Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 16.549
Filtrar
1.
Hua Xi Kou Qiang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 38(5): 537-540, 2020 Oct 01.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33085238

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To study the stress distribution under dynamic loading in the presence or absence of an abutment buffer layer by using three-dimensional finite element analysis. METHODS: A three-dimensional solid geometric model of an implant in a human mandible was established on the basis of CT scan data. A buffer-free abutment prosthesis and a buffer-abutment abutment prosthesis were installed above the implant. The buffer layer was made of high-density polyethylene. A vertical load of 200 N and a horizontal load of 100 N (45°) were concentrated on the centers of the implant restorations of the two groups. Stresses on the implant neck and body, abutment neck and body, central bolt neck and body, and bone interface were compared via three-dimensional finite element analysis. RESULTS: Stresses on the implant neck and body, abutment neck and body, central bolt neck and body, and bone interface on the abutment with a buffer layer were significantly lower than those on the abutment without a buffer layer. CONCLUSIONS: The increase in the buffer layer of the abutment neck significantly reduced stress on the implant neck, abutment, central bolt neck, and bone interface.


Assuntos
Dente Suporte , Implantes Dentários , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Análise de Elementos Finitos , Humanos , Estresse Mecânico
2.
Shanghai Kou Qiang Yi Xue ; 29(3): 262-266, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33043342

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To observe and compare the stress distribution of implant, crown, abutment and surrounding bone tissues in the aesthetic zone after restoration of resin-ceramic composite single crown, and provide theoretical basis for clinical restoration. METHODS: Three-dimensional finite element models of alveolar bone, implant, crown, and the thickness of different adhesives between crown and abutment (0.05 mm and 0.1 mm) were established by using Mimics 17.0 software.Force was applied at the angle of 130° with the long axis of the implant, the loading position was 2 mm from the incisal cingulum, and other force on the incisal margin was loaded in parallel to the long axis of the implant. The size was 100 N. Linear static stress analysis was carried out to compare the Von Mises stress after single crown restoration with different materials. RESULTS: When the thickness of adhesive was 0.05 mm, and resin cement was selected, after restoration of Enamic, Ultimate resin ceramic composite crown, the peak stress of alveolar bone, implant, crown and abutment was more uniform and decreased slightly, but the difference was not significant compared with that of IPS Empress, blocs Mark Ⅱ ceramic crown. When the thickness of adhesive was 0.05 mm, the peak stress was significantly lower than that of 0.1 mm. There was no significant difference in the stress between glass ionomer cement and resin cement.Under the same conditions, restoration with Ultimate crown had smaller stress value of peak Von Mises. CONCLUSIONS: The stress of resin composite ceramics single crown when applied to implantation in aesthetic area is slightly less and more uniform. The proportion of resin in composites and the thickness of adhesive can affect the stress distribution and peak value.


Assuntos
Implantes Dentários , Cerâmica , Coroas , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Estética Dentária , Análise de Elementos Finitos
3.
J Adhes Dent ; 22(5): 503-514, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33073781

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To compare shrinkage stress, cuspal strain and fracture load of weakened premolars restored with different conventional and bulk-fill composite resins and restorative techniques. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Fifty premolars received a 4.0 x 3.5mm mesio-occlusal-distal (MOD) class II preparation. The lingual and buccal cups were internally weakened. Specimens were restored according to the following 5 groups: Filtek Z350 XT/10 increments; Filtek Z350 XT/8 increments (both 3M Oral Care); Filtek Bulk Fill Flowable Restorative + Filtek Z350 XT (both 3M Oral Care); SDR + Spectra Basic (Dentsply Sirona); and Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent). Cuspal strains were measured using strain gauges (n = 10). After restoration, specimens were submitted to thermal/mechanical cycles and fractured. Post-gel shrinkage of the composites was determined. Additionally, residual shrinkage strains and stresses were analyzed using three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). The data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD (α = 0.05). RESULTS: One-way ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences among composite resins (p < 0.001) for the post-gel shrinkage. Filtek Z350 XT had the highest post-gel shrinkage and no difference was found between Spectra Basic and Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill (p = 0.110). The Filtek Z350 XT/10 increments, Filtek Z350 XT/8 increments and Filtek Bulk Fill Flowable Restorative/Filtek Z350 XT had statistically significantly higher cuspal deformation values when compared to the SDR/Spectra Basic and Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill techniques. 3D-FEA confirmed higher stress levels in the incrementally filled conventional restorations. Fracture loads were not statistically significantly different. CONCLUSION: The bulk-fill restoration techniques resulted in less cuspal strain and stress than the incremental technique with conventional composite resin. Fracture resistance was not affected by the restorative techniques.


