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1.
Mol Psychiatry ; 2020 May 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32372009

RESUMO

Educational attainment is widely used as a surrogate for socioeconomic status (SES). Low SES is a risk factor for hypertension and high blood pressure (BP). To identify novel BP loci, we performed multi-ancestry meta-analyses accounting for gene-educational attainment interactions using two variables, "Some College" (yes/no) and "Graduated College" (yes/no). Interactions were evaluated using both a 1 degree of freedom (DF) interaction term and a 2DF joint test of genetic and interaction effects. Analyses were performed for systolic BP, diastolic BP, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure. We pursued genome-wide interrogation in Stage 1 studies (N = 117 438) and follow-up on promising variants in Stage 2 studies (N = 293 787) in five ancestry groups. Through combined meta-analyses of Stages 1 and 2, we identified 84 known and 18 novel BP loci at genome-wide significance level (P < 5 × 10-8). Two novel loci were identified based on the 1DF test of interaction with educational attainment, while the remaining 16 loci were identified through the 2DF joint test of genetic and interaction effects. Ten novel loci were identified in individuals of African ancestry. Several novel loci show strong biological plausibility since they involve physiologic systems implicated in BP regulation. They include genes involved in the central nervous system-adrenal signaling axis (ZDHHC17, CADPS, PIK3C2G), vascular structure and function (GNB3, CDON), and renal function (HAS2 and HAS2-AS1, SLIT3). Collectively, these findings suggest a role of educational attainment or SES in further dissection of the genetic architecture of BP.

2.
Genet Epidemiol ; 44(6): 629-641, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32227373

RESUMO

Although multiple lifestyle exposures simultaneously impact blood pressure (BP) and cardiovascular health, most analysis so far has considered each single lifestyle exposure (e.g., smoking) at a time. Here, we exploit gene-multiple lifestyle exposure interactions to find novel BP loci. For each of 6,254 Framingham Heart Study participants, we computed lifestyle risk score (LRS) value by aggregating the risk of four lifestyle exposures (smoking, alcohol, education, and physical activity) on BP. Using the LRS, we performed genome-wide gene-environment interaction analysis in systolic and diastolic BP using the joint 2 degree of freedom (DF) and 1 DF interaction tests. We identified one genome-wide significant (p < 5 × 10-8 ) and 11 suggestive (p < 1 × 10-6 ) loci. Gene-environment analysis using single lifestyle exposures identified only one of the 12 loci. Nine of the 12 BP loci detected were novel. Loci detected by the LRS were located within or nearby genes with biologically plausible roles in the pathophysiology of hypertension, including KALRN, VIPR2, SNX1, and DAPK2. Our results suggest that simultaneous consideration of multiple lifestyle exposures in gene-environment interaction analysis can identify additional loci missed by single lifestyle approaches.

3.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 5121, 2019 11 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31719535

RESUMO

Both short and long sleep are associated with an adverse lipid profile, likely through different biological pathways. To elucidate the biology of sleep-associated adverse lipid profile, we conduct multi-ancestry genome-wide sleep-SNP interaction analyses on three lipid traits (HDL-c, LDL-c and triglycerides). In the total study sample (discovery + replication) of 126,926 individuals from 5 different ancestry groups, when considering either long or short total sleep time interactions in joint analyses, we identify 49 previously unreported lipid loci, and 10 additional previously unreported lipid loci in a restricted sample of European-ancestry cohorts. In addition, we identify new gene-sleep interactions for known lipid loci such as LPL and PCSK9. The previously unreported lipid loci have a modest explained variance in lipid levels: most notable, gene-short-sleep interactions explain 4.25% of the variance in triglyceride level. Collectively, these findings contribute to our understanding of the biological mechanisms involved in sleep-associated adverse lipid profiles.


