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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 98(44): e17826, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31689870

RESUMO

Current study was to evaluate the prevalence of guideline recommended medications adherence in myocardial infarction (MI) patients postpercutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and the association of medication nonadherence and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs).MI patients who underwent PCI in the last 12 months were enrolled. Demographic and clinical characteristics were collected and guideline recommended medications were evaluated. Patients were divided into with and without MACEs groups.Compared to patients without MACEs, those with MACEs were older (54.8 ±â€Š16.4 vs 51.1 ±â€Š15.2 years), more likely to be smoker (40.2% vs 31.9%), have higher body mass index (BMI; 25.0 ±â€Š6.1 vs 23.8 ±â€Š5.7 kg/m), diabetes (47.5% vs 37.8%), ischemic stroke (34.4% vs 25.6%), and estimated lower glomerular filtration rate (85.4 ±â€Š9.6 vs 92.6 ±â€Š10.7 mL/minute/1.73 m). Patients with MACEs were also more likely to present with ST-elevation MI (STEMI; 54.1% vs 48.4%) and to undergo urgent PCI (62.3% vs 56.3%). Furthermore, patients with MACEs were less likely to adhere to dual antiplatelet therapy (77.9% vs 85.9%), renin-angiotensin system inhibitor (62.3% vs 69.7%), and beta-blocker (69.7% vs 72.8%) treatment. In unadjusted model, medication nonadherence was associated with 2-fold higher odds of MACEs. After adjustment for demographics, risk factors, comorbidities, and peri-PCI characteristics, medications nonadherence remained independently associated with MACEs, with odds ratio of 1.40 (95% confidence interval: 1.29-1.87).Medications adherence rate among MI patients post-PCI is suboptimal in China, which is independently associated with MACEs.


Assuntos
Fármacos Cardiovasculares/uso terapêutico , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Infarto do Miocárdio/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto , Idoso , China/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Infarto do Miocárdio/cirurgia , Intervenção Coronária Percutânea , Prevalência
2.
Pan Afr Med J ; 33: 309, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31692777

RESUMO

Introduction: Adherence to insulin therapy is a critical factor for adequate control of diabetes mellitus. Despite the multiple well-known benefits of adherence to insulin therapy, poor adherence remains to be a common cause of diabetes mellitus-related complications. A better management of diabetes mellitus requires determining the level of patient adherence and identifying why non-adherence to insulin therapy occurs. Therefore, this study was designed to assess the level of adherence to insulin therapy and associated factors among diabetes mellitus patients. Methods: The study was conducted from May 1 to July 1, 2018, using a cross-sectional study design. Interviewer-administered questionnaire was employed for data collection and systematic random sampling technique was used to select study participants. The collected data were entered using Epi data version 3.1.1 and exported to SPSS version 22 for analysis. Logistic analysis was carried out to check the level of association between adherence to insulin therapy and the independent variables with significance level of 0.05 at 95% confidence interval. Results: 273 respondents were selected with a 100% response rate. Near to one-fourth (24.2%) of the respondents were adherent to their insulin therapy. The study revealed that good knowledge of diabetes mellitus [AOR=6.51; 95% CI [1.58, 26.71], age [>30 years] [AOR=2.63; 95% CI [1.27, 5.42], knowledge regarding insulin self-injection [AOR=4.21; 95%CI [1.06,16.65], favorable attitude towards insulin injection [AOR=2.14; 95% CI [1.04,4.41], free-of-cost insulin therapy [AOR= 4.62, 95% CI [1.06,16.65], having of glucometer at home [AOR= 2.82, 95% CI [1.12,7.09], and being a member of Ethiopian diabetic association [AOR= 5.41, 95% CI [2.31,12.64] were found to significantly affect adherence to insulin therapy. Conclusion: Nearly one-fourth of the study participants were adherent to their insulin therapy. Good knowledge and favorable attitude towards insulin injection, good knowledge regarding diabetes mellitus, being a member of the Ethiopian Diabetes Association, age greater than thirty years old, free-of-cost insulin therapy and having glucometer at home were found to be significant predictors of adherence to insulin therapy.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus/tratamento farmacológico , Hipoglicemiantes/administração & dosagem , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Etiópia , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Hospitais Públicos , Humanos , Injeções , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Autoadministração , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
3.
Pan Afr Med J ; 33: 277, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31692880

RESUMO

Introduction: Adherence is vital to effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) for reducing viral load and HIV/AIDS-related morbidity and mortality. This study was aimed at evaluating the adherence of HIV seropositive patients to ART in a tertiary institution in Nigeria. Methods: A cross sectional observational study was conducted among 400 HIV seropositive patients. The study was carried out between December 2016 and February 2017 at the HIV clinic of the Ekiti State University Teaching Hospital, Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Results: The mean age of the HIV patients was 42.2±9.5 years with a predominant female gender (Male:Female = 1:2.8). The median CD4 counts increased from 302.1±15.0cells/mm3 at diagnosis to 430.8±13.3cells/mm3 at the time of the study. Majority of participants were unaware of their spouses' HIV status (59.3%) while 32.5% of participants had a serodiscordant spouse. Poverty was a major challenge as 73.3% earned less than 140 dollars per month. Depressive symptoms, anxiety disorder and insomnia were also reported in 40.7%, 33.2% and 47.2% respectively. Poor adherence to ART was observed in almost 20% of the patients. Logistic regression indicated that predictors of poor adherence were depression, anxiety and low CD4 counts. Conclusion: Adherence to anti-retroviral therapy was good amongst the majority of HIV seropositive patients. Depression, anxiety disorder and low CD4 count were however associated with poor adherence. This emphasizes the role of the psychology units as integral part of the HIV clinic to assist patients' adherence to anti-retroviral regimens.


