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1.
J Clin Ethics ; 30(4): 376-383, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31851628

RESUMO

An Asian Indian Hindu family chose no intervention and hospice care for their newborn with hypoplastic right heart syndrome as an ethical option, and the newborn expired after five days. Professional nursing integrates values-based practice and evidence-based care with cultural humility when providing culturally responsive family-centered culture care. Each person's worldview is unique as influenced by culture, language, and religion, among other factors. The Nursing Team sought to understand this family's collective Indian Hindu worldview and end-of-life beliefs, values, and practices, in view of the unique aspects of the situation while the team integrated evidence-based strategies to provide family-centered culture care. Parental care choices conflicted with those of the Nursing Team, and some nurses experienced moral distress and cultural dissonance when negotiating their deeply held cultural and religious views to advocate for the family. The inability to reconcile and integrate a stressful or traumatic experience impacts nurses' well-being and contributes to compassion fatigue. Nurses need to be intentional in accessing interventions that promote coping and healing and moral resilience. Reflection and cultural humility, assessment, and knowledge in context, increase evidence-based culture care and positive outcomes. U.S. society's views on ethical behavior continue to evolve, and some may argue that the law should place more limits on parents' right to choose or to refuse treatment for their infants and children. Moral distress can lead to moral resilience and satisfaction of compassion when nurses provide family-centered culture care with cultural responsiveness and integrate values-based practice with evidence-based care, and aim to first do no harm.


Assuntos
Enfermagem Familiar/ética , Princípios Morais , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem no Hospital/psicologia , Relações Profissional-Família/ética , Religião , Estresse Psicológico , Recusa do Paciente ao Tratamento/ética , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Criança , Cultura , Empatia , Hinduísmo , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido
2.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; 36(9): 760-766, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30744386

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Noncancer patients with life-limiting diseases often receive more intensive level of care in their final days of life, with more cardiopulmonary resuscitation performed and less do-not-resuscitate (DNR) orders in place. Nevertheless, death is still often a taboo across Chinese culture, and ethnic disparities could negatively affect DNR directives completion rates. OBJECTIVES: We aim to explore whether Chinese noncancer patients are willing to sign their own DNR directives in a palliative specialist clinic, under a multidisciplinary team approach. DESIGN: Retrospective chart review of all noncancer patients with life-limiting diseases referred to palliative specialist clinic at a tertiary hospital in Hong Kong over a 4-year period. RESULTS: Over the study period, a total of 566 noncancer patients were seen, 119 of them completed their own DNR directives. Patients had a mean age of 74.9. Top 3 diagnoses were chronic renal failure (37%), congestive heart failure (16%), and motor neuron disease (11%). Forty-two percent of patients signed their DNR directives at first clinic attendance. Most Chinese patients (76.5%) invited family caregivers at DNR decision-making, especially for female gender (84.4% vs 69.1%; P = .047) and older (age >75) age group (86.2% vs 66.7%; P = .012). Of the 40 deceased patients, median time from signed directives to death was 5 months. Vast majority (95%) had their DNR directives being honored. CONCLUSION: Health-care workers should be sensitive toward the cultural influence during advance care planning. Role of family for ethnic Chinese remains crucial and professionals should respect this family oriented decision-making.


Assuntos
Diretivas Antecipadas/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/psicologia , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Cuidados Paliativos/psicologia , Ordens quanto à Conduta (Ética Médica)/psicologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Doenças Cardiovasculares/psicologia , Competência Cultural , Tomada de Decisões , Família , Feminino , Hong Kong , Humanos , Falência Renal Crônica/psicologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doença dos Neurônios Motores/psicologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Assistência Terminal/psicologia , Fatores de Tempo
3.
Reprod Health ; 16(1): 3, 2019 Jan 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30626421

