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2.
Allergol. immunopatol ; 48(1): 34-41, ene.-feb. 2020. tab
Artigo em Inglês | IBECS | ID: ibc-186589

RESUMO

Background: Exposure to pets can be a predisposing factor in the development of certain diseases, including allergic diseases. Objective: We analyzed the role that exposure to indoor dogs and cats plays in the prevalence of allergic diseases. Methods: We examined the cross-sectional data of 1056 women and 936 men aged 15 to 18 years; these individuals were selected through stratified and cluster random sampling. We asked all participants about their exposure to indoor dogs and cats during the year that preceded our study. The prevalence of allergic diseases was determined through core questions taken from The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire. Results: The prevalence was 12.7% (95% CI: 11.3%-14.2%) for asthma, 9.0% (95% CI: 7.8%-10.4%) for allergic rhinitis, and 5.2% (95% CI: 4.3%-6.2%) for atopic dermatitis. The multivariate analyses showed that exposure to indoor dogs, but not indoor cats, was associated with asthma prevalence (aOR 1.37; 95% CI: 1.03-1.83), as was male sex (aOR = 1.42; 95% CI: 1.08-1.86), a personal history of allergic rhinitis (aOR = 3.24; 95% CI: 2.25-4.66), and a maternal history of asthma (aOR = 3.06; 95% CI: 1.89-4.98). The population attributable risk for exposure to indoor dogs was 18%. Notably, neither allergic rhinitis nor atopic dermatitis was found to be associated with dog or cat exposure (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Exposure to dogs in late adolescence is a factor associated with asthma, although its contribution to the development of asthma should be investigated in new studies


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Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adolescente , Animais de Estimação , Asma/epidemiologia , Asma/etiologia , Rinite Alérgica/epidemiologia , Dermatite Atópica/epidemiologia , Exposição Ambiental , Cães , Estudos Transversais , Alergia e Imunologia , Análise Multivariada , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Razão de Chances , Modelos Logísticos
3.
Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract ; 23(1): 169-193, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31759446

RESUMO

Diseases of the urinary tract are reviewed, covering infectious (bacterial, viral, parasitic), degenerative, congenital, metabolic, nutritional, neoplastic, obstructive, and toxic causes. Some clinical presentations and diagnostic procedures are described for ferrets, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, mice, rats, chinchillas, hedgehogs, and sugar gliders, as well as therapies.


Assuntos
Mamíferos , Doenças Urológicas/veterinária , Animais , Chinchila , Cricetinae , Furões , Cobaias , Ouriços-Cacheiros , Marsupiais , Camundongos , Animais de Estimação , Coelhos , Ratos , Doenças Urológicas/diagnóstico , Doenças Urológicas/patologia , Doenças Urológicas/terapia
4.
Vet Clin North Am Exot Anim Pract ; 23(1): 195-214, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31759447

RESUMO

Radiographs can be used to easily visualize common types of urinary calculi in all parts of the urinary tract. Positive-contrast excretory urography and cystourethrography are sensitive to diseases within the ureters and urethra, most commonly obstruction. Ultrasound is widely available and noninvasive and can be used to evaluate renal architecture, ureteral dilation, urinary bladder wall disease, and urolithiasis. Computed tomography is increasing in availability and provides a large amount of cross-sectional information quickly and noninvasively. Multiple imaging modalities can be used to estimate or quantify glomerular filtration rate.


Assuntos
Mamíferos , Animais , Furões , Taxa de Filtração Glomerular/veterinária , Rim/diagnóstico por imagem , Animais de Estimação , Coelhos , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X/veterinária , Ultrassonografia/veterinária , Sistema Urinário/diagnóstico por imagem , Urografia/veterinária
5.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1672, 2019 Dec 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31830957

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many studies have shown that having a dog has an impact on the increase in physical activity (PA) of people. However, what is often not taken into account in many such studies is owning of other pets. The aim of this study was to compare PA levels between animal owners and non-owners and to research potential differences between owners of different kinds of animals. METHOD: 111 young females of mean age 21 ± 1.2 years enrolled in this cross-sectional study. Czech version of short International physical activity questionnaire (IPAQ) was used to assess PA level, supplemented with a question about whether they owned an animal and what kind. RESULTS: People who owned a pet had higher frequency and duration of moderate physical activity (MPA) and spent more MET/min/wk. (p < 0.05). This difference has projected into total PA duration and also into calories burned in a week. Furthermore, a statistically significant difference between subgroups of animal owners was also confirmed for MPA and total PA in favour of horse owners. CONCLUSIONS: Animal owners generally reported higher PA levels compared to people who do not own any pets. However, similarly significant in this particular age group was the kind of animal these young women owned.


