 68.7% in the LDG group and 66.6% in the ODG group (p = 0.752). No significant interactions were observed between the two groups and any of the variables examined, either in the PS or RS. The recurrence patterns were similar in the two groups. Furthermore, Cox regression analysis showed that surgical method (LDG/ODG) was not a prognostic factor affecting OS or DFS, either prospectively or retrospectively. CONCLUSIONS: The oncologic efficacy of laparoscopic and open distal gastrectomy for advanced GC is comparable. Well-designed RSs can be similar to small sample of PSs in assessing long-term oncologic outcomes of surgical interventions, but the short-term outcomes obtained should be treated with caution.

6.
World J Gastroenterol ; 25(37): 5641-5654, 2019 Oct 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31602164

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Robotic surgery has been considered to be significantly better than laparoscopic surgery for complicated procedures. AIM: To explore the short-term effect of robotic and laparoscopic spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (SPSHL) for advanced gastric cancer (GC) by Huang's three-step maneuver. METHODS: A total of 643 patients who underwent SPSHL were recruited from April 2012 to July 2017, including 35 patients who underwent robotic SPSHL (RSPSHL) and 608 who underwent laparoscopic SPSHL (LSPSHL). One-to-four propensity score matching was used to analyze the differences in clinical data between patients who underwent robotic SPSHL and those who underwent laparoscopic SPSHL. RESULTS: In all, 175 patients were matched, including 35 patients who underwent RSPSHL and 140 who underwent LSPSHL. After matching, there were no significant differences detected in the baseline characteristics between the two groups. Significant differences in total operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), splenic hilar blood loss (SHBL), splenic hilar dissection time (SHDT), and splenic trunk dissection time were evident between these groups (P < 0.05). Furthermore, no significant differences were observed between the two groups in the overall noncompliance rate of lymph node (LN) dissection (62.9% vs 60%, P = 0.757), number of retrieved No. 10 LNs (3.1 ± 1.4 vs 3.3 ± 2.5, P = 0.650), total number of examined LNs (37.8 ± 13.1 vs 40.6 ± 13.6, P = 0.274), and postoperative complications (14.3% vs 17.9%, P = 0.616). A stratified analysis that divided the patients receiving RSPSHL into an early group (EG) and a late group (LG) revealed that the LG experienced obvious improvements in SHDT and length of stay compared with the EG (P < 0.05). Logistic regression showed that robotic surgery was a significantly protective factor against both SHBL and SHDT (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: RSPSHL is safe and feasible, especially after overcoming the early learning curve, as this procedure results in a radical curative effect equivalent to that of LSPSHL.

7.
World J Surg ; 43(7): 1756-1765, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30815741

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is a lack of data on the effect of high postoperative body temperature on disease-free survival (DFS) in patients who underwent radical gastrectomy. METHODS: Patients who underwent radical gastrectomy from January 2006 to December 2011 were selected. The highest body temperature within 1 week after operation was used to establish diagnostic thresholds for high and low body temperature through X-tile software. RESULTS: A total of 1396 patients were included in the analysis. The diagnostic threshold for high body temperature was defined as 38 °C; 370 patients were allocated to the high-temperature group (HTG), while another 1026 patients were allocated to the low-temperature group (LTG). For all patients, survival analysis showed that 5-year DFS in the HTG was significantly lower than that for the LTG (55.6% vs 63.9%, P = 0.007). Multivariate analysis revealed that high postoperative body temperature was an independent prognostic risk factor for 5-year DFS (HR = 1.288 (1.067-1.555), P = 0.008). For patients without complications, survival analysis showed that the 5-year DFS rate in the HTG was lower than that for the LTG (57.5% vs 64.4%, P = 0.051), especially in patients with stage III gastric cancer (31.3% vs 41.7%, P = 0.037). For patients with complications or infectious complications, there were no significant differences between the HTG and LTG regarding 5-year DFS (49.3% vs 58.2%, P = 0.23 and 49.4% vs 55.1%, P = 0.481, respectively). CONCLUSION: For stage III gastric cancer patients without complications, high postoperative body temperature can significantly reduce the 5-year DFS. These patients may benefit from more aggressive adjuvant therapy and postoperative surveillance regimens.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/cirurgia , Febre/etiologia , Gastrectomia , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/etiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Neoplasias Gástricas/cirurgia , Adenocarcinoma/mortalidade , Adenocarcinoma/patologia , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Febre/diagnóstico , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Análise Multivariada , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/diagnóstico , Recidiva Local de Neoplasia/mortalidade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/diagnóstico , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Neoplasias Gástricas/mortalidade , Neoplasias Gástricas/patologia , Análise de Sobrevida
8.
Surg Endosc ; 33(10): 3425-3435, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30809728