Assuntos
Resinas Compostas , Restauração Dentária Permanente , Dente Pré-Molar , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Polimerização
4.
Am J Dent ; 33(5): 227-234, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33017523

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To evaluate the influence of different post-endodontic techniques on the fatigue survival and biomechanical behavior of crowned restored central incisors. METHODS: The crowns of 69 bovine incisors were cut, and the roots were treated endodontically and assigned randomly into three groups (n=23): resin composite buildup (BUP), glass fiber post-retained resin composite buildup (GFP), and cast post-and-core (CPC). They received full crown preparation with 2 mm ferrule, and a leucite-reinforced ceramic crown was cemented adhesively. Three specimens from each group were tested monotonically. The remaining specimens were subjected to the stepwise stress fatigue test until fracture or suspension after 1.5 x 106 cycles in a chewing simulator. The load and step at which each specimen failed were analyzed by Kaplan-Meier and Mantel-Cox (log-rank test) statistics, followed by multiple pairwise comparisons, at 5% significance level. The three groups tested (BUP, GFP, and CPC) were 3D modeled (Rhinoceros 4.0) and the maximum principal stress (MPa) criteria were used to calculate the results using FEA. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between the treatments regarding the load or the number of cycles (Mantel-Cox log-rank test for trend, X²= 0.015, df=1, P= 0.901, X²=3.171, df=1, P= 0.995). Crown cracks were the predominant failure mode, and oblique root fractures were only observed in groups GFP and CPC. In endodontically treated incisors with a 2-mm ferrule, the post-endodontic treatment had no significant effect on fatigue survival. Non-restorable fractures only occurred in teeth restored with posts. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Although the clinical significance of laboratory studies has some limitations, this study suggests that composite buildups without posts may be an option for restoring endodontically treated incisors with 2 mm ferrule height.


Assuntos
Incisivo , Técnica para Retentor Intrarradicular , Animais , Bovinos , Resinas Compostas , Coroas , Análise do Estresse Dentário
5.
J Contemp Dent Pract ; 21(7): 713-717, 2020 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33020351

RESUMO

AIM: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of air abrasion with aluminum oxide or glass beads to three types of zirconia containing various levels of cubic crystalline phases (3Y-TZP, Katana ML; 4Y-PSZ, Katana STML; and 5Y-PSZ, Katana UTML, Noritake) on the shear bond strength of resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty block specimens (8 × 8 × 3.5 mm) were milled out of each zirconia material and mounted in plastic pipe. Ten specimens of each of the zirconia materials were air-abraded using 50 µm aluminum oxide particles, ten specimens were abraded using 80 µm glass beads, and ten specimens served as a control and received no surface treatment. A zirconia primer was applied to the surface of the zirconia specimens. Composite disks were bonded using a resin cement and light-cured. The specimens were stored in 37°C distilled water for 24 hours and thermocycled for 2,500 cycles. The specimens were loaded in shear on a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed with one-way and two-way ANOVAs and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). RESULTS: A significant difference in shear bond strength was found based on the surface treatment (p < 0.001), but not on the type of zirconia (p = 0.132). CONCLUSION: Air abrasion with glass beads or no surface treatment resulted in significantly lower bond strength of the resin cement to all three zirconia types compared to air abrasion with aluminum oxide. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Although air abrasion with aluminum oxide may reportedly be more likely to weaken cubic-containing zirconia compared to air abrasion with glass beads, the use of aluminum oxide results in greater bond strength of the resin cement.


Assuntos
Óxido de Alumínio , Colagem Dentária , Abrasão Dental por Ar , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais , Propriedades de Superfície , Zircônio
6.
J Esthet Restor Dent ; 32(7): 726-733, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32886852