Assuntos
Loci Gênicos , Lipídeos/genética , Filogenia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Sono/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Mapeamento Cromossômico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
4.
J Nucl Cardiol ; 2019 Nov 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31705425

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare X-linked condition resulting in cardiomyopathy, however; the effects of BTHS on myocardial substrate metabolism and its relationships with cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism and left ventricular (LV) function are unknown. We sought to characterize myocardial glucose, fatty acid (FA), and leucine metabolism in BTHS and unaffected controls and examine their relationships with cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism and LV function. METHODS/RESULTS: Young adults with BTHS (n = 14) and unaffected controls (n = 11, Control, total n = 25) underwent bolus injections of 15O-water and 1-11C-glucose, palmitate, and leucine and concurrent positron emission tomography imaging. LV function and cardiac high-energy phosphate metabolism were examined via echocardiography and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. Myocardial glucose extraction fraction (21 ± 14% vs 10 ± 8%, P = .03) and glucose utilization (828.0 ± 470.0 vs 393.2 ± 361.0 µmol·g-1·min-1, P = .02) were significantly higher in BTHS vs Control. Myocardial FA extraction fraction (31 ± 7% vs 41 ± 6%, P < .002) and uptake (0.25 ± 0.04 vs 0.29 ± 0.03 mL·g-1·min-1, P < .002) were significantly lower in BTHS vs Control. Altered myocardial metabolism was associated with lower cardiac function in BTHS. CONCLUSIONS: Myocardial substrate metabolism is altered and may contribute to LV dysfunction in BTHS. Clinical Trials #: NCT01625663.

5.
Circ Genom Precis Med ; 12(10): 458-485, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31510778

RESUMO

One of 5 people will develop heart failure over his or her lifetime. Early diagnosis and better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease are critical to optimal treatment. The "omics"-genomics, pharmacogenomics, epigenomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and microbiomics- of heart failure represent rapidly expanding fields of science that have, to date, not been integrated into a single body of work. The goals of this statement are to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of these omics as they relate to the development and progression of heart failure and to consider the current and potential future applications of these data for precision medicine with respect to prevention, diagnosis, and therapy.

6.
Diabetol Metab Syndr ; 11: 61, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31384309

RESUMO

Background: Metabolic syndrome, an obesity-related condition associated with insulin resistance and low-grade inflammation, leads to diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, osteoarthritis, and other disorders. Optimal therapy is unknown. The antimalarial drug chloroquine activates the kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), improves metabolic syndrome and reduces atherosclerosis in mice. To translate this observation to humans, we conducted two clinical trials of chloroquine in people with the metabolic syndrome. Methods: Eligibility included adults with at least 3 criteria of metabolic syndrome but who did not have diabetes. Subjects were studied in the setting of a single academic health center. The specific hypothesis: chloroquine improves insulin sensitivity and decreases atherosclerosis. In Trial 1, the intervention was chloroquine dose escalations in 3-week intervals followed by hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps. Trial 2 was a parallel design randomized clinical trial, and the intervention was chloroquine, 80 mg/day, or placebo for 1 year. The primary outcomes were clamp determined-insulin sensitivity for Trial 1, and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) for Trial 2. For Trial 2, subjects were allocated based on a randomization sequence using a protocol in blocks of 8. Participants, care givers, and those assessing outcomes were blinded to group assignment. Results: For Trial 1, 25 patients were studied. Chloroquine increased hepatic insulin sensitivity without affecting glucose disposal, and improved serum lipids. For Trial 2, 116 patients were randomized, 59 to chloroquine (56 analyzed) and 57 to placebo (51 analyzed). Chloroquine had no effect on CIMT or carotid contrast enhancement by MRI, a pre-specified secondary outcome. The pre-specified secondary outcomes of blood pressure, lipids, and activation of JNK (a stress kinase implicated in diabetes and atherosclerosis) were decreased by chloroquine. Adverse events were similar between groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest that low dose chloroquine, which improves the metabolic syndrome through ATM-dependent mechanisms in mice, modestly improves components of the metabolic syndrome in humans but is unlikely to be clinically useful in this setting.Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00455325, NCT00455403), both posted 03 April 2007.