Assuntos
Exercício , Propriedade/estatística & dados numéricos , Animais de Estimação , Animais , Estudos Transversais , Cães , Feminino , Cavalos , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
6.
BMC Infect Dis ; 19(1): 1056, 2019 Dec 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31842783

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Toxoplasmosis is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. It is acquired by consumption of raw or undercooked meat containing tissue cyst, food or water contaminated with oocyst and congenital infection through the placenta leading to serious congenital abnormalities in the fetus like miscarriage, stillbirth, intrauterine death and neurologic defects. Therefore; this study was aimed to determine the prevalence of toxoplasmosis infection and its possible risk factors associated with pregnant women attending antenatal clinics in Hawassa and Yiregalem Hospitals, Southern Ethiopia. METHODS: A hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2016 to May 2017. The study was done in antenatal care clinics of Hawassa and Yiregalem Hospitals in Southern, Ethiopia. Five hundred pregnant women were interviewed with a pretested structured questionnaire to collect risk factors and socio-demographic data. Blood samples were collected and serum was separated and tested for anti- Toxoplasma gondii antibodies using ELISA (Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent Assay). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical software. The risk factors were tested for significance using Bivariate and multivariate analysis. P-value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The weighted prevalence of this study was 81.8% for the anti- Toxoplasma gondii antibody. Almost all participants (99.6%) had no information about the disease. A significant association was observed between seroprevalence and contact with domestic cats (OR = 1.206, 95% CI (1.627-2.206, P = 0.043), consumption of raw meat (OR = 0.848, 95% CI: 1.517-2.941, P = 0.019) and unpasteurized milk (OR = 0.871, 95% CI 1.531-2.221, P = 0.032). A significant association was not observed between seroprevalence and age, history of abortion, and blood transfusion. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study demonstrated a relatively higher prevalence of seropositivity than studies reported from other countries. Existence of domestic cats at home, consumption of undercooked meat and unpasteurized milk were identified as risk factors for T. gondii infection. Therefore, a health education program to increase the mother's knowledge about toxoplasmosis towards avoiding eating undercooked meat, contact with cats and consumption of unpasteurized milk during pregnancy is recommended. Furthermore, our results suggested that the implementation of newborn screening and follow-up testing can lead to reducing of toxoplasmosis associated complications.


Assuntos
Hospitais Gerais , Complicações Parasitárias na Gravidez/epidemiologia , Cuidado Pré-Natal , Toxoplasma/imunologia , Toxoplasmose/epidemiologia , Universidades , Adolescente , Adulto , Animais , Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/sangue , Estudos Transversais , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática , Etiópia/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Carne/parasitologia , Leite/parasitologia , Mães/psicologia , Animais de Estimação/parasitologia , Gravidez , Prevalência , Alimentos Crus/parasitologia , Fatores de Risco , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Toxoplasmose/parasitologia , Adulto Jovem
7.
ABCS health sci ; 44(3): 195-202, 20 dez 2019. tab
Artigo em Inglês, Português | LILACS | ID: biblio-1047753

RESUMO

A acumulação de animais é considerada um fenômeno complexo que, apesar de já ser reconhecido no universo acadêmico, ainda é de difícil solução para a gestão da saúde. Os estudos a respeito de acumulação, principalmente de animais, são incipientes no Brasil. Este artigo de revisão da literatura tem por objetivo alertar a respeito desta complexa morbidade, cada vez mais comum às aglomerações urbanas, indicando ações de promoção e de vigilância em saúde que permitam garantir a saúde dos animais, do acumulador e da coletividade a qual ele pertença. Sugere-se que uma nova abordagem em relação ao distúrbio de acumulação de animais possa combater a pouca visibilidade - inclusive acadêmica - demonstrada na revisão da literatura, ampliando o investimento em intervenções específicas que possam explicitar esse importante problema de saúde pública no Brasil.


Animal accumulation is considered a complex phenomenon that, although recognized in the academic universe, is still difficult to solve for health management. Studies on accumulation, mainly of animals, are incipient in Brazil. This literature review article aims to warn about this complex morbidity, which is increasingly common to urban agglomerations, indicating health promotion and surveillance actions to ensure the health of animals, the accumulator and the community to which it belongs. It is suggested that a new approach to animal accumulation disorder may counteract the poor - including academic - visibility demonstrated in the literature review, increasing investment in specific interventions that may explain this important public health problem in Brazil.


