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1.
Poult Sci ; 103(8): 103968, 2024 Jun 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38959643

RESUMO

Berberine (BBR), a well-known quaternary ammonium alkaloid, is recognized for its ability to prevent and alleviate metabolic disorders because of its anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the underlying mechanisms of BBR to mitigate fatty liver hemorrhagic syndrome (FLHS) through the modulation of gut microbiota and their metabolism remained unclear. The results revealed that BBR ameliorates lipid metabolism disorder in high-energy and low-protein (HELP) diet-induced FLHS laying hens, as evidenced by improved liver function and lipid deposition of the liver, reduced blood lipids, and the expression of liver lipid synthesis-related factors. Moreover, BBR alleviated HELP diet-induced barrier dysfunction, increased microbial population, and dysregulated lipid metabolism in the ileum. BBR reshaped the HELP-perturbed gut microbiota, particularly declining the abundance of Desulfovibrio_piger and elevating the abundance of Bacteroides_salanitronis_DSM_18170. Meanwhile, metabolomic profiling analysis revealed that BBR reshaped microbial metabolism and function, particularly by reducing the levels of hydrocinnamic acid, dehydroanonaine, and leucinic acid. Furthermore, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) experiments revealed that BBR-enriched gut microbiota alleviated hepatic lipid deposition and intestinal inflammation compared with those chicks that received a gut microbiota by HELP. Collectively, our study provided evidence that BBR effectively alleviated FLHS induced by HELP by reshaping the microbial and metabolic homeostasis within the liver-gut axis.

2.
Front Immunol ; 15: 1416961, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38983862

RESUMO

Depression, projected to be the predominant contributor to the global disease burden, is a complex condition with diverse symptoms including mood disturbances and cognitive impairments. Traditional treatments such as medication and psychotherapy often fall short, prompting the pursuit of alternative interventions. Recent research has highlighted the significant role of gut microbiota in mental health, influencing emotional and neural regulation. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), the infusion of fecal matter from a healthy donor into the gut of a patient, emerges as a promising strategy to ameliorate depressive symptoms by restoring gut microbial balance. The microbial-gut-brain (MGB) axis represents a critical pathway through which to potentially rectify dysbiosis and modulate neuropsychiatric outcomes. Preclinical studies reveal that FMT can enhance neurochemicals and reduce inflammatory markers, thereby alleviating depressive behaviors. Moreover, FMT has shown promise in clinical settings, improving gastrointestinal symptoms and overall quality of life in patients with depression. The review highlights the role of the gut-brain axis in depression and the need for further research to validate the long-term safety and efficacy of FMT, identify specific therapeutic microbial strains, and develop targeted microbial modulation strategies. Advancing our understanding of FMT could revolutionize depression treatment, shifting the paradigm toward microbiome-targeting therapies.


Assuntos
Eixo Encéfalo-Intestino , Depressão , Disbiose , Transplante de Microbiota Fecal , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Humanos , Depressão/terapia , Depressão/microbiologia , Disbiose/terapia , Animais , Resultado do Tratamento
3.
Biosci Microbiota Food Health ; 43(3): 162-169, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38966047

RESUMO

Diversion colitis (DC) is characterized by mucosal inflammation in the defunctioned segment of the colon following a colostomy or ileostomy. The major causes of DC are an increase in the number of aerobic bacteria, a lack of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), and immune disorders in the diverted colon. However, its exact pathogenesis remains unknown. Various treatment strategies for DC have been explored, although none have been definitively established. Treatment approaches such as SCFAs, 5-aminosalicylic acid enemas, steroid enemas, and irrigation with fibers have been attempted, yielding various degrees of efficacies in mitigating mucosal inflammation. However, only individual case reports demonstrating the limited effect of the following therapies have been published: leukocytapheresis, dextrose (hypertonic glucose) spray, infliximab, an elemental diet, and coconut oil. The usefulness of probiotics for treating DC has recently been reported. Furthermore, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a promising treatment for DC. This review provides an update on the treatment strategies of DC, with a particular focus on FMT and its relationship with the intestinal microbiota. FMT may become the first choice of treatment for some patients in the future because of its low medical costs, ease of use, and minimal side effects. Furthermore, FMT can also be used for postoperative DC prophylaxis.