7.
Glob Heart ; 14(2): 135-141, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31324367

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and in low- and middle-income countries, and hypertension (HTN) is a major risk factor for CVD. Although effective evidence-based interventions for control of HTN in high-income countries exist, implementation of these in low- and middle-income countries has been challenging due to limited capacity and infrastructure for late-phase translational research. In Rwanda, the 2015 STEPS NCD (STEPwise Approach to Surveillance of Noncommunicable Diseases) risk survey reported an overall prevalence of HTN of 15% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 13.8 to 16.3) for those ages 15 to 64 years; prevalence increased with increasing age to 39% (95% CI: 35.7 to 43.1) for those ages 55 to 64 years; CVD was the third most common cause of mortality (7%). Suboptimal infrastructure and capacity in Rwanda hinders research and community knowledge for HTN control. OBJECTIVES: To address the issue of suboptimal capacity to implement evidence-based interventions in HTN, this project was designed with the following objectives: 1) to develop a regional needs assessment of infrastructure for dissemination and implementation (D & I) strategies for HTN-CVD control; 2) to develop HTN-CVD research capacity through creation of countrywide resources such as core research facilities and training in the fields of HTN-CVD, D & I, and biostatistics; and 3) to engage and train multiple stakeholders in D & I and HTN-CVD evidence-based interventions. METHODS: A weeklong training program in HTN-CVD, biostatistics, and D & I was conducted in Rwanda in August 2018, and pre- and post-D & I training competency questionnaires were administered. RESULTS: Questionnaire results show a statistically significant increase in D & I knowledge and skills as a result of training (full scale pre- to post-test scores: 2.12 ± 0.78 vs. 3.94 ± 0.42; p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Using principles of community engagement and train-the-trainer methods, we will continue to adapt guidelines and treatments for HTN-CVD developed in high-income countries to the context of Rwanda with the goal of establishing a sustainable platform to address the burden of disease from HTN-CVD.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica/educação , Cardiologia/educação , Competência Clínica , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Hipertensão/prevenção & controle , Ciência da Implementação , Médicos/normas , Feminino , Humanos , Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Masculino , Prevalência , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Fatores de Risco , Ruanda/epidemiologia
8.
Hum Mol Genet ; 2019 Apr 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31127295

RESUMO

Elevated blood pressure (BP), a leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, is influenced by both genetic and lifestyle factors. Cigarette smoking is one such lifestyle factor. Across five ancestries, we performed a genome-wide gene-smoking interaction study of mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP) in 129 913 individuals in stage 1 and follow-up analysis in 480 178 additional individuals in stage 2. We report here 136 loci significantly associated with MAP and/or PP. Of these, 61 were previously published through main-effect analysis of BP traits, 37 were recently reported by us for systolic BP and/or diastolic BP through gene-smoking interaction analysis and 38 were newly identified (P < 5 × 10-8, false discovery rate < 0.05). We also identified nine new signals near known loci. Of the 136 loci, 8 showed significant interaction with smoking status. They include CSMD1 previously reported for insulin resistance and BP in the spontaneously hypertensive rats. Many of the 38 new loci show biologic plausibility for a role in BP regulation. SLC26A7 encodes a chloride/bicarbonate exchanger expressed in the renal outer medullary collecting duct. AVPR1A is widely expressed, including in vascular smooth muscle cells, kidney, myocardium and brain. FHAD1 is a long non-coding RNA overexpressed in heart failure. TMEM51 was associated with contractile function in cardiomyocytes. CASP9 plays a central role in cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Identified only in African ancestry were 30 novel loci. Our findings highlight the value of multi-ancestry investigations, particularly in studies of interaction with lifestyle factors, where genomic and lifestyle differences may contribute to novel findings.

10.
J Inherit Metab Dis ; 42(3): 480-493, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30924938

RESUMO

Barth syndrome (BTHS) is a rare X-linked condition resulting in abnormal mitochondria, cardioskeletal myopathy, and growth delay; however, the effects of BTHS on substrate metabolism regulation and their relationships with tissue function in humans are unknown. We sought to characterize glucose and fat metabolism during rest, submaximal exercise, and postexercise rest in children, adolescents, and young adults with BTHS and unaffected controls and examine their relationships with cardioskeletal energetics and function. Children/adolescents and young adults with BTHS (n = 29) and children/adolescent and young adult control participants (n = 28, total n = 57) underwent an infusion of 6'6'H2 glucose and U-13 C palmitate and indirect calorimetry during rest, 30-minutes of moderate exercise (50% V ˙ O 2 peak ), and recovery. Cardiac function, cardioskeletal mitochondrial energetics, and exercise capacity were examined via echocardiography, 31 P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and peak exercise testing, respectively. The glucose turnover rate was significantly higher in individuals with BTHS during rest (33.2 ± 9.8 vs 27.2 ± 8.1 µmol/kgFFM/min, P < .01) and exercise (34.7 ± 11.2 vs 29.5 ± 8.8 µmol/kgFFM/min, P < .05) and tended to be higher postexercise (33.7 ± 10.2 vs 28.8 ± 8.0 µmol/kgFFM/min, P < .06) compared to controls. Increases in total fat (-3.9 ± 7.5 vs 10.5 ± 8.4 µmol/kgFFM/min, P < .0001) and plasma fatty acid oxidation rates (0.0 ± 1.8 vs 5.1 ± 3.9 µmol/kgFFM/min, P < .0001) from rest to exercise were severely blunted in BTHS compared to controls. Conclusion: An inability to upregulate fat metabolism during moderate intensity exercise appears to be partially compensated by elevations in glucose metabolism. Derangements in fat and glucose metabolism are characteristic of the pathophysiology of BTHS. A severely blunted ability to upregulate fat metabolism during a modest level of physical activity is a defining pathophysiologic characteristic in children, adolescents, and young adults with BTHS.