Assuntos
Fármacos Anti-HIV/administração & dosagem , Contagem de Linfócito CD4 , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/epidemiologia , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Adesão à Medicação/psicologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nigéria , Inquéritos e Questionários
4.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 22(9): 1281-1285, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31489867

RESUMO

Background: The Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS) is a 10-item self-report measure of medication adherence in psychosis which is a vital predictor of illness course and outcome in patient with schizophrenia. The initial and subsequent studies have shown that MARS has good reliability and validity scores after correction for the small sample size in the index study. Aim: This study aimed to determine the psychometric properties of MARS among outpatients with schizophrenia at the outpatient clinic of the Neuropsychiatric Hospital Aro Abeokuta Ogun State Nigeria. Methods: Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to determine the internal consistency, item-total correlations, and reliability of the instrument. Factor analysis was done using principal component analysis with varimax rotation. Results: The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) for these 10 items (at time T1) was 0.6 with a P value of <0.001 while for the test--retest analysis was 0.7 with a P value of 0.04. A principal components factor analysis with varimax rotation produced a four-factor solution and factor 4 was found to be the most internally consistent, with Cronbach's alpha of 0.63. Conclusion: This study supports the internal consistency, test--retest reliability, and constructs validity of the MARS.


Assuntos
Adesão à Medicação/psicologia , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Psicometria/instrumentação , Esquizofrenia/tratamento farmacológico , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Adulto , Análise Fatorial , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nigéria , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Transtornos Psicóticos , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Esquizofrenia/diagnóstico , Autorrelato
5.
N Engl J Med ; 381(12): 1114-1123, 2019 09 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31532959

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Persons with low socioeconomic status and nonwhite persons in the United States have high rates of cardiovascular disease. The use of combination pills (also called "polypills") containing low doses of medications with proven benefits for the prevention of cardiovascular disease may be beneficial in such persons. However, few data are available regarding the use of polypill therapy in underserved communities in the United States, in which adherence to guideline-based care is generally low. METHODS: We conducted a randomized, controlled trial involving adults without cardiovascular disease. Participants were assigned to the polypill group or the usual-care group at a federally qualified community health center in Alabama. Components of the polypill were atorvastatin (at a dose of 10 mg), amlodipine (2.5 mg), losartan (25 mg), and hydrochlorothiazide (12.5 mg). The two primary outcomes were the changes from baseline in systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol level at 12 months. RESULTS: The trial enrolled 303 adults, of whom 96% were black. Three quarters of the participants had an annual income below $15,000. The mean estimated 10-year cardiovascular risk was 12.7%, the baseline blood pressure was 140/83 mm Hg, and the baseline LDL cholesterol level was 113 mg per deciliter. The monthly cost of the polypill was $26. At 12 months, adherence to the polypill regimen, as assessed on the basis of pill counts, was 86%. The mean systolic blood pressure decreased by 9 mm Hg in the polypill group, as compared with 2 mm Hg in the usual-care group (difference, -7 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval [CI], -12 to -2; P = 0.003). The mean LDL cholesterol level decreased by 15 mg per deciliter in the polypill group, as compared with 4 mg per deciliter in the usual-care group (difference, -11 mg per deciliter; 95% CI, -18 to -5; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: A polypill-based strategy led to greater reductions in systolic blood pressure and LDL cholesterol level than were observed with usual care in a socioeconomically vulnerable minority population. (Funded by the American Heart Association Strategically Focused Prevention Research Network and the National Institutes of Health; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02278471.).


Assuntos
Anti-Hipertensivos/administração & dosagem , Combinação de Medicamentos , Inibidores de Hidroximetilglutaril-CoA Redutases/administração & dosagem , Hipercolesterolemia/tratamento farmacológico , Hipertensão/tratamento farmacológico , Área Carente de Assistência Médica , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Alabama , Anlodipino/administração & dosagem , Atorvastatina/administração & dosagem , LDL-Colesterol/sangue , Centros Comunitários de Saúde , Feminino , Humanos , Hidroclorotiazida/administração & dosagem , Hipercolesterolemia/sangue , Hipercolesterolemia/complicações , Hipertensão/complicações , Losartan/administração & dosagem , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
6.
Pan Afr Med J ; 33: 89, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31489067

