Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 4.398
Filtrar
1.
BMC Palliat Care ; 20(1): 13, 2021 Jan 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33435925

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Artificial nutrition and hydration do not prolong survival or improve clinical symptoms of terminally ill cancer patients. Nonetheless, little is known about the effect of artificial hydration (AH) alone on patients' survival, symptoms or quality of dying. This study explored the relationship between AH and survival, symptoms and quality of dying among terminally ill cancer patients. METHODS: A pilot prospective, observational study was conducted in the palliative care units of three tertiary hospitals in Taiwan between October 2016 and December 2017. A total of 100 patients were included and classified into the hydration and non-hydration group using 400 mL of fluid per day as the cut-off point. The quality of dying was measured by the Good Death Scale (GDS). Multivariate analyses using Cox's proportional hazards model were used to assess the survival status of patients, the Wilcoxon rank-sum test for within-group analyses and the Mann-Whitney U test for between-groups analyses to evaluate changes in symptoms between day 0 and 7 in both groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the predictors of a good death. RESULTS: There were no differences in survival (p = 0.337) or symptom improvement between the hydration and non-hydration group, however, patients with AH had higher GDS scores. CONCLUSIONS: AH did not prolong survival nor significantly improve dehydration symptoms of terminally ill cancer patients but it may influence the quality of dying. Communication with patients and their families on the effect of AH may help them better prepared for the end-of-life experience.


Assuntos
Desidratação/terapia , Hidratação , Neoplasias/terapia , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Projetos Piloto , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , Estudos Prospectivos , Taxa de Sobrevida , Doente Terminal
2.
Support Care Cancer ; 29(1): 179-185, 2021 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32328774

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To characterize the practice of subcutaneous hydration provision in the Beer-Sheva home care hospice unit. We also explore the potential connection between the provision of subcutaneous hydration and the incidence of death rattle. METHODS: This was a prospective observational study involving 120 hospice patients. During the 6 days before death, hospice staff recorded whether or not fluids were administered orally and/or subcutaneously; the duration, timing, and quantity of fluid administration; the incidence, timing, and duration of death rattle; and whether medications that can affect death rattle were given. RESULT: Fifty-three percent of the patients received subcutaneous hydration. The mean daily volume administered in the hydration group was 434 ml. There was a significant association between the duration of treatment in the hospice unit and provision of subcutaneous hydration (mean of 51 days in hydration group vs. 31 days in non-hydration group, p = 0.03). Although not statistically significant, males were more likely to receive subcutaneous hydration than females (62% of males vs. 46% of females, p = 0.09). There was a higher incidence of death rattle in men compared to women (54.7% in men vs. 32.8% in women, p = 0.025). A statistically significant association between death rattle and the provision of subcutaneous hydration wasn't demonstrated. CONCLUSION: The decision of whether to provide subcutaneous hydration is individualized taking into consideration the values of the patients and their families. The provision of 500 ml per day of subcutaneous saline during the last 6 days of life does not significantly increase the incidence of death rattle.


Assuntos
Hidratação/métodos , Sons Respiratórios/fisiologia , Águas Salinas/uso terapêutico , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Morte , Feminino , Cuidados Paliativos na Terminalidade da Vida/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos
4.
N Z Med J ; 133(1526): 105-106, 2020 12 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33332346
7.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32872244

RESUMO

In the last decade, we have seen a growth of Compassionate Communities and Cities (CCC) at the end of life. There has been an evolution of organizations that help construct Community-Based Palliative Care programs. The objective is to analyze the implementation, methodology and effectiveness of the CCC models at the end of life. We conducted a systematic review following PRISMA ScR Guideline. The protocol was registered on PROSPERO (CRD42017068501). Five databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, CINAHL and Google Scholar) were searched for studies (from 2000 to 2018) using set eligibility criteria. Three reviewers screened full-texts articles and extracted study data. Outcomes were filled in a registration form which included a narrative synthesis of each article. We screened 1975 records. We retrieved 112 articles and included 31 articles for the final analysis: 17 descriptive studies, 4 interventions studies, 4 reviews and 6 qualitative studies. A total of 11 studies regard the development models of CCC at the end of life, 15 studies were about evaluation of compassionate communities' programs and 5 studies were about protocols for the development of CCC programs. There is poor evidence of the implementation and evaluation models of CCC at the end of life. There is little and low-/very low-quality evidence about CCC development and assessment models. We found no data published on care intervention in advance disease and end of life. A global model for the development and evaluation of CCC at the end of life seems to be necessary.