4.
Front Pharmacol ; 15: 1415844, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38966558

RESUMO

Introduction: Aged-related brain damage and gut microbiome disruption are common. Research affirms that modulating the microbiota-gut-brain axis can help reduce age-related brain damage. Methods: Ginseng, esteemed in traditional Chinese medicine, is recognized for its anti-aging capabilities. However, previous Ginseng anti-aging studies have largely focused on diseased animal models. To this end, efforts were hereby made to explore the potential neuroprotective effects of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from Ginseng-supplemented aged mice to those pre-treated with antibiotics. Results: As a result, FMT with specific modifications in natural aging mice improved animal weight gain, extended the telomere length, anti-oxidative stress in brain tissue, regulated the serum levels of cytokine, and balanced the proportion of Treg cells. Besides, FMT increased the abundance of beneficial bacteria of Lachnospiraceae, Dubosiella, Bacteroides, etc. and decreased the levels of potential pathogenic bacteria of Helicobacter and Lachnoclostridium in the fecal samples of natural aged mice. This revealed that FMT remarkably reshaped gut microbiome. Additionally, FMT-treated aged mice showed increased levels of metabolites of Ursolic acid, ß-carotene, S-Adenosylmethionine, Spermidine, Guanosine, Celecoxib, Linoleic acid, etc., which were significantly positively correlated with critical beneficial bacteria above. Additionally, these identified critical microbiota and metabolites were mainly enriched in the pathways of Amino acid metabolism, Lipid metabolism, Nucleotide metabolism, etc. Furthermore, FMT downregulated p53/p21/Rb signaling and upregulated p16/p14, ATM/synapsin I/synaptophysin/PSD95, CREB/ERK/AKT signaling in brain damage following natural aging. Discussion: Overall, the study demonstrates that reprogramming of gut microbiota by FMT impedes brain damage in the natural aging process, possibly through the regulation of microbiota-gut-brain axis.

5.
Microbiome ; 12(1): 122, 2024 Jul 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38970126

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a therapeutic intervention used to treat diseases associated with the gut microbiome. In the human gut microbiome, phages have been implicated in influencing human health, with successful engraftment of donor phages correlated with FMT treatment efficacy. The impact that gastrointestinal phages exert on human health has primarily been connected to their ability to modulate the bacterial communities in the gut. Nonetheless, how FMT affects recipients' phage populations, and in turn, how this influences the gut environment, is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of FMT on the phageome composition of participants within the Gut Bugs Trial (GBT), a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial that investigated the efficacy of FMT in treating obesity and comorbidities in adolescents. Stool samples collected from donors at the time of treatment and recipients at four time points (i.e., baseline and 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 26 weeks post-intervention), underwent shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Phage sequences were identified and characterized in silico to examine evidence of phage engraftment and to assess the extent of FMT-induced alterations in the recipients' phageome composition. RESULTS: Donor phages engrafted stably in recipients following FMT, composing a significant proportion of their phageome for the entire course of the study (33.8 ± 1.2% in females and 33.9 ± 3.7% in males). Phage engraftment varied between donors and donor engraftment efficacy was positively correlated with their phageome alpha diversity. FMT caused a shift in recipients' phageome toward the donors' composition and increased phageome alpha diversity and variability over time. CONCLUSIONS: FMT significantly altered recipients' phage and, overall, microbial populations. The increase in microbial diversity and variability is consistent with a shift in microbial population dynamics. This proposes that phages play a critical role in modulating the gut environment and suggests novel approaches to understanding the efficacy of FMT in altering the recipient's microbiome. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The Gut Bugs Trial was registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTR N12615001351505). Trial protocol: the trial protocol is available at https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/9/4/e026174 . Video Abstract.


