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1.
Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc ; 2020: 4286-4289, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33018943

RESUMO

A sleep inertia after waking up strongly affects the overall mental recovery after sleep. The sleep inertia depends not as much on overall sleep quality but also on the sleep stage in the waking up moment. The fix-time alarming system results in waking up at random sleep stage, which results in frequent sleep inertia. The widely used flow-time alarming systems based on motion detection (actigraphy) reduce but do not eliminate sleep inertia. Such systems do not wake up users in Deep sleep stage, but may instead wake them up in Wake, Light, or REM (Rapid Eyes Movement) stages. Moreover, frequent waking up in the REM stage results in serious psychological issues. We present a smartwatch alarm system that predicts sleep stages and thus produces an alarm call at an easy waking up moment with minimal sleep inertia effect. The sleep stages are predicted using an Encoder-Decoder Recurrent Neural Network model. The rationale of the prediction is that each sleep stages cycling pattern is a continuous quasi-periodic process. Experimental results from over 138 nocturnal sleep periods from 92 respondents show that our system provides 66-70% accuracy for Deep, Light, Wake, REM sleep stages and 71-77% accuracy for 2-classes (Deep/REM vs. Light/Wake stages) prediction classifications. The proposed alarm system wakes up the user at the moment when Easy Wake (Wake/Light) stage is the most probable.


Assuntos
Fases do Sono , Sono , Actigrafia , Humanos , Redes Neurais de Computação , Sono REM
2.
Annu Int Conf IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc ; 2020: 4608-4611, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33019020

RESUMO

Daily step counts from the Withings Activite were validated against those collected concurrently from the PiezoRxD Pedometer and the wGT3X-BT Actigraph worn on the waist and on the wrist in free-living conditions from 10 older adult volunteers. The Withings Activite underestimated step counts but showed good correlations with the other devices (Pearson correlation coefficient: 0.850 - 0.891).Clinical Relevance - Although the Withings Activite underestimated steps, they may be used in studies to estimate relative level of physical activity in free-living conditions since they have good correlations with other well-validated devices. Underestimation of steps may be corrected using linear transformation.


Assuntos
Actigrafia , Exercício Físico , Idoso , Terapia Comportamental , Humanos , Punho , Articulação do Punho
3.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0238772, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32946454

RESUMO

CONTEXT: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a complex condition comprising a 'clustering' of components representing cardiometabolic risk factors for heart disease and diabetes; its prevalence rate is high and consequences serious. Evidence suggests that light exposure patterns and misalignment of circadian rhythms might contribute to MetS etiology by impacting energy metabolism and glucose regulation. OBJECTIVE: We hypothesised that individuals with MetS would show disrupted circadian and sleep parameters alongside differences in light exposure profiles. We investigated this using data from a cohort study in Brazil. METHODS: Data from 103 individuals from the Baependi Heart Cohort Study aged between 50 and 70 were analysed. Motor activity and light exposure were measured using wrist-worn actigraphy devices. Cardiometabolic data were used to calculate the number of MetS components present in each participant, and participants grouped as MetS/non-MetS according to standard guidelines. Between-group comparisons were made for the actigraphy measures; additionally, correlation analyses were conducted. RESULTS: Motor activity and circadian profiles showed no differences between groups. However, the MetS group presented lower light exposure during the day and higher light exposure at night. Correlation analyses, including all participants, showed that greater daytime light exposure and greater light exposure difference between day and night were associated with reduced MetS risk (a lower number of MetS components). Also, the light exposure difference between day and night correlated with body mass index across all participants. CONCLUSIONS: The observed results suggest a direct association between light exposure and MetS which appears to not be attributable to disruptions in circadian activity rhythm nor to sleep parameters. This link between light exposure patterns and MetS risk could inform possible prevention strategies.


