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1.
JAMA ; 324(14): 1406-1418, 2020 10 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33048154

RESUMO

Importance: Persistent smoking may cause adverse outcomes among patients with cancer. Many cancer centers have not fully implemented evidence-based tobacco treatment into routine care. Objective: To determine the effectiveness of sustained telephone counseling and medication (intensive treatment) compared with shorter-term telephone counseling and medication advice (standard treatment) to assist patients recently diagnosed with cancer to quit smoking. Design, Setting, and Participants: This unblinded randomized clinical trial was conducted at Massachusetts General Hospital/Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Adults who had smoked 1 cigarette or more within 30 days, spoke English or Spanish, and had recently diagnosed breast, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, gynecological, head and neck, lung, lymphoma, or melanoma cancers were eligible. Enrollment occurred between November 2013 and July 2017; assessments were completed by the end of February 2018. Interventions: Participants randomized to the intensive treatment (n = 153) and the standard treatment (n = 150) received 4 weekly telephone counseling sessions and medication advice. The intensive treatment group also received 4 biweekly and 3 monthly telephone counseling sessions and choice of Food and Drug Administration-approved cessation medication (nicotine replacement therapy, bupropion, or varenicline). Main Outcome and Measures: The primary outcome was biochemically confirmed 7-day point prevalence tobacco abstinence at 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were treatment utilization rates. Results: Among 303 patients who were randomized (mean age, 58.3 years; 170 women [56.1%]), 221 (78.1%) completed the trial. Six-month biochemically confirmed quit rates were 34.5% (n = 51 in the intensive treatment group) vs 21.5% (n = 29 in the standard treatment group) (difference, 13.0% [95% CI, 3.0%-23.3%]; odds ratio, 1.92 [95% CI, 1.13-3.27]; P < .02). The median number of counseling sessions completed was 8 (interquartile range, 4-11) in the intensive treatment group. A total of 97 intensive treatment participants (77.0%) vs 68 standard treatment participants (59.1%) reported cessation medication use (difference, 17.9% [95% CI, 6.3%-29.5%]; odds ratio, 2.31 [95% CI, 1.32-4.04]; P = .003). The most common adverse events in the intensive treatment and standard treatment groups, respectively, were nausea (n = 13 and n = 6), rash (n = 4 and n = 1), hiccups (n = 4 and n = 1), mouth irritation (n = 4 and n = 0), difficulty sleeping (n = 3 and n = 2), and vivid dreams (n = 3 and n = 2). Conclusions and Relevance: Among smokers recently diagnosed with cancer in 2 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, sustained counseling and provision of free cessation medication compared with 4-week counseling and medication advice resulted in higher 6-month biochemically confirmed quit rates. However, the generalizability of the study findings is uncertain and requires further research. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01871506.


Assuntos
Aconselhamento/métodos , Neoplasias/diagnóstico , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/psicologia , Temperança/psicologia , Dispositivos para o Abandono do Uso de Tabaco , Idoso , Bupropiona/efeitos adversos , Bupropiona/uso terapêutico , Cotinina/análise , Aconselhamento/estatística & dados numéricos , Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Entrevista Motivacional , Satisfação do Paciente , Seleção de Pacientes , Saliva/química , Fumar/tratamento farmacológico , Fumar/epidemiologia , Fumar/psicologia , Agentes de Cessação do Hábito de Fumar/efeitos adversos , Agentes de Cessação do Hábito de Fumar/uso terapêutico , Telefone , Dispositivos para o Abandono do Uso de Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Vareniclina/efeitos adversos , Vareniclina/uso terapêutico
3.
Cent Eur J Public Health ; 28 Suppl: S26-S30, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33069185