RESUMO

Introduction: Mortality of adult patients who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is higher in low-income than in high-income countries. After the failure of standard first-line treatment, patients switch to second-line regimens. However, there are limited data about the outcome of patients after switching to a second-line regimen in the study area. This study aimed to measure the rate of mortality and its determinants among HIV patients on second-line ART regimens. Methods: Multicenter institution based retrospective follow up study was conducted among 1192 adult patients who started second-line ART between 2008 and 2016 in eight selected hospitals of Amhara region. Patients who started second-line treatment after the failure of first-line treatment were included. Patient medical records, registration books, and computer database were used to collect the data. Time to death after a switch to second-line ART was the primary outcome of interest. Cox proportional hazard model was fitted to identify determinant factors of mortality. Results: Among 1192 patients who were on second-line ART, 136 (11.4%) died with 3,157 person-years of follow up. Over the study period, the mortality rate was 4.33 per 100 person-years. Not taking isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) (Adjusted Hazard Ratio (AHR): 6.6; 95% CI: 2.9, 15.0), did not make modification on second-line regimen (AHR: 4.4; 95% CI: 2.8, 6.8), poor clinical adherence (AHR: 2.5; 95% CI: 1.4, 4.5), functional status of bedridden (AHR: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.5, 4.8), and having attained a tertiary level of education (AHR: 0.4; 95% CI: 0.2, 0.8) were independent determinants of mortality. Conclusion: The incidence rate of mortality was high and most of the deaths occurred within 12 months after switching to second-line ART. Higher mortality among adult HIV-infected patients was associated with poor adherence, no formal education, not taking IPT, being bedridden at the time of the switch, and not modifying second-line treatment. Improving treatment adherence of patients by providing consistent adherence counseling, providing INH prophylaxis and monitoring patient's regimen more closely during the first twelve months after switch could decrease mortality of HIV patients on a second-line regimen.


Assuntos
Fármacos Anti-HIV/administração & dosagem , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Isoniazida/administração & dosagem , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Pessoas Acamadas/estatística & dados numéricos , Escolaridade , Etiópia/epidemiologia , Feminino , Seguimentos , Infecções por HIV/mortalidade , Hospitais , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Tempo , Adulto Jovem
7.
Pan Afr Med J ; 33: 95, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31489073

RESUMO

Introduction: Successful and long-term positive impact of antiretroviral treatment requires high rates of adherence (> 90%). In Senegal, there is a lack of data regarding adherence to antiretroviral treatment and only a few studies have looked at the determinants. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence and determinants contributing to antiretroviral (ARV) adherence among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infected outpatients receiving care at four public hospitals in Dakar, Senegal. Methods: A cross-sectional based study was carried out among HIV-positive ART adults in Dakar, Senegal. Patients were systematically sampled during either their clinical visits or visit to collect ARV drugs from six public hospitals and data collected with a questionnaire. The study outcome was adherence to antiretroviral treatment assessed by a multiple approach method which combined three self-reported adherence tools: self-reporting, Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and the Simplified Medication Adherence Questionnaire (SMAQ). Data were entered with an Excel spreadsheet and transferred to STATA for descriptive, bivariate and multivariate analysis. All the statistical tests were done at the threshold level of 0.05. Results: A total of 150 HIV-positive patients on first line ART regimen at six public health facilities were enrolled into the study. The mean age of patients was 43.1 years with a sex ratio of 0.3. Most of the patients were prescribed Tenofovir-based regimen. Of these patients, 26.67% were found to be highly adherent. After adjusting for health-related variables, demographic and socio-economic variables, better adherence was associated with participating actively within an association of persons living with HIV (AoR=2.89; 95% CI: 1.04 - 7.99; p value 0.041) while being widowed patient was associated with lower adherence (AoR=0.17; 95% CI: 0.03 - 0.94; p value 0.043). Conclusion: Our study findings imply that adherence should be routinely assessed during medical visits. Ongoing strategies to improve adherence such as out-of-clinic group-based models or psychological support should be directed toward outpatients' clinics to assist in improving adherence and long term virologic suppression in Senegal.


Assuntos
Fármacos Anti-HIV/administração & dosagem , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Hospitais Públicos , Humanos , Masculino , Pacientes Ambulatoriais , Prevalência , Senegal , Inquéritos e Questionários
8.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 8: CD009164, 2019 08 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31425618