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the microtensile bond strength of four dental computer-aided design/computer-aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) ceramics after application of four different surface treatments. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four dental CAD/CAM ceramics were tested: feldspathic ceramic (VITABLOCKS-Mark II), polymer-infiltrated ceramic network (VITA ENAMIC), zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate (VITA SUPRINITY), and yttria-stabilized zirconia (VITA YZ T). Four surface treatments were applied: no treatment, 5% hydrofluoric acid-etching, airborne particle abrasion, and tribochemical silica coating. The ceramic blocks were repaired with nanohybrid composite (Tetric N-Collection). Sixteen test groups of 12 specimens were prepared. After thermocycling, microtensile bond testing was performed. The microtensile strengths values were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post-hoc test. RESULTS: Repaired feldspathic and resin polymer-infiltrated ceramic network ceramics demonstrated superior microtensile bond strengths compared to zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate and yttria-stabilized zirconia. Etched feldspathic and polymer-infiltrated ceramic network ceramics had higher bond strength than the untreated groups. Surface treatments did not affect the bond strength of zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate and yttria-stabilized zirconia with the exception of etching, which reduced the bond strength of yttria-stabilized zirconia. CONCLUSION: Feldspathic ceramic and polymer-infiltrated ceramic network were repaired with dental composite after surface etching with hydrofluoric acid. Repair of zirconia-reinforced lithium silicate and yttria-stabilized zirconia did not demonstrate promising results. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Repair of feldspathic ceramic and polymer-infiltrated ceramic network restorations may be a cost-effective means to promote the longevity of dental restorations. However, zirconia and zirconia-reinforced lithium disilicate restorations do not offer such an option.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Cerâmica , Desenho Assistido por Computador , Porcelana Dentária , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Propriedades de Superfície , Zircônio
7.
Int J Prosthodont ; 33(5): 527-535, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32956434

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To establish the most effective cementation protocol for bonding zirconia crowns to Ti-Base CAD/CAM abutments in terms of abutment height, cement type, and surface pretreatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Zirconia crowns were designed to fit abutments of 2.5-mm (short) and 4.0-mm (tall) height. The retention of conventional resin cement with a universal adhesive (RelyX Ultimate, 3M ESPE) was compared to self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200, 3M ESPE) following different surface pretreatments (n = 10/group): (1) no treatment (NT); (2) Ti-Base abutment surface blasting with alumina particles (SB); (3) zirconia crown tribochemical surface blasting with silica-coated alumina particles (TBS); and (4) a combination of SB + TBS. Pull-out testing was performed in a universal testing machine. Data were statistically evaluated using a linear mixed model following least significant difference post hoc test. RESULTS: Pull-out data as a function of Ti-Base height demonstrated higher retention for tall compared to short abutments (P < .001). Ultimate outperformed U200 cement (data collapsed over height and pretreatment) (P < .001). Analysis of pretreatment depicted higher retention for SB + TBS, followed by SB, TBS, and NT (P < .04). The interaction between Ti-Base height and cement type highlighted the superior adhesive strength of Ultimate compared to U200 for both heights (P < .001). Irrespective of type of pretreatment, surface pretreatment improved the retention for U200 cement and short Ti-Base (P < .03 compared to NT). In contrast, higher retention was demonstrated for SB + TBS, followed by SB, TBS, and NT, for Ultimate cement combined with tall Ti-Base (P < .02) (data collapsed over height and cement, respectively). CONCLUSION: There was a direct relationship among Ti-Base height, micromechanical and/or chemical pretreatment, and conventional adhesive bonding in improving the retention of zirconia crowns.


Assuntos
Cimentação , Titânio , Desenho Assistido por Computador , Coroas , Dente Suporte , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Zircônio
8.
Int J Prosthodont ; 33(5): 546-552, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32956436

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To evaluate the effect of cementation protocols on the bonding interface stability and pull-out forces of temporary implant-supported crowns bonded on a titanium base abutment (TiB) or on a temporary titanium abutment (TiA). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 60 implants were restored with PMMA-based CAD/CAM crowns. Five groups (n = 12) were created: Group 1 = TiB/SRc: crown conditioned with MMA-based liquid (SR Connect, Ivoclar Vivadent); Group 2 = TiB/50Al-MB: crown airborne particle-abraded with 50-µm Al2O3 and silanized (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent); Group 3 = TiB/30SiOAl-SRc: crown airborne particle-abraded with 30-µm silica-coated Al2O3 (CoJet, 3M ESPE) and conditioned with MMA-based liquid (SR Connect); Group 4 = TiB/30SiOAl-MB: crown airborne particle-abraded with 30- µm silica-coated Al2O3 (CoJet) and silanized (Monobond Plus); and Group 5 = TiA/TA-PMMA: crown manually enlarged, activated, and rebased with PMMA resin (Telio Lab, Ivoclar Vivadent). Specimens in the TiB groups were cemented using a resin cement (Multilink Hybrid Abutment, Ivoclar Vivadent). After aging (120,000 cycles, 49 N, 1.67 Hz, 5°C to 55°C, 120 seconds), bonding interface failure was analyzed (50x). Pull-out forces (N) (0.5 mm/minute) and modes of failure were registered. Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the data (α = .05). RESULTS: Bonding failure after aging varied from 0% (Group 5) to 100% (Groups 1, 2, and 4) (P < .001). Mean pull-out force ranged between 53.1 N (Group 1) and 1,146.5 N (Group 5). The pull-off forces were significantly greater for Group 5 (P < .05), followed by Group 3 (P < .05), whereas the differences among the remaining groups were not significant (P > .05). CONCLUSION: The cementation protocol had an effect on the bonding interface stability and pull-out forces of PMMA-based crowns bonded on a titanium base. Airborne particle abrasion of the crown internal surface and conditioning it with an MMA-based liquid may be recommended to improve retention of titanium base temporary restorations. Yet, for optimal outcomes, conventional temporary abutments might be preferred.