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The primary aim of a hospital is to promote/improve and restore health, thus smoking, whether in its passive or active form, should be banned in all hospital premises for the benefit of employees and patients alike. The Global Network for Tobacco Free Healthcare Services (GNTH) is an international non-profit association formed in 1999. The GNTH's mission is to implement tobacco-free policies to create a healthy workplace and patients' environment; help physicians, nurses, and other healthcare workers to stop smoking; and educate all caregivers about tobacco dependence treatment and support them in providing smoking cessation interventions. METHODS: Implementation standards and a system of their self-audit for all participating hospitals were developed by the GNTH. We describe both the international and Czech networks, recommended methods for programme implementation and results of self-audit questionnaires completed by Czech participating hospitals. RESULTS: Worldwide, there are 19 national networks with 1,672 members including 56 gold forum members. To date, the largest network has been formed in France (670 members), followed by Spain (580) and Taiwan (209). After the first Czech institution (Prague-based General University Hospital) joined GNTH in 2010, the Czech Republic established its national network in 2017 currently comprising 10 members, of this number 1 gold, 3 silver and 6 bronze national certification level members. The main barriers to better outcomes in the Czech Republic include smoking on outdoor hospital grounds, lack of pharmacotherapy reimbursement and time, and inadequate staff education in the field of tobacco dependence treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The Global Network's mission is to advocate, recruit and enable healthcare services and professionals to implement and sustain effective tobacco management and cessation policies in accordance with the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). A systematic approach supports the quality of care and treatment outcomes for patients as well as healthy workplace conditions for the staff.


Assuntos
Hospitais , Política Antifumo , Local de Trabalho , Humanos , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Prevenção do Hábito de Fumar
5.
Recurso na Internet em Português | LIS - Localizador de Informação em Saúde | ID: lis-47862

RESUMO

O projeto Access Initiative for Quitting Tobacco fornece às pessoas acesso gratuito à terapia de reposição de nicotina e a uma profissional de saúde digital


Assuntos
Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Infecções por Coronavirus , Organização Mundial da Saúde
6.
Recurso na Internet em Português | LIS - Localizador de Informação em Saúde | ID: lis-47854

RESUMO

O tabagismo é uma das causas mais comuns de morte e doenças no Brasil


Assuntos
Tabagismo , Longevidade , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar
7.
Recurso na Internet em Português | LIS - Localizador de Informação em Saúde | ID: lis-47857

RESUMO

41% dos entrevistados disseram ter largado o cigarro por causa da pandemia


Assuntos
Prevenção do Hábito de Fumar , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Reino Unido
8.
J UOEH ; 42(3): 251-259, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32879189

RESUMO

Preventing cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an urgent public health challenge. Although brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) can indicate the risk of arterial stiffness and CVD, findings regarding whether baPWV is associated with smoking are inconsistent. This study considered the influence of smoking on arteriosclerosis, specifically focusing on secondhand smoke (SHS), and aimed to construct a strategy for preventing the worsening of arteriosclerosis. We recruited 295 male employees from five companies who had smoking habits such as being smokers, living with smokers, and exposure to SHS outside the home. We measured body composition and hemodynamics, including blood pressure and baPWV, and found that baPWV had significant positive correlations with age, smoking index, alcohol consumption, body-fat percentage, blood pressure, and heart rate, and significant negative correlations with height, fat-free mass, and lower-limb muscle mass. Moreover, baPWV showed a significant adverse effect on participants who had metabolic syndrome (MetS) risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes. Multiple regression analysis showed that baPWV had significant positive relationships with age, height, MetS risk factors, cohabitation with smokers, blood pressure, and heart rate, and a significant negative relationship with lower-limb muscle mass. The same results were obtained when adjusting for current smoking status, smoking index, cohabitation with smokers at birth, and frequency of exposure to SHS outside the home. Exposure to tobacco smoke due to cohabitation with smokers increased baPWV regardless of the person's smoking habits. Thus, to prevent an increase in baPWV in housemates and smokers, it is necessary for smokers to quit smoking.


