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1.
Cureus ; 16(4): e58483, 2024 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38765403

RESUMO

Ogilvie's syndrome is a colonic pseudo-obstruction that results in colonic dilation without a mechanical obstruction. We discuss a 33-year-old, 36-week pregnant, G1P0L0A0 female who presented with severe pre-eclampsia. Less than 24 hours after induction by vaginal delivery, she developed significant abdominal pain and distention. On a CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis, she was diagnosed with Ogilvie's syndrome due to a finding of large bowel dilation with an abrupt transition point at the splenic flexure without a noted mass. She was initially treated conservatively with nasogastric tube decompression and IV fluid resuscitation. When these conservative measures failed, neostigmine was administered with transient improvement in symptoms. Despite the appropriate administration of neostigmine and initial relief of symptoms with stool output, the patient ultimately required surgical intervention with the creation of a transverse loop colostomy. The development of Ogilvie's syndrome in the postpartum period is a very rare finding, particularly after a vaginal delivery.

2.
Br J Clin Pharmacol ; 90(7): 1667-1676, 2024 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38583490

RESUMO

AIMS: Residual neuromuscular blockade has been linked to pulmonary complications in the postoperative period. This study aimed to determine whether sugammadex was associated with a lower risk of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) compared with neostigmine. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary academic medical center. Patients ≥18 year of age undergoing noncardiac surgical procedures with general anesthesia and mechanical ventilation were enrolled between January 2019 and September 2021. We identified all patients receiving rocuronium and reversal with neostigmine or sugammadex via electronic medical record review. The primary endpoint was a composite of PPCs (including pneumonia, atelectasis, respiratory failure, pulmonary embolism, pleural effusion, or pneumothorax). The incidence of PPCs was compared using propensity score analysis. RESULTS: A total of 1786 patients were included in this study. Among these patients, 976 (54.6%) received neostigmine, and 810 (45.4%) received sugammadex. In the whole sample, PPCs occurred in 81 (4.54%) subjects (7.04% sugammadex vs. 2.46% neostigmine). Baseline covariates were well balanced between groups after overlap weighting. Patients in the sugammadex group had similar risk (overlap weighting OR: 0.75; 95% CI: 0.40 to 1.41) compared to neostigmine. The sensitivity analysis showed consistent results. In subgroup analysis, the interaction P-value for the reversal agents stratified by surgery duration was 0.011. CONCLUSION: There was no significant difference in the rate of PPCs when the neuromuscular blockade was reversed with sugammadex compared to neostigmine. Patients undergoing prolonged surgery may benefit from sugammadex, which needs to be further investigated.


Assuntos
Pneumopatias , Neostigmina , Bloqueio Neuromuscular , Fármacos Neuromusculares não Despolarizantes , Complicações Pós-Operatórias , Rocurônio , Sugammadex , Humanos , Neostigmina/efeitos adversos , Neostigmina/administração & dosagem , Sugammadex/efeitos adversos , Sugammadex/administração & dosagem , Estudos Retrospectivos , Masculino , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Bloqueio Neuromuscular/efeitos adversos , Bloqueio Neuromuscular/métodos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/prevenção & controle , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Idoso , Rocurônio/administração & dosagem , Rocurônio/efeitos adversos , Fármacos Neuromusculares não Despolarizantes/efeitos adversos , Fármacos Neuromusculares não Despolarizantes/administração & dosagem , Pneumopatias/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Respiração Artificial/efeitos adversos , Anestesia Geral/efeitos adversos
3.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38615713

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Some studies investigating the effect of calcium on neostigmine-induced recovery of neuromuscular blockade have shown that this combination promotes neuromuscular recovery, but does not significantly affect the incidence of postoperative residual curarization and time to extubation. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of 10 mg/kg calcium chloride co-administered with neostigmine on early recovery and time to extubation. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study included 88 ASA I-II patients aged between 18 and 65 years who were scheduled for elective surgery lasting at least 1 h under general anaesthesia in which 10 mg/kg of calcium chloride or the same volume of normal saline was co-administered with 5 µg/kg of neostigmine at the end of surgery. Time to extubation (time from neostigmine administration to extubation), time from neostigmine administration to TOF ratio (TOFr) 0.9 (neuromuscular recovery), and the incidence of residual neuromuscular blockade (RNMB) and other adverse effects were recorded. RESULTS: Median (Q1, Q3) extubation time was significantly shorter in the calcium group vs. the placebo group (6.5 min [5.52-7.43] vs. 9.78 min [8.35-11]), P < .001. Median neuromuscular recovery time in the calcium group was 5 min vs. 7.1 min in the placebo group, P < .001. Patients in the calcium group had significantly higher TOFr and lower incidence of RNMB at 5 and 10 min vs. the placebo group, and no significant side effects. CONCLUSION: Calcium chloride at a dose of 10 mg/kg co-administered with neostigmine promotes early neuromuscular recovery and reduces time to extubation by about 32%.


Assuntos
Extubação , Período de Recuperação da Anestesia , Cloreto de Cálcio , Neostigmina , Bloqueio Neuromuscular , Neostigmina/administração & dosagem , Neostigmina/farmacologia , Humanos , Método Duplo-Cego , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Feminino , Adulto , Estudos Prospectivos , Cloreto de Cálcio/administração & dosagem , Cloreto de Cálcio/farmacologia , Fatores de Tempo , Adulto Jovem , Adolescente , Idoso , Inibidores da Colinesterase/administração & dosagem , Inibidores da Colinesterase/farmacologia
4.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 24(1): 123, 2024 Apr 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38561654

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Glycopyrrolate-neostigmine (G/N) for reversing neuromuscular blockade (NMB) causes fewer changes in heart rate (HR) than atropine-neostigmine (A/N). This advantage may be especially beneficial for elderly patients. Therefore, this study aimed to compare the cardiovascular effects of G/N and A/N for the reversal of NMB in elderly patients. METHODS: Elderly patients aged 65-80 years who were scheduled for elective non-cardiac surgery under general anesthesia were randomly assigned to the glycopyrrolate group (group G) or the atropine group (group A). Following the last administration of muscle relaxants for more than 30 min, group G received 4 ug/kg glycopyrrolate and 20 ug/kg neostigmine, while group A received 10 ug/kg atropine and 20 ug/kg neostigmine. HR, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and ST segment in lead II (ST-II) were measured 1 min before administration and 1-15 min after administration. RESULTS: HR was significantly lower in group G compared to group A at 2-8 min after administration (P < 0.05). MAP was significantly lower in group G compared to group A at 1-4 min after administration (P < 0.05). ST-II was significantly depressed in group A compared to group G at 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 14, and 15 min after administration (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In comparison to A/N, G/N for reversing residual NMB in the elderly has a more stable HR, MAP, and ST-II within 15 min after administration.


Assuntos
Sistema Cardiovascular , Recuperação Demorada da Anestesia , Bloqueio Neuromuscular , Idoso , Humanos , Neostigmina/farmacologia , Glicopirrolato , Atropina/farmacologia
5.
Hernia ; 2024 Apr 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38683482

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Post-operative urinary retention (POUR) is a known complication of hernia surgery. Minimally invasive inguinal hernia repair (IHR) is typically done under general anesthesia with neuromuscular blockade (NMB), which is commonly reversed with an anticholinesterase inhibitor paired with an anticholinergic agent. Sugammadex is a unique NMB reversal agent that does not have to be paired with an anticholinergic. We sought to explore the role of sugammadex in reducing the rate of POUR following these procedures. METHODS: Data were collected retrospectively at a single institution between February 2016 and October 2019. We identified and studied patients who underwent minimally invasive IHR and received either sugammadex or neostigmine/glycopyrrolate for NMB reversal. The primary endpoint was POUR requiring bladder catheterization. Secondary endpoints included post-operative and 30-day readmissions. RESULTS: 274 patients were included in this study (143 received neostigmine and glycopyrrolate, 131 sugammadex). The sugammadex patients were on average 5 years older than the neostigmine/ glycopyrrolate patients (63.2 vs 58.2, p = 0.003), and received less median intravenous fluids (IVF) (900 ml vs 1000 ml; p = 0.015). There was a significant difference in the rate of POUR between the sugammadex and neostigmine/glycopyrrolate patients (0.0% vs 8.4%, p ≤ 0.001). The difference remained significant after controlling for age and IVF. The odds of POUR for those who received neostigmine/glycopyrrolate were 25 × higher than the odds of those who received sugammadex. CONCLUSION: The results of this study reflect the protective role of sugammadex against POUR in minimally invasive IHR cases.

6.
BJA Educ ; 24(1): 13-22, 2024 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38495745
7.
J Anesth Analg Crit Care ; 4(1): 9, 2024 Feb 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38331969

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Thoracic surgery is a high-risk surgery especially for the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. Postoperative residual paralysis has been shown to be a risk factor for pulmonary complications. Nevertheless, there are few data in the literature concerning the use of neuromuscular blocking agent antagonists in patients undergoing lung surgery. METHODS: Seventy patients were randomized in three Italian centers to receive sugammadex or neostigmine at the end of thoracic surgery according to the depth of the residual neuromuscular block. The primary outcome was the time from reversal administration to a train-of-four ratio (TOFR) of 0.9. Secondary outcomes were the time to TOFR of 1.0, to extubation, to postanesthesia unit (PACU) discharge, postoperative complications until 30 days after surgery, and length of hospital stay. RESULTS: Median time to recovery to a TOFR of 0.9 was significantly shorter in the sugammadex group compared to the neostigmine one (88 vs. 278 s - P < 0.001). The percentage of patients who recovered to a TOFR of 0.9 within 5 min from reversal administration was 94.4% and 58.8% in the sugammadex and neostigmine groups, respectively (P < 0.001). The time to extubation, but not the PACU stay time, was significantly shorter in the sugammadex group. No differences were found between the study groups as regards postoperative complications and length of hospital stay. The superiority of sugammadex in shortening the recovery time was confirmed for both deep/moderate and shallow/minimal neuromuscular block. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients undergoing thoracic surgery, sugammadex ensures a faster recovery from the neuromuscular block and earlier extubation compared to neostigmine.

8.
J Clin Anesth ; 93: 111344, 2024 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38007845

RESUMO

STUDY OBJECTIVE: Perioperative neuromuscular blocking agents are pharmacologically reversed to minimize complications associated with residual neuromuscular block. Neuromuscular block reversal with anticholinesterases (e.g., neostigmine) require coadministration of an anticholinergic agent (e.g., glycopyrrolate) to mitigate muscarinic activity; however, sugammadex, devoid of cholinergic activity, does not require anticholinergic coadministration. Single-institution studies have found decreased incidence of post-operative urinary retention associated with sugammadex reversal. This study used a multicenter database to better understand the association between neuromuscular block reversal technique and post-operative urinary retention. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study utilizing large healthcare database. SETTING: Non-profit, non-governmental and community and teaching hospitals and health systems from rural and urban areas. PATIENTS: 61,898 matched adult inpatients and 95,500 matched adult outpatients. INTERVENTIONS: Neuromuscular block reversal with sugammadex or neostigmine plus glycopyrrolate. MEASUREMENTS: Incidence of post-operative urinary retention by neuromuscular block reversal agent and the independent association of neuromuscular block reversal technique and risk of post-operative urinary retention. MAIN RESULTS: The incidence of post-operative urinary retention was 2-fold greater among neostigmine with glycopyrrolate compared to sugammadex patients (5.0% vs 2.4% inpatients; 0.9% vs 0.4% outpatients; both p < 0.0001). Multivariable logistic regression identified reversal with neostigmine to be independently associated with greater risk of post-operative urinary retention (inpatients: odds ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 2.00 to 2.41; p < 0.001; outpatients: odds ratio, 2.57; 95% confidence interval, 2.13 to 3.10; p < 0.001). Post-operative urinary retention-related visits within 2 days following discharge were five-fold higher among those reversed with neostigmine than sugammadex among inpatients (0.05% vs. 0.01%, respectively; p = 0.018) and outpatients (0.5% vs. 0.1%; p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Though this study suggests that neuromuscular block reversal with neostigmine can increase post-operative urinary retention risk, additional studies are needed to fully understand the association.


Assuntos
Bloqueio Neuromuscular , Fármacos Neuromusculares não Despolarizantes , Retenção Urinária , Adulto , Humanos , Neostigmina/efeitos adversos , Sugammadex/efeitos adversos , Bloqueio Neuromuscular/efeitos adversos , Bloqueio Neuromuscular/métodos , Retenção Urinária/induzido quimicamente , Retenção Urinária/epidemiologia , Glicopirrolato , Estudos Retrospectivos , Inibidores da Colinesterase/efeitos adversos , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/epidemiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/etiologia , Complicações Pós-Operatórias/prevenção & controle , Hospitais
10.
Clin Case Rep ; 11(11): e8132, 2023 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37927977

RESUMO

Key Clinical message: Neostigmine and atropine offer a promising treatment option for postdural puncture headache (PDPH) following spinal anesthesia in cesarean section, providing effective relief with a favorable risk-benefit profile. Abstract: Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a common consequence of cesarean section surgeries after spinal anesthesia. This case study describes the successful treatment of PDPH with intravenous neostigmine and atropine. A 31 years female who underwent elective cesarean section with spinal anesthesia developed a severe headache on the 6th postoperative day and was diagnosed to have PDPH. PDPH failed to respond to conventional treatment modalities like hydration, a Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, and sphenopalatine ganglion block. Epidural blood patch could not be performed due to lack of consent. A trial dose of intravenous neostigmine (20 mcg/kg) along with atropine (10 mcg/kg) successfully provided symptomatic and clinical relief. The combination of neostigmine and atropine demonstrates a rapid onset of action, providing patients with effective analgesia while avoiding the need for invasive procedures such as epidural blood patches and offers quicker pain relief. This promising result warrants additional research.

11.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37985511

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The presence of gastrointestinal dysfunction is an outcome-relevant complication in critically ill ICU patients. AIMS, MATERIALS AND METHODS: The following review aims to show the importance of gastrointestinal dysfunction. Multimodal therapy for gastroparesis and paralytic ileus is discussed. CONCLUSION: Erythromycin and metoclopramide are options for gastroparesis, while neostigmine is commonly used for paralytic ileus.

12.
Int Urogynecol J ; 2023 Nov 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37930427

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: This study was aimed at determining the effect of sugammadex versus a combination of glycopyrrolate and neostigmine (GN) for neuromuscular reversal blockage on transient postoperative urinary retention (TPOUR) in patients undergoing a laparoscopic and robot-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in patients undergoing a laparoscopic or robotic hysterectomy between February 2017 and December 2021. Patients with and without concomitant procedures were included. Demographics and perioperative data were extracted from the patient's medical record. Before discharge, all patients were required to spontaneously void and have a post-void residual of less than 150 ml. RESULTS: We identified 500 patients and 485 were included in the final analysis. We had 319 subjects who received sugammadex and 166 GN combination. Both groups had overall similar demographics and perioperative characteristics. Most patients had a conventional laparoscopy procedure (391 [82.5%]) compared with robotic (83 [17.5%]). Patients who received GN were significantly more likely to be discharged home with an indwelling catheter (odds ratio [OR], 1.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-3.05). After adjusting for perioperative medications and sling implantation during the surgery a logistic regression model continued to demonstrate that patients who received GN had significantly higher odds of being discharged with a catheter (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.03-3.12). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that sugammadex decreases the odds of TPOUR after laparoscopic hysterectomies with and without slings compared with the combination of GN. Additional prospective trials are required to confirm this finding.