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Three-dimensional (3D) systems for laparoscopy provide surgeons with additional information on spatial depth not found in two-dimensional (2D) systems. METHODS: This study enrolled 156 spleen-preserving splenic hilar lymphadenectomy (LSPSHL) patients in a randomized controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02327481) at the department of gastric surgery at Fujian Medical University Union Hospital between January 2015 and April 2016. The short-term efficacies were compared between the treatment groups. The unedited videos of 80 LSPSHL (40 procedures each for 3D and 2D) were rated for technical performance using the Generic Error Rating Tool. RESULTS: The data for 156 LSPSHL patients indicate that the estimated blood loss (EBL) (3D vs 2D = 66.3 vs. 99.0, P = 0.046) was significantly less in the 3D group. The postoperative recovery and complication rates were similar (P > 0.05). And there were no deaths within 30 days of surgery. Two observers analyzed 80 videos of LSPSHL. The results showed that there were fewer grasping-errors made in the 3D group than in the 2D group when dissecting the inferior pole region of spleen (IPRS) (P = 0.016) and the superior pole region of spleen (SPRS) (P = 0.022). Additionally, the inter-rater reliability was high regarding grasping-errors in the IPRS (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 0.92) and in the SPRS (ICC 0.83). The ICC for the total number of errors was 0.82. The mean of errors in the 3D group (3D vs. 2D = 20.7 vs. 23.5, P = 0.022) was less than the 2D group. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with 2D LSPSHL, 3D technology reduces EBL and technical errors during splenic hilar dissection.

9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 98(3): e14177, 2019 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30653164

RESUMO

In gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs), rupture is a high-risk feature; however, "tumor rupture" is inconsistently defined, and its prognostic value remains controversial.Six hundred ninety-one patients undergoing surgery for primary nonmetastatic GISTs from 2003 to 2015 at our institution were enrolled. The strict definitions of "tumor rupture" according to the Kinki GIST Study Group (KGSG) were used.The median follow-up time was 64 months. The 5-year recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) rates in the entire group were 79.3% and 84.1%, respectively. According to the KGSG's definition, tumor rupture occurred only in 24 (3.5%) of 691 patients. For all 691 patients, multivariable analysis showed that tumor rupture, according to KGSG's definition, is one of the independently prognostic factors for both RFS and OS. Twenty-four patients with tumor rupture were further analyzed. Receiving IM for more than 3 years was significantly associated with improved RFS and OS in GISTs patients with tumor rupture.Tumor rupture according to KGSG's definition was an independent predictive factor associated with GIST patient prognosis. More importantly, for GISTs with tumor rupture according to the KGSG's strict definition, receiving IM treatment for ≥3 years should be considered.