13.
Nat Commun ; 10(1): 376, 2019 01 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30670697

RESUMO

Many genetic loci affect circulating lipid levels, but it remains unknown whether lifestyle factors, such as physical activity, modify these genetic effects. To identify lipid loci interacting with physical activity, we performed genome-wide analyses of circulating HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels in up to 120,979 individuals of European, African, Asian, Hispanic, and Brazilian ancestry, with follow-up of suggestive associations in an additional 131,012 individuals. We find four loci, in/near CLASP1, LHX1, SNTA1, and CNTNAP2, that are associated with circulating lipid levels through interaction with physical activity; higher levels of physical activity enhance the HDL cholesterol-increasing effects of the CLASP1, LHX1, and SNTA1 loci and attenuate the LDL cholesterol-increasing effect of the CNTNAP2 locus. The CLASP1, LHX1, and SNTA1 regions harbor genes linked to muscle function and lipid metabolism. Our results elucidate the role of physical activity interactions in the genetic contribution to blood lipid levels.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Loci Gênicos/genética , Lipídeos/sangue , Lipídeos/genética , Adolescente , Adulto , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/genética , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/genética , Brasil , Proteínas de Ligação ao Cálcio/genética , Colesterol/sangue , HDL-Colesterol/sangue , HDL-Colesterol/genética , LDL-Colesterol/sangue , LDL-Colesterol/genética , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/genética , Feminino , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Genótipo , Hispano-Americanos/genética , Humanos , Proteínas com Homeodomínio LIM/genética , Metabolismo dos Lipídeos/genética , Masculino , Proteínas de Membrana/genética , Proteínas Associadas aos Microtúbulos/genética , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Proteínas Musculares/genética , Proteínas do Tecido Nervoso/genética , Fatores de Transcrição/genética , Triglicerídeos/sangue , Triglicerídeos/genética , Adulto Jovem
14.
Am J Hum Genet ; 104(1): 112-138, 2019 01 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30595373

RESUMO

Mitochondria (MT), the major site of cellular energy production, are under dual genetic control by 37 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes and numerous nuclear genes (MT-nDNA). In the CHARGEmtDNA+ Consortium, we studied genetic associations of mtDNA and MT-nDNA associations with body mass index (BMI), waist-hip-ratio (WHR), glucose, insulin, HOMA-B, HOMA-IR, and HbA1c. This 45-cohort collaboration comprised 70,775 (insulin) to 170,202 (BMI) pan-ancestry individuals. Validation and imputation of mtDNA variants was followed by single-variant and gene-based association testing. We report two significant common variants, one in MT-ATP6 associated (p ≤ 5E-04) with WHR and one in the D-loop with glucose. Five rare variants in MT-ATP6, MT-ND5, and MT-ND6 associated with BMI, WHR, or insulin. Gene-based meta-analysis identified MT-ND3 associated with BMI (p ≤ 1E-03). We considered 2,282 MT-nDNA candidate gene associations compiled from online summary results for our traits (20 unique studies with 31 dataset consortia's genome-wide associations [GWASs]). Of these, 109 genes associated (p ≤ 1E-06) with at least 1 of our 7 traits. We assessed regulatory features of variants in the 109 genes, cis- and trans-gene expression regulation, and performed enrichment and protein-protein interactions analyses. Of the identified mtDNA and MT-nDNA genes, 79 associated with adipose measures, 49 with glucose/insulin, 13 with risk for type 2 diabetes, and 18 with cardiovascular disease, indicating for pleiotropic effects with health implications. Additionally, 21 genes related to cholesterol, suggesting additional important roles for the genes identified. Our results suggest that mtDNA and MT-nDNA genes and variants reported make important contributions to glucose and insulin metabolism, adipocyte regulation, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.