Assuntos
Implantes Dentários , Titânio , Desenho Assistido por Computador , Coroas , Dente Suporte , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Zircônio
9.
Head Face Med ; 16(1): 20, 2020 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32891153

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Bond failure during fixed orthodontic treatment is a frequently occurring problem. As bracket rebonding is associated with reduced shear bond strength, the aim of the present investigation is to analyse the effect of different innovative rebonding systems to identify optimised rebonding protocols for orthodontic patient care. METHODS: Metallic brackets were bonded to the frontal enamel surfaces of 240 bovine lower incisors embedded in resin bases. Teeth were randomly divided into two major experimental groups: in group 1 a hydrophilic primer (Assure™ PLUS) was compared to commonly used orthodontic adhesives (Transbond XT™, BrackFix®, Grengloo™) and a zero control. In group 2 different rebonding systems were analysed using a hydrophilic primer (Assure™ PLUS), a methyl methacrylate-consisting primer (Plastic Conditioner) and a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT™). All teeth were tested for shear bond strength according to the DIN-13990 standard, the Adhesive Remnant Index and enamel fracture rate. RESULTS: The hydrophilic primer enhanced shear bond strength at first bonding (Assure™ PLUS 20.29 ± 4.95 MPa vs. Transbond XT™ 18.45 ± 2.57 MPa; BrackFix® 17 ± 5.2 MPa; Grengloo™ 19.08 ± 3.19 MPa; Meron 8.7 ± 3.9 MPa) and second bonding (Assure™ PLUS 16.76 ± 3.71 MPa vs. Transbond XT™ 13.06 ± 3.19 MPa). Using Plastic Conditioner did not seem to improve shear bond strength at rebonding (13.57 ± 2.94). When enamel etching was left out, required shear bond strength could not be achieved (Plastic Conditioner + Assure™ PLUS 8.12 ± 3.34 MPa; Plastic Conditioner: 3.7 ± 1.95 MPa). Hydrophilic priming systems showed decreased ARI-scores (second bonding: 2.63) and increased enamel fracture rates (first bonding: 55%; second bonding 21,05%). CONCLUSIONS: Based on the present study we found that rebonding strength could be compensated by the use of hydrophilic priming systems. The additional use of a methyl methacrylate-consisting primer does not seem to enhance shear bond strength. No etching approaches resulted in non-sufficient bond strength.


Assuntos
Condicionamento Ácido do Dente , Colagem Dentária , Braquetes Ortodônticos , Animais , Bovinos , Cimentos Dentários , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Resistência ao Cisalhamento
10.
Hua Xi Kou Qiang Yi Xue Za Zhi ; 38(4): 376-379, 2020 Aug 01.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32865354

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to compare the effects of water storage treatment and thermal cycling on the shear bond strength (SBS) of three self-adhesive dual-cure resin cements. METHODS: Six cubic zirconia specimens with side length of 2 cm were obtained by cutting and sintering. Three self-adhering dual-cure resin cements (i.e., Clearfil SAC, RelyX U200, and Multilink Speed) were selected. According to their bonding modes, they were divided into three groups: direct bonding group (direct coating with resin cement), adhesive group (applying universal adhesives and then coating with resin cement), and primer group (applying Z-Prime Plus and then coating with resin cement). According to experimental conditions, each group was divided into two subgroups: subgroup a (water storage at 37 ℃ for 24 h) and subgroup b (thermalcycling for 5 000 times). SBS data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA by using SPSS 19.0 software (P<0.05). The fractured zirconia surface was observed under a stereomicroscope. RESULTS: After water storage for 24 h, the SBS of the adhesive group and the primer group of the three resin cements was higher than that of the direct adhesive group (P<0.05), but the difference in SBS between the adhesive group and the primer group was not significant (P>0.05). After thermalcycling, the SBS of the three types of resin cements decreased (P<0.05); the SBS of the adhesive group was higher than that of the direct adhesive group and the primer group (P<0.05). Fracture mode analysis revealed that the type Ⅲ fracture mode evidently increased after the thermalcycling treatment compared with the water storage treatment. CONCLUSIONS: The universal adhesives and the primer can improve the SBS of self-adhesive dual-cure resin cement in water storage at 37 ℃ for 24 h. The universal adhesives had a better bonding durability than the zirconia primer.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Cimentos de Resina , Cerâmica , Cimentos Dentários , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais , Resistência ao Cisalhamento , Propriedades de Superfície , Zircônio
11.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 151(10): 796-797.e2, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32979959

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Bonding crowns and bridges with resin cement can improve retention and reinforcement of the restoration. However, there is variation in the steps taken by different practitioners to achieve this goal. METHODS: The authors developed a survey on bonding dental crowns and bridges with resin cement and distributed it electronically to the American Dental Association Clinical Evaluators (ACE) Panel on May 22, 2020. The survey remained open for 2 weeks. Descriptive data analysis was conducted using SAS Version 9.4. RESULTS: A total of 326 panelists responded to the survey, and 86% of respondents who place crowns or bridges use resin cements for bonding. When placing a lithium disilicate restoration, an almost equal proportion of respondents etch it with hydrofluoric acid in their office or asked the laboratory to do it for them, and more than two-thirds use a silane primer before bonding. For zirconia restorations, 70% reported their restorations are sandblasted in the laboratory, and 39% use a primer containing 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate. One-half of respondents clean their lithium disilicate or zirconia restorations with a cleaning solution. Resin cements used with a primer in the etch-and-rinse mode are the most widely used. The technique used to cure and clean excess resin cement varies among respondents. CONCLUSIONS: The types of resin cements used, tooth preparation, crown or bridge preparation, and bonding technique vary among this sample. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Although many dentists bond crowns and bridges on the basis of best practices, improvement in the process may be achieved by dentists communicating with their laboratory to confirm the steps performed there, ensuring an effective cleaning technique is used after try-in and verifying that the correct primer is used with their chosen restorative material.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Cimentos de Resina , American Dental Association , Coroas , Cimentos Dentários , Materiais Dentários , Porcelana Dentária , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Propriedades de Superfície , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
12.
Oral Health Prev Dent ; 18(1): 747-756, 2020 Sep 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32895658

RESUMO

PURPOSE: This in vitro study evaluated the effectiveness of polyacrylic acid as an acid etchant similar to phosphoric acid and its effect on the microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to enamel. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ninety Te-Econom Plus resin blocks (11 x 4 mm) were cemented onto bovine enamel and distributed into 10 groups according to the surface treatments (no surface treatment; etching with 37% phosphoric acid; etching with 20% polyacrylic acid; etching with 37% phosphoric acid + dental adhesive, and etching with 20% polyacrylic acid + dental adhesive) and the self-adhesive resin cements used (RelyX U200 and MaxCem Elite) (n = 9). After bonding, the specimens were sectioned into sticks, subjected to thermocycling (5760 cycles, 5°C and 55°C) and microtensile bond strength testing (n = 6). Images of representative specimens were obtained using a scanning electron microscope. Enamel penetration evaluation of different surface treatments was analysed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (n = 3). Data on bond strength were subjected to 2-way ANOVA and Tukey's least significant difference test (α = 0.05). RESULTS: Both 37% phosphoric acid and 20% polyacrylic acid yielded the same microtensile bond strength between self-adhesive resin cement and enamel, independent of the application of dental adhesives (p > 0.05). MaxCem Elite showed higher bond strength values than RelyX U200 just for the 20% polyacrylic acid group (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Acid pre-conditioning of dental enamel may influence the bond strength of self-adhesive resin cement to enamel, and 20% polyacrylic acid showed efficacy similar to that of 37% phosphoric acid.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Cimentos de Resina , Condicionamento Ácido do Dente , Resinas Acrílicas , Animais , Bovinos , Resinas Compostas , Cimentos Dentários , Esmalte Dentário , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais , Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura , Propriedades de Superfície , Resistência à Tração
13.
Int J Esthet Dent ; 15(3): 344-354, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32760928