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pharmacological treatments for tobacco dependence, such as nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), have been shown to be safe and effective interventions for smoking cessation. Higher levels of adherence to these medications increase the likelihood of sustained smoking cessation, but many smokers use them at a lower dose and for less time than is optimal. It is important to determine the effectiveness of interventions designed specifically to increase medication adherence. Such interventions may address motivation to use medication, such as influencing beliefs about the value of taking medications, or provide support to overcome problems with maintaining adherence. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of interventions aiming to increase adherence to medications for smoking cessation on medication adherence and smoking abstinence compared with a control group typically receiving standard care. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register, and clinical trial registries (ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform) to the 3 September 2018. We also conducted forward and backward citation searches. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised, cluster-randomised or quasi-randomised studies in which adults using active pharmacological treatment for smoking cessation were allocated to an intervention arm where there was a principal focus on increasing adherence to medications for tobacco dependence, or a control arm providing standard care. Dependent on setting, standard care may have comprised minimal support or varying degrees of behavioural support. Included studies used a measure that allowed assessment of the degree of medication adherence. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently screened studies for eligibility, extracted data for included studies and assessed risk of bias. For continuous outcome measures, we calculated effect sizes as standardised mean differences (SMDs). For dichotomous outcome measures, we calculated effect sizes as risk ratios (RRs). In meta-analyses for adherence outcomes, we combined dichotomous and continuous data using the generic inverse variance method and reported pooled effect sizes as SMDs; for abstinence outcomes, we reported and pooled dichotomous outcomes. We obtained pooled effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) using random-effects models. We conducted subgroup analyses to assess whether the primary focus of the adherence treatment ('practicalities' versus 'perceptions' versus both), the delivery approach (participant versus clinician-centred) or the medication type were associated with effectiveness. MAIN RESULTS: We identified two new studies, giving a total of 10 studies, involving 3655 participants. The medication adherence interventions studied were all provided in addition to standard behavioural support.They typically provided further information on the rationale for, and emphasised the importance of, adherence to medication or supported the development of strategies to overcome problems with maintaining adherence (or both). Seven studies targeted adherence to NRT, two to bupropion and one to varenicline. Most studies were judged to be at high or unclear risk of bias, with four of these studies judged at high risk of attrition or detection bias. Only one study was judged to be at low risk of bias.Meta-analysis of all 10 included studies (12 comparisons) provided moderate-certainty evidence that adherence interventions led to small improvements in adherence (i.e. the mean amount of medication consumed; SMD 0.10, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.18; I² = 6%; n = 3655), limited by risk of bias. Subgroup analyses for the primary outcome identified no significant subgroup effects, with effect sizes for subgroups imprecisely estimated. However, there was a very weak indication that interventions focused on the 'practicalities' of adhering to treatment (i.e. capabilities, resources, levels of support or skills) may be effective (SMD 0.21, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.38; I² = 39%; n = 1752), whereas interventions focused on treatment 'perceptions' (i.e. beliefs, cognitions, concerns and preferences; SMD 0.10, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.24; I² = 0%; n = 839) or on both (SMD 0.04, 95% CI -0.08 to 0.16; I² = 0%; n = 1064), may not be effective. Participant-centred interventions may be effective (SMD 0.12, 95% CI 0.02 to 0.23; I² = 20%; n = 2791), whereas those that are clinician-centred may not (SMD 0.09, 95% CI -0.05 to 0.23; I² = 0%; n = 864).Five studies assessed short-term smoking abstinence (five comparisons), while an overlapping set of five studies (seven comparisons) assessed long-term smoking abstinence of six months or more. Meta-analyses resulted in low-certainty evidence that adherence interventions may slightly increase short-term smoking cessation rates (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.21; I² = 0%; n = 1795) and long-term smoking cessation rates (RR 1.16, 95% CI 0.96 to 1.40; I² = 48%; n = 3593). In both cases, the evidence was limited by risk of bias and imprecision, with CIs encompassing minimal harm as well as moderate benefit, and a high likelihood that further evidence will change the estimate of the effect. There was no evidence that interventions to increase adherence to medication led to any adverse events. Studies did not report on factors plausibly associated with increases in adherence, such as self-efficacy, understanding of and attitudes toward treatment, and motivation and intentions to quit. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: In people who are stopping smoking and receiving behavioural support, there is moderate-certainty evidence that enhanced behavioural support focusing on adherence to smoking cessation medications can modestly improve adherence. There is only low-certainty evidence that this may slightly improve the likelihood of cessation in the shorter or longer-term. Interventions to increase adherence can aim to address the practicalities of taking medication, change perceptions about medication, such as reasons to take it or concerns about doing so, or both. However, there is currently insufficient evidence to confirm which approach is more effective. There is no evidence on whether such interventions are effective for people who are stopping smoking without standard behavioural support.


Assuntos
Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Agonistas Nicotínicos/uso terapêutico , Abandono do Hábito de Fumar/métodos , Dispositivos para o Abandono do Uso de Tabaco , Tabagismo/tratamento farmacológico , Benzazepinas/uso terapêutico , Bupropiona/uso terapêutico , Quimioterapia Combinada/métodos , Humanos , Nortriptilina/uso terapêutico , Quinoxalinas/uso terapêutico , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Prevenção do Hábito de Fumar
9.
Pan Afr Med J ; 33: 27, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31384342

RESUMO

Introduction: In Nigeria, approximately 4.33 million adults suffer from hypertension and about a third of them do not adhere to prescribed medications. Depression has been reported to significantly predict poor medication adherence. The relationship between medication non-adherence and co-morbid depressive disorder in patients with hypertension has not been adequately explored in this environment. The study aimed to determine the prevalence of depression in patients with hypertension. The association between socio-demographic characteristics and presence of co-morbidity on medication adherence was also determined. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive research design was adopted for the study. A socio-demographic questionnaire, the modified Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS), the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI), were administered to four hundred patients with hypertension attending medical out-patient clinic between August and September 2012. Results: About 43% (168) were aged 61 to 64 years the majority being females, with a female to male ratio of 1.63:1. The prevalence of comorbid depression was 22.8%, made up of mild (21.8%) and moderate (1.0%) depressive episodes only. Depression was commoner among females than males in a ratio of 3:1. A majority of the participants (96.8%) had high medication adherence; 2.8% and 0.4% had moderate and low adherence respectively. Depression was more among patients with good medication adherence. Conclusion: The occurrence of mild depressive disorder among hypertensives did not affect the level of medication adherence. Review of Antihypertensive drugs should also be done often to ensure patients are not likely to have depressive illness as a side effect of drugs used.