Assuntos
Arteriosclerose/etiologia , Arteriosclerose/prevenção & controle , Saúde do Trabalhador , Características de Residência , Fumantes , Poluição por Fumaça de Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Rigidez Vascular , Local de Trabalho , Arteriosclerose/fisiopatologia , Progressão da Doença , Humanos , Masculino , Análise de Onda de Pulso , Fatores de Risco , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar
9.
Rev Med Liege ; 75(9): 613-618, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32909414

RESUMO

The proportion of patients whose asthma is poorly controlled due to their smoking remains high. Electronic cigarette (EC) is a new tool to help people stopping smoking, which substitutes a much less irritating aerosol to very toxic cigarette smoke, but it cannot be considered completely healthy. It represents a possible assistance for asthmatic smokers who wish using it to stop smoking. This article is a systematic review of the literature on the data concerning the relationships between EC use and asthma. There is a positive association between asthma symptoms, their severity and current use of CE in adolescents. The results are more contrasted in adult asthmatic CE users compared to cigarette smoking. CE should not be used by adolescents but can help, in exclusively use, adults with asthma stopping smoking.


Assuntos
Asma , Sistemas Eletrônicos de Liberação de Nicotina , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Adolescente , Adulto , Humanos , Fumar
10.
S Afr Med J ; 110(8): 796-801, 2020 Jul 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880309

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Smoking cessation is a complex process influenced by factors such as smokers' nicotine dependence levels, socioeconomic status (SES) and other lifestyle behaviours. Little is known about these relationships in South Africa (SA). OBJECTIVES: To explore the relationship between nicotine dependence, SES, lifestyle behaviours and lifetime quit attempts among adult smokers in SA. METHODS: This study used data from 2 651 participants aged ≥16 years in the 2011 South African Social Attitudes Survey. Information on SES (measured by asset ownership), binge drinking, physical activity, fruit and vegetable intake, intention to quit smoking and lifetime quit attempts was extracted. Nicotine dependence was measured using the Heaviness of Smoking Index (HSI). All data were weighted to account for the complex survey design and to yield nationally representative estimates. Data analysis included binary logistic regression with high nicotine dependence (HND) defined as HSI ≥4 and lifetime quit attempts as separate outcomes. RESULTS: The prevalence of smoking was 20.1% (31.6% for males and 9.5% for females), and was highest in the mixed-ancestry group (37.0%). Overall, 14.5% of smokers had HND, with a higher proportion in the high-SES group. The odds of HND increased with every 10  years of smoking history (odds ratio (OR) 2.05; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.40 - 3.00) but decreased among participants who reported frequent physical activity (OR 0.4; 95% CI 0.18 - 0.86) and those who planned to quit (OR 0.37; 95% CI 0.19 - 0.75). Quit attempts were more likely among participants who reported frequent fruit and vegetable intake (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.07 - 2.98) and less likely among those reporting binge drinking (OR 0.31; 95% CI 0.16 - 0.59) or assessed as having HND (OR 0.32; 95% CI 0.17 - 0.58). CONCLUSIONS: Most adult smokers in SA have low nicotine dependence. However, the association of HND with high SES in this study suggests that although cessation treatment based on an integrated lifestyle behavioural intervention package may suffice for most smokers, a more intense cessation treatment package is needed for smokers of higher SES.


Assuntos
Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/estatística & dados numéricos , Tabagismo/epidemiologia , Adulto , Bebedeira/epidemiologia , Grupos de Populações Continentais/estatística & dados numéricos , Dieta , Exercício Físico , Feminino , Frutas , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Masculino , Distribuição por Sexo , Classe Social , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Verduras
12.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1478, 2020 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32993598