Assuntos
Bacteriófagos , Transplante de Microbiota Fecal , Fezes , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Obesidade , Humanos , Transplante de Microbiota Fecal/métodos , Bacteriófagos/fisiologia , Bacteriófagos/classificação , Bacteriófagos/isolamento & purificação , Bacteriófagos/genética , Fezes/microbiologia , Fezes/virologia , Obesidade/terapia , Obesidade/microbiologia , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Adolescente , Masculino , Bactérias/classificação , Bactérias/virologia , Bactérias/genética , Metagenômica/métodos , Resultado do Tratamento
6.
Front Pharmacol ; 15: 1407925, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38974034

RESUMO

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common and slow-progressing neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and non-motor symptoms, including gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunctions. Over the last years, the microbiota-gut-brain (MGB) axis is emerging as a bacterial-neuro-immune ascending pathway that contributes to the progression of PD. Indeed, PD patients are characterized by changes in gut microbiota composition, alterations of intestinal epithelial barrier (IEB) and enteric neurogenic/inflammatory responses that, besides determining intestinal disturbances, contribute to brain pathology. In this context, despite the causal relationship between gut dysbiosis, impaired MGB axis and PD remains to be elucidated, emerging evidence shows that MGB axis modulation can represent a suitable therapeutical strategy for the treatment of PD. This review provides an overview of the available knowledge about the beneficial effects of gut-directed therapies, including dietary interventions, prebiotics, probiotics, synbiotics and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), in both PD patients and animal models. In this context, particular attention has been devoted to the mechanisms by which the modulation of MGB axis could halt or slow down PD pathology and, most importantly, how these approaches can be included in the clinical practice.

7.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 11(7): ofae309, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38975247

RESUMO

Background: Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is recommended for the treatment of recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (rCDI). In the current study, we evaluated rates of rCDI and subsequent FMT in a large metropolitan area. We compared demographic and clinical differences in FMT recipients and nonrecipients and quantified differences in outcomes based on treatment modality. Methods: A retrospective community-wide cohort study was conducted using surveillance data from the Georgia Emerging Infections Program, the Georgia Discharge Data System, and locally maintained lists of FMTs completed across multiple institutions to evaluate all episodes of C. difficile infection (CDI) in this region between 2016 and 2019. Cases were limited to patients with rCDI and ≥1 documented hospitalization. A propensity-matched cohort was created to compare rates of recurrence and mortality among matched patients based on FMT receipt. Results: A total of 3038 (22%) of 13 852 patients with CDI had rCDI during this period. In a propensity-matched cohort, patients who received an FMT had lower rates of rCDI (odds ratio, 0.6 [95% confidence interval, .38-.96) and a lower mortality rate (0.26 [.08-.82]). Of patients with rCDI, only 6% had received FMT. Recipients were more likely to be young, white, and female and less likely to have renal disease, diabetes, or liver disease, though these chronic illnesses were associated with higher rates of rCDI. Conclusions: These data suggest FMT has been underused in a population-based assessment and that FMT substantially reduced risk of recurrence and death.