Assuntos
Luz , Síndrome Metabólica/etiologia , Actigrafia/métodos , Idoso , Brasil/epidemiologia , Ritmo Circadiano , Estudos de Coortes , Correlação de Dados , Feminino , Glucose/metabolismo , Humanos , Masculino , Síndrome Metabólica/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Sono
4.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0238464, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941498

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Actigraphs are wrist-worn devices that record tri-axial accelerometry data used clinically and in research studies. The expense of research-grade actigraphs, however, limit their widespread adoption, especially in clinical settings. Tri-axial accelerometer-based consumer wearable devices have gained worldwide popularity and hold potential for a cost-effective alternative. The lack of independent validation of minute-to-minute accelerometer data with polysomnographic data or even research-grade actigraphs, as well as access to raw data has hindered the utility and acceptance of consumer-grade actigraphs. METHODS: Sleep clinic patients wore a consumer-grade wearable (Huami Arc) on their non-dominant wrist while undergoing an overnight polysomnography (PSG) study. The sample was split into two, 20 in a training group and 21 in a testing group. In addition to the Arc, the testing group also wore a research-grade actigraph (Philips Actiwatch Spectrum). Sleep was scored for each 60-s epoch on both devices using the Cole-Kripke algorithm. RESULTS: Based on analysis of our training group, Arc and PSG data were aligned best when a threshold of 10 units was used to examine the Arc data. Using this threshold value in our testing group, the Arc has an accuracy of 90.3%±4.3%, sleep sensitivity (or wake specificity) of 95.5%±3.5%, and sleep specificity (wake sensitivity) of 55.6%±22.7%. Compared to PSG, Actiwatch has an accuracy of 88.7%±4.5%, sleep sensitivity of 92.6%±5.2%, and sleep specificity of 60.5%±20.2%, comparable to that observed in the Arc. CONCLUSIONS: An optimized sleep/wake threshold value was identified for a consumer-grade wearable Arc trained by PSG data. By applying this sleep/wake threshold value for Arc generated accelerometer data, when compared to PSG, sleep and wake estimates were adequate and comparable to those generated by a clinical-grade actigraph. As with other actigraphs, sleep specificity plateaus due to limitations in distinguishing wake without movement from sleep. Further studies are needed to evaluate the Arc's ability to differentiate between sleep and wake using other sources of data available from the Arc, such as high resolution accelerometry and photoplethysmography.


Assuntos
Acelerometria/instrumentação , Polissonografia/instrumentação , Sono/fisiologia , Actigrafia/instrumentação , Adulto , Idoso , Algoritmos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Movimento , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Dispositivos Eletrônicos Vestíveis , Punho , Articulação do Punho
5.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32842672

RESUMO

Prospective memory (PM) is essential in everyday life because it concerns the ability to remember to perform an intended action in the future. This ability could be influenced by poor sleep quality, the role of which, however, is still being debated. To examine the role of sleep quality in PM in depth, we decided to perform a retrospective naturalistic study examining different clinical populations with a primary sleep disorder or comorbid low sleep quality. If sleep is important for PM function, we could expect poor sleep to affect PM performance tasks both directly and indirectly. We examined a total of 3600 nights, recorded using actigraphy in participants belonging to the following groups: primary insomnia (731 nights); narcolepsy type 1 (1069 nights); attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (152 nights in children and 239 in adults); severe obesity (232 nights); essential hypertension (226 nights); menopause (143 nights); healthy controls (808 nights). In a naturalistic activity-based PM task, each participant originally wore an actigraph around the non-dominant wrist and was requested to push the event-marker button at two specific times of day: bedtime (activity 1) and get-up time (activity 2). Each clinical group showed significantly lower sleep quality in comparison to the control group. However, only narcolepsy type 1 patients presented a significantly impaired PM performance at get-up time, remembering to push the event-marker button around half the time compared not only to healthy controls but also to the other clinical groups. Overall, the present results seem to point to sleep quality having no effect on the efficiency of a naturalistic activity-based PM task. Moreover, the data indicated that narcolepsy type 1 patients may show a disease-specific cognitive deficit of PM.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade , Memória Episódica , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília , Sono , Actigrafia , Adulto , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/complicações , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Rememoração Mental , Estudos Retrospectivos , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/complicações
8.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 7: CD009209, 2020 07 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32700325