RESUMO

AIM: Die silicone materials are used to build chairside composite restorations. The purpose of this study was to compare the flowability, dimension accuracy, and tear strength of four elastomeric die materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Materials were divided into four groups: Mach-2 (M2), Scan Die (SD), GrandioSO Inlay System (GIS), and Impregum-F (IM). Flowability analysis was carried out using the shark fin test (SFT). For dimension accuracy, impressions were taken from a premolar Class I preparation and an elastomeric model was cast. Composite resin restorations were built and positioned into the premolar for gap measurement. The mean gap length was divided into three levels: acceptable (A), not acceptable (NA), and misfit (M). For tear strength, strip specimens were made with a V-shaped notch (n = 6). The specimens were tested in a universal machine until tear. All data were analyzed statistically with a confidence interval of 95%. RESULTS: GIS showed the lowest flowability values, with no differences between IM, M2, and SD. For dimension accuracy, IM showed 100% 'A' gap values, followed by M2 (80%), SD (60%), and GIS (60%). For tear strength, IM showed the highest values, followed by M2, GIS, and SD. CONCLUSIONS: M2, SD, and IM had similar flowability, while GIS had the lowest. IM presented higher tear strength than M2, followed by GIS and SD. IM showed the highest degrees of acceptable gap filling, followed by M2.


Assuntos
Resinas Compostas , Restaurações Intracoronárias , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais
14.
Indian J Dent Res ; 31(3): 414-419, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32769276

RESUMO

Objectives: To evaluate the impact of implants number and attachments type on the peri-implant stresses and retention of maxillary palateless implant-supported overdenture. Materials and Methods: Four edentulous maxillary educational acrylic resin models were used. According to the implants number and type of attachment used, four groups were compared: Group I, 2-locator attachments in the canine area; Group II, 2- OT equator attachments in the canine area; Group III, 4-locator attachments in the canine, second premolar area and Group IV, 4-OT equator attachments in the canine, second premolar area. Implants retained palateless overdenture was constructed on each model. Four self-protected linear strain gauges were cemented on each implant. A digital loading device was used to apply compressive loads to measure the resulting peri-implant stresses. Forcemeter and Universal testing machines were used to test the retention of palateless overdenture. Results: A significant difference between the same implant number and distribution with different attachments was found (P = 0.003, P = 0.020), respectively. Least stresses amount was found around the 4-implant locator palateless overdenture, while the highest was found around the 2-implant OT equator palateless overdenture. Nevertheless; the result was that 2-implant locator palateless overdenture recorded insignificant higher retentive forces than the 4-implant OT equator one. Conclusions: It can be concluded that the implant-retained palateless overdenture with four locator attachments is considered a promising treatment option regarding stress distribution. Using locator attachments, for implant-retained palateless overdenture with either two or four implants considering their superior retentive properties, is advantageous when compared to OT equator attachments.


Assuntos
Implantes Dentários , Revestimento de Dentadura , Prótese Dentária Fixada por Implante , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Retenção de Dentadura , Maxila
15.
Indian J Dent Res ; 31(3): 470-474, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32769285

RESUMO

Objectives: To evaluate the leachable components of resin cements in oral simulating fluids using high performance liquid chromatography and its resultant shear bond strength with ceramics. Methods: Forty extracted permanent human mandibular molar teeth were sectioned horizontally with a disc beneath the dentino-enamel junction to expose the coronal dentin surface and later finished with 600-grit silicon carbide paper to create a uniform flat surface. Forty Lithium Di-silicate Ceramic block cylinders were sliced in a saw cutting machine at 250 rpm under water-cooling to obtain the discs. The teeth and the ceramic discs were then randomly assigned to two groups on the basis of material used for luting the ceramic disk. Group I: Ceramic disc luted with tooth surface using Variolink II Dual cure Resin Cement, Group II: Ceramic disc luted with tooth surface using multilink speed self-adhesive self-curing resin cement. All ceramic discs were etched with 5% HF acid (IPS Ceramic Etching Gel, Ivoclar, Schaan, Liechtenstein) for 20 seconds, then rinsed thoroughly for 20 seconds and dried for 20 seconds. Ceramic specimens were luted on dentin surfaces with the application of 5 kg load. The samples were stored in 75% ethanol solution for 2 weeks at 37 degree Celsius for chemical aging. HPLC Analysis were performed to analyze the eluted monomer. After HPLC Analysis, Samples were then loaded using universal testing machine for the evaluation of shear bond strength between ceramic discs and the resin cements before and after the elution of monomers. Results: Under HPLC analysis, results showed that the peak release of monomer is Bis-GMA in both the groups. The shear force required to break the bond between the ceramic luted to tooth surface with the resin cements were more for Group I. Statistical results: The statistical analysis was done using ANOVA and paired t-test and it shows P value ≥0.05, hence the null hypothesis is rejected. Conclusion: The monomer eluded from all the groups are identified as Bis-GMA, The eluded monomer decreases the bond strength between the resin cement and the ceramic due to water sorption, The Variolink II (dual cure) resin cement shows improved bond strength than the Multilink (self-cure self-adhesive) resin cement.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Cimentos de Resina , Cerâmica , Cimentos Dentários , Porcelana Dentária , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Resistência ao Cisalhamento , Propriedades de Superfície
16.
Dental Press J Orthod ; 25(3): 31-38, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32844970