Assuntos
DNA Mitocondrial/genética , Genes Mitocondriais/genética , Variação Genética/genética , Metabolismo/genética , Mitocôndrias/genética , Mitocôndrias/metabolismo , Adipócitos/metabolismo , Índice de Massa Corporal , Doenças Cardiovasculares/genética , Doenças Cardiovasculares/metabolismo , Estudos de Coortes , Diabetes Mellitus/genética , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolismo , Glucose/metabolismo , Hemoglobina A Glicada/metabolismo , Humanos , Insulina/metabolismo , Locos de Características Quantitativas , Relação Cintura-Quadril
15.
JIMD Rep ; 41: 63-72, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29654548

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Cardioskeletal myopathy is thought to contribute to exercise intolerance, and reduced quality of life (QOL) in Barth syndrome (BTHS). The objectives of this study were to examine: (1) skeletal muscle strength/performance in adolescents and young adults with BTHS and (2) the safety, feasibility, and initial efficacy of 12 weeks of progressive resistance exercise training (RET) on muscle strength, mass, and performance, bone mineral density, exercise tolerance, cardiac function, and QOL in individuals with BTHS. METHODS: Individuals with BTHS (n = 9, 23 ± 6 years), and age-, sex-, and activity level-matched unaffected Controls (n = 7, 26 ± 5 years) underwent baseline testing to assess muscle performance, exercise capacity, cardiac structure and function, body composition, and health-related QOL. Subsequently, n = 3 participants with BTHS performed 12 weeks of supervised RET (60 min per session, 3 sessions/week). All testing was repeated post-RET. RESULTS: BTHS had lower strength and lean muscle mass compared to Controls (all p < 0.05). BTHS also had diminished lower extremity, upper extremity, thoracic spine, lumbar spine, and pelvic bone mineral density (all p < 0.05) and reduced exercise capacity (p < 0.001) compared to Controls. RET was well-tolerated and attended, was not associated with any adverse events, and significantly increased muscle strength (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Individuals with BTHS demonstrate reduced muscle strength and mass, bone mineral density, and exercise capacity. RET appears safe and well-tolerated in BTHS and promotes increased muscle strength. Larger studies are needed to confirm these improvements and to fully determine the effects of RET in individuals with BTHS.

16.
Am J Hum Genet ; 102(3): 375-400, 2018 03 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29455858

RESUMO

Genome-wide association analysis advanced understanding of blood pressure (BP), a major risk factor for vascular conditions such as coronary heart disease and stroke. Accounting for smoking behavior may help identify BP loci and extend our knowledge of its genetic architecture. We performed genome-wide association meta-analyses of systolic and diastolic BP incorporating gene-smoking interactions in 610,091 individuals. Stage 1 analysis examined ∼18.8 million SNPs and small insertion/deletion variants in 129,913 individuals from four ancestries (European, African, Asian, and Hispanic) with follow-up analysis of promising variants in 480,178 additional individuals from five ancestries. We identified 15 loci that were genome-wide significant (p < 5 × 10-8) in stage 1 and formally replicated in stage 2. A combined stage 1 and 2 meta-analysis identified 66 additional genome-wide significant loci (13, 35, and 18 loci in European, African, and trans-ancestry, respectively). A total of 56 known BP loci were also identified by our results (p < 5 × 10-8). Of the newly identified loci, ten showed significant interaction with smoking status, but none of them were replicated in stage 2. Several loci were identified in African ancestry, highlighting the importance of genetic studies in diverse populations. The identified loci show strong evidence for regulatory features and support shared pathophysiology with cardiometabolic and addiction traits. They also highlight a role in BP regulation for biological candidates such as modulators of vascular structure and function (CDKN1B, BCAR1-CFDP1, PXDN, EEA1), ciliopathies (SDCCAG8, RPGRIP1L), telomere maintenance (TNKS, PINX1, AKTIP), and central dopaminergic signaling (MSRA, EBF2).