Assuntos
Humanos , Animais de Estimação , Vigilância em Saúde Pública , Transtorno de Acumulação , Saúde Pública
8.
BMC Public Health ; 19(1): 1428, 2019 Nov 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31684914

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Dog ownership is suggested to improve mental well-being, although empirical evidence among community dog owners is limited. This study examined changes in human mental well-being following dog acquisition, including four measures: loneliness, positive and negative affect, and psychological distress. METHODS: We conducted an eight-month controlled study involving three groups (n = 71): 17 acquired a dog within 1 month of baseline (dog acquisition); 29 delayed dog acquisition until study completion (lagged control); and 25 had no intentions of acquiring a dog (community control). All participants completed the UCLA Loneliness Scale (possible scores 0-60), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule and Kessler10 at baseline, three-months and eight-months. We used repeated measures ANCOVAs to analyse data with owner age and sex included as covariates. Post-hoc tests were performed for significant effects (p < 0.05). RESULTS: There was a statistically significant group by time interaction for loneliness (p = 0.03), with an estimated reduction of 8.41 units (95% CI -16.57, - 0.26) from baseline to three-months and 7.12 (95% CI -12.55, - 1.69) from baseline to eight-months in the dog acquisition group. The group by time interaction for positive affect was also significant (p = 0.03), although there was no change in the dog acquisition group. CONCLUSIONS: Companion dog acquisition may reduce loneliness among community dog owners. Our study provides useful direction for future larger trials on the effects of dog ownership on human mental well-being. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This trial was retrospectively registered on 5th July 2017 with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ( ACTRN12617000967381 ).


Assuntos
Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Propriedade/estatística & dados numéricos , Animais de Estimação/psicologia , Adulto , Afeto , Idoso , Animais , Austrália , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Solidão , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
9.
J Vet Med Educ ; 46(4): 438-448, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31756148

RESUMO

The stress of veterinary school and the high prevalence of psychological distress among veterinary students have been well documented. Pet ownership is known to improve overall health and reduce stress among the public. Yet, for veterinary students, owning a pet (especially a dog) can offer both rewards and challenges. The academic schedule for veterinary students often comprises long hours that can make caring for a dog challenging. This study explores the area of veterinary students' dog care options and perspectives by examining two aspects of this issue: (a) currently available options, as reported by academic administrators, and (b) perceived need for these options, as reported by veterinary students. A survey of associate deans for academic affairs (n = 30) found that routine on-site kenneling options for student-owned dogs are available at eight (26.6%) veterinary schools. Simultaneously, results of a student survey (n = 768) revealed a great desire for on-campus services. Among students who did not have access to on-campus kenneling facilities, 71.5% (453 of 634) felt that creating these options would be important or very important. Across all students surveyed, 76% (581 of 764) felt it would be important to have on-site dog housing/care available. Students experience considerable stress over having to find accommodations or care for their dogs while engaged in academic activities. Thus, providing on-site boarding and care options for student-owned dogs can play an important role in both recruiting prospective veterinary students and enhancing the well-being of those currently in the program.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Propriedade , Animais de Estimação/psicologia , Faculdades de Medicina Veterinária/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Animais , Cães , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos , Inquéritos e Questionários
10.
Parasit Vectors ; 12(1): 480, 2019 Oct 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31610795

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Endoparasites in dogs and cats are a concern related to pet health and zoonotic risks. Several determinants may affect the endoparasite transmission and infection of dogs and cats such as pet's lifestyle or regional parasite distribution. Although different zoonotic endoparasites, such as Toxocara spp. and Echinococcus spp., have been identified in France, little information exists about the deworming behaviors of owners or the frequency of occurrence of risk factors associated with endoparasite infection or transmission. Deworming guidelines, such as those created by the European Scientific Counsel Companion Animal Parasites (ESCCAP), recommend a deworming frequency according to the risk of infection of every pet and the potential risk for zoonotic transmission. The objectives of this study were to explore how lifestyles of dogs and cats from France were related to a particular risk of endoparasites and assess whether deworming frequencies complied with ESCCAP recommendations. METHODS: French data were extracted from a database created during a recent European pet owner survey regarding endoparasitic infection risk. Dogs and cats were grouped into risk categories based upon the ESCCAP guidelines. The compliance between the actual and recommended deworming frequencies were explored among the regions surveyed. RESULTS: The majority of dogs and cats were older than 6 months, had outdoor access, had contact with children or elderly people, and lived in rural and town areas. Most of the dogs were in contact with other dogs, snails or prey (83%), and ate slugs, snails, grass or dug in the garden (68%). Likewise, most of the cats hunted outside (57%) and caught prey animals (52%). Consequently, most of the dogs (89%) and cats (53%) were considered to be in the highest-risk category (D). However, independent of the region, the average deworming compliance for dogs was poor (6%). While deworming compliance for cats in category A (low-risk) was excellent (94%), for cats in category D it was poor (6%). CONCLUSIONS: Deworming compliance is needed to enhance pet health and reduce zoonotic risks. Future studies are warranted to thoroughly investigate the compliance and effectiveness of deworming protocols, and the risk factors associated with endoparasites in France.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/parasitologia , Animais de Estimação/parasitologia , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Cães , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/epidemiologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/prevenção & controle , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Zoonoses/parasitologia , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle
11.
Can J Vet Res ; 83(4): 291-297, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31571730