Assuntos
Redes Comunitárias , Empatia , Cuidados Paliativos , Cidades , Humanos , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Cuidados Paliativos/organização & administração , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Assistência Terminal/organização & administração
8.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 9: CD012780, 2020 09 30.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32996586

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Serious illness is often characterised by physical/psychological problems, family support needs, and high healthcare resource use. Hospital-based specialist palliative care (HSPC) has developed to assist in better meeting the needs of patients and their families and potentially reducing hospital care expenditure. There is a need for clarity on the effectiveness and optimal models of HSPC, given that most people still die in hospital and also to allocate scarce resources judiciously. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of HSPC compared to usual care for adults with advanced illness (hereafter patients) and their unpaid caregivers/families. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, CDSR, DARE and HTA database via the Cochrane Library; MEDLINE; Embase; CINAHL; PsycINFO; CareSearch; National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database (NHS EED) and two trial registers to August 2019, together with checking of reference lists and relevant systematic reviews, citation searching and contact with experts to identify additional studies. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the impact of HSPC on outcomes for patients or their unpaid caregivers/families, or both. HSPC was defined as specialist palliative care delivered by a palliative care team that is based in a hospital providing holistic care, co-ordination by a multidisciplinary team, and collaboration between HSPC providers and generalists. HSPC was provided to patients while they were admitted as inpatients to acute care hospitals, outpatients or patients receiving care from hospital outreach teams at home. The comparator was usual care, defined as inpatient or outpatient hospital care without specialist palliative care input at the point of entry into the study, community care or hospice care provided outside of the hospital setting. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We assessed risk of bias and extracted data. To account for use of different scales across studies, we calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for continuous data. We used an inverse variance random-effects model. For binary data, we calculated odds ratio (ORs) with 95% CIs. We assessed the evidence using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. Our primary outcomes were patient health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and symptom burden (a collection of two or more symptoms). Key secondary outcomes were pain, depression, satisfaction with care, achieving preferred place of death, mortality/survival, unpaid caregiver burden, and cost-effectiveness. Qualitative data was analysed where available. MAIN RESULTS: We identified 42 RCTs involving 7779 participants (6678 patients and 1101 caregivers/family members). Twenty-one studies were with cancer populations, 14 were with non-cancer populations (of which six were with heart failure patients), and seven with mixed cancer and non-cancer populations (mixed diagnoses). HSPC was offered in different ways and included the following models: ward-based, inpatient consult, outpatient, hospital-at-home or hospital outreach, and service provision across multiple settings which included hospital. For our main analyses, we pooled data from studies reporting adjusted endpoint values. Forty studies had a high risk of bias in at least one domain. Compared with usual care, HSPC improved patient HRQoL with a small effect size of 0.26 SMD over usual care (95% CI 0.15 to 0.37; I2 = 3%, 10 studies, 1344 participants, low-quality evidence, higher scores indicate better patient HRQoL). HSPC also improved other person-centred outcomes. It reduced patient symptom burden with a small effect size of -0.26 SMD over usual care (95% CI -0.41 to -0.12; I2 = 0%, 6 studies, 761 participants, very low-quality evidence, lower scores indicate lower symptom burden). HSPC improved patient satisfaction with care with a small effect size of 0.36 SMD over usual care (95% CI 0.41 to 0.57; I2 = 0%, 2 studies, 337 participants, low-quality evidence, higher scores indicate better patient satisfaction with care). Using home death as a proxy measure for achieving patient's preferred place of death, patients were more likely to die at home with HSPC compared to usual care (OR 1.63, 95% CI 1.23 to 2.16; I2 = 0%, 7 studies, 861 participants, low-quality evidence). Data on pain (4 studies, 525 participants) showed no evidence of a difference between HSPC and usual care (SMD -0.16, 95% CI -0.33 to 0.01; I2 = 0%, very low-quality evidence). Eight studies (N = 1252 participants) reported on adverse events and very low-quality evidence did not demonstrate an effect of HSPC on serious harms. Two studies (170 participants) presented data on caregiver burden and both found no evidence of effect of HSPC (very low-quality evidence). We included 13 economic studies (2103 participants). Overall, the evidence on cost-effectiveness of HSPC compared to usual care was inconsistent among the four full economic studies. Other studies that used only partial economic analysis and those that presented more limited resource use and cost information also had inconsistent results (very low-quality evidence). Quality of the evidence The quality of the evidence assessed using GRADE was very low to low, downgraded due to a high risk of bias, inconsistency and imprecision. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Very low- to low-quality evidence suggests that when compared to usual care, HSPC may offer small benefits for several person-centred outcomes including patient HRQoL, symptom burden and patient satisfaction with care, while also increasing the chances of patients dying in their preferred place (measured by home death). While we found no evidence that HSPC causes serious harms, the evidence was insufficient to draw strong conclusions. Although these are only small effect sizes, they may be clinically relevant at an advanced stage of disease with limited prognosis, and are person-centred outcomes important to many patients and families. More well conducted studies are needed to study populations with non-malignant diseases and mixed diagnoses, ward-based models of HSPC, 24 hours access (out-of-hours care) as part of HSPC, pain, achieving patient preferred place of care, patient satisfaction with care, caregiver outcomes (satisfaction with care, burden, depression, anxiety, grief, quality of life), and cost-effectiveness of HSPC. In addition, research is needed to provide validated person-centred outcomes to be used across studies and populations.