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Around 5.4 million under-five deaths occur globally annually. Over 2.5 million neonatal deaths and an equivalent stillbirths also occur annually worldwide. India is largest contributor to these under-five deaths and stillbirths. To meet the National Health Policy goals aligned with sustainable development targets, adoption of specific strategy and interventions based on exact causes of death and stillbirths are essential. The current cause of death (CoD) labelling process is verbal autopsy based and subject to related limitations. In view of rare diagnostic autopsies, the minimally invasive tissue sampling (MITS) has emerged as a suitable alternate with comparable efficiency to determine CoD. But there is no experience on perception and acceptance for MITS in north Indian context. This formative research is exploring the perceptions and view of families, communities and healthcare providers regarding MITS to determine the acceptability and feasibility. METHODS: The cross-sectional study adopts exploratory qualitative research design. The study will be conducted in New Delhi linked to deaths and stillbirths occurring at a tertiary care hospital. The data from multiple stakeholders will be collected through 53-60 key-informant in-depth interviews (IDIs), 8 focus group discussions (FGDs) and 8-10 death or stillbirth event observations. The IDIs will be done with the parents, family members, community representatives, religious priests, burial site representatives and different health care providers. The FGDs will be conducted with the fathers, mothers, and elderly family members in the community. The data collection will focus on death, post-death rituals, religious practices, willingness to know CoD, acceptability of MITS and decision making dynamics. Data will be analysed following free listing, open coding, selective coding and theme identification. Subsequently 8-10 parents will be approached for consent to conduct MITS using the communication package to be developed using the findings. DISCUSSION: The study will provide in-depth understanding of the cultural, social, religious practices related to child death and stillbirth and factors that potentially determine acceptance of MITS. The findings will guide development of communication and counselling package and strategies for obtaining consent for MITS. The pilot experience on obtaining consent for MITS will inform suitable refinement and future practice.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Autopsia , Mortalidade da Criança/etnologia , Mortalidade Infantil/etnologia , Natimorto/etnologia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Causas de Morte , Pré-Escolar , Estudos Transversais , Família , Feminino , Humanos , Índia , Lactente , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Minimamente Invasivos , Gravidez , Projetos de Pesquisa
4.
Death Stud ; 43(4): 270-279, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29757095

RESUMO

In this qualitative study, we explored how Chinese rural elders narrate death-related issues and death preparation. Adopting a phenomenological approach, we interviewed 14 participants regarding the particular actions they employ to prepare for death. The findings revealed a death preparation system for rural Chinese elders that is instrumental in how they converse about death, wish for a good death, make objects and symbols, and anticipate an afterlife as a worshiped ancestor rather than a wandering ghost. Family and family honor provide the context for death preparation. We discuss implications and the need for the death preparation education of younger generations.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento/etnologia , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Família/etnologia , População Rural , Idoso , China/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
5.
J Palliat Care ; 34(1): 12-15, 2019 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29947278

RESUMO

BACKGROUND:: This case report addresses a client from a minority cultural background in Australia and her complex cultural needs at the end of life. CASE HISTORY:: A 66-year-old Japanese female client diagnosed with renal cancer, and lung and spine metastasis shared her story. Since a left nephrectomy in 2007, she has had hemodialysis 3 days a week. She left Japan more than 30 years ago and moved to Australia 20 years ago. With the 6-month prognosis, she expressed her desire to "go home." The meaning of "going home" was explored with the author who shares the same cultural background and language and is a palliative care nurse. The meanings for wanting to go home were her nostalgia for the traditional food, language, land, and death rituals. DISCUSSION:: The client identified her preferred place to die and discussed her death wishes. Open, honest communication with health professionals about her condition and prognosis facilitated meaningful discussions. CONCLUSION:: The narrative demonstrates the complex issues and needs of clients from minority cultural backgrounds and the importance of understanding the real cultural meaning behind their stories. Exploring the meaning with compassionate curiosity as well as interpretation support was the key.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/psicologia , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente/etnologia , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente/métodos , Cuidados Paliativos/psicologia , Assistência Terminal/psicologia , Idoso , Austrália , Feminino , Humanos , Cuidados Paliativos/métodos , Assistência Terminal/métodos
6.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 17(2): 147-154, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30066623

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The knowledge of the concept of brain death is fundamental for being able to understand the organ donation process and helps to achieve its acceptance. Our aim was to analyze levels of understanding of the brain death concept among Latin Americans residing in Florida (USA) and to determine the factors affecting this understanding. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A sample of residents of Latin American origin in the state of Florida was randomized and stratified by nationality, age, and sex (N = 1524). Attitude was assessed using a validated questionnaire, which was self-administered and completed anonymously. For statistical analysis of descriptive data, we used t test, the chi-square test, and logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: The questionnaire completion rate was 95% (n = 1450). We found that 24% (n = 350) understood the concept of brain death, 54% (n = 777) did not understand it, and the remaining 22% (n = 323) believed it did not mean a person's death. The following variables were related to understanding this concept: (1) country of origin (P ⟨ .001), (2) sex (P = .001), (3) marital status (P ⟨ .001), (4) level of formal education (P < .001), (5) having spoken about the subject with one's family (P < .001), (6) a partner's attitude toward donation (P < .001), and (6) religion (P < .001). In the multivariate analysis, the following factors continued to be related: country of origin, level of formal education, and religion. A more positive attitude toward organ donation was found among those who understood the concept of brain death (29% vs 22%; P = .004). CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of the concept of brain death among Latin American residents in Florida is limited, with marked differences depending on the respondent's country of origin, level of formal education, and religion.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais Nativos do Continente Americano/psicologia , Morte Encefálica , Emigrantes e Imigrantes/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Compreensão , Escolaridade , Feminino , Florida , Humanos , Relações Interpessoais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Religião e Medicina , Fatores Sexuais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Doadores de Tecidos/psicologia , Doadores de Tecidos/provisão & distribução , Obtenção de Tecidos e Órgãos , Adulto Jovem
7.
Omega (Westport) ; 80(2): 266-279, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28933659

RESUMO

Burial rituals are symbolic activities that encourage the expression of grief as a positive way to heal while helping to confirm the reality of death. In the Caribbean, consisting of multiple distinct islands and histories of colonization, how individuals are buried on each island depends on the historical intermingling of the colonizer's Christian religion and African (spiritual) rituals. Each island has distinct burial rituals that are a blending of Christian and African religious or spiritual cultures. This article highlights the distinct burial rituals on the Caribbean islands of Barbados, Haiti, and Trinidad and how its historical past has shaped present burial rituals and its significance to the African Caribbean grieving processes.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Comportamento Ritualístico , Rituais Fúnebres/psicologia , Religião e Psicologia , Luto , Características Culturais , Pesar , Humanos , Religião , Índias Ocidentais
8.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; 36(4): 282-289, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30556405

RESUMO

This study was conducted to examine cultural appropriateness and readiness for the Blackfeet people in the United States talking about end of life. In the past, a taboo perception of Blackfeet traditional belief in end-of-life discussion was identified as a core barrier for hospice use. However, a recent anecdotal increase in hospice interest triggered the research team to investigate community-wide interest as well as traditional appropriateness of hospice introduction. The community-based participatory research approach was used to conduct the study. Using convenience sampling, we interviewed 10 tribally recognized Elders and surveyed 102 tribal members who were over 18 years old using a modified Duke End-of-Life Care Survey. Here, our report focused on the perception changes on end-of-life discussion. The elders' statements were divided into two, saying that an end-of-life discussion was not against tradition and that sickness and death would break the living spirit, thus no such discussion. Despite, the importance of a family gathering and the need for knowledge about end-of-life care were confirmed. The survey (response rate 100%; n = 92) showed that 90% of the respondents thought dying was a normal part of life and 76% felt comfortable talking about death. In conclusion, there was a shift in the Blackfeet Indians' attitude toward end-of-life discussion from reluctance to at ease. Recommendations specific to the Blackfeet-related entities are presented.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Índios Norte-Americanos/psicologia , Assistência Terminal/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Competência Cultural , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Cuidados Paliativos na Terminalidade da Vida/psicologia , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Percepção , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Tabu , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
9.
MCN Am J Matern Child Nurs ; 44(1): 13-19, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30444741

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To describe the bereavement support needs of black urban women in late adolescence after perinatal loss. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Eight black women aged 18 to 21 years who had experienced recent perinatal loss were interviewed in person or by telephone at three points in the 12 weeks that followed their loss to describe their perinatal bereavement experience and support needs. Data from the interviews were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. RESULTS: Black adolescent women need culturally appropriate bereavement support targeted at key transition points along the bereavement trajectory. They need accurate information, compassionate and respectful communication, and support from their mothers, grandmothers, and other women from their community of faith who have experienced perinatal loss. They value mementos, such as photographs and footprints. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Nurses are well-positioned to be consistent caregivers and to provide clear, compassionate communication and anticipatory guidance to young black women experiencing perinatal loss. Attending to spiritual needs, harnessing family support, providing mementos, and encouraging reflection through journaling may help adolescent women find meaning and new perspectives on their bereavement experience.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Morte Perinatal , Adolescente , Afro-Americanos/etnologia , Luto , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Apoio Social , População Urbana , Adulto Jovem
10.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 29(6): 1326-1332, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30588963