Assuntos
Antineoplásicos/administração & dosagem , Tumores do Estroma Gastrointestinal/tratamento farmacológico , Mesilato de Imatinib/administração & dosagem , Ruptura Espontânea/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Quimioterapia Adjuvante , Esquema de Medicação , Feminino , Seguimentos , Tumores do Estroma Gastrointestinal/complicações , Tumores do Estroma Gastrointestinal/mortalidade , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Ruptura Espontânea/epidemiologia , Ruptura Espontânea/etiologia , Taxa de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
10.
Oncologist ; 24(6): e260-e274, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30470692

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Young survivors of gastric cancer (GC) have better prognoses than elderly patients, yet their disease-specific survival (DSS) has received little attention. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data on young patients (aged ≤40 years) with GC undergoing resections at three Chinese institutions (n = 542) and from the SEER database (n = 533) were retrospectively analyzed. Three-year conditional disease-specific survival (CS3) was assessed. The effects of well-known prognostic factors over time were analyzed by time-dependent Cox regression. RESULTS: Overall, young Chinese patients with GC had a better 5-year DSS than U.S. patients (62.8% vs. 54.1%; p < .05). The disease-specific mortality likelihood of the entire cohort was not constant over time, with most deaths occurring during the first 3 years after surgery but peaking at 1 and 2 years in China and the U.S., respectively. Based on 5-year survivorship, the CS3 rates of both groups were similar (90.9% [U.S.] vs. 91.5% [China]; p > .05). Cox regression showed that for Chinese patients, site, size, T stage, and N stage were independent prognostic factors at baseline (p < .05). For U.S. patients, grade, T stage. and N stage significantly affected DSS at baseline (p < .05). In both groups, only T stage continuously affected DSS within 3 years after gastrectomy. However, for both groups, the initial well-known prognostic factors lost prognostic significance after 5 years of survival (all p > .05). Although the 5-year DSS rates of young Chinese patients with T3 and T4a disease were significantly better than those of young U.S. patients, in each T stage, the CS3 of both regions trended toward consistency over time. CONCLUSION: For young patients with GC, the factors that predict survival at baseline vary over time. Although the initial 5-year DSS is heterogeneous, insight into conditional survival will help clinicians evaluate the long-term prognoses of survivors while ignoring population differences. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: With the increasing number of young survivors of gastric cancer (GC), it is essential for clinicians to understand the dynamic prognosis of these patients. Based on large data sets from China and the U.S., this study found that the prognostic factors that predict survival for young patients with GC at baseline vary over time. Although the initial 5-year disease-specific survival is heterogeneous, insight into conditional survival will help clinicians evaluate the long-term prognoses of survivors while ignoring population differences. This knowledge may be more effective in helping young patients with GC to manage future uncertainties, especially when they need to make important life plans.

11.
BMC Cancer ; 18(1): 1064, 2018 Nov 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30390644

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The types of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma (GA) for whom postoperative radiotherapy can improve the disease-specific survival rate (DSS) remain controversial. This study aims to explore the ideal indications. METHODS: Patients in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database with T3-4Nx or TxN+ GA from January 1988 to December 2012 were included and divided into a postoperative chemoradiotherapy group (Group R) and a postoperative chemotherapy group (Group C). We established a nomogram to predict DSS and then divided entire patient cohort into low-risk and high-risk groups based on the DSS predicted by the nomogram. RESULTS: The Cox multiple regression analysis demonstrated that various risk factors affected DSS for Group R. Based on these risk factors, a nomogram for predicting DSS was established. The decision curve indicated that the best clinical effect could be obtained when the threshold probability was 0-58%. The patients were then divided into low-risk (< 69 points) and high-risk (≥ 69 points) groups according to the five-year DSS predicted. DSS was significantly better for Group R than for Group C for high-risk patients (P < 0.001) but was similar for low-risk patients (P = 0.732). CONCLUSION: At present, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guidelines may include an overly broad range of indications for postoperative radiotherapy for patients with GA. For intestinal GA patients with a postoperative pathologic stage of T1 N1 who are younger than 65 years, have had more than 15 lymph nodes dissected, and have received postoperative chemotherapy, postoperative radiotherapy should not be recommended.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/epidemiologia , Adenocarcinoma/radioterapia , Cuidados Pós-Operatórios , Neoplasias Gástricas/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Gástricas/radioterapia , Adenocarcinoma/diagnóstico , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Tomada de Decisão Clínica , Terapia Combinada , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gradação de Tumores , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Nomogramas , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Programa de SEER , Neoplasias Gástricas/diagnóstico , Resultado do Tratamento
12.
J Gastrointest Surg ; 22(7): 1152-1162, 2018 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29736669