RESUMO

The objective of this study was to assess veterinarians' understanding of nutraceutical use in humans and companion animals and their motivation and circumstances for recommending nutraceuticals to clients. We administered a cross-sectional survey to veterinarians attending continuing education sessions at the University of Georgia (USA) College of Veterinary Medicine from 2012 to 2015 (N = 126). Information regarding veterinarians' age, year of graduation, practice focus, and typical approaches to nutraceutical use was compiled from the returned surveys. The results indicated that veterinarians are more familiar with nutraceutical use in animals than in humans and primarily recommend nutraceuticals to their clients for preventative purposes and/or due to client interest. Veterinarians believed that nutraceuticals were most useful for osteoarthritis and therefore use omega-3 fatty acid and glucosamine/chondroitin products more often than other products for both their patients and their own pets. Safety and efficacy were the most important considerations when deciding which nutraceuticals to recommend to clients. The survey results show that veterinarians are familiar with nutraceuticals and open to their use in patients when they perceive these products to be safe and efficacious.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Suplementos Nutricionais , Animais de Estimação , Médicos Veterinários , Animais , Estudos Transversais , Coleta de Dados , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade
12.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(1): e014319, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31576975

RESUMO

The role of rodents as reservoirs of helminths of public health importance is not well known. The zoonotic potential of Syphacia spp. has been confirmed; therefore, the study aimed to estimate the occurrence of oxyurid nematodes in small rodents from pet shops and breeding clubs in Slovakia. Fecal samples of 586 pet rodents kept in 133 cages were collected between 2016 and 2018 and examined by Faust´s flotation method. Four species of oxyurid nematodes, Syphacia muris, S. obvelata, Aspiculuris tetraptera and Paraspidodera uncinata were detected. A. tetraptera was found in the faecal samples of all rodent species included in this survey. The number of positive boxes varied from 5.4% in hamsters to 70.0% with mice. The prevalence of Syphacia muris was highest in Mongolian gerbils where up to 75.0% boxes were positive; S. obvelata was found in 26.7% of boxes with mice, 25.0% of boxes with Mongolian gerbils and 3.2% of boxes with rats. The high prevalence of Syphacia spp. in all animal species points out the infection risk for humans. Animals offered for sale are often in close contact with human beings; therefore they should be regularly tested for parasites and then effectively dewormed.


Assuntos
Fezes/parasitologia , Doenças Negligenciadas/veterinária , Oxiuríase/veterinária , Oxyuroidea/isolamento & purificação , Animais de Estimação/parasitologia , Doenças dos Roedores/parasitologia , Animais , Cricetinae/parasitologia , Gerbillinae/parasitologia , Cobaias/parasitologia , Camundongos/parasitologia , Doenças Negligenciadas/diagnóstico , Doenças Negligenciadas/epidemiologia , Oxiuríase/diagnóstico , Oxiuríase/epidemiologia , Oxyuroidea/classificação , Animais de Estimação/classificação , Prevalência , Ratos/parasitologia , Doenças dos Roedores/diagnóstico , Doenças dos Roedores/epidemiologia , Eslováquia/epidemiologia
13.
Lett Appl Microbiol ; 69(6): 399-402, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31618795