RESUMO

We aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude of the Saudi population and students of health science colleges as well as healthcare workers in Riyadh city about organ donation (OD). Data of this study were collected from 648 Saudi residents of Riyadh city using interviewer-administered questionnaires and online surveys. The participants included 503 from the general population and 145 health science professionals. The subjects included 252 males and 396 females with mean age of 27.09 ± 9 years. Majority of the participants (60%) were aware of OD from media as the main source of information, while only 30% had knowledge about Saudi center for organ transplantation (SCOT). It was found that 47.7% of the population agreed to donate both organs and tissue and 26% of them accepted the idea of OD to please Allah. The most important barrier (13%) was the belief that their bodies should be kept intact after death followed by ignorance about OD. Among health science professionals, 63% thought that everyone should be automatically registered as an organ donor while 15% believed that the donated organs could be misused. The majority of Riyadh's population knew the concept and procedure of OD; however, there was a lack of awareness of the presence of SCOT. Religion is not a barrier for OD in the Saudi population. Awareness programs are urgently needed to emphasize the importance of donation as well as clarification of wrong beliefs.


Assuntos
Árabes/psicologia , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde/etnologia , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Transplante de Órgãos/psicologia , Doadores de Tecidos/psicologia , Obtenção de Tecidos e Órgãos , População Urbana , Acesso à Informação , Adolescente , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Educação em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Transplante de Órgãos/efeitos adversos , Transplante de Órgãos/métodos , Religião e Medicina , Arábia Saudita , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
11.
Hastings Cent Rep ; 48 Suppl 4: S60-S62, 2018 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30584861

RESUMO

Constantin Reliu had been working for twenty years as a cook in Turkey when he returned to his hometown of Barlad, Romania, to discover that, there, he was dead. His former wife had, unbeknownst to him, at some point during his stay in Turkey registered him as deceased in Romania. He has since been living a legal nightmare trying to prove to Romanian authorities that he is, in fact, alive. Reliu is not alone in finding out that the legal system is not as attuned to physiological activity or biological assessment by doctors in determining death as one might think. If one starts with the assumption that death is a purely biological concept, solely the province of doctors, Reliu's story seems entirely unrelated to the concept of death in the medical context. A brain scan would not lead to a reversal of his being assessed as dead. The story is a reminder, however, that how death is used is not just biological, and therefore that the standard of death even in the clinic must answer to cultural considerations. Values, the law, and custom matter a great deal in determining who is alive and who is not, whether in the courtroom, the coroner's office, or the clinic.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Morte , Política Pública/legislação & jurisprudência , Percepção Social , Temas Bioéticos/legislação & jurisprudência , Cultura , Humanos , Legislação Médica/ética , Romênia
12.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 29(5): 1028-1034, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30381497

RESUMO

This study aimed to evaluate the awareness of organ transplantation and willingness to donate among Saudi Health Colleges students and the impact of gender, year of study, and field of specialization on this. This is a cross-sectional survey-based study. The survey was distributed to all the students attending the annual national conference of Saudi Health Colleges students held in 2018. The survey had two parts. The first part collected the information about gender, university, college of specialization, and year of study. The second part asked 10 questions, seven of which were about the types, causes, treatment of organ failure (awareness questions), and three of which were about their willingness to donate (altruism questions). The participants had three response options: "Yes", "No" and "I don't know. Descriptive statistics (mean, standard) and the frequencies were generated for each parameter. Categorical data were compared using Chi-square and continuous data using an independent t-test or paired t-test. A total of 821 respondents completed the questionnaire; 58.1% were female, 41.3% studying medicine, 25.1% applied medical sciences, 12.7% pharmacy, 9.6% dentistry, and 4.5% nursing 4.5%. The overall awareness of the correct responses constituted 60.4% while 12.3 % gave incorrect responses and 27.3% did not know what the answers were. The highest awareness score was about the concept of brain death (86.4%). The overall awareness score was significantly higher than the altruism score (62.7% and 45.7% respectively (P = 0.0001). Female respondents proved more aware than the male respondents in all the questions did. However, the differences reached the significant levels in four of the ten questions. If we split and summate the responses into "awareness" questions and "altruism" questions, we find that, although female students score higher in both categories, this reaches the significant level for the altruism score (59.90% vs. 45.60% (P = 0.0001). Final year students were significantly more aware than the freshmen in seven of the 10 questions posed with the biggest gap seen in the awareness that Islamic Sharia permits donating organs after death (82.3% vs. 49.6% (P = 0.0001). When we compare of responses by the college, we find that significant differences between the College of Medicine students and applied medical sciences in two questions with the former having a higher awareness score. The overall awareness score was significantly higher than the altruism score (62.7% and 45.7% respectively). Female students have higher altruistic score than male students. The scores are significantly higher in the senior students than in the junior ones.