13.
J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol ; 39(3): 468-473, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-38025572

RESUMO

Background and Aims: Sugammadex (SUG) has been associated with changes in coagulation studies. Most reports have concluded a lack of clinical significance based on surgical blood loss with SUG use at the end of surgery. Previous reports have not measured its use intraoperatively during ongoing blood loss. Our hypothesis was that the use of SUG intraoperatively may increase bleeding. Material and Methods: This was a single site retrospective study. Inclusion criteria were patients undergoing a primary posterior cervical spine fusion, aged over 18 years, between July 2015 and June 2021. The primary outcomes compared were intraoperative estimated blood loss (EBL) and postoperative drain output (PDO) between patients receiving SUG, neostigmine (NEO) and no NMB reversal agent. The objective was to determine if there was a difference in primary endpoints between patients administered SUG, NEO or no paralytic reversal agent. Primary endpoints were compared using analysis of variance with a P value of 0.05 used to determine statistical significance. Groups were compared using the Chi-squared test, rank sum or student's t test. A logistic regression model was constructed to account for differences between the groups. Results: There was no difference in median EBL or PDO between groups. The use of SUG was not associated with an increase in odds for >500 milliliters (ml) of EBL. Increasing duration of surgery and chronic kidney disease were both associated with an increased risk for EBL >500 ml. Conclusion: Intraoperative use of SUG was not associated with increased bleeding. Any coagulation laboratory abnormalities previously noted did not appear to have an associated clinical significance.

15.
J Pers Med ; 13(9)2023 Sep 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37763148

RESUMO

This single-center retrospective exploratory analysis evaluated the effects of sugammadex compared with neostigmine on postoperative recovery in patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) who underwent video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)-thymectomy. This retrospective study included 180 patients with MG, aged >18 years, who received sugammadex (sugammadex group, n = 83) or neostigmine-glycopyrrolate (neostigmine group, n = 88) after VATS-thymectomy between November 2007 and December 2020. Inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) adjustment was performed to balance the baseline characteristics between the two groups. The primary outcome was the length of postoperative hospital stay, and the secondary outcomes were the incidence of postoperative mortality and complications, as well as the postoperative extubation and reintubation rates, in the operating room after VATS-thymectomy; the outcomes were compared between the two groups. After IPTW adjustment, the sugammadex group showed a significantly shorter median postoperative hospital stay than the neostigmine group (4 (2, 4) vs. 5 (3, 6) days, respectively; p = 0.003). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the incidences of postoperative complications (including postoperative myasthenic crisis, nerve palsy, atelectasis, and pleural effusion). Patients with MG following VATS-thymectomy who received sugammadex showed a significantly shorter postoperative hospital stay than those who received neostigmine.

16.
Adv Clin Exp Med ; 2023 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37665083

RESUMO

Postoperative urinary retention (POUR) is a common surgical complication that can result in bladder overdistension, urinary tract infection and an extended hospital stay. Although neostigmine is an effective therapy for POUR, its usage remains controversial. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of neostigmine in improving POUR after surgery. PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library databases were reviewed. A methodical search approach was used for data extraction, while meta-analysis and bias analysis employed Review Manager 5.2 and MedCalc. Fourteen studies involving 4196 postoperative patients were included. With an odds ratio (OR) of 1.70, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of 1.11-2.60 and an overall effect with p < 0.05, our analysis indicated that the patients receiving neostigmine had a greater effective urine retention rate than after other standard therapies. The subgroup analysis showed that neostigmine recipients had reduced residual urine volume (mean difference (MD) = -1.16, 95% CI: -2.05--0.27, overall p < 0.05, and I2 = 90%) and POUR (standardized MD (SMD) = 3.76, 95% CI: 2.19-5.34, overall p < 0.001, and I2 = 99% using a random effects model) as compared to controls. A random-effects model was utilized due to the substantial heterogeneity between trials. The studies were consistent and had no publication bias. Based on the findings of this meta-analysis, neostigmine can be considered an effective POUR treatment.

17.
Front Pharmacol ; 14: 1227496, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37601044

RESUMO

Neostigmine is a clinical cholinesterase inhibitor, that is, commonly used to enhance the function of the cholinergic neuromuscular junction. Recent studies have shown that neostigmine regulates the immune-inflammatory response through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, affecting perioperative neurocognitive function. This article reviews the relevant research evidence over the past 20 years, intending to provide new perspectives and strategies for the clinical application of neostigmine.

18.
BMC Anesthesiol ; 23(1): 269, 2023 08 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37563623

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Residual neuromuscular block after using neuromuscular blocking agents is a common and potentially harmful complication of general anesthesia. Neostigmine is a widely used antagonist, but its optimal dose for elderly patients is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To compare the optimal dosage and safety of neostigmine for reversing shallow residual block in elderly patients after cisatracurium-induced neuromuscular block. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial was conducted in 196 elderly patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery under general anesthesia with cisatracurium. Patients were assigned to receive either no neostigmine (control group) or neostigmine at 20 µg/kg, 40 µg/kg or 50 µg/kg when train-of-four (TOF) ratio reached 0.2 at the end of surgery. The primary outcome was the time to reach TOF ratio of 0.9 after administration. Secondary outcomes included TOF ratio at 10 min after administration, postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative cognitive impairment and post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) stay time. RESULTS: The time to reach TOF ratio of 0.9 in the 20 µg/kg, 40 µg/kg and 50 µg/kg groups was significantly shorter than the control group (H = 104.257, P < 0.01), and the time of 40 µg/kg group and 50 µg/kg group was significantly shorter than the 20 µg/kg group (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between 40 µg/kg and 50 µg/kg groups (P = 0.249). The TOF ratio at 10 min after administration showed similar results. There were no significant differences among groups in postoperative nausea and vomiting, postoperative cognitive impairment or post-operation hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS: Timely use of neostigmine after general anesthesia in elderly patients can significantly shorten time of TOF value reaching 0.9, among which 40 µg/kg dosage may be a more optimized choice. TRIAL REGISTRATION: this study was registered on chictr.org.cn (ChiCTR2100054685, 24/12/2021).


Assuntos
Recuperação Demorada da Anestesia , Neostigmina , Bloqueio Neuromuscular , Doenças Neuromusculares , Fármacos Neuromusculares não Despolarizantes , Idoso , Humanos , Inibidores da Colinesterase/farmacologia , Recuperação Demorada da Anestesia/induzido quimicamente , Neostigmina/administração & dosagem , Neostigmina/farmacologia , Bloqueio Neuromuscular/métodos , Náusea e Vômito Pós-Operatórios/induzido quimicamente , Atracúrio/toxicidade
19.
J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol ; 39(2): 232-238, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-37564851

RESUMO

Background and Aims: The use of sugammadex instead of neostigmine for the reversal of neuromuscular blockade may decrease postoperative pulmonary complications. It is unclear if this finding is applicable to situations where sugammadex is administered after the administration of neostigmine. The objective of this study was to compare the incidence of a composite outcome measure of major postoperative pulmonary complications in patients who received sugammadex as a rescue agent after neostigmine versus those who received sugammadex alone for reversal of neuromuscular blockade. Material and Methods: This retrospective cohort study analyzed the medical records of adult patients who underwent elective inpatient noncardiac surgery under general anesthesia and received sugammadex for reversal of neuromuscular blockade, at a tertiary care academic hospital between August 2016 and November 2018. Results: A total of 1,672 patients were included, of whom 1,452 underwent reversal with sugammadex alone and 220 received sugammadex following reversal with neostigmine/glycopyrrolate. The composite primary outcome was diagnosed in 60 (3.6%) patients. Comparing these two groups, and after adjusting for confounding factors, patients who received sugammadex after reversal with neostigmine had more postoperative pulmonary complications than those reversed with sugammadex alone (6.8% vs. 3.1%, odds ratio, 2.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.25 to 4.18; P = 0.006). Conclusion: The use of sugammadex following reversal with neostigmine was associated with a higher incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications as compared to the use of sugammadex alone. The implications of using sugammadex after the failure of standard reversal drugs should be investigated in prospective studies.

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