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Robotic-assisted gastrectomy (RAG) has been rapidly adopted for gastric cancer (GC) treatment. However, whether RAG provides any significant outcome/cost advantages over laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) for the experienced laparoscopist remains unclear. METHODS: A retrospective review of a prospectively collected database identified 768 consecutive patients who underwent either RAG (n = 103) or LAG (n = 667) for GC between July 2016 and June 2017 at a large center. A 1:3 matched propensity score analysis was performed. The short-term outcomes and hospital costs between the two groups were compared. RESULTS: A well-balanced cohort of 404 patients was analyzed (RAG:LAG = 1:3 match). The mean operation times were 226.6 ± 36.2 min for the RAG group and 181.8 ± 49.8 min for the LAG group (p < 0.001). The total numbers of retrieved lymph nodes were similar in the RAG and LAG groups (means 38 and 40, respectively, p = 0.115). The overall and major complication rates (RAG, 13.9% vs. LAG, 12.5%, p = 0.732 and RAG, 3.0% vs. LAG, 1.3%, p = 0.373, respectively) were similar. RAG was much more costly than LAG (1.3 times, p < 0.001) mainly due to the amortization and consumables of the robotic system. According to cumulative sum (CUSUM), the learning phases were divided as follows: phase 1 (cases 1-21), phase 2 (cases 22-63), and phase 3 (cases 64-101), in the robotic group. The surgical stress (SS) was higher in the robotic group compared with the laparoscopic group in phase 1 (p < 0.05). However, the SS did not differ significantly between the two groups in phase 3. CONCLUSIONS: RAG is a feasible and safe surgical procedure for GC, especially in the post-learning curve period. However, further studies are warranted to evaluate the long-term oncological outcomes and to elucidate whether RAG is cost-effective when compared to LAG.


Assuntos
Gastrectomia/métodos , Laparoscopia/métodos , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Pontuação de Propensão , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Robóticos/métodos , Neoplasias Gástricas/cirurgia , Idoso , Índice de Massa Corporal , Feminino , Gastroscopia , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Duração da Cirurgia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Neoplasias Gástricas/diagnóstico
13.
Surg Endosc ; 32(5): 2193-2200, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29423551

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The proportion of elderly patients who undergo surgery has rapidly increased. However, clinical indicators that predict outcomes are limited. Frailty is thought to estimate physiological reserves, although its use has not been evaluated in laparoscopic surgical patients. This study aimed to evaluate the significance of preoperative modified frailty index (PMFI) in octogenarians undergoing a laparoscopic gastrectomy. METHODS: We reviewed prospectively collected data from 119 patients with gastric cancer (GC) aged 80 years or older who underwent a radical laparoscopic gastrectomy (RLG) between January 2007 and December 2012. Three baseline frailty traits were measured using routine preoperative laboratory data: albumin < 3.4 g/dL, haematocrit < 35%, and creatinine > 2 mg/dL. Patients were categorized by the number of positive traits as follows: low preoperative modified frailty index (LPMFI): 0-2 traits and high preoperative modified frailty index (HPMFI): 3 traits. We compared patient characteristics, operative outcomes, pathological results, morbidity, and survival. RESULTS: A total of 43 (36.1%) patients were considered HPMFI, and 76 (63.9%) patients were considered LPMFI. HPMFI was associated with an increased risk of postoperative complications (HPMFI group: odds ratio 2.506; 95% CI, 1.113-5.643, P = 0.027). With a median follow-up of 39.0 months, the 3-year overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) rates for the entire cohort were 47.9, 34.3, and 51.7%, respectively. Significant differences were observed in OS (HPMFI group, 37.2%; LPMFI group, 53.9%; P = 0.038) and RFS (HPMFI group, 23.3%; LPMFI group, 40.5%; P = 0.012) between the groups, but no difference was found for CSS (HPMFI group, 43.5%; LPMFI group, 56.4%; P = 0.078). CONCLUSIONS: HPMFI based on an easily calculable preoperative measure may be useful for predicting postoperative complications and have a negative impact on 3-year OS and RFS after an RLG in octogenarians. Therefore, HPMFI can serve as a low-cost, simple screen for high-risk individuals who might suffer more than expected during the postoperative period after an RLG.