Assuntos
Cuidadores/estatística & dados numéricos , Serviços Hospitalares de Assistência Domiciliar/economia , Cuidados Paliativos/economia , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Assistência Terminal/economia , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Assistência Ambulatorial/economia , Viés , Cuidadores/psicologia , Análise Custo-Benefício , Família , Insuficiência Cardíaca/mortalidade , Insuficiência Cardíaca/terapia , Hospitalização/economia , Humanos , Neoplasias/mortalidade , Neoplasias/terapia , Manejo da Dor/estatística & dados numéricos , Satisfação do Paciente , Qualidade de Vida , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto , Avaliação de Sintomas/estatística & dados numéricos
9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32927824

RESUMO

Life-sustaining treatments (LSTs) and end-of-life (EOL) care's goal for prolonging one's life are defined as aggressive EOL care among critically ill patients. They have limited effects and add unnecessary financial burden to advanced cancer patients. A questionnaire survey was conducted to collect information on demographics, disease conditions, preference for LSTs, and goal of EOL care among advanced cancer patients of comprehensive grade-A tertiary hospitals in Wuhan, mainland China. Most patients preferred to accept LSTs when they were in a critical condition, including cardiopulmonary resuscitation (89.9%), mechanical ventilation support (85.7%), nasogastric tube feeding (84.1%), blood transfusion (89.8%), general surgery (87.5%), and hemodialysis (85.8%). Most (88%) preferred prolonging life as the goal of EOL care. Logistic regression showed common influencing factors were participants who completed junior high/high school or below and were financially adequate had higher reference for aggressive EOL care. Patients whose physician had accurately disclosed prognosis; however, showed a decrease trend for aggressive EOL care. Most advanced cancer patients preferred to accept aggressive EOL care. Discussions about prognosis disclosure among physicians and patients should be improved. Education about LSTs' limitations and comfort-oriented care's benefits should be promoted among the advanced cancer patients in mainland China.


Assuntos
Cuidados para Prolongar a Vida/métodos , Neoplasias/epidemiologia , Preferência do Paciente , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Doente Terminal/psicologia , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Neoplasias/terapia
10.
Cuad Bioet ; 31(102): 203-222, 2020.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32910672

RESUMO

The crisis in the health system caused by COVID-19 has left some important humanitarian deficits on how to care for the sick in their last days of life. The humanization of the dying process has been affected in three fundamental aspects, each of which constitutes a medical and ethical duty necessary. In this study, I analyze why dying accompanied, with the possibility of saying goodbye and receiving spiritual assistance, constitutes a specific triad of care and natural obligations that should not be overlooked - even in times of health crisis - if we do not want to see human dignity violated and violated some fundamental rights derived from it.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Espiritualidade , Assistência Terminal/ética , Desumanização , Emoções , Humanos , Relações Interpessoais , Obrigações Morais , Cuidados Paliativos , Conforto do Paciente , Isolamento de Pacientes/ética , Direitos do Paciente , Pessoalidade , Papel do Médico , Religião , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Assistência Terminal/psicologia , Visitas a Pacientes
11.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; 37(11): 992-997, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32762477

RESUMO

Telemedicine technology has become essential to healthcare delivery in the COVID-19 era, but concerns remain regarding whether the intimacy and communication that is central to high-quality palliative care will be compromised by the use of this technology. We employed a business model approach to identify the need for system innovation in palliative care, and a quality improvement approach to structure the project. Products from this project included a standard operating procedure for safe use of tablet computers for inpatient palliative care consultations and family visitations; tablet procurement with installation of video telehealth software; and training and education for clinical staff and other stakeholders. We describe a case illustrating the successful use of palliative care telehealth in the care of a COVID-19-positive patient at the end of life. Successful use of video telehealth for palliative care involved overcoming inertia to the development of telehealth infrastructure and learning clinical video telehealth skills; and engaging front-line care staff and family members who were open to a trial of telehealth for communication. Information gleaned from family about the patient as a person helped bedside staff to tailor care toward aspects meaningful to the patient and family and informed best practices to incorporate intimacy into future palliative video consultations and family visit.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Telemedicina/métodos , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Família/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Melhoria de Qualidade , Visitas a Pacientes
12.
Anticancer Res ; 40(7): 3897-3903, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32620630

RESUMO

BACKGROUND/AIM: Previous studies have shown discrepancies between patient's desired and actual death place. As planning of family support and involvement of palliative home care teams seem to improve the chance to meet patients preferences, geographical availability of specialized palliative home care could influence place of death. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Data of patients diagnosed and deceased between January 2011 until December 2014 with lung, brain, colorectal, breast and prostate cancer was collected from Swedish national registers and multiple regression analyses were performed. RESULTS: Patients with lung, brain, colorectal, and prostate cancer who resided in rural municipalities had a higher likelihood of dying at home than dying in hospital settings, compared to those who lived in urban areas. CONCLUSION: Patients in Sweden, with the exception of breast cancer patients, have a higher likelihood of home death than inpatient hospital death when residing in rural areas compared to when residing in urban areas.


Assuntos
Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias/mortalidade , Neoplasias/terapia , Cuidados Paliativos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Preferência do Paciente , Sistema de Registros , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Suécia/epidemiologia , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Assistência Terminal/estatística & dados numéricos , População Urbana/estatística & dados numéricos
13.
Med Care ; 58(8): 665-673, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32520768

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Many people with terminal illness prefer to die in home-like settings-including care homes, hospices, or palliative care units-rather than an acute care hospital. Home-based palliative care services can increase the likelihood of death in a community setting, but the provision of these services may increase costs relative to usual care. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the incremental cost per community death for persons enrolled in end-of-life home care in Ontario, Canada, who died between 2011 and 2015. METHODS: Using a population-based cohort of 50,068 older adults, we determined the total cost of care in the last 90 days of life, as well as the incremental cost to achieve an additional community death for persons enrolled in end-of-life home care, in comparison with propensity score-matched individuals under usual care (ie, did not receive home care services in the last 90 days of life). RESULTS: Recipients of end-of-life home care were nearly 3 times more likely to experience a community death than individuals not receiving home care services, and the incremental cost to achieve an additional community death through the provision of end-of-life home care was CAN$995 (95% confidence interval: -$547 to $2392). CONCLUSION: Results suggest that a modest investment in end-of-life home care has the potential to improve the dying experience of community-dwelling older adults by enabling fewer deaths in acute care hospitals.


Assuntos
Análise Custo-Benefício/normas , Investimentos em Saúde/normas , Suicídio Assistido/economia , Assistência Terminal/economia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Análise Custo-Benefício/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar/economia , Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar/tendências , Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Investimentos em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Ontário , Suicídio Assistido/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Assistência Terminal/tendências
14.
Rev Mal Respir ; 37(6): 451-461, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32505369