RESUMO

The sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) is a small, arboreal, nocturnal, gliding mammalian possum belonging to the marsupial infraclass. Exotic marsupials, including sugar gliders, are becoming popular companion pets and, consequently, the risk of potential infections that can be transmitted to humans should be investigated. Data on the role of the sugar glider as a possible carrier of pathogenic and zoonotic bacteria are scarce and fragmentary. Therefore, this study is aimed at evaluating the prevalence of potentially zoonotic bacteria (Salmonella spp., Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp., Pseudomonas spp., Klebsiella spp., Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica) in 64 sugar gliders kept as pets in Italy. The highest prevalence of infection pertained to members of the family Enterobacteriaceae, in particular Citrobacter spp. (50%), Enterobacter spp. (28·1%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (15·6%); Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from 10 out of 64 samples (15·6%). All strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae exhibited some level of resistance to multiple antimicrobials (ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and doxycycline). SIGNIFICANCE AND IMPACT OF THE STUDY: The results of this study show that sugar gliders may act as carriers of potentially pathogenic agents for humans and other animal species, therefore caution should be exercised in the handling and contact with these animals.


Assuntos
Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/fisiologia , Enterobacteriaceae/efeitos dos fármacos , Enterobacteriaceae/isolamento & purificação , Marsupiais/microbiologia , Animais de Estimação/microbiologia , Animais , Enterobacteriaceae/classificação , Itália
14.
BMC Vet Res ; 15(1): 334, 2019 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31533719

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In developed nations, pet ownership is common within families. Both physical and psychological health benefits may result from owning a pet during childhood and adolescence. However, it is difficult to determine whether these benefits are due to pet ownership directly or to factors linked to both pet ownership and health. Previous research found associations between a range of socio-demographic factors and pet ownership in seven-year-old children from a UK cohort. The current study extends this research to adolescence, considering that these factors may be important to consider in future Human-Animal Interaction (HAI) research across childhood. RESULTS: The Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) collected pet ownership data prospectively via maternal reports from gestation up to age 10 years old and via self-report retrospectively at age 18 for ages 11 (n = 3063) to 18 years old (n = 3098) on cats, dogs, rabbits, rodents, birds, fish, tortoise/turtles and horses. The dataset also contains a wide range of potential confounders, including demographic and socio-economic variables. The ownership of all pet types peaked at age 11 (80%) and then decreased during adolescence, with the exclusion of cats which remained constant (around 30%), and dogs which increased through 11-18 years (26-37%). Logistic regression was used to build multivariable models for ownership of each pet type at age 13 years, and the factors identified in these models were compared to previously published data for 7 year-olds in the same cohort. There was some consistency with predictors reported at age 7. Generally sex, birth order, maternal age, maternal education, number of people in the household, house type, and concurrent ownership of other pets were associated with pet ownership at both 7 and 13 years (the direction of association varied according to pet type). Factors that were no longer associated with adolescent pet ownership included child ethnicity, paternal education, and parental social class. CONCLUSIONS: A number of socio-demographic factors are associated with pet ownership in childhood and adolescence and they differ according to the type of pet, and age of child. These factors are potential confounders that must be considered in future HAI studies.


Assuntos
Propriedade/estatística & dados numéricos , Animais de Estimação , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Adolescente , Animais , Criança , Estudos de Coortes , Demografia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Reino Unido
15.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 49(6): 1029-1039, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31526524

RESUMO

Acupuncture is recognized to induce multifactorial changes in the neuroregulatory aspects of pain physiology. Many aspects overlap with known receptor interactions of commonly used analgesic drugs, and acupuncture can increase the efficacy or replace the use of these pharmacologic pain treatments. This article discusses the currently recognized components of the pain pathways that are modified by acupuncture. It introduces the role of fibroblasts and fascia in mechanotransduction and discusses the ways in which this provides a link between the acupuncture needle and the nervous system and is a conduit for extracellular fluid movement, lymphatics, and the immune system.


Assuntos
Terapia por Acupuntura/veterinária , Manejo da Dor/veterinária , Animais de Estimação , Animais , Manejo da Dor/métodos
16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31554230