Assuntos
Anti-Hipertensivos/administração & dosagem , Depressão/epidemiologia , Hipertensão/tratamento farmacológico , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Anti-Hipertensivos/efeitos adversos , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Hipertensão/psicologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nigéria , Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Fatores Sexuais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Centros de Atenção Terciária , Adulto Jovem
10.
Pan Afr Med J ; 33: 28, 2019.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31384343

RESUMO

Poor compliance with therapy is frequently encountered in most of patients with chronic diseases. It increases the risk of morbi-mortality and healthcare costs. Patients on chronic haemodialysis often have poor compliance with treatment. This study aims to assess the level of compliance with treatment in our patients on chronic hemodialysis and to identify the predictive factors of poor compliance with treatment. We conducted a cross-sectional study at the Oujda Hospital in November 2011. The compliance with treatment was measured using a questionnaire: the compliance evaluation test (CET) assessed the compliance with medication treatment and diet. A rate of 85% was retained arbitrarily as a threshold for good compliance with treatment. Patient in a zone of partial adherence had a rate between 57% and 85% while a lower rate (57%) indicated poor compliance with treatment. Different demographic and clinicobiologic parameters were analyzed and predictive factors for good and poor compliance with treatment were identified. Our study involved 101 patients on chronic haemodialysis; the sex ratio was 1.2, the average age of patients was 15.6 years. CET showed that 23.4% of patients had good compliance with treatment, 39.4% partial compliance with treatment and 37.2% poor compliance with treatment. Statistical analysis showed that poor compliance with treatment was associated with a lower socio-economic and intellectual status, with co-morbidities and with long term hemodialysis. Good compliance with treatment was observed in very old patients helped by a third person, taking a reduced number of medications, with a higher intellectual level.


Assuntos
Dieta/normas , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Cooperação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Diálise Renal/métodos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
11.
AIDS Behav ; 23(9): 2610-2617, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31377894

RESUMO

Adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) during pregnancy and the postpartum period is necessary to prevent vertical HIV transmission and to secure the long-term health of an HIV-infected woman. Health behavior theory suggests that patients' attitudes towards medication can predict their medication-taking behaviour. This study sought to understand how women's attitudes towards ART changes between the pregnancy and postpartum periods, and the factors associated with these attitudes. The study enrolled 200 pregnant women living with HIV. Structured surveys were administered during pregnancy and at three and 6 months postpartum. Overall, attitudes towards ART were stable over time. More positive attitudes towards ART were associated with HIV acceptance, lower levels of depression, and lower levels of shame. Counselling interventions are needed to help HIV-infected women accept their status and reduce shameful emotions. Depression screening and treatment should be integrated into PMTCT services. This study emphasizes the importance of early attention to attitudes towards ART, in order to establish a trajectory of sustained care engagement.


Assuntos
Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Transmissão Vertical de Doença Infecciosa/prevenção & controle , Adesão à Medicação/psicologia , Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/tratamento farmacológico , Gestantes/psicologia , Adulto , Aconselhamento , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/etnologia , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde/etnologia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Adesão à Medicação/etnologia , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Período Pós-Parto/psicologia , Gravidez , Gestantes/etnologia , Tanzânia/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
12.
Lancet ; 394(10199): 672-683, 2019 08 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31448738

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A fixed-dose combination therapy (polypill strategy) has been proposed as an approach to reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease, especially in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs). The PolyIran study aimed to assess the effectiveness and safety of a four-component polypill including aspirin, atorvastatin, hydrochlorothiazide, and either enalapril or valsartan for primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. METHODS: The PolyIran study was a two-group, pragmatic, cluster-randomised trial nested within the Golestan Cohort Study (GCS), a cohort study with 50 045 participants aged 40-75 years from the Golestan province in Iran. Clusters (villages) were randomly allocated (1:1) to either a package of non-pharmacological preventive interventions alone (minimal care group) or together with a once-daily polypill tablet (polypill group). Randomisation was stratified by three districts (Gonbad, Aq-Qala, and Kalaleh), with the village as the unit of randomisation. We used a balanced randomisation algorithm, considering block sizes of 20 and balancing for cluster size or natural log of the cluster size (depending on the skewness within strata). Randomisation was done at a fixed point in time (Jan 18, 2011) by statisticians at the University of Birmingham (Birmingham, UK), independent of the local study team. The non-pharmacological preventive interventions (including educational training about healthy lifestyle-eg, healthy diet with low salt, sugar, and fat content, exercise, weight control, and abstinence from smoking and opium) were delivered by the PolyIran field visit team at months 3 and 6, and then every 6 months thereafter. Two formulations of polypill tablet were used in this study. Participants were first prescribed polypill one (hydrochlorothiazide 12·5 mg, aspirin 81 mg, atorvastatin 20 mg, and enalapril 5 mg). Participants who developed cough during follow-up were switched by a trained study physician to polypill two, which included valsartan 40 mg instead of enalapril 5 mg. Participants were followed up for 60 months. The primary outcome-occurrence of major cardiovascular events (including hospitalisation for acute coronary syndrome, fatal myocardial infarction, sudden death, heart failure, coronary artery revascularisation procedures, and non-fatal and fatal stroke)-was centrally assessed by the GCS follow-up team, who were masked to allocation status. We did intention-to-treat analyses by including all participants who met eligibility criteria in the two study groups. The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01271985. FINDINGS: Between Feb 22, 2011, and April 15, 2013, we enrolled 6838 individuals into the study-3417 (in 116 clusters) in the minimal care group and 3421 (in 120 clusters) in the polypill group. 1761 (51·5%) of 3421 participants in the polypill group were women, as were 1679 (49·1%) of 3417 participants in the minimal care group. Median adherence to polypill tablets was 80·5% (IQR 48·5-92·2). During follow-up, 301 (8·8%) of 3417 participants in the minimal care group had major cardiovascular events compared with 202 (5·9%) of 3421 participants in the polypill group (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0·66, 95% CI 0·55-0·80). We found no statistically significant interaction with the presence (HR 0·61, 95% CI 0·49-0·75) or absence of pre-existing cardiovascular disease (0·80; 0·51-1·12; pinteraction=0·19). When restricted to participants in the polypill group with high adherence, the reduction in the risk of major cardiovascular events was even greater compared with the minimal care group (adjusted HR 0·43, 95% CI 0·33-0·55). The frequency of adverse events was similar between the two study groups. 21 intracranial haemorrhages were reported during the 5 years of follow-up-ten participants in the polypill group and 11 participants in the minimal care group. There were 13 physician-confirmed diagnoses of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in the polypill group and nine in the minimal care group. INTERPRETATION: Use of polypill was effective in preventing major cardiovascular events. Medication adherence was high and adverse event numbers were low. The polypill strategy could be considered as an additional effective component in controlling cardiovascular diseases, especially in LMICs. FUNDING: Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Barakat Foundation, and Alborz Darou.