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic treatment for adults is currently increasing, and therefore the need to bond brackets to restorations and temporary crowns. The use of CAD/CAM PMMA provisional restorations for orthodontic purposes have not yet been described, and there is currently insufficient information regarding the strength of bracket adhesion. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed at evaluating the effects of thermocycling (TC) and surface treatment on shear bond strength (SBS) of brackets to different provisional materials. METHODS: Forty specimens were made from each material [PMMA (Telio Lab), bis-acryl (Telio CS C&B), and PMMA CAD/CAM (Telio CAD)], sandpapered, and divided according to surface treatment (pumiced or sandblasted) and TC (half of the samples = 1,000 cycles, 5°C/55°C water baths) (n = 10/group). Stainless-steel brackets were bonded to the specimens (using Transbond XT), and SBS testing was performed. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and LSD post-hoc tests (α = 0.05). Failure types were classified with adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores. RESULTS: SBS values ranged from 1.5 to 14.9 MPa. Sandblasted bis-acryl and sandblasted auto-curing PMMA groups presented similar values (p> 0.05), higher than the CAD/CAM material (p< 0.05), with or without TC. When thermocycled, pumiced bis-acryl showed higher SBS than pumiced acrylic (p= 0.005) and CAD/CAM materials (p= 0.000), with statistical difference (p= 0.009). TC showed negative effect (p< 0.05) for sandblasted bis-acryl and pumiced acrylic groups. ARI predominant score was mostly zero (0) for CAD/CAM, 1 and 2 for bis-acryl, and 1 for acrylic groups. CONCLUSION: In general, bis-acryl material showed the highest SBS values, followed by acrylic and CAD/CAM materials, which showed SBS values lower than an optimum strength for bonding brackets.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Braquetes Ortodônticos , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Teste de Materiais , Polimetil Metacrilato , Cimentos de Resina , Resistência ao Cisalhamento , Propriedades de Superfície
17.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 23(8): 1073-1078, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32788484

RESUMO

Aims: The aim of this study was to compare the retention of different luting agents used with implant-supported restorations. Materials and Methods: A total of 90 custom metal frameworks and copings were prepared and divided into six different luting agent groups (n = 15/group): polycarboxylate cement (PC), resin-modified glass-ionomer cement (RMGIC), two self-adhesive resin cements (SARC), copper-ion zinc-phosphate cement (CZPC), and non-eugenol temporary resin cement (TRC). After sandblasting with 50 µm Al2O3, the copings were cemented on frameworks and stored in artificial saliva for 48 h at 37°C and thermocycled between 5-55°C for 37,500 cycles. Samples were subjected to tensile testing by a universal testing machine, and data were statistically analyzed. Results: The differences between the retention values of types of cement were significant (P < 0.05). The maximum retention value was calculated for CZPC (755,12 ± 55 MPa) while the lowest value was for TRC (311,7 ± 61 Mpa). Conclusion: Neither of the tested cement had superiority over another to ensuring retention. The types of cement presented were meant to be a discretionary guide for the clinician in deciding the amount of the desired retention between castings and abutments.


Assuntos
Implantes Dentários , Retenção em Prótese Dentária , Cimentos de Ionômeros de Vidro/química , Cimento de Policarboxilato/química , Cimento de Fosfato de Zinco/química , Cimentação , Cimentos Dentários , Retenção em Prótese Dentária/métodos , Prótese Dentária Fixada por Implante , Análise do Estresse Dentário/instrumentação , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Propriedades de Superfície , Óxido de Zinco
18.
Int J Comput Dent ; 23(3): 225-233, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32789310