RESUMO

Background: Various health benefits from the ownership of companion dogs have been studied from a One Health perspective. However, the preventive effects on depression are unclear, with inconsistent results across studies. We hypothesized that heterogeneity among owners would be related to the mixed results. Specifically, the difference in the strength of the bond between the owners and their companion dogs would modify the effect of dog ownership. As an exploratory study, we compared the depression symptoms of the owners with favorable attitudes toward their dogs, with those of the owners with unfavorable attitudes, to investigate the potential effect modification of owners' attitudes on the association between the ownership and depression symptom. Methods: We conducted a web-based questionnaire survey of 654 19- to 39-year-old adults who had companion dogs in Seoul, South Korea, where a major health burden is depression among young adults. We measured the owners' attitudes toward their dogs using the modified Pet Attitude Scale (PAS-M) and their depression symptoms using the short version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies depression scale (CESD-10). Demographic and socioeconomic factors were measured to adjust for the association between attitude and depression symptoms. Multivariate logistic regression models were used in this study. Results: The owners who had less favorable attitudes toward their dogs (lower PAS-M scores) tended to have depression symptoms. The direction and significance were maintained either when the PAS-M variable was used as a continuous variable (odds ratio (OR) for one score increase in PAS-M was 0.95 (95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.94-0.96)) or as a categorical variable (OR for lower PAS-M was 3.19 (95% CI = 2.28 -4.47)). Conclusion: We found a positive significant association between owners' depression symptoms and unfavorable attitudes toward their dogs, although causal direction could not be determined. Future studies should investigate the potential causal link.


Assuntos
Depressão/psicologia , Animais de Estimação/psicologia , Adulto , Animais , Atitude , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Propriedade , Seul , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
17.
Crit Rev Oncol Hematol ; 143: 56-61, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31479836

RESUMO

"Can I keep my dog while receiving chemotherapy?" "Can my cat sleep on my bed while I'm on treatment?" "What precautions should I take with my pets in order to avoid infections?"" I read that my dog could give me breast cancer, is that true?" "Do you have assistance therapy dogs at your chemotherapy day unit?" These are not uncommon questions from cancer patients in oncology/haematology consultation rooms. The answers to these questions however, are widely unknown among physicians. Pet ownership is thought to provide patients with both emotional and physical health benefits. However, owning pets may also pose health risks to immunocompromised patients through zoonotic transmission of disease. Some studies have also suggested that the ownership of domestic pets may increase the risk of developing some cancers. But what is the evidence behind these claims? This paper presents the results of a literature review of a variety of scientific literature about pet ownership as a potential risk factor for suffering cancer, zoonotic diseases and the immunocompromised, and animal-assisted-therapy in cancer patients.


Assuntos
Vínculo Homem-Animal de Estimação , Neoplasias/psicologia , Animais de Estimação/psicologia , Terapia Assistida por Animais , Animais , Gatos , Cães , Humanos , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Propriedade , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Zoonoses/epidemiologia
18.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 49(6): 1013-1027, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31481257

RESUMO

Alpha-2 agonists have potent analgesic effects, in addition to their sedative actions. Alpha-2 agonists provide analgesia through any of several routes of administration, including parenteral, oral, epidural or intrathecal and intraarticular, because of spinal and supraspinal actions. Systemic doses are short acting, whereas local administration at the site of action result in longer analgesic effects. The potent cardiovascular and respiratory effects of alpha-2 agonists should be considered when used as analgesics.


Assuntos
Agonistas alfa-Adrenérgicos/uso terapêutico , Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Dor/veterinária , Animais de Estimação , Analgesia/métodos , Analgesia/veterinária , Animais , Dor/tratamento farmacológico
19.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 49(6): 1143-1156, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31473030

RESUMO

Physical agent modalities can be effective in the perioperative period for controlling pain and inflammation. This article presents research-based evidence to support the use of these modalities in pain management and to reduce the use of pain medications, including opioids. The mechanism of action, applications, contraindications, and adverse effects of cryotherapy, pulsed electromagnetic field therapy, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, and laser therapy are reviewed. Incorporation of 1 or more of these therapies in anesthesia pain management protocols can improve outcomes and reduce potential drug side effects.


Assuntos
Manejo da Dor/veterinária , Dor/veterinária , Assistência Perioperatória/veterinária , Animais de Estimação , Animais , Dor/tratamento farmacológico , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Assistência Perioperatória/métodos
20.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 49(6): 1109-1125, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31474415

RESUMO

Local anesthetics are the only class of drugs that can block transduction and transmission of nociception. Physical properties, mechanism of action, and pharmacokinetics of this class of drugs are reviewed in this article. The clinical use, such intravenous administration of lidocaine, and local and systemic toxic effects are covered. A review of current studies published in the human and veterinary literature on lidocaine patches (Lidoderm) and liposomal bupivacaine (Experal and Nocita) are discussed.


Assuntos
Anestesia Local/veterinária , Anestésicos Locais/administração & dosagem , Animais de Estimação , Anestesia Local/métodos , Animais , Lidocaína/administração & dosagem
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