Assuntos
Fragilidade , Gastrectomia , Laparoscopia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/mortalidade , Neoplasias Gástricas/cirurgia , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Fragilidade/mortalidade , Gastrectomia/efeitos adversos , Gastrectomia/mortalidade , Humanos , Laparoscopia/efeitos adversos , Laparoscopia/mortalidade , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Período Pós-Operatório , Prognóstico , Estudos Prospectivos , Neoplasias Gástricas/mortalidade
14.
Surgery ; 163(2): 300-304, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29195739

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine the relative safety and efficacy of 3D laparoscopic gastrectomy and 2D laparoscopic surgery in patients with gastric cancer. BACKGROUND: There is still a lack of randomized controlled trials regarding the safety and efficacy of 3D versus 2D laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer. METHODS: A large-scale, phase 3, prospective, randomized controlled trial was conducted. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02327481). RESULTS: A total of 438 patients were randomized (3D group: 219 cases; 2D group: 219 cases) between January 1, 2015, and April 1, 2016; 19 patients were excluded. Finally, data from 419 patients were analyzed (3D group: 211 cases; 2D group: 208 cases). There were no differences between the 2 groups regarding the operation time (3D versus 2D, 176 ± 35 min vs. 174 ± 33 min, P = .562). The intraoperative blood loss in the 3D group was somewhat less than in the 2D group (61 ± 83 mL vs. 82 ± 119 mL, P = .045). Further analysis suggested that the use of 3D laparoscopic surgery was a protective factor against excessive blood loss (≥200 mL). CONCLUSION: 3D laparoscopic gastrectomy did not shorten the operation time compared with 2D laparoscopic gastrectomy, but provided the benefit of less intraoperative blood loss and a lesser occurrence of excessive bleeding than the conventional 2D laparoscopic gastrectomy; the clinical value of the difference is limited.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/cirurgia , Gastrectomia/métodos , Imagem Tridimensional , Laparoscopia/métodos , Neoplasias Gástricas/cirurgia , Idoso , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica/estatística & dados numéricos , China/epidemiologia , Feminino , Gastrectomia/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Laparoscopia/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Duração da Cirurgia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Estudos Prospectivos
15.
World J Surg ; 42(1): 195-203, 2018 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28741200