Assuntos
Fármacos Cardiovasculares/administração & dosagem , Doenças Cardiovasculares/prevenção & controle , Combinação de Medicamentos , Prevenção Secundária/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Anticolesterolemiantes/administração & dosagem , Anti-Hipertensivos/administração & dosagem , Aspirina/administração & dosagem , Atorvastatina/administração & dosagem , Pressão Sanguínea/efeitos dos fármacos , Fármacos Cardiovasculares/uso terapêutico , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , LDL-Colesterol/efeitos dos fármacos , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Enalapril/administração & dosagem , Feminino , Humanos , Hidroclorotiazida/administração & dosagem , Masculino , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inibidores da Agregação de Plaquetas/administração & dosagem , Valsartana/administração & dosagem
13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 19(1): 654, 2019 Jul 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31331280

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Retaining patients on antiretroviral treatment in care is critical to sustaining the 90:90:90 vision. Nigeria has made some progress in placing HIV-positive patients on treatment. In an effort to increase access to treatment, ART decentralization has been implemented in the country. This is aimed at strengthening lower level health facilities to provide comprehensive antiretroviral treatment. We determined the level of retention and adherence to treatment as well as the associated factors among private and public secondary level hospitals in Anambra State. METHOD: We conducted a cross-sectional study among patients who had taken antiretroviral treatment for at least one complete year. A structured questionnaire and patient record review were used to extract information on patient adherence to treatment, and retention in care. Adherence to treatment was ascertained by patient self-report of missed pills in the 30 days prior to date of interview. Retention in care was ascertained using the 3-month visit constancy method reviewing the period spanning 12 months prior to the study. RESULT: We found a comparable level of retention in care (private 81.1%; public 80.3%; p = 0.722). However, treatment adherence was significantly higher amongst participants in the private hospitals compared to those in the public hospitals (private: 95.3%; public: 90.7%; p = 0.001). Determinants of good retention in the private hospitals included disclosure of one's HIV status (AOR: 1.94, 95% CI: 1.09-3.46), being on first-line regimen (AOR: 3.07, 95% CI: 1.27-7.41), whereas being on once-daily regimen (AOR: 0.58, 95% CI: 0.36-0.92), and being currently married (AOR: 0.54 95% CI: 0.32-0.91) determined poor retention. In the public hospitals, only disclosure (AOR: 3.12 95% CI: 1.81-5.56) determined good retention, whereas, spending less than N1000 on transport (AOR: 0.230 95% CI: 0.07-0.78) and residing in a rural area (AOR: 0.64 95% CI: 0.41-0.99) determined poor retention. None of the factors determined adherence. CONCLUSION: Retention in care was high and comparable among the different hospital types and HIV disclosure status was an important factor relating to retention in care. The other factors that determined retention were however different at public and private hospitals. The HIV program manager should consider these variations in designing programs to improve patient retention in care and adherence to treatment.


Assuntos
Fármacos Anti-HIV/uso terapêutico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Retenção nos Cuidados/estatística & dados numéricos , Síndrome de Imunodeficiência Adquirida/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Hospitais Privados/estatística & dados numéricos , Hospitais Públicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Nigéria , Cooperação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
AIDS Behav ; 23(Suppl 3): 242-250, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31317363

RESUMO

HIV-related stigma is prevalent in the US Deep South; however, information regarding the types of stigma and their effects on HIV-related outcomes is limited. This study examined the prevalence of different forms of stigma and the association of stigma with medication and medical visit adherence in the Deep South. Survey participants included 201 individuals living with HIV recruited from Infectious Diseases Clinics (ID) and AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs) in four Deep South states. Study participants reported high levels of experienced, perceived, and internalized stigma. Multivariable analysis revealed that internalized stigma and recent stigmatizing experiences were significantly associated with poorer HIV medication adherence. Internalized stigma was also associated with having missed an HIV medical care visit in the last 6 months. These findings suggest the need to identify and develop effective interventions to address internalized HIV-related stigma and to address community HIV stigma to improve outcomes for individuals living with HIV.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Adesão à Medicação/psicologia , Estigma Social , Cooperação e Adesão ao Tratamento/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Alabama/epidemiologia , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Mississippi/epidemiologia , North Carolina/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Apoio Social , South Carolina/epidemiologia , Estereotipagem , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
15.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1012, 2019 Jul 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31357968