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Four decades of population-based tobacco control strategies have contributed to substantial reduction in smoking prevalence in Australia. However, smoking prevalence is still double in socially disadvantaged groups compared to those that are not. But not all tobacco control strategies successfully used in the general population is effective in specific high-risk population groups. Hence, an effective way to reduce smoking in high risk population groups may include targeting them specifically to identify and support smokers to quit. In this backdrop, we examined whether tobacco control interventions at the population-level are more effective in increasing life expectancy among Australians compared to interventions targeting a high risk group or a combination of the two when smoking prevalence is reduced to 10 and 0% respectively. METHODS: Using the risk percentiles approach, analyses were performed separately for men and women using data from various sources such as the 2014-15 National Health Survey linked to death registry, simulated data for high risk groups, and the Australian population and deaths data from the census. Indigenous status was simulated by preferentially assigning those who are indigenous to lower SES quintiles. The age-sex distribution of mental disorder status was simulated using its distribution from 2016 National Drug Strategy Household Survey with 25.9% of mentally ill being assigned to current smoking category and the rest to non-smoking category. The age-sex distribution of prisoners was simulated based on 2014 ABS Prisoners Australia survey with 74% of prisoners being assigned to current smoker category and the rest to non-smoker category. Homelessness status was simulated according to age, sex and indigenous status for 2011 census with all homeless being allocated to the lowest SES category. The age-sex distribution of total cholesterol level was simulated based on 2011-13 Australian Health Survey. RESULTS: The results showed that the combined approach for reducing smoking is most effective for improving life expectancy of Australians particularly for the socially disadvantaged and mentally ill groups both of which have high fraction of smokers in the population. For those who were mentally ill the gain in ALE due to reduction of smoking to 10% was 0.53 years for males and 0.36 years for females which were around 51 and 42% respectively of the maximal gains in ALE that could be achieved through complete cessation. CONCLUSIONS: Targeting high-risk population groups having substantial fraction of smokers in the population can strongly complement the existing population-based smoking reduction strategies. As population and high risk approaches are both important, the national prevention policies should make judicious use of both to maximize health gain.


Assuntos
Promoção da Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Expectativa de Vida/tendências , Fumantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/estatística & dados numéricos , Fumar/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Distribuição por Idade , Austrália/epidemiologia , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Pessoas em Situação de Rua/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dinâmica Populacional , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Distribuição por Sexo , Prevenção do Hábito de Fumar
13.
PLoS Med ; 17(9): e1003355, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32991589

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Secondhand smoke can cause adverse pregnancy outcomes, yet there is a lack of effective smoking cessation interventions targeted at expectant fathers. We examined the effectiveness of a video-based smoking cessation intervention focusing on maternal and child health in promoting quitting among expectant fathers. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A single-blind, 3-arm, randomized controlled trial was conducted at the obstetrics registration centers of 3 tertiary public hospitals in 3 major cities (Guangzhou, Shenzhen, and Foshan) in China. Smoking expectant fathers who registered with their pregnant partners were invited to participate in this study. Between 14 August 2017 to 28 February 2018, 1,023 participants were randomized to a video (n = 333), text (n = 322), or control (n = 368) group. The video and text groups received videos or text messages on the risks of smoking for maternal and child health via instant messaging. The control group received a leaflet with information on smoking cessation. Follow-up visits were conducted at 1 week and at 1, 3, and 6 months. The primary outcome, by intention to treat (ITT), was validated abstinence from smoking at the 6-month follow-up. The secondary outcomes included 7-day point prevalence of abstinence (PPA) and level of readiness to quit at each follow-up. The mean age of participants was 32 years, and about half of them were first-time expectant fathers. About two-thirds of participants had completed tertiary education. The response rate was 79.7% (815 of 1,023) at 6 months. The video and text groups had higher rates of validated abstinence than the control group (video group: 22.5% [75 of 333], P < 0.001; text group: 14.9% [48 of 322], P = 0.02; control group: 9.2% [34 of 368]) with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) of 2.80 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.79-4.37, P < 0.001) in the video group and 1.70 (95% CI: 1.06-2.74, P = 0.03) in the text group. The video and text groups differed in the rates of validated abstinence (22.5% versus 14.9%, P = 0.008; adjusted OR: 1.64, 95% CI: 1.10-2.46, P = 0.02). The video and text groups had higher rates of 7-day PPA than the control group at 6 months (video group: 24.6% [82 of 333] versus 11.4% [42 of 368], P < 0.001; text group: 17.4% [56 of 333] versus 11.4% [42 of 368], P = 0.02). The video and text groups also differed in the rates of 7-day PPA (24.6% versus 17.4%, P = 0.02). Excluding the quitters, the video and text groups had higher levels of readiness to quit than the control group at 6 months (video group: 43.5% [109 of 251] versus 31.6% [103 of 326], P = 0.002; text group: 40.6% [108 of 266] versus 31.6% [103 of 326], P = 0.01), No such difference was detected between the video and text groups (43.5% versus 40.6%, P = 0.29). The study was limited in that the long-term effectiveness of the intervention is uncertain. CONCLUSIONS: This smoking cessation intervention for expectant fathers that focused on explaining the ramifications of smoking on maternal and child health was effective and feasible in promoting quitting, and video messages were more effective than texts in delivering the information. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03236025.