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends undertaking 150 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity per week, but most people do not. Workplaces present opportunities to influence behaviour and encourage physical activity, as well as other aspects of a healthy lifestyle. A pedometer is an inexpensive device that encourages physical activity by providing feedback on daily steps, although pedometers are now being largely replaced by more sophisticated devices such as accelerometers and Smartphone apps. For this reason, this is the final update of this review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of pedometer interventions in the workplace for increasing physical activity and improving long-term health outcomes. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, Embase, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) UPDATE, Web of Science, ClinicalTrials.gov, and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform from the earliest record to December 2016. We also consulted the reference lists of included studies and contacted study authors to identify additional records. We updated this search in May 2019, but these results have not yet been incorporated. One more study, previously identified as an ongoing study, was placed in 'Studies awaiting classification'. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of workplace interventions with a pedometer component for employed adults, compared to no or minimal interventions, or to alternative physical activity interventions. We excluded athletes and interventions using accelerometers. The primary outcome was physical activity. Studies were excluded if physical activity was not measured. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. When studies presented more than one physical activity measure, we used a pre-specified list of preferred measures to select one measure and up to three time points for analysis. When possible, follow-up measures were taken after completion of the intervention to identify lasting effects once the intervention had ceased. Given the diversity of measures found, we used ratios of means (RoMs) as standardised effect measures for physical activity. MAIN RESULTS: We included 14 studies, recruiting a total of 4762 participants. These studies were conducted in various high-income countries and in diverse workplaces (from offices to physical workplaces). Participants included both healthy populations and those at risk of chronic disease (e.g. through inactivity or overweight), with a mean age of 41 years. All studies used multi-component health promotion interventions. Eleven studies used minimal intervention controls, and four used alternative physical activity interventions. Intervention duration ranged from one week to two years, and follow-up after completion of the intervention ranged from three to ten months. Most studies and outcomes were rated at overall unclear or high risk of bias, and only one study was rated at low risk of bias. The most frequent concerns were absence of blinding and high rates of attrition. When pedometer interventions are compared to minimal interventions at follow-up points at least one month after completion of the intervention, pedometers may have no effect on physical activity (6 studies; very low-certainty evidence; no meta-analysis due to very high heterogeneity), but the effect is very uncertain. Pedometers may have effects on sedentary behaviour and on quality of life (mental health component), but these effects were very uncertain (1 study; very low-certainty evidence). Pedometer interventions may slightly reduce anthropometry (body mass index (BMI) -0.64, 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.45 to 0.18; 3 studies; low-certainty evidence). Pedometer interventions probably had little to no effect on blood pressure (systolic: -0.08 mmHg, 95% CI -3.26 to 3.11; 2 studies; moderate-certainty evidence) and may have reduced adverse effects (such as injuries; from 24 to 10 per 100 people in populations experiencing relatively frequent events; odds ratio (OR) 0.50, 95% CI 0.30 to 0.84; low-certainty evidence). No studies compared biochemical measures or disease risk scores at follow-up after completion of the intervention versus a minimal intervention. Comparison of pedometer interventions to alternative physical activity interventions at follow-up points at least one month after completion of the intervention revealed that pedometers may have an effect on physical activity, but the effect is very uncertain (1 study; very low-certainty evidence). Sedentary behaviour, anthropometry (BMI or waist circumference), blood pressure (systolic or diastolic), biochemistry (low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, total cholesterol, or triglycerides), disease risk scores, quality of life (mental or physical health components), and adverse effects at follow-up after completion of the intervention were not compared to an alternative physical activity intervention. Some positive effects were observed immediately at completion of the intervention periods, but these effects were not consistent, and overall certainty of evidence was insufficient to assess the effectiveness of workplace pedometer interventions. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Exercise interventions can have positive effects on employee physical activity and health, although current evidence is insufficient to suggest that a pedometer-based intervention would be more effective than other options. It is important to note that over the past decade, technological advancement in accelerometers as commercial products, often freely available in Smartphones, has in many ways rendered the use of pedometers outdated. Future studies aiming to test the impact of either pedometers or accelerometers would likely find any control arm highly contaminated. Decision-makers considering allocating resources to large-scale programmes of this kind should be cautious about the expected benefits of incorporating a pedometer and should note that these effects may not be sustained over the longer term. Future studies should be designed to identify the effective components of multi-component interventions, although pedometers may not be given the highest priority (especially considering the increased availability of accelerometers). Approaches to increase the sustainability of intervention effects and behaviours over a longer term should be considered, as should more consistent measures of physical activity and health outcomes.