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to compare the short- and long-term outcomes of malnourished gastric cancer patients who underwent laparoscopic or open radical gastrectomy. BACKGROUND: Preoperative malnutrition is an independent risk factor for postoperative mortality and morbidity in major gastrointestinal surgery. However, whether laparoscopic surgery can improve the short- and long-term outcomes of malnourished gastric cancer patients has not been determined. METHODS: We reviewed prospectively collected data from 2441 patients with gastric cancer between January 2009 and December 2014 and compared the short- and long-term outcomes in malnourished gastric cancer patients who underwent laparoscopic or open radical gastrectomy. Nutritional risk factors included weight loss >10% within 6 months, body mass index <18.5 kg/m2, Subjective Global Assessment Grade C, and serum albumin <3.0 g/dL. RESULTS: Overall, 501 patients (20.52%) were classified as malnourished. Patients with gastric stump carcinoma, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, distant metastases, palliative operation, or the presence of other malignancies were excluded. Finally, a total of 412 patients were analyzed; 304 in the laparoscopic group and 108 in the open group. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the clinicopathological characteristics. However, the operation time (181 ± 53 vs. 253 ± 81 min), intraoperative blood loss (80 ± 116 vs. 322 ± 502 mL), time to first ambulation (2.21 ± 1.04 vs. 2.55 ± 1.50 days), liquid diet (4.91 ± 1.61 vs. 5.72 ± 2.09 days) and semiliquid diet (7.67 ± 1.56 vs. 9.53 ± 2.09 days) as well as the postoperative hospital stay duration (13.00 ± 6.56 vs. 15.22 ± 6.87 days) were significantly lower in the laparoscopic group than those in the open group (p < 0.05). The instances of overall complications (laparoscopic vs. open: 18.4 vs. 30.6%, p = 0.008) and pneumonia (laparoscopic vs. open: 10.9 vs. 19.4%, p = 0.023) were significantly lower in the laparoscopic group. With a median follow-up of 31.0 months (range 1.0-88.0), the 3-year overall survival (OS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and cancer-specific survival (CSS) rates for the entire cohort were 58.9, 54.0 and 63.0%, respectively. Further analysis showed that the OS (57.5 vs. 59.4%, p = 0.560), RFS (51.8 vs. 54.8%, p = 0.441) and CSS (62.8 vs. 63.0%, p = 0.789) between the laparoscopic and open groups, respectively, were no significantly different. Further analysis showed no significant differences in the OS rates of the two groups of patients stratified by tumor stage (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Compared with open radical gastrectomy, laparoscopy would reduce the postoperative complications especially pneumonia and shorten the postoperative hospital stay for patients with preoperative malnutrition without affecting their long-term survival.


Assuntos
Gastrectomia/efeitos adversos , Laparoscopia/efeitos adversos , Desnutrição/complicações , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Neoplasias Gástricas/complicações , Neoplasias Gástricas/cirurgia , Idoso , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Duração da Cirurgia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Neoplasias Gástricas/mortalidade , Neoplasias Gástricas/patologia , Taxa de Sobrevida , Resultado do Tratamento
16.
Ann Surg Oncol ; 24(11): 3376-3385, 2017 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28699132

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The effects of preoperative malnutrition and preoperative correction of hypoalbuminemia (PCH) on the short- and long-term outcomes in patients with gastric cancer are unclear. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to examine the effect of preoperative nutritional status on short- and long-term outcomes in patients who underwent radical gastrectomy, and also explored the role of PCH in malnourished patients with gastric cancer. METHODS: We prospectively reviewed data from patients with gastric cancer who were treated in our department between January 2009 and December 2014. The effect of preoperative nutritional status on short- and long-term outcomes in patients who underwent radical gastrectomy was investigated, and we explored whether PCH could improve the short- and long-term outcomes of these patients. RESULTS: A total of 1976 patients were analyzed, including 412 patients in the malnourished group and 1564 in the well-nourished group. The overall incidence of complications in the malnourished group was significantly higher than the well-nourished group (21.4 vs. 15.5%, p = 0.005). Except for incision infection (3.2 vs. 1.6%, p = 0.041), there were no significant differences for other complications. In the malnourished group, 98 cases of preoperative hypoproteinemia were corrected (PCH group), whereas 314 cases were not (NPCH group). The incidence of incision infection in the PCH group was significantly lower than in the NPCH group (0 vs. 4.1%, p = 0.041). The median follow-up time was 39 months (1.0-88.0 months), and the 3-year overall survival (OS; 59.1 vs. 75%, p < 0.001) and disease-free survival (DFS; 54.8 vs. 72.5%, p < 0.001) rates were significantly lower in the malnourished group than in the well-nourished group. A multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that malnutrition was an independent prognostic factor for 3-year OS (hazard ratio [HR] 1.211, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.01-1.452, p = 0.039) and DFS (HR 1.168, 95% CI 1.013-1.398, p = 0.043). For the malnourished group with stage I gastric cancer, the PCH and NPCH groups showed no significant differences in 3-year OS (90.0 vs. 89.0%, p = 0.227) or DFS (90.0 vs. 87.3%, p = 0.363); however, for the malnourished group with stages II-III gastric cancer, the 3-year OS (69.9 vs. 47.6%, p = 0.013) and DFS (55.4 vs. 43.6%, p = 0.046) rates were significantly higher in the PCH group than in the NPCH group. CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of incision infection was significantly higher in patients with malnutrition than in well-nourished patients. The 3-year OS and DFS rates were significantly lower in malnourished patients than in well-nourished patients. PCH may both reduce the incidence of incisional infection in patients with malnutrition and improve 3-year OS and DFS rates for malnourished patients with stages II-III gastric cancer; however, to confirm our findings, further studies are warranted.