Assuntos
Saúde da Criança , Pai , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Adulto , Terapia Comportamental/métodos , China , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Motivação/fisiologia , Método Simples-Cego , Fumar/epidemiologia , Envio de Mensagens de Texto , Poluição por Fumaça de Tabaco/efeitos adversos
14.
Pediatrics ; 146(4)2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32989082

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: We tested a Public Health Service 5As-based clinician-delivered smoking cessation counseling intervention with adolescent smokers in pediatric primary care practice. METHODS: We enrolled clinicians from 120 practices and recruited youth (age ≥14) from the American Academy of Pediatrics Pediatric Research in Office Settings practice-based research network. Practices were randomly assigned to training in smoking cessation (intervention) or social media counseling (attentional control). Youth recruited during clinical visits completed confidential screening forms. All self-reported smokers and a random sample of nonsmokers were offered enrollment and interviewed by phone at 4 to 6 weeks, 6 months, and 12 months after visits. Measures included adolescents' report of clinicians' delivery of screening and counseling, current tobacco use, and cessation behaviors and intentions. Analysis assessed receipt of screening and counseling, predictors of receiving 5As counseling, and effects of interventions on smoking behaviors and cessation at 6 and 12 months. RESULTS: Clinicians trained in the 5As intervention delivered more screening (ß = 1.0605, P < .0001) and counseling (ß = 0.4354, P < .0001). In both arms, clinicians more often screened smokers than nonsmokers. At 6 months, study arm was not significantly associated with successful cessation; however, smokers in the 5As group were more likely to have quit at 12 months. Addicted smokers more often were counseled, regardless of study arm, but were less likely to successfully quit smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Adolescent smokers whose clinicians were trained in 5As were more likely to receive smoking screening and counseling than controls, but the ability of this intervention to help adolescents quit smoking was limited.


Assuntos
Aconselhamento/educação , Motivação , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/psicologia , Adolescente , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , não Fumantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Profissionais de Enfermagem/educação , Pediatras/educação , Assistentes Médicos/educação , Fumantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Fumar
17.
Oral Health Prev Dent ; 18(1): 757-763, 2020 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32895659

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the experience of specific oral and dental symptoms or side effects as reported by patients following the use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) products. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study involved paper-based confidential survey questionnaires accessible for a period of 8 months to patients attending the School of Dentistry Dental Clinic, Griffith University, Australia. This study recorded demography, smoking history, NRT use history, and specific oral and systemic symptoms. The data was assessed and grouped into three divisions: those with no history of NRT use, current and former users of NRT, and current users of NRT. RESULTS: Current users of NRT reported a statistically significantly higher incidence of all oral symptoms and increased incidence of systemic symptoms, as compared to those with no history of NRT use. There was no statistically significant difference between current and former users of NRT for almost all symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: A correlative relationship has been observed between the use of NRT products and patients' reported oral symptoms. This study showed a statistically significantly higher incidence of oral symptoms in current and former NRT users. The reported oral side effects and compounding risk profiles show an imperative need for further research into nicotine replacement therapy products' impact on oral health status and treatment outcomes in dental patients using NRT.