8.
BMC Gastroenterol ; 24(1): 217, 2024 Jul 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38970007

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Multiple randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have investigated the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but have yielded inconsistent results. We updated the short-term and long-term efficacy of FMT in treating IBS, and performed a first-of-its-kind exploration of the relationship between gut microbiota and emotions. METHODS: We conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library using various search strategies to identify all eligible studies. The inclusion criteria for data extraction were randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that investigated the efficacy of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) compared to placebo in adult patients (≥ 18 years old) with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). A meta-analysis was then performed to assess the summary relative risk (RR) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Out of 3,065 potentially relevant records, a total of 10 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) involving 573 subjects met the eligibility criteria for inclusion in the meta-analysis. The meta-analyses revealed no significant differences in short-term (12 weeks) (RR 0.20, 95% CI -0.04 to 0.44), long-term (52 weeks) global improvement (RR 1.38, 95% CI 0.87 to 2.21), besides short-term (12 weeks) (SMD - 48.16, 95% CI -102.13 to 5.81, I2 = 90%) and long-term (24 weeks) (SMD 2.16, 95% CI -60.52 to 64.83, I2 = 68%) IBS-SSS. There was statistically significant difference in short-term improvement of IBS-QoL (SMD 10.11, 95% CI 0.71 to 19.51, I2 = 82%), although there was a high risk of bias. In terms of long-term improvement (24 weeks and 54 weeks), there were no significant differences between the FMT and placebo groups (SMD 7.56, 95% CI 1.60 to 13.52, I2 = 0%; SMD 6.62, 95% CI -0.85 to 14.08, I2 = 0%). Sensitivity analysis indicated that there were visible significant effects observed when the criteria were based on Rome IV criteria (RR 16.48, 95% CI 7.22 to 37.62) and Gastroscopy (RR 3.25, 95%CI 2.37 to 4.47), Colonoscopy (RR 1.42, 95% CI 0.98 to 2.05). when using mixed stool FMT based on data from two RCTs, no significant difference was observed (RR 0.94, 95% CI 0.66 to -1.34). The remission of depression exhibited no significant difference between the FMT and placebo groups at the 12-week mark (SMD - 0.26, 95% CI -3.09 to 2.58), and at 24 weeks (SMD - 2.26, 95% CI -12.96 to 8.45). Furthermore, major adverse events associated with FMT were transient and self-limiting. DISCUSSION: Based on the available randomized controlled trials (RCTs), the current evidence does not support the efficacy of FMT in improving global IBS symptoms in the long term. The differential results observed in subgroup analyses raise questions about the accurate identification of suitable populations for FMT. Further investigation is needed to better understand the reasons behind these inconsistent findings and to determine the true potential of FMT as a treatment for IBS.


Assuntos
Transplante de Microbiota Fecal , Síndrome do Intestino Irritável , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Síndrome do Intestino Irritável/terapia , Síndrome do Intestino Irritável/microbiologia , Transplante de Microbiota Fecal/métodos , Humanos , Resultado do Tratamento , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Adulto , Emoções
9.
Nutrients ; 16(13)2024 Jul 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38999862

RESUMO

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common gastrointestinal disorder with gut microbiota imbalance playing a significant role. There are increasing numbers of research studies exploring treatment options involving probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT), but it is still uncertain which treatment option is superior. The research was conducted on various databases and unpublished trial data (up to February 2023). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were screened for adult patients with IBS comparing interventions with placebo. Probiotics, prebiotics, synbiotics, and FMT were assessed for their impact using mean difference and Bayesian network meta-analysis. Out of 6528 articles, 54 were included for probiotics, 7 for prebiotics/synbiotics, and 6 for FMT. Probiotics showed improvement in IBS symptoms, particularly with Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus strains. Prebiotics and synbiotics did not show significant improvement. Network meta-analysis indicated the favorable effects of probiotics (OR = 0.53, 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.59) and FMT (OR = 0.46, 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.64) on IBS, with no serious adverse events reported. In short, probiotics and FMT are effective for managing IBS, with Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus being dominant strains. However, the most effective probiotic combination or strain remains unclear, while prebiotics and synbiotics did not show significant improvement.