RESUMO

AIM: To evaluate the fracture resistance and failure pattern of 3D-printed and milled composite resin crowns as a function of different material thicknesses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three typodont tooth models were prepared to receive a full coverage composite resin crown with different thicknesses (0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mm). The prepared master casts were digitally scanned using an intraoral scanner, and the STL files were used to fabricate 60 nanocomposite crowns divided into two groups according to the material thickness (n = 10) and fabrication method: a 3D-printed group (3D) using an SLA printer with nanocomposite, and a milled group (M) using a milling machine and composite blocks. All crowns were adhesively seated on stereolithography (SLA)-fabricated dies. All samples were subjected to thermomechanical loading and fracture testing. The load to fracture [N] was recorded and the failure pattern evaluated. Data were statistically analyzed using a two-way ANOVA followed by a Bonferroni post hoc test. The level of significance was set at α = 0.05. RESULTS: The 3D group showed the highest values for fracture resistance compared with the milled group within the three tested thicknesses (P < 0.001). The 3D and M groups presented significantly higher load to fracture for the 1.5-mm thickness (2383.5 ± 188.58 N and 1284.7 ± 77.62 N, respectively) compared with the 1.0-mm thickness (1945.9 ± 65.32 N and 932.1 ± 41.29 N, respectively) and the 0.5-mm thickness, which showed the lowest values in both groups (1345.0 ± 101.15 N and 519.3 ± 32.96 N, respectively). A higher incidence of irreparable fractures was observed for the 1.5-mm thickness. CONCLUSION: 3D-printed composite resin crowns showed high fracture resistance at different material thicknesses and can be suggested as a viable solution in conservative dentistry.


Assuntos
Porcelana Dentária , Falha de Restauração Dentária , Cerâmica , Desenho Assistido por Computador , Coroas , Planejamento de Prótese Dentária , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Impressão Tridimensional
19.
J Esthet Restor Dent ; 32(7): 699-706, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32627364

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of different surface treatments on the retention between zirconia crowns and tooth structure after in vitro aging. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human third molars (n = 44) received crown preparations and CAD/CAM zirconia crowns were manufactured. Specimens were divided into two groups: no aging, control (NAC, n = 11) or aging (A, n = 33). NAC were bonded with universal adhesive (UA). Aged specimens were divided into three subgroups (n = 11) according to surface treatment: Control: no abrasion + UA; Alumina: alumina abrasion + UA; Silica: tribochemical silica coating + UA. The crowns were cemented with dual-cure resin cement. Specimens in group A were aged by a combination of mechanical, thermal, and pH cycling. Retention strength values were obtained by tensile tests and results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey test (P < .05). RESULTS: Aging decreased the retention strength in control specimens (P < .001). Surface treatment improved the retention strength of aged specimens (P < .001), with similar results between alumina and tribochemical silica coating. CONCLUSION: The chemical interaction between the universal bonding system and zirconia's surface was not sufficient to withstand artificial aging. Tribochemical silica coating did not promote additional retention in comparison to alumina blasting. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The long-term retention of translucent zirconia crowns to tooth structure using phosphate-based materials is improved by means of mechanical surface treatments such as alumina blasting and tribochemical silica coating.


Assuntos
Colagem Dentária , Coroas , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Humanos , Teste de Materiais , Cimentos de Resina , Dióxido de Silício , Propriedades de Superfície , Zircônio
20.
J Endod ; 46(10): 1465-1469, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32615172

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine whether the methods used to treat endodontically and restore anterior immature teeth with a necrotic pulp influence their resistance to fracture. METHODS: After access opening and cleaning and shaping, 80 specimen teeth were assigned into 5 groups according to the endodontic obturation method and coronal restoration as follows: A1, apexification with a composite restoration in the crown area; A2, apexification with a composite restoration in the crown and 3 mm into the root; IR, immediate revascularization with a composite restoration in the crown area; SR, successful revascularization with a composite in the crown area; and the control group, a mature tooth treated with gutta-percha and sealer with a composite restoration in the crown area. The teeth were mounted in acrylic blocks and brought to fracture under compressive forces in a universal testing machine. Both the fracture strength and the location where the fracture occurred were recorded. RESULTS: There were no statistically significant differences in the fracture resistance among the 5 groups (1-way analysis of variance, F4 = .545, P = .703). No statistically significant differences were found in the location where the fracture occurred either (χ24 = 4.1, P = .391). CONCLUSIONS: Within the limitations of this in vitro study, it can be concluded that the treatment options used to treat nonvital immature teeth provided the same resistance to fracture.


Assuntos
Materiais Restauradores do Canal Radicular , Fraturas dos Dentes , Dente não Vital , Resinas Compostas , Restauração Dentária Permanente , Análise do Estresse Dentário , Guta-Percha , Humanos , Obturação do Canal Radicular
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA