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11.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0239634, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33021990

RESUMO

In recent years, the environmental problems caused by excessive carbon emissions from energy sources have become increasingly serious, which not only aggravates the climate change caused by the greenhouse effect but also seriously restricts the sustainable development of Chinese economy. An attempt is made in this paper to use energy consumption method and input-output method to study the carbon emission structure of China's energy system and industry in 2015 from two perspectives, namely China's energy supply side and energy demand side, by taking into account the two factors of energy invest in gross capital formation and export. The results show that neglecting these two factors will lead to underestimation of intermediate use carbon emissions and overestimation of final use carbon emissions. On energy supply side, the carbon emission structure of China's energy system is still dominated by high-carbon energy (raw coal, coke, diesel, and fuel oil, etc.), accounting for more than 70% of total energy carbon emissions; on the contrary, the natural gas such as clean energy accounts for only 3.45% of total energy carbon emissions, indicating that the energy consumption structure optimization and emission reduction gap of China's energy supply side are still substantial. On energy demand side, the final use (direct consumption by residents and government) produces less carbon emissions, while the intermediate use (production by enterprises) produces more than 90% of the total energy carbon emissions. Fossil energy, power sector, heavy industry, chemical industry, and transportation belong to industries with larger carbon emissions and lower carbon emission efficiency, while agriculture, construction, light industry, and service belong to industries with fewer carbon emissions and higher carbon emission efficiency. This means that the optimization of industrial structure is conducive to slowing down the growth of energy carbon emissions on the demand side.


Assuntos
Pegada de Carbono/economia , Desenvolvimento Econômico , Combustíveis Fósseis , Aquecimento Global/economia , Carbono/análise , China , Mudança Climática/economia , Carvão Mineral/economia , Fontes Geradoras de Energia/economia , Poluição Ambiental/economia , Poluição Ambiental/prevenção & controle , Combustíveis Fósseis/economia , Aquecimento Global/prevenção & controle , Efeito Estufa/economia , Efeito Estufa/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Indústrias/economia , Investimentos em Saúde
12.
Tex Med ; 116(9): 4-5, 2020 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33023283

RESUMO

Human health is inextricably connected with the health of the environment. Our actions to reduce the threats of climate change and global warming are key to our well-being and survival.


Assuntos
Mudança Climática , Exposição Ambiental/efeitos adversos , Aquecimento Global/prevenção & controle , Saúde , Temperatura Alta/efeitos adversos , Papel do Médico , Responsabilidade Social , Promoção da Saúde , Humanos , Texas
15.
Nature ; 585(7826): 545-550, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32968258

RESUMO

To constrain global warming, we must strongly curtail greenhouse gas emissions and capture excess atmospheric carbon dioxide1,2. Regrowing natural forests is a prominent strategy for capturing additional carbon3, but accurate assessments of its potential are limited by uncertainty and variability in carbon accumulation rates2,3. To assess why and where rates differ, here we compile 13,112 georeferenced measurements of carbon accumulation. Climatic factors explain variation in rates better than land-use history, so we combine the field measurements with 66 environmental covariate layers to create a global, one-kilometre-resolution map of potential aboveground carbon accumulation rates for the first 30 years of natural forest regrowth. This map shows over 100-fold variation in rates across the globe, and indicates that default rates from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)4,5 may underestimate aboveground carbon accumulation rates by 32 per cent on average and do not capture eight-fold variation within ecozones. Conversely, we conclude that maximum climate mitigation potential from natural forest regrowth is 11 per cent lower than previously reported3 owing to the use of overly high rates for the location of potential new forest. Although our data compilation includes more studies and sites than previous efforts, our results depend on data availability, which is concentrated in ten countries, and data quality, which varies across studies. However, the plots cover most of the environmental conditions across the areas for which we predicted carbon accumulation rates (except for northern Africa and northeast Asia). We therefore provide a robust and globally consistent tool for assessing natural forest regrowth as a climate mitigation strategy.


Assuntos
Sequestro de Carbono , Carbono/metabolismo , Agricultura Florestal/estatística & dados numéricos , Agricultura Florestal/tendências , Florestas , Mapeamento Geográfico , Árvores/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Árvores/metabolismo , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais , Coleta de Dados , Recuperação e Remediação Ambiental , Aquecimento Global/prevenção & controle , Internacionalidade , Cinética
17.
Rev Infirm ; 69(262): 33-35, 2020.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32838864

RESUMO

Although initiatives for reducing the carbon footprint of care facilities exist, they remain underdeveloped in terms of the current climate threat. Nurses must be involved in the decisions and initiatives taken to reduce the impact of their organisation on the environment and encourage caregivers to adopt a long lasting ecological approach.


Assuntos
Aquecimento Global/prevenção & controle , Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros/psicologia , Pegada de Carbono , Instalações de Saúde , Humanos
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