Assuntos
Abandono do Hábito de Fumar , Dispositivos para o Abandono do Uso de Tabaco , Austrália , Humanos , Nicotina , Prevenção do Hábito de Fumar
18.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1237, 2020 Aug 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32795286

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Tobacco control strategies have engendered overall declines in smoking; however, a large gap remains between people with and without mental health problems, causing substantial health inequalities. Population-level information on barriers and opportunities for improvements is scarce. We aimed to assess mental health status of cigarette smokers and recent ex-smokers ('past-year smokers') in England, and smoking and harm reduction behaviour and quit attempts by mental health status. METHODS: Data were collected from 5637 current and 434 recent ex-smokers in 2016/17 in household surveys of representative samples of adults. We calculated weighted prevalence of different indicators of mental health problem: a) ever diagnosis, b) none, moderate, serious past-month distress, c) past-year treatment. We compared weighted smoking status, cigarette type, dependence, motivation to stop smoking, cutting down, use of nicotine replacement therapy or e-cigarettes, short-term abstinence, and quit attempts according to mental health status. RESULTS: Among past-year smokers: 35.9% ever had a diagnosis; 24.3% had experienced moderate, an additional 9.7% serious, past-month distress; 21.9% had had past-year treatment. Those with an indication of a mental health problem were more highly dependent and more likely to smoke roll-your-own cigarettes but also more likely to be motivated to stop smoking, to cut down, use nicotine replacement therapy or e-cigarettes and to have attempted to quit in the past year. CONCLUSIONS: About a third of cigarette smokers in England have mental health problems. Interventions should address their increased dependence and leverage higher prevalence of harm reduction behaviours, motivation to stop and attempts to stop smoking.


Assuntos
Redução do Dano , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Fumantes/psicologia , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/psicologia , Fumar/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Inglaterra/epidemiologia , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fumantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
19.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(7): 1009-1013, 2020 Jul 10.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32741162

RESUMO

Carrying out standardized diagnosis, treatment, intervention, management, surveillance and evaluation of COPD is an important part of the special action for the prevention and treatment of chronic respiratory diseases in the "Healthy China Initiative (2019-2030)" . The surveillance of COPD among Chinese residents provides basic data for assessing the level of standardized diagnosis, treatment, intervention and management of patients with COPD. Based the data of all COPD patients found in the surveillance of COPD (2014-2015), the key series articles report the awareness rate of COPD among patients aged ≥40 years in China, and analyze the spirometry examination rate, medicine treatment rate, inhalation therapy rate, respiratory rehabilitation rate, smoking cessation rate, successful smoking cessation rate, and pneumococcal vaccination rate in COPD patients aged ≥ 40 years and their associated factors, providing a scientific reference for China to carry out special action for the prevention and treatment of chronic respiratory diseases represented by COPD.


Assuntos
Vigilância da População , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica , Adulto , China/epidemiologia , Humanos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/diagnóstico , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/epidemiologia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/prevenção & controle , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/estatística & dados numéricos , Espirometria
20.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(7): 1021-1027, 2020 Jul 10.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32741164

RESUMO

Objective: To understand the smoking cessation behaviors in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients aged 40 years or older in China and provide evidence for COPD control and prevention. Methods: COPD patients with post-bronchodilator FEV(1)/FVC<70% were selected from COPD surveillance (2014-2015) of China, in which 5 791 current or former smokers defined by questionnaire survey were included in the study. The smoking cessation rate/ratio and the successful smoking cessation rate in COPD patients, the successful smoking cessation rate in COPD patients who ever smoked daily and the rate of attempting to quit smoking in current smokers with COPD were estimated using data adjusted by complicated sampling method. Results: The smoking cessation rate was 25.0% and the successful smoking cessation rate was 19.1% in COPD patients aged 40 years or older who ever smoked. The smoking cessation ratio was 23.1% and the successful smoking cessation ratio was 17.6% in COPD patients who ever smoked daily. The rate and ratio were higher in urban area than rural area (P<0.05) and increased with age (P<0.05). Patients who were aware of smoking being a risk factor for COPD had higher rate and ratio than patients who were not aware (P<0.05). Patients with more severe airflow limitation and patients smoking less had higher rate and ratio (P<0.05). Conclusions: The smoking cessation rate and ratio were low in COPD patients in China. More health education for COPD patients about smoking cessation needs to be strengthened. It is suggested for healthcare workers to actively advise smoking cessation and suggest smoking cessation ways for patients who smoke in their routine clinical service to increase the successful smoking cessation rate/ratio in COPD patients.


Assuntos
Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , China/epidemiologia , Humanos , Fumar/epidemiologia
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