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Numerous studies about poor communication and altered quality of life of patients with chronic obstuctive pulmonary disease (COPD) lead to the conclusion that overall palliative management of COPD remains to be improved. The aim of this study was to describe pulmonologists' practice of palliative care for COPD patients in order to identify obstacles to it. MATERIAL AND METHOD: A survey was sent to all pulmonologists whose email appeared in the 2017 French-language Respiratory Medicine Society's directory. RESULTS: A total of 294 responses were obtained, among which 287 were analysed. Overall, 81.6% of the pulmonologists said that they identify a distinct palliative phase from "sometimes to often" in the care of COPD patients. When not identified, the most common reason given (68.8%) was the difficulty of defining when to start palliative care. Aspects of the palliative approach, which were considered the most problematic for pulmonologists, were the discussion of end of life care, and the impression that COPD patients have a low demand for information. 31% of pulmonologists reported that they gathered information about patients' wishes to undergo resuscitation and endotracheal intubation in 61 % to 100% of patients who they judged to have the most severe disease. CONCLUSION: Uncertainty as to when to begin a palliative approach for COPD patients and perceptions around communication in chronic diseases appear to be the main obstacles to a palliative approach.


Assuntos
Cuidados Paliativos/psicologia , Cuidados Paliativos/estatística & dados numéricos , Percepção , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/terapia , Pneumologistas , Adulto , Diretivas Antecipadas/psicologia , Diretivas Antecipadas/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Feminino , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Cuidados Paliativos/normas , Relações Médico-Paciente , Padrões de Prática Médica/normas , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/epidemiologia , Doença Pulmonar Obstrutiva Crônica/psicologia , Pneumologia/normas , Pneumologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumologistas/psicologia , Pneumologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Qualidade de Vida , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Assistência Terminal/psicologia , Assistência Terminal/estatística & dados numéricos
15.
Palliat Med ; 34(9): 1235-1240, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32588748

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Hospital clinicians have had to rapidly develop expertise in managing the clinical manifestations of COVID-19 including symptoms common at the end of life, such as breathlessness and agitation. There is limited evidence exploring whether end-of-life symptom control in this group requires new or adapted guidance. AIM: To review whether prescribing for symptom control in patients dying with COVID-19 adhered to existing local guidance or whether there was deviation which may represent a need for revised guidance or specialist support in particular patient groups. DESIGN/SETTING: A retrospective review of the electronic patient record of 61 hospital inpatients referred to the specialist palliative care team with swab-confirmed COVID-19 who subsequently died over a 1-month period. Intubated patients were excluded. RESULTS: In all, 83% (40/48) of patients were prescribed opioids at a starting dose consistent with existing local guidelines. In seven of eight patients where higher doses were prescribed, this was on specialist palliative care team advice. Mean total opioid dose required in the last 24 h of life was 14 mg morphine subcutaneous equivalent, and mean total midazolam dose was 9.5 mg. For three patients in whom non-invasive ventilation was in place higher doses were used. CONCLUSION: Prescription of end-of-life symptom control drugs for COVID-19 fell within the existing guidance when supported by specialist palliative care advice. While some patients may require increased doses, routine prescription of higher starting opioid and benzodiazepine doses beyond existing local guidance was not observed.


Assuntos
Biofarmácia/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Delírio/tratamento farmacológico , Dispneia/tratamento farmacológico , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Assistência Terminal/normas , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Analgésicos Opioides/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , Feminino , Humanos , Hipnóticos e Sedativos/uso terapêutico , Masculino , Midazolam/uso terapêutico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Morfina/uso terapêutico , Pandemias , Estudos Retrospectivos
17.
BMJ Support Palliat Care ; 10(3): 343-349, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32546559

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Anticipatory prescribing (AP) of injectable medications in advance of clinical need is established practice in community end-of-life care. Changes to prescribing guidelines and practice have been reported during the COVID-19 pandemic. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To investigate UK and Ireland clinicians' experiences concerning changes in AP during the COVID-19 pandemic and their recommendations for change. METHODS: Online survey of participants at previous AP national workshops, members of the Association for Palliative Medicine of Great Britain and Ireland and other professional organisations, with snowball sampling. RESULTS: Two hundred and sixty-one replies were received between 9 and 19 April 2020 from clinicians in community, hospice and hospital settings across all areas of the UK and Ireland. Changes to AP local guidance and practice were reported: route of administration (47%), drugs prescribed (38%), total quantities prescribed (35%), doses and ranges (29%). Concerns over shortages of nurses and doctors to administer subcutaneous injections led 37% to consider drug administration by family or social caregivers, often by buccal, sublingual and transdermal routes. Clinical contact and patient assessment were more often remote via telephone or video (63%). Recommendations for regulatory changes to permit drug repurposing and easier community access were made. CONCLUSIONS: The challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic for UK community palliative care has stimulated rapid innovation in AP. The extent to which these are implemented and their clinical efficacy need further examination.