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Poor adherence is a major issue and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, and immense costs for the healthcare system. Due to demographic changes, the burden of neurological diseases is increasing with a crucial exacerbation of the problem of nonadherence. However, comprehensive data on geriatric patients with neurological disorders do not exist to date. In this cross-sectional observational study we aim to identify disease-specific adherence-modulating factors in neurogeriatric patients. METHODS: Patients 60 years or older with neurological disorders will receive an assessment of adherence (Stendal Adherence with Medication Score) and a comprehensive geriatric assessment during their stay in the Department of Neurology or Geriatrics at the Jena University Hospital (baseline data). In addition disease specific data will be derived from medical records. After one and twelve months a telephone interview will be conducted to evaluate if and why changes of medication occurred (follow up data). DISCUSSION: This study aims to explore disease-specific patterns of nonadherence in elderly patients with neurological disorders and characteristics of information transfer between a specialized center, practicing neurologists, general practitioners, and the patients and their caregivers. This comprehensive data may help to develop and apply complex and disease-specific interventions to enhance adherence. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00016774. Registered 19.02.2019.


Assuntos
Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso/tratamento farmacológico , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
16.
Hypertension ; 74(3): 652-659, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31327263

RESUMO

Masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH) in treated hypertensive patients is defined as controlled automated office blood pressure (BP; <135/85 mm Hg) in-clinic but uncontrolled out-of-clinic BP by ambulatory BP monitoring (awake [daytime] readings ≥135/85 mm Hg or 24-hour readings ≥130/80 mm Hg). To determine whether MUCH is attributable to antihypertensive medication nonadherence. One hundred eighty-four enrolled patients were confirmed to have controlled office BP; of these, 167 patients were with adequate 24-hour ambulatory BP recordings. Of 167 patients, 86 were controlled by in-clinic BP assessment but had uncontrolled ambulatory awake BP, indicative of MUCH. The remaining 81 had controlled in-clinic and ambulatory awake BP, consistent with true controlled hypertension. After exclusion of 9 patients with missing 24-hour urine collections, antihypertensive medication adherence was determined based on the detection of urinary drugs or drug metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Of the 81 patients with MUCH, 69 (85.2%) were fully adherent and 12 (14.8%) were partially adherent (fewer medications detected than prescribed). Of the 77 patients with true controlled hypertension, 69 (89.6%) were fully adherent with prescribed antihypertensive medications and 8 (10.4%) were partially adherent. None of the patients in either group were fully nonadherent. There was no statistically significant difference in complete or partial adherence between the MUCH and true controlled groups (P=0.403). Measurement of urinary drug and drug metabolite levels demonstrates a similarly high level of antihypertensive medication adherence in both MUCH and truly controlled hypertensive patients. These findings indicate that MUCH is not attributable to antihypertensive medication nonadherence.


Assuntos
Assistência Ambulatorial/métodos , Anti-Hipertensivos/administração & dosagem , Monitorização Ambulatorial da Pressão Arterial/métodos , Hipertensão Mascarada/diagnóstico , Hipertensão Mascarada/tratamento farmacológico , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Feminino , Seguimentos , Hospitais Universitários , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Medição de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Fatores de Tempo , Falha de Tratamento
17.
Lancet ; 394(10202): 929-938, 2019 09 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31327563

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Primaquine is the only widely used drug that prevents Plasmodium vivax malaria relapses, but adherence to the standard 14-day regimen is poor. We aimed to assess the efficacy of a shorter course (7 days) of primaquine for radical cure of vivax malaria. METHODS: We did a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, non-inferiority trial in eight health-care clinics (two each in Afghanistan, Ethiopia, Indonesia, and Vietnam). Patients (aged ≥6 months) with normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) and presenting with uncomplicated vivax malaria were enrolled. Patients were given standard blood schizontocidal treatment and randomly assigned (2:2:1) to receive 7 days of supervised primaquine (1·0 mg/kg per day), 14 days of supervised primaquine (0·5 mg/kg per day), or placebo. The primary endpoint was the incidence rate of symptomatic P vivax parasitaemia during the 12-month follow-up period, assessed in the intention-to-treat population. A margin of 0·07 recurrences per person-year was used to establish non-inferiority of the 7-day regimen compared with the 14-day regimen. This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01814683). FINDINGS: Between July 20, 2014, and Nov 25, 2017, 2336 patients were enrolled. The incidence rate of symptomatic recurrent P vivax malaria was 0·18 (95% CI 0·15 to 0·21) recurrences per person-year for 935 patients in the 7-day primaquine group and 0·16 (0·13 to 0·18) for 937 patients in the 14-day primaquine group, a difference of 0·02 (-0·02 to 0·05, p=0·3405). The incidence rate for 464 patients in the placebo group was 0·96 (95% CI 0·83 to 1·08) recurrences per person-year. Potentially drug-related serious adverse events within 42 days of starting treatment were reported in nine (1·0%) of 935 patients in the 7-day group, one (0·1%) of 937 in the 14-day group and none of 464 in the control arm. Four of the serious adverse events were significant haemolysis (three in the 7-day group and one in the 14-day group). INTERPRETATION: In patients with normal G6PD, 7-day primaquine was well tolerated and non-inferior to 14-day primaquine. The short-course regimen might improve adherence and therefore the effectiveness of primaquine for radical cure of P vivax malaria. FUNDING: UK Department for International Development, UK Medical Research Council, UK National Institute for Health Research, and the Wellcome Trust through the Joint Global Health Trials Scheme (MR/K007424/1) and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (OPP1054404).