Assuntos
Pressão Sanguínea/genética , Grupos de Populações Continentais/genética , Loci Gênicos , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Fumar/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Diástole/genética , Epistasia Genética , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único/genética , Locos de Características Quantitativas/genética , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Sístole/genética
17.
J Card Fail ; 24(7): 428-438, 2018 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29482026

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Poor response to loop diuretic therapy is a marker of risk during heart failure hospitalization. We sought to describe baseline determinants of diuretic response and to further explore the relationship between this response and clinical outcomes. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patient data from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Heart Failure Network ROSE-AHF and CARRESS-HF clinical trials were analyzed to determine baseline determinants of diuretic response. Diuretic efficiency (DE) was defined as total 72-hour fluid output per total equivalent loop diuretic dose. Data from DOSE-AHF was then used to determine if these predictors of DE correlated with response to a high- versus low-dose diuretic strategy. At 72 hours, the high-DE group had median fluid output of 9071 ml (interquartile range: 7240-11775) with median furosemide dose of 320 mg (220-480) compared with 8030 ml (6300-9915) and 840 mg (600-1215) respectively for the low DE group. Cystatin C was independently associated with DE (odds ratio 0.36 per 1mg/L increase; 95% confidence interval: 0.24-0.56; P < 0.001). Independently from baseline characteristics, reduced fluid output, weight loss and DE were each associated with increased 60 day mortality. Among patients with estimated glomerular filtration rate below the median, those randomized to a high-dose strategy had improved symptoms compared with those randomized to a low-dose strategy. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated baseline cystatin C, as a biomarker of renal dysfunction, is associated with reduced diuretic response during heart failure hospitalization. Higher loop diuretic doses are required for therapeutic decongestion in patients with renal insufficiency. Poor response identifies a high-risk population.


Assuntos
Furosemida/administração & dosagem , Insuficiência Cardíaca/diagnóstico , Hospitalização/tendências , Doença Aguda , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Biomarcadores/sangue , Cistatina C/sangue , Relação Dose-Resposta a Droga , Feminino , Insuficiência Cardíaca/sangue , Insuficiência Cardíaca/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.) , Prognóstico , Inibidores de Simportadores de Cloreto de Sódio e Potássio/administração & dosagem , Estados Unidos
18.
Hum Hered ; 83(6): 315-332, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31167214

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dichotomization using the lower quartile as cutoff is commonly used for harmonizing heterogeneous physical activity (PA) measures across studies. However, this may create misclassification and hinder discovery of new loci. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the performance of selecting individuals from the extremes of the exposure (SIEE) as an alternative approach to reduce such misclassification. METHOD: For systolic and diastolic blood pressure in the Framingham Heart Study, we performed a genome-wide association study with gene-PA interaction analysis using three PA variables derived by SIEE and two other dichotomization approaches. We compared number of loci detected and overlap with loci found using a quantitative PA variable. In addition, we performed simulation studies to assess bias, false discovery rates (FDR), and power under synergistic/antagonistic genetic effects in exposure groups and in the presence/absence of measurement error. RESULTS: In the empirical analysis, SIEE's performance was neither the best nor the worst. In most simulation scenarios, SIEE was consistently outperformed in terms of FDR and power. Particularly, in a scenario characterized by antagonistic effects and measurement error, SIEE had the least bias and highest power. CONCLUSION: SIEE's promise appears limited to detecting loci with antagonistic effects. Further studies are needed to evaluate SIEE's full advantage.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Viés , Pressão Sanguínea/fisiologia , Simulação por Computador , Análise de Dados , Loci Gênicos , Humanos , Sístole/fisiologia
20.
Curr Hypertens Rep ; 19(3): 23, 2017 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28283927

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Here, we discuss the interpretation and modeling of gene-environment interactions in hypertension-related phenotypes, with a focus on the necessary assumptions and possible challenges. RECENT FINDINGS: Recently, small cohort studies have discovered several novel genetic variants associated with hypertension-related phenotypes through modeling gene-environment interactions. Several consortia-based meta-analytic efforts have uncovered many novel genetic variants in hypertension without modeling interaction terms, giving promise to future meta-analytic efforts that incorporate gene-environment interactions. Heritability studies and genome-wide association studies have established that hypertension, a prevalent cardiovascular disease, has a genetic component that may be modulated by the environment (such as lifestyle factors). This review includes a discussion of known genetic associations for hypertension/blood pressure, including those resulting from the incorporation of gene-environmental interaction modeling.


Assuntos
Pressão Sanguínea/genética , Interação Gene-Ambiente , Hipertensão/genética , Epistasia Genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Variação Genética , Estudo de Associação Genômica Ampla , Humanos , Fenótipo
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