Assuntos
Cuidadores , Vias de Administração de Medicamentos , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Administração Bucal , Administração Sublingual , Analgésicos não Entorpecentes/administração & dosagem , Analgésicos Opioides/administração & dosagem , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Fentanila/administração & dosagem , Clínicos Gerais , Cuidados Paliativos na Terminalidade da Vida/métodos , Hospitais para Doentes Terminais , Humanos , Hipnóticos e Sedativos/administração & dosagem , Irlanda/epidemiologia , Lorazepam/administração & dosagem , Metotrimeprazina/administração & dosagem , Antagonistas Muscarínicos/administração & dosagem , Enfermeiras Especialistas , Medicina Paliativa , Pandemias , Médicos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telemedicina/métodos , Adesivo Transdérmico , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
18.
PLoS One ; 15(6): e0235138, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32574209

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The challenges of supporting the end-of-life preferences of patients and their families have often been attributed to poor understanding of the patient's condition. Understanding how physicians, as patients, communicate their end-of-life care preferences to their families may inform shared decision making at end of life. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to understand what matters to families of physicians when decision making with and for a physician who is approaching the end of life. DESIGN: Cross-sectional qualitative design. PARTICIPANTS: We conducted interviews with family members of deceased physicians. APPROACH: We analyzed the data using the constant comparison method to identify themes. KEY RESULTS: Family members (N = 26) rarely were unclear about the treatment preferences of physicians who died. Three overarching themes emerged about what matters most to physicians' families: (1) honoring preferences for the context of end-of-life care; (2) supporting the patient's control and dignity in care; and, (3) developing a shared understanding of preferences. Families struggled to make decisions and provide the care needed by the physicians at the end of life, often encountering significant challenges from the healthcare system. CONCLUSIONS: Even when disease and prognosis are well understood as in this group of physicians, families still experienced difficulties in end-of-life decision making. These findings highlight the need to specifically address preferences for caregiver, care setting and symptom management in shared end-of-life decision making conversations with patients and families.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Atitude Frente a Morte , Morte , Família/psicologia , Médicos de Família/psicologia , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Tomada de Decisões , Feminino , Cuidados Paliativos na Terminalidade da Vida/métodos , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Pesquisa Qualitativa
19.
Jpn J Clin Oncol ; 50(7): 830-833, 2020 Jul 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32419027

RESUMO

Death rattle occurs during the last days of life, and relatives of those afflicted frequently report that it is very distressful. However, there is no effective treatment for it. The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of Japanese palliative care physicians in clinical practice in Japan. We conducted a nationwide survey of 268 physicians via an anonymous, self-report questionnaire. We assessed pharmacological and non-pharmacological management and anticholinergic agent choice. One hundred eighty-nine physicians (70.5%) returned the questionnaires. Fifty-five participants (29.1%) treating patients with Type-1 (real death rattle) and 36 participants (19%) treating patients with Type-2 (pseudo-death rattle) death rattle reported that they would frequently administer an anticholinergic agent. One-fourth would administer scopolamine butylbromide or scopolamine hydrobromide. In conclusion, more Japanese palliative care physicians thought that anticholinergic agents might be effective for treating Type-1 death rattle rather than Type-2. Further clinical trials of these agents are needed.


Assuntos
Neoplasias/psicologia , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Doente Terminal/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Masculino , Neoplasias/terapia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Resultado do Tratamento
20.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 60(2): e70-e74, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32387574

RESUMO

Bereavement care is considered an integral component of quality end-of-life care endorsed by the palliative care movement. However, few hospitals and health care institutions offer universal bereavement care to all families of patients who die. The current coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has highlighted this gap and created a sense of urgency, from a public health perspective, for institutions to provide support to bereaved family members. In this article, drawing on the palliative care and bereavement literature, we offer suggestions about how to incorporate palliative care tools and psychological strategies into bereavement care for families during this pandemic.


Assuntos
Luto , Infecções por Coronavirus , Família/psicologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Humanos , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Cuidados Paliativos/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Assistência Terminal/métodos , Assistência Terminal/psicologia
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA