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1.
Nano Lett ; 2020 Feb 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32048513

RESUMO

Pt-based alloy catalysts are promising candidates for fuel-cell applications, especially for cathodic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and anodic methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The rational design of composition and morphology is crucial to promoting catalytic performances. Here, we report the synthesis of Pt-Co nanoframes via chemical etching of Co from solid rhombic dodecahedra. The obtained Pt-Co nanoframes exhibit excellent ORR mass activity in acidic electrolyte, which is as high as 0.40 A mgPt-1 initially and 0.34 A mgPt-1 after 10 000 potential cycles at 0.95 VRHE. Furthermore, their MOR mass activity in alkaline media is up to 4.28 A mgPt-1 and is 4-fold higher than that of commercial Pt/C catalyst. Experimental studies indicate that the weakened binding of intermediate carbonaceous poison contributes to the enhanced MOR behavior. More impressively, the Pt-Co nanoframes also demonstrate remarkable stability under long-term testing, which could be attributed to the negligible electrochemical Co dissolution.

2.
J Phys Chem B ; 122(2): 855-863, 2018 01 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29091455

RESUMO

The role of oxygen in the activation of C-H bonds in methane on clean and oxygen-precovered Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) surfaces was studied with combined in situ near-ambient-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Activation of methane at 300 K and "moderate pressures" was only observed on oxygen-precovered Cu(111) surfaces. Density functional theory calculations reveal that the lowest activation energy barrier of C-H on Cu(111) in the presence of chemisorbed oxygen is related to a two-active-site, four-centered mechanism, which stabilizes the required transition-state intermediate by dipole-dipole attraction of O-H and Cu-CH3 species. The C-H bond activation barriers on Cu2O(111) surfaces are large due to the weak stabilization of H and CH3 fragments.

3.
Chem Rev ; 118(5): 2816-2862, 2018 03 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29116787

RESUMO

The activation of O2 on metal surfaces is a critical process for heterogeneous catalysis and materials oxidation. Fundamental studies of well-defined metal surfaces using a variety of techniques have given crucial insight into the mechanisms, energetics, and dynamics of O2 adsorption and dissociation. Here, trends in the activation of O2 on transition metal surfaces are discussed, and various O2 adsorption states are described in terms of both electronic structure and geometry. The mechanism and dynamics of O2 dissociation are also reviewed, including the importance of the spin transition. The reactivity of O2 and O toward reactant molecules is also briefly discussed in the context of catalysis. The reactivity of a surface toward O2 generally correlates with the adsorption strength of O, the tendency to oxidize, and the heat of formation of the oxide. Periodic trends can be rationalized in terms of attractive and repulsive interactions with the d-band, such that inert metals tend to feature a full d band that is low energy and has a large spatial overlap with adsorbate states. More open surfaces or undercoordinated defect sites can be much more reactive than close-packed surfaces. Reactions between O and other species tend to be more prevalent than reactions between O2 and other species, particularly on more reactive surfaces.

4.
Nat Commun ; 8(1): 429, 2017 09 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28874734

RESUMO

Despite its importance in oxidation catalysis, the active phase of Pt remains uncertain, even for the Pt(111) single-crystal surface. Here, using a ReactorSTM, the catalytically relevant structures are identified as two surface oxides, different from bulk α-PtO2, previously observed. They are constructed from expanded oxide rows with a lattice constant close to that of α-PtO2, either assembling into spoked wheels, 1-5 bar O2, or closely packed in parallel lines, above 2.2 bar. Both are only ordered at elevated temperatures (400-500 K). The triangular oxide can also form on the square lattice of Pt(100). Under NO and CO oxidation conditions, similar features are observed. Furthermore, both oxides are unstable outside the O2 atmosphere, indicating the presence of active O atoms, crucial for oxidation catalysts.Improving platinum as an oxidation catalyst requires understanding its structure under catalytic conditions. Here, the authors discover that catalytically important surface oxides form only when Pt is exposed to high pressure and temperature, highlighting the need to study catalysts in realistic environments.

5.
Ultramicroscopy ; 182: 233-242, 2017 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28734230

RESUMO

A combined X-ray and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) instrument is presented that enables the local detection of X-ray absorption on surfaces in a gas environment. To suppress the collection of ion currents generated in the gas phase, coaxially shielded STM tips were used. The conductive outer shield of the coaxial tips can be biased to deflect ions away from the tip core. When tunneling, the X-ray-induced current is separated from the regular, 'topographic' tunneling current using a novel high-speed separation scheme. We demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument by measuring the local X-ray-induced current on Au(1 1 1) in 800 mbar Ar.

6.
Chem Soc Rev ; 46(14): 4347-4374, 2017 Jul 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28589194

RESUMO

Platinum and palladium are frequently used as catalytic materials, for example for the oxidation of CO. This is one of the most widely studied reactions in the field of surface science. Although seemingly uncomplicated, it remains an active and interesting topic, which is partially explained by the push to conduct experiments on model systems under relevant reaction conditions. Recent developments in the surface-science methodology have allowed obtaining chemical and structural information on the active phase of model catalysts. Tools of the trade include near-ambient-pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy, high-pressure surface X-ray diffraction, and high-pressure vibrational spectroscopy. Interpretation is often aided by density functional theory in combination with thermodynamic and kinetic modeling. In this review, results for the catalytic oxidation of CO obtained by these techniques are compared. On several of the Pt and Pd surfaces, new structures develop in excess O2. For Pt, this requires a much larger excess of O2 than for Pd. Most of these structures also develop in pure O2 and are identified as (surface) oxides. A large body of evidence supports the conjecture that these oxides are more reactive than the corresponding O-covered metallic surfaces under similar conditions, although still debated in the literature. An outlook on this developing field, including directions that move away from CO oxidation towards more complex chemistry, concludes this review.

7.
Rev Sci Instrum ; 87(11): 113705, 2016 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27910601

RESUMO

We have developed a new instrument combining a scanning probe microscope (SPM) and an X-ray scattering platform for ambient-pressure catalysis studies. The two instruments are integrated with a flow reactor and an ultra-high vacuum system that can be mounted easily on the diffractometer at a synchrotron end station. This makes it possible to perform SPM and X-ray scattering experiments in the same instrument under identical conditions that are relevant for catalysis.

8.
Nat Chem ; 8(10): 929-34, 2016 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27657868

RESUMO

Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a heterogeneous catalytic reaction that creates approximately 2% of the world's fuel. It involves the synthesis of linear hydrocarbon molecules from a gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen at high pressures (from a few to tens of bars) and high temperatures (200-350 °C). To gain further insight into the fundamental mechanisms of this industrial process, we have used a purpose-built scanning tunnelling microscope to monitor a cobalt model catalyst under reaction conditions. We show that, after 30 minutes of reaction, the terraces of the cobalt catalyst are covered by parallel arrays of stripes. We propose that the stripes are formed by the self-assembly of linear hydrocarbon product molecules. Surprisingly, the width of the stripes corresponds to molecules that are 14 or 15 carbon atoms long. We introduce a simple model that explains the accumulation of such long molecules by describing their monomer-by-monomer synthesis and explicitly accounting for their thermal desorption.

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