Assuntos
Actigrafia/instrumentação , Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Atividade Motora/fisiologia , Caminhada/fisiologia , Local de Trabalho , Adulto , Viés , Doenças Cardiovasculares/etiologia , Humanos , Qualidade de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Fatores de Risco , Comportamento Sedentário
9.
Rev. andal. med. deporte ; 13(2): 76-80, jun. 2020. tab
Artigo em Inglês | IBECS | ID: ibc-194368

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To analyze chronotype, duration and quality of sleep among elite athletes, to compare differences in sleep variables between sex, and to compare differences between athletes of individual and team sports. METHOD: The sample included 70 Brazilian elite athletes of both sex (male=37; female=33) with a mean age 23.0 ± 4.0 years old. To measure sleep-wake cycle, athletes wore an actigraph on the wrist for 10 days. Moreover, athletes answered the chronotype questionnaire of Horne and Östberg. RESULTS: The most athletes are intermediate-type (n=55, 78.6%), with a mean of 07h:18min of sleep per night. The athletes demonstrated higher sleep fragmentation (39.26 ± 23.66 minutes) and higher sleep latency (30.88 ± 16.19 minutes) during pre-competition training days. Additionally, the athletes of individual sports demonstrated more fragmentation (p < 0.001) and less sleep efficiency (p < 0.001) compared athletes of team sports. However, there was no significant difference in all sleep variables between the male and female sex. CONCLUSION: The overall elite athletes presented poor sleep quality during the training periods prior to the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, and individual athletes showed higher fragmentation and poorer sleep efficiency compared to team athletes


OBJETIVO: Analizar el cronotipo, la duración y la calidad del sueño entre los atletas de élite, comparar las diferencias en las variables de sueño entre los sexos y comparar las diferencias entre los atletas de los deportes individuales y de equipo. MÉTODO: La muestra incluyó a 70 atletas de élite brasileños de ambos sexos (hombre = 37; mujer = 33) con una edad media de 23.0 ± 4.0 años. Para medir lo ciclo de vigilia-sueño, los atletas usaron un actígrafo en la muñeca durante 10 días. Además, los atletas respondieron el cuestionario cronotipo de Horne y Östberg. RESULTADOS: La mayoría de los atletas son de tipo intermedio (n = 55, 78.6%), con una media de 07h: 18min de sueño por noche. Los atletas demostraron una mayor fragmentación del sueño (39.26 ± 23.66 minutos) y una mayor latencia del sueño (30.88 ± 16.19 minutos) durante los días de entrenamiento previo a la competencia. Además, los atletas de deportes individuales demostraron más fragmentación (p <0.001) y menos eficiencia del sueño (p <0.001) en comparación con los atletas de deportes de equipo. Sin embargo, no hubo diferencias significativas en todas las variables de sueño entre el sexo masculino y el femenino. CONCLUSIÓN: Los atletas de élite en general presentaron mala calidad del sueño durante los períodos de entrenamiento previos a los Juegos Olímpicos de Río 2016, y los atletas individuales mostraron una mayor fragmentación y una menor eficiencia del sueño en comparación con los atletas del equipo


OBJETIVO: Analisar o cronotipo, a duração e a qualidade do sono de atletas de elite, comparar as diferenças nas variáveis do sono entre os sexos e as diferenças entre atletas de esportes individuais e coletivos. MÉTODO: A amostra incluiu 70 atletas de elite brasileiros de ambos os sexos (masculino = 37; feminino = 33) com idade média de 23.0 ± 4.0 anos. Para mensurar o ciclo vigília-sono, os atletas usaram um actígrafo no punho por 10 dias. Além disso, os atletas responderam ao questionário de cronotipo de Horne e Östberg. RESULTADOS: A maioria dos atletas é do tipo intermediário (n = 55, 78.6%), com média de 07h:18min de sono por noite. Os atletas demonstraram maior fragmentação do sono (39.26 ± 23.66 minutos) e maior latência do sono (30.88 ± 16.19 minutos) durante os dias de treinamento pré-competição. Além disso, os atletas de esportes individuais demonstraram maior fragmentação (p <0.001) e menor eficiência do sono (p <0.001) em comparação aos atletas de esportes coletivos. No entanto, não houve diferença significativa em todas as variáveis de sono entre os sexos masculino e feminino. CONCLUSÃO: Os atletas de elite em geral apresentaram baixa qualidade do sono durante os períodos de treinamento antes dos Jogos Olímpicos Rio 2016, e os atletas de esportes individuais apresentaram maior fragmentação e menor eficiência do sono em comparação aos atletas de esportivos coletivos


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto Jovem , Adulto , Latência do Sono/fisiologia , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Atletas , Esportes/fisiologia , Actigrafia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Esportes/classificação , Fatores Sexuais , Desempenho Físico Funcional , Brasil
10.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 887, 2020 Jun 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32513161