Assuntos
Transplante de Microbiota Fecal , Síndrome do Intestino Irritável , Metanálise em Rede , Prebióticos , Probióticos , Simbióticos , Síndrome do Intestino Irritável/terapia , Síndrome do Intestino Irritável/microbiologia , Humanos , Prebióticos/administração & dosagem , Probióticos/uso terapêutico , Probióticos/administração & dosagem , Simbióticos/administração & dosagem , Resultado do Tratamento , Microbioma Gastrointestinal , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Bifidobacterium , Adulto , Feminino , Lactobacillus , Masculino
10.
Clin Cosmet Investig Dermatol ; 17: 1613-1619, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39006130

RESUMO

Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a common skin disease, the pathogenesis of which has not been fully elucidated. The gut microbiota is the largest micro-ecosystem in the human body that affects the immune system and skin barrier function. Recent studies have shown that in addition to the environmental factors, skin barrier, genetic factors and immune response, gut microbiota disturbance may also cause AD. This review described the correlation of AD with gut microbiota and existing research status of AD treatment via targeting gut microbiota.

11.
Cureus ; 16(6): e62265, 2024 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39006586

RESUMO

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is the administration of fecal bacteria from a healthy donor into the intestinal tract of a recipient in order to directly change the recipient's gut microbial composition and confer a health benefit. The relationship between the gut microbiome and the central nervous system, termed the gut-brain axis, has been a frequent topic of gut microbiome studies. Commensal gut bacteria communicate with the central nervous system through various hormones, cytokines, and neural pathways. Therefore, influencing the gut microbiome via FMT may have the potential in treating symptoms of neurodegenerative conditions. This study aims to identify current uses of FMT in treating neurodegenerative diseases and highlight areas of future investigation. Following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) framework, a literature search was conducted of peer-reviewed sources on September 27, 2022, from Embase, MEDLINE, Web of Science, and Cochrane Central. Search terms were utilized that were related to the application of FMT and neurodegenerative disorders and limited those human studies, those that were published in English, and those that were published between 2017 and 2022. The initial search yielded 450 unique articles, and after the assessment of the title and abstract for inclusion and exclusion criteria, six articles were identified for full-text review. Studies that focused on either Parkinson's disease (PD) or multiple sclerosis (MS) demonstrated improvements in both motor symptoms and non-motor symptoms. FMT was also shown to provide significant relief of constipation and general gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in all conditions studied. The studies related to MS showed the most mixed results with regard to symptomatic improvement. The data on the use of FMT as a treatment for neurodegenerative disorders is limited; however, studies have shown not only improvement in GI symptoms but also improvement in the cognitive symptoms of PD and dementia. The data on FMT as a treatment to improve the motor symptoms of PD is both more complete and more compelling than the data on the motor symptoms of MS. The studies that were reviewed showed no major adverse effects of FMT and generally promising results. There is a strong case to be made for larger, more well-controlled studies to be done on FMT and its potential use as a treatment not only for GI symptoms but for the motor and cognitive symptoms of neurodegenerative diseases.

13.
Neurobiol Dis ; 199: 106598, 2024 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39002809

RESUMO

Myocardial infarction (MI) and depression are leading causes of mortality and morbidity globally, and these conditions are increasing recognized as being fundamentally interconnected. The recently recognized gut-heart-brain axis offers insights into depression following MI, but effective treatments for this comorbidity remain lacking. To address this medical need, we employed an animal model of MI to investigate the potential repurposing of sotagliflozin (SOTA), an approved sodium-glucose cotransporter 1 and 2 (SGLT1/2) inhibitor for diabetes, for managing depression following MI and identifying potential SOTA-associated microbial mechanisms. SOTA treatment improved cardiac dysfunction and alleviated depression-like behaviors induced by MI, accompanied by alterations in gut microbiota composition, such as changes in the Prevotellaceae NK3B31 group, Alloprevotella, and Prevotellaceae UCG-001. Moreover, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) using fecal samples from SOTA-treated MI mice demonstrated that gut microbiota contributed to the beneficial effects of SOTA on cardiac dysfunction and depression-like behaviors in MI mice. Intriguingly, FMT-based intervention and concordance analysis of gut microbiota before and after FMT suggested that Prevotellaceae NK3B31 group, Alloprevotella, and Prevotellaceae UCG-001 were associated with the beneficial effects of SOTA. Furthermore, functional prediction of gut microbiota and correlation analysis support the significance of these dynamic microbial communities. In conclusion, these findings suggest that SOTA could serve as a potential drug to ameliorate cardiac dysfunction and depressive symptoms in MI patients via through the gut-heart-brain axis.

14.
Front Vet Sci ; 11: 1385469, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38978633

RESUMO

Introduction: Anxiety and cognitive dysfunction are frequent, difficult to treat and burdensome comorbidities in human and canine epilepsy. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been shown to modulate behavior in rodent models by altering the gastrointestinal microbiota (GIM). This study aims to investigate the beneficial effects of FMT on behavioral comorbidities in a canine translational model of epilepsy. Methods: Nine dogs with drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE) and behavioral comorbidities were recruited. The fecal donor had epilepsy with unremarkable behavior, which exhibited a complete response to phenobarbital, resulting in it being seizure-free long term. FMTs were performed three times, two weeks apart, and the dogs had follow-up visits at three and six months after FMTs. Comprehensive behavioral analysis, including formerly validated questionnaires and behavioral tests for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)- and fear- and anxiety-like behavior, as well as cognitive dysfunction, were conducted, followed by objective computational analysis. Blood samples were taken for the analysis of antiseizure drug (ASD) concentrations, hematology, and biochemistry. Urine neurotransmitter concentrations were measured. Fecal samples were subjected to analysis using shallow DNA shotgun sequencing, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based Dysbiosis Index (DI) assessment, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) quantification. Results: Following FMT, the patients showed improvement in ADHD-like behavior, fear- and anxiety-like behavior, and quality of life. The excitatory neurotransmitters aspartate and glutamate were decreased, while the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and GABA/glutamate ratio were increased compared to baseline. Only minor taxonomic changes were observed, with a decrease in Firmicutes and a Blautia_A species, while a Ruminococcus species increased. Functional gene analysis, SCFA concentration, blood parameters, and ASD concentrations remained unchanged. Discussion: Behavioral comorbidities in canine IE could be alleviated by FMT. This study highlights FMT's potential as a novel approach to improving behavioral comorbidities and enhancing the quality of life in canine patients with epilepsy.

15.
Front Neurosci ; 18: 1415167, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38979127

RESUMO

Background: The clinical impact of washed microbiota transplantation (WMT) from healthy donors in sleep disorder (SD) patients is unclear. This study aimed to investigate the effect of WMT in SD patients. Methods: The clinical data were collected from patients with different indications receiving 1-3 courses of WMT, divided into two groups by 7 points of PSQI scale. The score of PQSI and SF-36 scale was used to assess the improvement in sleep quality and life quality among patients with sleep disorders following WMT. Finally, 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing was performed on fecal samples of patients with sleep disorders before and after WMT. Results: WMT significantly improved sleep quality in patients with sleep disorder in the short and medium term. WMT significantly improved sleep latency, sleep time and total score in the short term. WMT significantly improved sleep quality and total score in the medium term. In terms of sleep quality and sleep latency, the improvement value also increased with the increase of treatment course, and the improvement effect of multiple treatment course was better than that of single and double treatment course. In the total score, the improvement effect of double and multiple treatment was better than that of single treatment. WMT also improved quality of life in the sleep disorder group. WMT significantly improved general health, vitality, social function and mental health in the short term. WMT significantly improved role-physical, general health, vitality, and mental health in the medium term. WMT regulated the disturbed gut microbiota in patients with sleep disorders. In the normal sleep group, WMT had no effect on the decline of sleep quality in the short, medium and long term, and had an improving effect on the quality of life. Conclusion: WMT could significantly improve sleep quality and life quality in patients with sleep disorders with no adverse events. The improvement in sleep quality resulting from WMT could lead to an overall enhancement in life quality. WMT could be a potentially effective treatment for patients with sleep disorders by regulating the gut microbiota.