Assuntos
Gastrectomia/efeitos adversos , Hipoalbuminemia/fisiopatologia , Desnutrição/fisiopatologia , Cuidados Pré-Operatórios , Neoplasias Gástricas/mortalidade , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/mortalidade , Idoso , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prognóstico , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Neoplasias Gástricas/patologia , Neoplasias Gástricas/cirurgia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/etiologia , Infecção da Ferida Cirúrgica/patologia , Taxa de Sobrevida , Fatores de Tempo
17.
Surg Endosc ; 31(7): 2939-2945, 2017 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27826781

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we evaluated the short-term outcomes following three-dimensional (3D) or two-dimensional (2D) laparoscopic surgery for patients with gastric cancer. BACKGROUND: There is a lack of prospective evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of 3D versus 2D laparoscopic surgery for patients with gastric cancer. Therefore, we conducted a phase III single-center, prospective, randomized, controlled trial to compare 3D and 2D laparoscopic surgery for patients with gastric cancer. METHODS: We compared operation time, intraoperative blood loss, number of lymph node dissections, morbidity, and mortality between the 3D and 2D groups following laparoscopic surgery for gastric cancer. The study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov with ID number NCT02327481. RESULTS: A total of 228 patients were randomized (3D group 115 cases; 2D group 113 cases) between January 1, 2015 and September 1, 2015. Seven patients who underwent exploratory operations were excluded. Finally, a total of 221 patients were analyzed (3D group 109 cases, 2D group 112 cases). There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding the clinical pathological characteristics, operating time (3D vs. 2D, 184 ± 36 vs. 178 ± 37 min, P = 0.288), number of lymph node dissections (36 ± 14 vs. 37 ± 13, P = 0.698), time to first ambulation (2.27 ± 1.60 vs. 2.04 ± 0.84, P = 0.18), flatus (3.89 ± 1.49 vs. 3.69 ± 1.12, P = 0.255), liquid diet (4.88 ± 1.88 vs. 4.79 ± 1.57, P = 0.684), or duration of postoperative hospital stay (12.52 ± 4.83 vs. 12.63 ± 7.32, P = 0.903). The postoperative complication rates of the 3D and 2D groups were 18.3 and 16.1%, respectively, P = 0.723. No patients died during the postoperative hospital stay. However, the intraoperative blood loss in the 3D group was significantly lower than the 2D group (58 ± 75 vs. 78 ± 72 ml, P = 0.047). CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in operation time and number of lymph node harvested between the 3D and 2D groups; however, 3D laparoscopic surgery may reduce the intraoperative blood loss compared to 2D procedure. Therefore, we conclude that this trial is safe and is thus ongoing.


Assuntos
Adenocarcinoma/cirurgia , Gastrectomia/métodos , Imagem Tridimensional , Laparoscopia/métodos , Neoplasias Gástricas/cirurgia , Adenocarcinoma/diagnóstico por imagem , Adenocarcinoma/mortalidade , Adulto , Idoso , Perda Sanguínea Cirúrgica/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Tempo de Internação/estatística & dados numéricos , Excisão de Linfonodo , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Duração da Cirurgia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Período Pós-Operatório , Estudos Prospectivos , Neoplasias Gástricas/diagnóstico por imagem , Neoplasias Gástricas/mortalidade , Resultado do Tratamento
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