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Adequate physical activity (PA) is considered essential in diabetes management. However, evidence on the best method of promoting PA within diabetes care is inconclusive. The current work identifies perceptions on the acceptability of Intervention Group Participants (IGP) and Project Officers (POs) about the "MOVEdiabetes" intervention programme aimed at increasing PA in adults with type 2 diabetes in Oman (a retrospectively registered trial). METHODS: The "MOVEdiabetes" programme (PA consultations, pedometers and WhatsApp messages) was delivered by the POs (primary health care practitioners) in four primary care centres within a one-year cluster randomised control trial. Recruitment and retention were measured from trial attendance records. Programme satisfaction, appropriateness, and content suitability were assessed using exit surveys for both the IGP (interview based) and POs (self-administered). Open text questions on perceptions to the study programme were also included. RESULTS: Participants were randomised to an intervention group (IG, n = 122) or comparison group (CG, n = 110). The overall retention rate at three and 12 months was 92.7% [110(90.2%) IG vs 105(95.5%) CG] and 75% [82(67.2%) IG vs 92(83.6%) CG] respectively. Most (n = 14, 87.5%) POs and more than half (n = 49, 59.8%) IGP perceived the programme as very appropriate and many reported that they were "quite/ very satisfied" with the programme (n = 16, 100% PO's and n = 71, 86.6% IGP). Two thirds (n = 55, 66.0%) of IGP were very/quite likely to recommend the programme to others. PA consultations, use of pedometers and Whatsapp messages were well perceived by all. Participants recommended the inclusion of dietary advice and PA promotion for the general public. Exploring PA facilities within the community was suggested by POs. CONCLUSIONS: The "MOVEdiabetes" programme achieved a high retention rate and was perceived as satisfactory and appropriate. Results from this study suggest that it is worthwhile exploring the use of the "MOVEdiabetes" programme in clinical practice and further community links. TRIAL REGISTRATION: International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials No: ISRCTN14425284. Registered retrospectively on 12th April 2016.


Assuntos
Terapia Comportamental/métodos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/reabilitação , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Atenção Primária à Saúde/métodos , Actigrafia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/psicologia , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Omã , Projetos de Pesquisa
11.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(6): e206614, 2020 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32484552

RESUMO

Importance: Many shift workers have difficulty sleeping during the daytime owing to an inappropriately timed circadian drive for wakefulness. Objective: To determine whether a dual hypocretin receptor antagonist would enable shift workers to have more daytime sleep. Design, Setting, and Participants: This double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial included 2 weeks of baseline data and 3 weeks of intervention data, from March 2016 to December 2018. Individuals were recruited through poster advertisements in the broader San Francisco Bay area in California. From an initial voluntary recruitment cohort of 38 shift workers, 19 individuals with self-reported difficulty sleeping during the daytime following night work shift were included. Data were analyzed from Janaury to March 2019. Interventions: 1 week of 10 mg suvorexant or placebo, titrated upward to 20 mg suvorexant or placebo for 2 additional weeks. Main Outcomes and Measures: Objective (ie, actigraphy) and subjective (ie, sleep logs) measures of sleep. Results: Among 19 participants who completed the study (mean [SD] age, 37.7 [11.1] years; 13 [68%] men), 8 participants (42%) were assigned to the suvorexant group and 11 participants (58%) were assigned to the placebo group. Compared with individuals in the placebo group, individuals in the suvorexant group increased their objective total sleep time by a mean (SE) of 1.04 (0.53) hours (P = .05) at the end of 1 week of 10-mg doses and by 2.16 (0.75) hours (P = .004) by the end of the 2 weeks of 20-mg doses. Subjective sleep was similarly improved as, compared with the placebo group, individuals in the suvorexant group increased their subjective total sleep time by a mean (SE) of 2.08 (0.47) hours (P < .001) at the end of 1 week of 10-mg doses and by 2.97 (0.56) hours (P < .001) by the end of the 2 weeks of 20-mg doses. Physician ratings of daytime sleep aligned with these measures, as there was no change in the placebo group and a much improved change in the suvorexant group. No adverse events were reported in the suvorexant group. Conclusions and Relevance: This pilot study found that the use of a dual hypocretin receptor antagonist in shift workers under real-world conditions resulted in more than 2 extra hours of daytime sleep per episode. Future research should confirm this pilot finding in a larger sample size and examine whether, over the long term, use of this medication has a concomitant improvement in medical and psychiatric health as well as workplace performance and safety. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02491788.


