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1.
J Med Genet ; 2020 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32994281

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Familial clustering of melanoma suggests a shared genetic predisposition among family members, but only 10%-40% of familial cases carry a pathogenic variant in a known high-risk melanoma susceptibility gene. We investigated whether a melanoma-specific Polygenic Risk Score (PRS) is associated with melanoma risk in patients with genetically unexplained familial melanoma. METHODS: Dutch familial melanoma cases (n=418) were genotyped for 46 SNPs previously identified as independently associated with melanoma risk. The 46-SNP PRS was calculated and standardised to 3423 healthy controls (sPRS) and the association between PRS and melanoma risk was modelled using logistic regression. Within the case series, possible differences were further explored by investigating the PRS in relation to (1) the number of primary melanomas in a patient and (2) the extent of familial clustering of melanoma. RESULTS: The PRS was significantly associated with melanoma risk, with a per-SD OR of 2.12 (95% CI 1.90 to 2.35, p<0.001), corresponding to a 5.70-fold increased risk (95% CI 3.93 to 8.28) when comparing the top 90th to the middle 40-60th PRS percentiles. The mean PRS was significantly higher in cases with multiple primary melanomas than in cases with a single melanoma (sPRS 1.17 vs 0.71, p=0.001). Conversely, cases from high-density melanoma families had a lower (but non-significant) mean PRS than cases from low-density families (sPRS 0.60 vs 0.94, p=0.204). CONCLUSION: Our work underlines the significance of a PRS in determining melanoma susceptibility and encourages further exploration of the diagnostic value of a PRS in genetically unexplained melanoma families.

2.
J Community Genet ; 2020 Sep 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880035

RESUMO

Individuals having a genetic predisposition to cancer and their partners face challenging decisions regarding their wish to have children. This study aimed to determine the effects of an online decision aid to support couples in making an informed decision regarding their reproductive options. A nationwide pretest-posttest study was conducted in the Netherlands among 131 participants between November 2016 and May 2018. Couples were eligible for participation if one partner had a pathogenic variant predisposing for an autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome. Participants completed a questionnaire before use (T0), and at 3 months (T3) after use of the decision aid to assess the primary outcome measure informed decision-making, and the secondary outcome measures decisional conflict, knowledge, realistic expectations, level of deliberation, and decision self-efficacy. T0-T3 comparisons show an overall positive effect for all outcome measures (all ps < 0.05; knowledge (ES = - 1.05), decisional conflict (ES = 0.99), participants' decision self-efficacy (ES = -0.55), level of deliberation (ES = - 0.50), and realistic expectations (ES = - 0.44). Informed decision-making increased over time and 58.0% of the participants made an informed reproductive decision at T3. The online decision aid seems to be an appropriate tool to complement standard reproductive counseling to support our target group in making an informed reproductive decision. Use of the decision aid may lessen the negative psychological impact of decision-making on couples' daily life and wellbeing.

3.
Genet Med ; 22(8): 1427-1428, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32576986

RESUMO

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.

4.
Int J Cancer ; 147(10): 2708-2716, 2020 Nov 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32383162

RESUMO

Breast cancer risk is approximately twice as high in first-degree relatives of female breast cancer cases than in women in the general population. Less than half of this risk can be attributed to the currently known genetic risk factors. Recessive risk alleles represent a relatively underexplored explanation for the remainder of familial risk. To address this, we selected 19 non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer families in which at least three siblings were affected, while no first-degree relatives of the previous or following generation had breast cancer. Germline DNA from one of the siblings was subjected to exome sequencing, while all affected siblings were genotyped using SNP arrays to assess haplotype sharing and to calculate a polygenic risk score (PRS) based on 160 low-risk variants. We found no convincing candidate recessive alleles among exome sequencing variants in genomic regions for which all three siblings shared two haplotypes. However, we found two families in which all affected siblings carried the CHEK2*1100delC. In addition, the average normalized PRS of the "recessive" family probands (0.81) was significantly higher than that in both general population cases (0.35, P = .026) and controls (P = .0004). These findings suggest that the familial aggregation is, at least in part, explained by a polygenic effect of common low-risk variants and rarer intermediate-risk variants, while we did not find evidence of a role for novel recessive risk alleles.

5.
Genet Med ; 22(8): 1355-1365, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32398771

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Current interpretation guidelines for germline variants in high-risk cancer susceptibility genes consider predicted loss-of-function (LoF) variants, such as nonsense variants and variants in the canonical splice site sequences ofBRCA2, to be associated with high cancer risk. However, some variant alleles produce alternative transcripts that encode (partially) functional protein isoforms leading to possible incorrect risk estimations. For accurate classification of variants it is therefore essential that alternative transcripts are identified and functionally characterized. METHODS: We systematically evaluated a large panel of human BRCA2 variants for the production of alternative transcripts and assessed their capacity to exert BRCA2 protein functionality. Evaluated variants included all single-exon deletions, various multiple-exon deletions, intronic variants at the canonical splice donor and acceptor sequences, and variants that previously have been shown to affect messenger RNA (mRNA) splicing in carriers. RESULTS: Multiple alternative transcripts encoding (partially) functional protein isoforms were identified (e.g., ∆[E4-E7], ∆[E6-E7], ∆E[6q39_E8], ∆[E10], ∆[E12], ∆E[12-14]). Expression of these transcripts did attenuate the impact of predicted LoF variants such as the canonical splice site variants c.631+2T>G, c.517-2A>G, c.6842-2A>G, c.6937+1G>A, and nonsense variants c.491T>A, c.581G>A, and c.6901G>T. CONCLUSION: These results allow refinement of variant interpretation guidelines for BRCA2 by providing insight into the functional consequences of naturally occurring and variant-related alternative splicing events.

6.
Patient Prefer Adherence ; 14: 333-342, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32109999

RESUMO

Purpose: Counselees' preferences are considered important for the choice of risk communication format and for improving patient-centered care. We here report on counselees' preferences for how risks are presented in familial breast cancer counseling and the impact of this preferred format on their understanding of risk. Patients and Methods: As part of a practice-based randomized controlled trial, 326 unaffected women with a family history of breast cancer received their lifetime risk in one of five presentation formats after standard genetic counseling in three Dutch familial cancer clinics: 1) in percentages, 2) in frequencies ("X out of 100"), 3) in frequencies plus graphical format (10×10 human icons), 4) in frequencies and 10-year age-related risk and 5) in frequencies and 10-year age-related risk plus graphical format. Format preferences and risk understanding (accuracy) were assessed at 2-week follow-up by a questionnaire, completed by 279/326 women. Results: The most preferred risk communication formats were numbers combined with verbal descriptions (37%) and numbers only (26%). Of the numerical formats, most (55%) women preferred percentages. The majority (73%) preferred to be informed about both lifetime and 10-year age-related risk. Women who had received a graphical display were more likely to choose a graphical display as their preferred format. There was no significant effect between the intervention groups with regard to risk accuracy. Overall, women given risk estimates in their preferred format had a slightly better understanding of risk. Conclusion: The results suggest that the accuracy of breast cancer risk estimation is slightly better for women who had received this information in their preferred format, but the risk format used had no effect on women's risk accuracy. To meet the most frequent preference, counselors should consider providing a time frame of reference (eg, risk in the next 10 years) in a numerical format, in addition to lifetime risk.

7.
Clin Cancer Res ; 25(24): 7517-7526, 2019 12 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31492746

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Whether endometrial carcinoma (EC) should be considered part of the gBRCA1/2-associated hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) syndrome is topic of debate. We sought to assess whether ECs occurring in gBRCA carriers are enriched for clinicopathologic and molecular characteristics, thereby supporting a causal relationship. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Thirty-eight gBRCA carriers that developed EC were selected from the nationwide cohort study on hereditary breast and ovarian cancer in the Netherlands (HEBON), and these were supplemented with four institutional cases. Tumor tissue was retrieved via PALGA (Dutch Pathology Registry). Nineteen morphologic features were scored and histotype was determined by three expert gynecologic pathologists, blinded for molecular analyses (UCM-OncoPlus Assay including 1213 genes). ECs with LOH of the gBRCA-wild-type allele (gBRCA/LOHpos) were defined "gBRCA-associated," those without LOH (gBRCA/LOHneg) were defined "sporadic." RESULTS: LOH could be assessed for 40 ECs (30 gBRCA1, 10 gBRCA2), of which 60% were gBRCA/LOHpos. gBRCA/LOHpos ECs were more frequently of nonendometrioid (58%, P = 0.001) and grade 3 histology (79%, P < 0.001). All but two were in the TP53-mutated TCGA-subgroup (91.7%, P < 0.001). In contrast, gBRCA/LOHneg ECs were mainly grade 1 endometrioid EC (94%) and showed a more heterogeneous distribution of TCGA-molecular subgroups: POLE-mutated (6.3%), MSI-high (25%), NSMP (62.5%), and TP53-mutated (6.3%). CONCLUSIONS: We provide novel evidence in favor of EC being part of the gBRCA-associated HBOC-syndrome. gBRCA-associated ECs are enriched for EC subtypes associated with unfavorable clinical outcome. These findings have profound therapeutic consequences as these patients may benefit from treatment strategies such as PARP inhibitors. In addition, it should influence counseling and surveillance of gBRCA carriers.

8.
Breast Cancer Res Treat ; 177(3): 723-733, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31302855

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In healthy BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, bilateral risk-reducing mastectomy (BRRM) strongly reduces the risk of developing breast cancer (BC); however, no clear survival benefit of BRRM over BC surveillance has been reported yet. METHODS: In this Dutch multicenter cohort study, we used multivariable Cox models with BRRM as a time-dependent covariable to estimate the associations between BRRM and the overall and BC-specific mortality rates, separately for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 10.3 years, 722 out of 1712 BRCA1 (42%) and 406 out of 1145 BRCA2 (35%) mutation carriers underwent BRRM. For BRCA1 mutation carriers, we observed 52 deaths (20 from BC) in the surveillance group, and 10 deaths (one from BC) after BRRM. The hazard ratios were 0.40 (95% CI 0.20-0.90) for overall mortality and 0.06 (95% CI 0.01-0.46) for BC-specific mortality. BC-specific survival at age 65 was 93% for surveillance and 99.7% for BRRM. For BRCA2 mutation carriers, we observed 29 deaths (7 from BC) in the surveillance group, and 4 deaths (no BC) after BRRM. The hazard ratio for overall mortality was 0.45 (95% CI 0.15-1.36). BC-specific survival at age 65 was 98% for surveillance and 100% for BRRM. CONCLUSION: BRRM was associated with lower mortality than surveillance for BRCA1 mutation carriers, but for BRCA2 mutation carriers, BRRM may lead to similar BC-specific survival as surveillance. Our findings support a more individualized counseling based on BRCA mutation type.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/etiologia , Neoplasias da Mama/prevenção & controle , Heterozigoto , Mutação , Mastectomia Profilática , Neoplasias da Mama/mortalidade , Neoplasias da Mama/cirurgia , Feminino , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Humanos , Mortalidade , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Prognóstico , Mastectomia Profilática/métodos , Vigilância em Saúde Pública , Comportamento de Redução do Risco
9.
Genet Med ; 21(12): 2706-2712, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31204389

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Biallelic pathogenic variants in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes cause a recessive childhood cancer predisposition syndrome known as constitutional mismatch repair deficiency (CMMRD). Family members with a heterozygous MMR variant have Lynch syndrome. We aimed at estimating cancer risk in these heterozygous carriers as a novel approach to avoid complicated statistical methods to correct for ascertainment bias. METHODS: Cumulative colorectal cancer incidence was estimated in a cohort of PMS2- and MSH6-associated families, ascertained by the CMMRD phenotype of the index, by using mutation probabilities based on kinship coefficients as analytical weights in a proportional hazard regression on the cause-specific hazards. Confidence intervals (CIs) were obtained by bootstrapping at the family level. RESULTS: The estimated cumulative colorectal cancer risk at age 70 years for heterozygous PMS2 variant carriers was 8.7% (95% CI 4.3-12.7%) for both sexes combined, and 9.9% (95% CI 4.9-15.3%) for men and 5.9% (95% CI 1.6-11.1%) for women separately. For heterozygous MSH6 variant carriers these estimates are 11.8% (95% CI 4.5-22.7%) for both sexes combined, 10.0% (95% CI 1.83-24.5%) for men and 11.7% (95% CI 2.10-26.5%) for women. CONCLUSION: Our findings are consistent with previous reports that used more complex statistical methods to correct for ascertainment bias. These results underline the need for MMR gene-specific surveillance protocols for Lynch syndrome.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/complicações , Neoplasias Colorretais/etiologia , Medição de Risco/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/genética , Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/metabolismo , Reparo de Erro de Pareamento de DNA , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética , Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/metabolismo , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Endonuclease PMS2 de Reparo de Erro de Pareamento/genética , Endonuclease PMS2 de Reparo de Erro de Pareamento/metabolismo , Mutação , Fatores de Risco
10.
J Med Genet ; 56(9): 581-589, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31186341

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The currently known breast cancer-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are presently not used to guide clinical management. We explored whether a genetic test that incorporates a SNP-based polygenic risk score (PRS) is clinically meaningful in non-BRCA1/2 high-risk breast cancer families. METHODS: 101 non-BRCA1/2 high-risk breast cancer families were included; 323 cases and 262 unaffected female relatives were genotyped. The 161-SNP PRS was calculated and standardised to 327 population controls (sPRS). Association analysis was performed using a Cox-type random effect regression model adjusted by family history. Updated individualised breast cancer lifetime risk scores were derived by combining the Breast and Ovarian Analysis of Disease Incidence and Carrier Estimation Algorithm breast cancer lifetime risk with the effect of the sPRS. RESULTS: The mean sPRS for cases and their unaffected relatives was 0.70 (SD=0.9) and 0.53 (SD=0.9), respectively. A significant association was found between sPRS and breast cancer, HR=1.16, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.28, p=0.026. Addition of the sPRS to risk prediction based on family history alone changed screening recommendations in 11.5%, 14.7% and 19.8 % of the women according to breast screening guidelines from the USA (National Comprehensive Cancer Network), UK (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Netherlands (Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation), respectively. CONCLUSION: Our results support the application of the PRS in risk prediction and clinical management of women from genetically unexplained breast cancer families.

11.
J Genet Couns ; 28(3): 533-542, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30629779

RESUMO

A nationwide pretest-posttest study was conducted in all clinical genetic centres in the Netherlands, to evaluate the effects of an online decision aid to support persons who have a genetic predisposition to cancer and their partners in making an informed decision regarding reproductive options. Main outcomes (decisional conflict, knowledge, realistic expectations, level of deliberation, and decision self-efficacy) were measured before use (T0), immediately after use (T1), and at 2 weeks (T2) after use of the decision aid. Paired sample t tests were used to compute differences between the first and subsequent measurements. T0-T1 and T0-T2 comparisons indicate a significant reduction in mean decisional conflict scores with stronger effects for participants with high baseline decisional conflict. Furthermore, use of the decision aid resulted in increased knowledge levels and improved realistic expectations. Level of deliberation only increased for participants with lower baseline levels of deliberation. Decision self-efficacy increased for those with low baseline scores, whereas those with high baseline scores showed a reduction at T2. It can be concluded that use of the decision aid resulted in several positive outcomes indicative of informed decision-making. The decision aid is an appropriate and highly appreciated tool to be used in addition to reproductive counseling.

12.
Genet Med ; 21(2): 293-302, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29988080

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Genetic testing has uncovered large numbers of variants in the BRCA2 gene for which the clinical significance is unclear. Cancer risk prediction of these variants of uncertain significance (VUS) can be improved by reliable assessment of the extent of impairment of the tumor suppressor function(s) of BRCA2. METHODS: Here, we evaluated the performance of the mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC)-based functional assay on an extensive set of BRCA2 missense variants. RESULTS: Whereas all 20 nonpathogenic (class 1/2) variants were able to complement the cell lethal phenotype induced by loss of endogenous mouse Brca2, only 1 out of 15 pathogenic (class 4/5) variants (p.Gly2609Asp) was able to do so. However, in this variant the major tumor suppressive activity of BRCA2, i.e., homology directed repair (HDR), was severely abrogated. Among 43 evaluated VUS (class 3), 7 were unable to complement the lethal phenotype of mouse Brca2 loss while 7 other variants displayed a more severe reduction of HDR activity than observed for class 1/ 2 variants. CONCLUSION: The mESC-based BRCA2 functional assay can reliably determine the functional impact of VUS, distinguish between pathogenic and nonpathogenic variants, and may contribute to improved cancer risk estimation for BRCA2 VUS carriers.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Genes BRCA2 , Variação Genética , Células-Tronco Embrionárias Murinas , Animais , Antineoplásicos/farmacologia , Western Blotting , Ciclo Celular , Células Cultivadas , Cisplatino/farmacologia , Fluorbenzenos/farmacologia , Teste de Complementação Genética , Humanos , Camundongos , Células-Tronco Embrionárias Murinas/efeitos dos fármacos , Mutação de Sentido Incorreto , Ftalazinas/farmacologia , Inibidores de Poli(ADP-Ribose) Polimerases/farmacologia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real , Transfecção
13.
Genet Med ; 21(7): 1486-1496, 2019 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30504929

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To enhance classification of variants of uncertain significance (VUS) in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes in the cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, we developed the cell-free in vitro MMR activity (CIMRA) assay. Here, we calibrate and validate the assay, enabling its integration with in silico and clinical data. METHODS: Two sets of previously classified MLH1 and MSH2 variants were selected from a curated MMR gene database, and their biochemical activity determined by the CIMRA assay. The assay was calibrated by regression analysis followed by symmetric cross-validation and Bayesian integration with in silico predictions of pathogenicity. CIMRA assay reproducibility was assessed in four laboratories. RESULTS: Concordance between the training runs met our prespecified validation criterion. The CIMRA assay alone correctly classified 65% of variants, with only 3% discordant classification. Bayesian integration with in silico predictions of pathogenicity increased the proportion of correctly classified variants to 87%, without changing the discordance rate. Interlaboratory results were highly reproducible. CONCLUSION: The CIMRA assay accurately predicts pathogenic and benign MMR gene variants. Quantitative combination of assay results with in silico analysis correctly classified the majority of variants. Using this calibration, CIMRA assay results can be integrated into the diagnostic algorithm for MMR gene variants.


Assuntos
Neoplasias Colorretais Hereditárias sem Polipose/genética , Reparo de Erro de Pareamento de DNA/genética , Técnicas Genéticas , Células 3T3 , Animais , Teorema de Bayes , Calibragem , Simulação por Computador , Humanos , Técnicas In Vitro , Camundongos , Proteína 1 Homóloga a MutL/genética , Proteína 2 Homóloga a MutS/genética , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Sensibilidade e Especificidade
14.
Fam Cancer ; 18(1): 137-146, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29846879

RESUMO

An online decision aid to support persons having a genetic predisposition to cancer and their partners during reproductive decision-making was developed. A two-phase usability test was conducted among 12 couples (N = 22; 2 persons participated without their partner) at risk for hereditary cancer and 15 health care providers. Couples and health care providers expressed similar suggestions for improvements, and evaluated the modified decision aid as acceptable, easy to use, and comprehensible. The final decision aid was pilot tested (N = 16) with paired sample t tests comparing main outcomes (decisional conflict, knowledge, realistic expectations regarding the reproductive options and decision self-efficacy) before (T0), immediately (T1) and 2 weeks after (T2) use of the decision aid. Pilot testing indicated decreased decisional conflict scores, increased knowledge, and improved realistic expectations regarding the reproductive options, at T1 and T2. No effect was found for couples' decision self-efficacy. The positive findings during usability testing were thus reflected in the pilot study. The decision aid will be further evaluated in a nationwide pretest-posttest study to facilitate implementation in the onco-genetic counselling setting. Ultimately, it is expected that the decision aid will enable end-users to make an informed decision.


Assuntos
Tomada de Decisões , Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Síndromes Neoplásicas Hereditárias/genética , Reprodução/genética , Adulto , Feminino , Aconselhamento Genético/métodos , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Internet , Masculino , Projetos Piloto
15.
Int J Cancer ; 144(10): 2453-2464, 2019 05 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30414346

RESUMO

Germline mutations in the major melanoma susceptibility gene CDKN2A explain genetic predisposition in only 10-40% of melanoma-prone families. In our study we comprehensively characterized 488 melanoma cases from 451 non-CDKN2A/CDK4 families for mutations in 30 established and candidate melanoma susceptibility genes using a custom-designed targeted gene panel approach. We identified (likely) pathogenic variants in established melanoma susceptibility genes in 18 families (n = 3 BAP1, n = 15 MITF p.E318K; diagnostic yield 4.0%). Among the three identified BAP1-families, there were no reported diagnoses of uveal melanoma or malignant mesothelioma. We additionally identified two potentially deleterious missense variants in the telomere maintenance genes ACD and TERF2IP, but none in the POT1 gene. MC1R risk variants were strongly enriched in our familial melanoma cohort compared to healthy controls (R variants: OR 3.67, 95% CI 2.88-4.68, p <0.001). Several variants of interest were also identified in candidate melanoma susceptibility genes, in particular rare (pathogenic) variants in the albinism gene OCA2 were repeatedly found. We conclude that multigene panel testing for familial melanoma is appropriate considering the additional 4% diagnostic yield in non-CDKN2A/CDK4 families. Our study shows that BAP1 and MITF are important genes to be included in such a diagnostic test.


Assuntos
Quinase 4 Dependente de Ciclina/genética , Inibidor p16 de Quinase Dependente de Ciclina/genética , Predisposição Genética para Doença/genética , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa/genética , Melanoma/genética , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Humanos , Neoplasias Pulmonares/genética , Masculino , Mesotelioma/genética , Fator de Transcrição Associado à Microftalmia/genética , Ubiquitina Tiolesterase/genética
16.
Br J Cancer ; 119: 357-363, 2018 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29937543

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The effect of in vitro fertilisation (IVF) on breast cancer risk for BRCA1/2 mutation carriers is rarely examined. As carriers may increasingly undergo IVF as part of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), we examined the impact of ovarian stimulation for IVF on breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. METHODS: The study population consisted of 1550 BRCA1 and 964 BRCA2 mutation carriers, derived from the nationwide HEBON study and the nationwide PGD registry. Questionnaires, clinical records and linkages with the Netherlands Cancer Registry were used to collect data on IVF exposure, risk-reducing surgeries and cancer diagnosis, respectively. Time-dependent Cox regression analyses were conducted, stratified for birth cohort and adjusted for subfertility. RESULTS: Of the 2514 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, 3% (n = 76) were exposed to ovarian stimulation for IVF. In total, 938 BRCA1/2 mutation carriers (37.3%) were diagnosed with breast cancer. IVF exposure was not associated with risk of breast cancer (HR: 0.79, 95% CI: 0.46-1.36). Similar results were found for the subgroups of subfertile women (n = 232; HR: 0.73, 95% CI: 0.39-1.37) and BRCA1 mutation carriers (HR: 1.12, 95% CI: 0.60-2.09). In addition, age at and recency of first IVF treatment were not associated with breast cancer risk. CONCLUSION: No evidence was found for an association between ovarian stimulation for IVF and breast cancer risk in BRCA1/2 mutation carriers.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/etiologia , Fertilização In Vitro/efeitos adversos , Genes BRCA1 , Genes BRCA2 , Heterozigoto , Mutação , Indução da Ovulação , Adulto , Idoso , Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Risco
17.
J Mol Diagn ; 20(5): 600-611, 2018 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29936257

RESUMO

BRCA1/2 variant analysis in tumor tissue could streamline the referral of patients with epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer to genetic counselors and select patients who benefit most from targeted treatment. We investigated the sensitivity of BRCA1/2 variant analysis in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue using a combination of next-generation sequencing and copy number variant multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. After optimization using a training cohort of known BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, validation was performed in a prospective cohort in which screening of BRCA1/2 tumor DNA and leukocyte germline DNA was performed in parallel. BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation and pedigree analysis were also performed. In the training cohort, 45 of 46 germline BRCA1/2 variants were detected (sensitivity, 98%). In the prospective cohort (n = 62), all six germline variants were identified (sensitivity, 100%), together with five somatic BRCA1/2 variants and eight cases with BRCA1 promoter hypermethylation. In four BRCA1/2 variant-negative patients, surveillance or prophylactic management options were offered on the basis of positive family histories. We conclude that BRCA1/2 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor tissue analysis reliably detects BRCA1/2 variants. When taking family history of BRCA1/2 variant-negative patients into account, tumor BRCA1/2 variant screening allows more efficient selection of epithelial ovarian cancer patients for genetic counseling and simultaneously selects patients who benefit most from targeted treatment.