Assuntos
Antimaláricos/administração & dosagem , Malária Vivax/tratamento farmacológico , Primaquina/administração & dosagem , Adolescente , Adulto , Antimaláricos/efeitos adversos , Antimaláricos/uso terapêutico , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Método Duplo-Cego , Esquema de Medicação , Estudos de Equivalência como Asunto , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Malária Vivax/parasitologia , Masculino , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Parasitemia/tratamento farmacológico , Parasitemia/parasitologia , Plasmodium vivax/isolamento & purificação , Primaquina/efeitos adversos , Primaquina/uso terapêutico , Recidiva , Prevenção Secundária/métodos , Adulto Jovem
18.
BMC Med ; 17(1): 127, 2019 07 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31311573

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Smartphone apps are becoming increasingly popular for supporting diabetes self-management. A key aspect of diabetes self-management is appropriate medication-taking. This study aims to systematically assess and characterise the medication management features in diabetes self-management apps and their congruence with best-practice evidence-based criteria. METHODS: The Google Play and Apple app stores were searched in June 2018 using diabetes-related terms in the English language. Apps with both medication and blood glucose management features were downloaded and evaluated against assessment criteria derived from international medication management and diabetes guidelines. RESULTS: Our search yielded 3369 Android and 1799 iOS potentially relevant apps; of which, 143 apps (81 Android, 62 iOS) met inclusion criteria and were downloaded and assessed. Over half 58.0% (83/143) of the apps had a medication reminder feature; 16.8% (24/143) had a feature to review medication adherence; 39.9% (57/143) allowed entry of medication-taking instructions; 5.6% (8/143) provided information about medication; and 4.2% (6/143) displayed motivational messages to encourage medication-taking. Only two apps prompted users on the use of complementary medicine. Issues such as limited medication logging capacity, faulty reminder features, unclear medication adherence assessment, and visually distracting excessive advertising were observed during app assessments. CONCLUSIONS: A large proportion of diabetes self-management apps lacked features for enhancing medication adherence and safety. More emphasis should be given to the design of medication management features in diabetes apps to improve their alignment to evidence-based best practice.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/tratamento farmacológico , Adesão à Medicação , Aplicativos Móveis , Autocuidado/métodos , Autogestão/métodos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/psicologia , Humanos , Adesão à Medicação/psicologia , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Aplicativos Móveis/normas , Aplicativos Móveis/estatística & dados numéricos , Autocuidado/normas , Autocuidado/estatística & dados numéricos , Autoeficácia , Autogestão/estatística & dados numéricos , Smartphone
19.
AIDS Behav ; 23(9): 2588-2599, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31263998

RESUMO

Black and Latina transgender women (BLTW) are disproportionately impacted by HIV but remain underrepresented in HIV and health services research. Between March 2016 and May 2017, BLTW (N = 201) were recruited in Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, DC through convenience sampling for a survey assessing multilevel determinants of HIV risk and treatment outcomes. Interviews concluded with a rapid oral HIV test. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression modeling was performed to identify gender affirmation-related correlates of self-reported HIV treatment interruptions (HIVTIs) among BLTW living with HIV who had initiated antiretroviral therapy (ART) (n = 96). Among them, 57.3% (n = 55) reported at least one HIVTI. Unmet surgical needs (aOR = 1.6), past-year marijuana use (aOR = 14.6), and no current hormone use (aOR = 24.9) were significantly (p < 0.05) associated with HIVTIs in multivariable analysis. Unmet need for gender affirmation may inhibit ART adherence, highlighting opportunities to mitigate care interruptions in alignment with community needs and goals.


Assuntos
Fármacos Anti-HIV/uso terapêutico , Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoas Transgênero/psicologia , Adulto , Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/psicologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Africano/estatística & dados numéricos , Baltimore/epidemiologia , District of Columbia/epidemiologia , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/etnologia , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Adesão à Medicação/etnologia , Adesão à Medicação/psicologia , Estigma Social , Pessoas Transgênero/estatística & dados numéricos , Transexualismo
20.
Med Care ; 57(8): 648-653, 2019 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31299026

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the impacts of the implementation of patient cost-sharing for an outpatient visit and prescription drugs for poor and nonable bodied Koreans in 2007. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTINGS: Nationally-representative longitudinal data sets (Korea Welfare Panel Study and the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing) in 2006, 2008, and 2010. RESEARCH DESIGN: Propensity score matching with difference-in-differences framework exploiting within-person variation in cost-sharing. RESULTS: Decreases in the probability of outpatient visit are offset by increases in the likelihood of hospitalization after the policy change. Cost-sharing also decreases drug adherence by 20%, particularly among chronically-ill persons. CONCLUSION: Because the costs of increased hospitalization among Medical Aid enrollees accrue to the government, the introduction of outpatient cost-sharing does not achieve the goal of cost control.


Assuntos
Assistência Ambulatorial/economia , Custo Compartilhado de Seguro , Pobreza , Idoso , Assistência Ambulatorial/organização & administração , Controle de Custos/economia , Controle de Custos/métodos , Controle de Custos/organização & administração , Custo Compartilhado de Seguro/economia , Custo Compartilhado de Seguro/métodos , Custos de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Hospitalização/economia , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicamentos sob Prescrição/economia , Pontuação de Propensão , República da Coreia
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