Assuntos
Azepinas/uso terapêutico , Antagonistas dos Receptores de Orexina/uso terapêutico , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/tratamento farmacológico , Sono/efeitos dos fármacos , Triazóis/uso terapêutico , Actigrafia/métodos , Adulto , California/epidemiologia , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Método Duplo-Cego , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Placebos/administração & dosagem , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/epidemiologia , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/fisiopatologia , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/tratamento farmacológico , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/fisiopatologia
12.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 935, 2020 Jun 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32539787

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The benefits of physical activity (PA) have been well documented, and the worksite is a promising setting for PA promotion. The aims of this study were as follows: 1. To evaluate the effect of a group-based worksite intervention on PA and health-related outcomes by using pedometers. 2. To examine the associations between the change in vigorous physical activity (VPA)/moderate physical activity (MPA)/walking and health related outcomes. METHODS: A total of 398 participants (221 in the intervention group (IG) and 177 in the control group (CG)) from 17 worksites were recruited for a prospective self-controlled trial of a worksite physical activity intervention program in China. In the IG, a pedometer was utilized to self-monitor the PA, together with group competition, goal setting, and other incentives. No intervention was applied to the CG. Physical activity, sedentary behavior, and health-related outcomes were measured at baseline and immediately after the 100-day period intervention. RESULTS: A total of 262 participants completed the program (68.3% adherence). Adherence in the intervention group was 67.9% (n = 150/221). Improvements between baseline and follow-up among intervention participants were observed in the following parameters: VPA (+ 109.7 METs/week; p < 0.05), walking (+ 209.2 METs/week; p < 0.01), systolic blood pressure (SBP; - 2.1 mmHg; p < 0.01), waist circumference (WC; - 2.3 cm; p < 0.01), body fat percentage (BF); - 1.0%; p < 0.01), and body mass index (BMI; - 0.5 kg/m2; p < 0.01). VPA was related to changes in body fat percentage (p < 0.05) and body mass index (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: This integrated group-based intervention program contributed to comprehensive improvement in health-related outcomes. The study was useful for establishing associations between change in VPA/MPA/walking and health-related outcomes in a natural setting. Long-term evaluation is required to examine the potential of such an integrated intervention to promote PA. REGISTRATION: This study was prospectively registered in the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ChiCTR-1,800,015,529. Date of registration: April 5, 2018.


Assuntos
Terapia Comportamental/métodos , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Doenças Profissionais/prevenção & controle , Serviços de Saúde do Trabalhador/métodos , Caminhada/psicologia , Local de Trabalho/psicologia , Actigrafia , Adulto , China , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos
13.
PLoS Biol ; 18(6): e3000726, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32497046

RESUMO

Why does poor-quality sleep lead to atherosclerosis? In a diverse sample of over 1,600 individuals, we describe a pathway wherein sleep fragmentation raises inflammatory-related white blood cell counts (neutrophils and monocytes), thereby increasing atherosclerosis severity, even when other common risk factors have been accounted for. Improving sleep quality may thus represent one preventive strategy for lowering inflammatory status and thus atherosclerosis risk, reinforcing public health policies focused on sleep health.


Assuntos
Vasos Sanguíneos/patologia , Privação do Sono/complicações , Actigrafia , Idoso , Aterosclerose/patologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Polissonografia , Índice de Gravidade de Doença
14.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(698): 1237-1242, 2020 Jun 17.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32558452

RESUMO

Circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD) represent sleep-wake disturbances due to a disruption of endogenous circadian system or to a desynchronization between internal sleep-wake rhythms and the external environment. They comprise seven diagnostic entities grouped in two main categories: endogenous and exogenous. The patients typically describe chronic excessive daytime sleepiness and/or insomnia symptoms, impacting their daytime functioning. The exact prevalence of CRSD is probably underestimated. The diagnosis is based on sleep diary coupled with actigraphy. Several therapeutic options are validated to allow the realignment between endogenous circadian rhythm and the external environment. The correct diagnostic of CRSD is important to improve the patient's quality of life and to propose them appropriate treatment.


Assuntos
Ritmo Circadiano , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/diagnóstico , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/terapia , Sono , Actigrafia , Ritmo Circadiano/fisiologia , Humanos , Qualidade de Vida , Sono/fisiologia , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/fisiopatologia , Transtornos do Sono do Ritmo Circadiano/psicologia , Sonolência
15.
PLoS One ; 15(6): e0234060, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32555652

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE/BACKGROUND: Wrist-worn sleep actigraphs are limited for evaluating sleep, especially in sleepers who lie awake in bed without moving for extended periods. Sleep logs depend on the accuracy of perceiving and remembering times of being awake. Here we evaluated pressing an event-marker button while lying awake under two conditions: self-initiated pressing every 5 to 10 minutes or pressing when signaled every 5 minutes by a vibration pulse from a wristband. We evaluated the two conditions for acceptability and their concordance with actigraphically scored sleep. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Twenty-nine adults wore actigraphs on six nights. On nights 1 and 4, they pressed the marker to a vibration signal, and on nights 2 and 5, they self-initiated presses without any signal. On nights 3 and 6, they were told not to press the marker. Every morning they filled out a sleep log about how they had slept. RESULTS: The vibration band was unacceptable to 42% of the participants, who judged it too disturbing to their sleep. Self-initiated pressing was acceptable to all, although it reduced log reported sleep depth compared to a no pressing condition. Estimations of sleep onset latency were considerably longer by button pressing than by actigraphy. Agreement of epoch-by-epoch sleep scoring by actigraphy and by button pressing was poor (kappa = 0.23) for self-initiated pressing and moderate (kappa = 0.46) for pressing in response to a vibration. CONCLUSIONS: Self-initiated button pressing to indicate being awake while lying in bed is acceptable to many, interferes little with sleep, and adds substantially to the information given by actigraphy.


Assuntos
Actigrafia , Sono/fisiologia , Vigília/fisiologia , Actigrafia/instrumentação , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Tempo , Vibração , Adulto Jovem
17.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 101(9): 1563-1569, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32502566

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To derive accelerometer count thresholds for classifying time spent in sedentary, light intensity, and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) in manual wheelchair users (MWUs) with spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: Participants completed 18 activities of daily living and exercises for 10 minutes each with a 3-minute break between activities while wearing a COSMED K4b2 portable metabolic cart and an ActiGraph activity monitor on the dominant wrist. A linear regression was computed between the wrist acceleration vector magnitude and SCI metabolic equivalent of task (MET) for 80% of the participants to obtain thresholds for classifying different activity intensities, and the obtained thresholds were tested for accuracy on the remaining 20% of participants. This cross-validation process was iterated for 1000 times to evaluate the stability of the thresholds on data corresponding to different proportions of sedentary, light intensity, and MVPA. MET values of 1.5 or lower were classified as sedentary behavior, MET values between 1.5 and 3 were classified as light intensity, and MET values of 3 or higher were classified as MVPA. The final thresholds were then validated on an out-of-sample independent dataset. PARTICIPANTS: MWUs (N=17) with SCI in the out-of-sample validation data set. INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. SETTING: Research lab, community MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Accelerometer thresholds to classify sedentary, light intensity, and MVPA were obtained and their accuracy tested using cross-validation and an out-of-sample dataset. RESULTS: The threshold between sedentary and light intensity was 2057 counts-per-minute, and the threshold between light intensity and MVPA was 11,551 counts per minute. Based on the out-of-sample validation, the obtained thresholds had an overall accuracy of 85.6%, with a sensitivity and specificity of 95.3% and 97.4% for sedentary behavior, 87.8% and 84.5% for light intensity, 68.5% and 96.3% for MVPA, respectively. CONCLUSION: Accelerometer-based thresholds can be used to accurately identify sedentary behavior. However, thresholds may not provide accurate estimations of MVPA throughout the day when participants engage in more resistance-based activities.


Assuntos
Actigrafia/instrumentação , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Traumatismos da Medula Espinal/reabilitação , Atividades Cotidianas , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Comportamento Sedentário , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Cadeiras de Rodas , Punho
18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32560544