16.
Heliyon ; 10(12): e33214, 2024 Jun 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-39021924

RESUMO

Background: The pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) may be closely related to immune regulation and inflammatory cytokines induced by specific flora. Repairing the intestinal flora may alter the immune response in MS patients, thus opening up novel approaches for the treatment of MS. Objective: We aimed to test the therapeutic effect of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and the characteristics of intestinal microbiota composition changes, explore the potential mechanisms of FMT treatment. Methods: EAE animals were treated with FMT, with the therapeutic effects were evaluated by observing neurological scores and measuring serum levels of cortisol, IL-17, and TLR-2. Fecal microbiome 16S rRNA sequencing was used to profile changes in microbiota composition, and adrenalectomy pretreatment was used to test whether FMT effects were dependent on HPA axis function. Results: FMT improved neurological function and reduced serum IL-17 to levels that were close to the control group. FMT reestablished intestinal homeostasis by altering the structure of the intestinal flora, increasing the abundance of beneficial flora, and regulating intestinal metabolites. We found that the therapeutic effects of FMT depended partly on the efferent function of the HPA axis; surgical disruption of the HPA axis altered the abundance and diversity of the intestinal flora. Conclusion: FMT showed a neuroprotective effect on EAE by increasing the abundance of the beneficial flora, rebuilding intestinal homeostasis, reducing IL-17 and cortisol serum levels, and promoting serum TLR-2; the therapeutic effect of FMT on EAE is partly dependent on the HPA axis.

17.
Front Microbiol ; 15: 1403892, 2024.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38962126

RESUMO

Introduction: The gut microbiota and the microbiota-gut-brain axis have gained considerable attention in recent years, emerging as key players in the mechanisms that mediate the occurrence and progression of many central nervous system-related diseases, including epilepsy. In clinical practice, one of the side effects of quinolone antibiotics is a lower seizure threshold or aggravation. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Methods: We aimed to unravel the intrinsic mechanisms through 16S rRNA sequencing and serum untargeted metabolomic analysis to shed light on the effects of gut microbiota in ciprofloxacin-induced seizure susceptibility and lithium pilocarpine-induced epilepsy rat models. Results: We observed that ciprofloxacin treatment increased seizure susceptibility and caused gut dysbiosis. We also found similar changes in the gut microbiota of rats with lithium pilocarpine-induced epilepsy. Notably, the levels of Akkermansia and Bacteroides significantly increased in both the ciprofloxacin-induced seizure susceptibility and lithium pilocarpine-induced epilepsy rat models. However, Marvinbryantia, Oscillibacter, and Ruminococcaceae_NK4A214_group showed a coincidental reduction. Additionally, the serum untargeted metabolomic analysis revealed decreased levels of indole-3-propionic acid, a product of tryptophan-indole metabolism, after ciprofloxacin treatment, similar to those in the plasma of lithium pilocarpine-induced epilepsy in rats. Importantly, alterations in the gut microbiota, seizure susceptibility, and indole-3-propionic acid levels can be restored by fecal microbiota transplantation. Conclusion: In summary, our findings provide evidence that ciprofloxacin-induced seizure susceptibility is partially mediated by the gut microbiota and tryptophan-indole metabolism. These associations may play a role in epileptogenesis, and impacting the development progression and treatment outcomes of epilepsy.

18.
Poult Sci ; 103(9): 103926, 2024 Jun 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38964253

RESUMO

The circadian misalignment (CM) disordered circadian rhythms exert adverse effects on animals. Poultry as one of animals suffers health and welfare problems due to long-term lighting photoperiods caused by CM. However, the roles of CM on organ development, cell growth, metabolism and immune are still unclear in chickens. In this study, a Chinese dual-purpose native breed, was used to explore the effects of CM on transcriptomic pattern of brain and cell energy biogenesis, and further fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) was applied to investigate its "therapy" effect from CM suffering. Our results showed that the CM led to stunting in brain and small intestine of chicken. CM decreased of cell proliferation, and energy production, mtDNA copies and expression of genes related to cell cycle or mitochondrial biogenetics, while it upregulated the reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and the sensitivity to inflammation. Interestingly, FMT rescued the organ developmental defects and cell dysfunctions induced by CM. Circadian misalignment brought about abnormal tissue and cell developments, energy biogenesis, and immune response in birds. This study provided a comprehensive perspective on understanding the regulation of CM and FMT on bird development and welfare.