Assuntos
Proteína BRCA1/genética , Proteína BRCA2/genética , Testes Genéticos , Variação Genética , Neoplasias Ovarianas/genética , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Metilação de DNA/genética , Feminino , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa/genética , Humanos , Perda de Heterozigosidade , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Regiões Promotoras Genéticas/genética
18.
Sci Rep ; 8(1): 6574, 2018 04 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29700408

RESUMO

E-cadherin (CDH1) is a putative tumor suppressor gene implicated in breast carcinogenesis. Yet, whether risk factors or survival differ by E-cadherin tumor expression is unclear. We evaluated E-cadherin tumor immunohistochemistry expression using tissue microarrays of 5,933 female invasive breast cancers from 12 studies from the Breast Cancer Consortium. H-scores were calculated and case-case odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using logistic regression. Survival analyses were performed using Cox regression models. All analyses were stratified by estrogen receptor (ER) status and histologic subtype. E-cadherin low cases (N = 1191, 20%) were more frequently of lobular histology, low grade, >2 cm, and HER2-negative. Loss of E-cadherin expression (score < 100) was associated with menopausal hormone use among ER-positive tumors (ever compared to never users, OR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.97-1.59), which was stronger when we evaluated complete loss of E-cadherin (i.e. H-score = 0), OR = 1.57, 95% CI = 1.06-2.33. Breast cancer specific mortality was unrelated to E-cadherin expression in multivariable models. E-cadherin low expression is associated with lobular histology, tumor characteristics and menopausal hormone use, with no evidence of an association with breast cancer specific survival. These data support loss of E-cadherin expression as an important marker of tumor subtypes.


Assuntos
Neoplasias da Mama/genética , Neoplasias da Mama/mortalidade , Caderinas/genética , Expressão Gênica , Adulto , Idoso , Biomarcadores Tumorais , Neoplasias da Mama/diagnóstico , Neoplasias da Mama/metabolismo , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Razão de Chances , Prognóstico , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Receptor ErbB-2/metabolismo , Receptores Estrogênicos/metabolismo , Receptores de Progesterona/metabolismo , Fatores de Risco
19.
J Med Genet ; 55(10): 661-668, 2018 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29661971

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Several factors have been reported that influence the probability of a germline CDKN2A mutation in a melanoma family. Our goal was to create a scoring system to estimate this probability, based on a set of clinical features present in the patient and his or her family. METHODS: Five clinical features and their association with CDKN2A mutations were investigated in a training cohort of 1227 Dutch melanoma families (13.7% with CDKN2A mutation) using multivariate logistic regression. Predefined features included number of family members with melanoma and with multiple primary melanomas, median age at diagnosis and presence of pancreatic cancer or upper airway cancer in a family member. Based on these five features, a scoring system (CDKN2A Mutation(CM)-Score) was developed and subsequently validated in a combined Swedish and Dutch familial melanoma cohort (n=421 families; 9.0% with CDKN2A mutation). RESULTS: All five features were significantly associated (p<0.05) with a CDKN2A mutation. At a CM-Score of 16 out of 49 possible points, the threshold of 10% mutation probability is approximated (9.9%; 95% CI 9.8 to 10.1). This probability further increased to >90% for families with ≥36 points. A CM-Score under 16 points was associated with a low mutation probability (≤4%). CM-Score performed well in both the training cohort (area under the curve (AUC) 0.89; 95% CI 0.86 to 0.92) and the external validation cohort (AUC 0.94; 95% CI 0.90 to 0.98). CONCLUSION: We developed a practical scoring system to predict CDKN2A mutation status among melanoma-prone families. We suggest that CDKN2A analysis should be recommended to families with a CM-Score of ≥16 points.


Assuntos
Inibidor p16 de Quinase Dependente de Ciclina/genética , Melanoma/genética , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/genética , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Europa (Continente) , Feminino , Mutação em Linhagem Germinativa , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Melanoma/diagnóstico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos , Neoplasias Pancreáticas/diagnóstico , Projetos de Pesquisa , Suécia , Adulto Jovem
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