RESUMO

Background: The school gives access to children, regardless of age, ethnicity, gender and socio-economic class and can be identified as the key environment in which to promote children's physical activity (PA). The guidelines of the European Union recommend accumulating at least 10-min bouts of PA to reach the daily 60 min. Active breaks (ABs) led by teachers inside the classroom represent a good strategy to promote PA. The aim of this pilot and feasibility study was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness in terms of PA level of an AB programme in children aged 8-9 years attending primary school. Methods: A pre-post quasi-experimental pilot and feasibility study was performed in two primary school classes, one of which was assigned to a 14-week AB intervention (AB group) and the other to the control group (CG). At baseline and at follow-up, children were monitored for sedentary and motor activity during an entire week using ActiGraph Accelerometer (ActiLife6 wGT3X-BT). The satisfaction of children and teachers was assessed by self-administered questionnaires. Results: In the pre-post comparison, AB group (n = 16) showed a reduction in the minutes spent in weekly sedentary activity (-168.7 min, p > 0.05), an increase in the number of step counts (+14,026.9, p < 0.05) and in time spent in moderate to vigorous PA (MVPA): weekly MVPA: +64.4 min, daily MVPA: +8.05 min, percentage of MVPA: +0.70%. On the contrary, CG showed a worsening in all variables. ANCOVA analysis, after adjusting for baseline values, showed significant differences between the AB group and CG for time spent in MVPA, percentage of MVPA and step counts. The satisfaction of children and teachers was good. Teachers were able to adapt the AB protocol to the needs of the school curriculum, thus confirming the feasibility of the AB programme. Conclusions: This pilot and feasibility study showed the feasibility and effectiveness of the AB protocol and represented the basis for a future controlled trial.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Serviços de Saúde Escolar , Comportamento Sedentário , Actigrafia , Criança , Currículo , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Itália , Masculino , Equivalente Metabólico/fisiologia , Projetos Piloto , Instituições Acadêmicas
19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32516925

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The main aim of this study was to quantify the associations between parents' and children's physical activity by age, gender, and the day of the week on the basis of a pedometer-measured step count (SC). METHODS: The sample comprised data from 4-to 16-year-old children and their parents from the Czech Republic (1102 mother-child dyads and 693 father-child dyads). The parents and their children wore the Yamax SW200 pedometer during seven days of monitoring. RESULTS: The strongest SC association was found between mothers and daughters aged 4-7.9 years on weekdays (rp = 0.402; p < 0.01) and at weekends (rp = 0.577; p < 0.01). In children aged 8-16, the parent-child association is gender-specific, with the father-son relationship being dominant, especially at weekends (weekend SC: fathers-sons8-11.9 y rp = 0.416, p < 0.01; fathers-sons12-16 y rp = 0.443, p < 0.01). An increase of 1000 steps in the fathers (mothers) is associated with an increase of more than 400 (200) steps in their sons (daughters). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms a strong parent-child SC relationship in children younger than eight years of age. In older children, the parent-child SC association is gender-specific and dominated by the father-son relationship, particularly on weekends. The SC associations that are revealed can be used for the development of physical activity programs for adolescents.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Relações Pais-Filho , Actigrafia , Adolescente , Idoso , Criança , Pré-Escolar , República Tcheca , Pai , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pais
20.
Geriatr Gerontol Int ; 20(8): 773-778, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32573085

RESUMO

AIM: To investigate the influence of replacing sedentary time with physical activity on cognitive function using an isotemporal substitution model in a population of community-dwelling oldest old. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included residents of the Arakawa ward, Tokyo, who were part of a prospective cohort from the Arakawa 85+ study. We measured physical activity in 136 participants using a triaxial actigraph. Cognitive function was measured using the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-III and participants were divided into a "cognitive decline group" (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-III ≤88) and "cognitive maintain group" (Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-III ≥89). Physical activity was divided into three categories: sedentary behavior (≤1.5 metabolic equivalents), light physical activity (>1.5 to <3.0 metabolic equivalents), and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (≥3 metabolic equivalents). Using an isotemporal substitution approach, we applied multiple logistic regression analysis to demonstrate the association between cognitive function and replacing 30 min/day of sedentary behavior with an equal period of light physical activity. Covariates included age, education and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale. RESULTS: Our findings showed that in men, replacing 30 min of sedentary behavior per day with light physical activity was associated with a 1.47-fold increase in the odds of maintaining cognitive function. An association between physical activity and cognitive function was not observed in female participants. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that substituting sedentary behavior with light physical activity could be helpful in maintaining cognitive function in community-dwelling oldest old men. These results highlight the importance of behavioral changes to promote cognition. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2020; 20: 773-778.


Assuntos
Cognição/fisiologia , Disfunção Cognitiva/epidemiologia , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Comportamento Sedentário , Actigrafia , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Vida Independente , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Tóquio/epidemiologia
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