19.
Future Microbiol ; : 1-9, 2024 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38989699

RESUMO

There is an unmet need for effective treatments of Clostridioides difficile infection, an emerging health crisis in the United States. The management of C. difficile infection should include treatment of active infection and a strategy to prevent recurrence. Current gold standard therapy includes oral antibiotics which predispose patients to gut dysbiosis and increase the risk of recurrent infection. Addressing dysbiosis via fecal microbiota transplantation is an active and promising area of research, but studies have lacked standardization which makes outcome and safety data difficult to interpret. Rebyota™, formerly known as RBX2660, is a live biotherapeutic product designed using a standardized protocol and manufacturing process that has been shown to be effective for preventing recurrent C. difficile infection.


Clostridioides difficile infection is becoming more common in the USA and causes profuse diarrhea that can be deadly. Treatment with antibiotics causes dysregulation of the bacteria in the gut putting patients at a higher risk of reinfection. Fecal microbiota live ­ jslm is a new therapy approved by the US FDA that uses stool from healthy donors to return gut bacteria levels to normal after treatment for a C. diff infection.

20.
Microbiol Spectr ; : e0038824, 2024 Jul 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38990027

RESUMO

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an innovative and promising treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), which is related to the capability of FMT to supply functional microorganisms to improve recipient gut health. Numerous studies have highlighted considerable variability in the efficacy of FMT interventions for IBD. Several factors, including the composition of the donor microorganisms, significantly affect the efficacy of FMT in the treatment of IBD. Consequently, identifying the functional microorganisms in the donor is crucial for enhancing the efficacy of FMT. To explore potential common anti-inflammatory bacteria with therapeutic implications for IBD, germ-free (GF) BALB/c mice were pre-colonized with fecal microbiota obtained from diverse donors, including Macaca fascicularis (MCC_FMT), Bama miniature pigs (BP_FMT), beagle dogs (BD_FMT), and C57BL/6 J mice (Mice_FMT). Subsequently, mice were treated with dextran sodium sulfate (DSS). As expected, the symptoms of colitis were alleviated by MCC_FMT, BP_FMT, BD_FMT, and Mice_FMT, as demonstrated by the prevention of an elevated disease activity index in mice. Additionally, the utilization of distinct donors protected the intestinal barrier and contributed to the regulation of cytokine homeostasis. Metagenomic sequencing data showed that the microbial community structure and dominant species were significantly different among the four groups, which may be linked to variations in the anti-inflammatory efficacy observed in the respective groups. Notably, Lactobacillus reuteri and Flavonifractor plautii were consistently present in all four groups. L. reuteri exhibited a significant negative correlation with IL-1ß, and animal studies further confirmed its efficacy in alleviating IBD, suggesting the presence of common functional bacteria across different donors that exert anti-inflammatory effects. This study provides essential foundational data for the potential clinical applications of FMT.IMPORTANCEDespite variations in efficacy observed among donors, numerous studies have underscored the potential of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) for managing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), indicating the presence of shared anti-IBD bacterial species. In the present study, the collective anti-inflammatory efficacy observed across all four donor groups prompted the identification of two common bacterial species using metagenomics. A significant negative correlation between Lactobacillus reuteri and IL-1ß was revealed. Furthermore, mice gavaged with L. reuteri successfully managed the colitis challenge induced by dextran sodium sulfate (DSS), suggesting that L. reuteri may act as an efficacious bacterium mediating shared anti-inflammatory effects among variable donors. This finding highlights the utilization of variable donors to screen FMT core bacteria, which may be a novel strategy for developing FMT applications.

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