Assuntos
Altruísmo , Árabes/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Especialização , Estudantes de Ciências da Saúde/psicologia , Doadores de Tecidos/psicologia , Obtenção de Tecidos e Órgãos , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Doações , Humanos , Masculino , Religião e Medicina , Arábia Saudita , Fatores Sexuais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Doadores de Tecidos/provisão & distribução
13.
Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl ; 29(5): 1115-1127, 2018.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30381508

RESUMO

A positive attitude to organ donation among doctors is key to increasing organ donation. Education of medical students is suggested to be central to achieving this. This study examined whether knowledge of organ donation and transplantation (ODT) correlates with attitudes and beliefs relevant to ODT among medical students in Saudi Arabia. Two hundred and thirty-three students completed a self-administered questionnaire. A knowledge score was calculated for each student and correlated with answers on attitudes and beliefs with regard to ODT. This study revealed a complex interaction between knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs to ODT. The majority of students support ODT in general, but a significant proportion have negative beliefs when asked about specific details of the process and concern for family members with regard to both deceased and live donation is evident. Despite almost all students believing that Islamic beliefs do not preclude ODT, 27.1% believe transplantation to be unacceptable in the Society in which they live. Education is an important strategy to improve donation rates. These findings can guide development of medical student education programs suggesting inclusion of open debate about views in society and the importance of discussion with family members to be essential.


Assuntos
Árabes/psicologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Doadores de Tecidos/psicologia , Obtenção de Tecidos e Órgãos , Adolescente , Adulto , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Religião e Medicina , Arábia Saudita , Doadores de Tecidos/provisão & distribução , Adulto Jovem
14.
Res Aging ; 40(10): 956-977, 2018 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30296918

RESUMO

Research suggests that religion plays a critical role in individuals' attitudes toward death in later life. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether a previously unexamined aspect of religion-secure attachment to God-is associated with death anxiety among U.S. older adults and whether this association varies across race. Using longitudinal data from a representative sample of adults aged 65 and older ( N = 936), the analyses reveal that secure attachment to God is associated with a decrease in death anxiety over time. Furthermore, the negative association between secure attachment to God and change in death anxiety is greater for older Blacks than their White counterparts. These results indicate that religion serves a protective function against death anxiety in later life. Moreover, religion provides greater psychological benefits for older Blacks than older Whites, reinforcing a long-standing claim that religion is particularly valuable for individuals from marginalized backgrounds.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Idoso/psicologia , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/psicologia , Religião e Psicologia , Cristianismo , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Estados Unidos
15.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 20(1): 36-44, 2018 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30063612

RESUMO

Dying is a deeply personal process. The personal values, goals, and experiences of a lifetime come to the forefront during the end of life and may be shaped to some degree by the religious and cultural identity of the patient and family. When patients are part of a faith-based, religious, or cultural minority group, it can be particularly challenging for the clinical care team to gain the understanding and insights needed to reconcile disparities between majority and minority values. This article uses a case study to illustrate and review ethical issues, which frequently occur and can be anticipated in the end-of-life care of patients who identify themselves as Orthodox Jews. Although the specifics are unique to this faith-based minority group, the process of identifying, educating, and developing a means to incorporate faith-based and cultural minority beliefs and values in the provision of care can be applied to other such minority groups that the clinical team may encounter in their work.


Assuntos
Ética em Enfermagem , Judaísmo/psicologia , Assistência Terminal/ética , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Espiritualismo/psicologia , Assistência Terminal/métodos
16.
Cult. cuid ; 22(51): 88-95, mayo-ago. 2018.
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-175670

RESUMO

El rito funerario tiene un claro componente terapéutico para las personas que lo realizan, pero cuando la muerte es anunciada, la persona que va a morir puede realizar lo que he dado en llamar un "rito funerario inverso". En ese rito se produciría una doble acción terapéutica: Primera para sus seres queridos ayudándoles a superar su pérdida y segunda para el propio individuo al poder enfrentarse a su propia muerte. Cuál puede ser el posible origen de este rito y la influencia de la cultura y los valores personales y comunitarios en él


The funeral rite has a clear therapeutic component for the people who perform it, but when death is announced, the person who is going to die can perform what I have called a "reverse funeral rite." In this rite would produce a double therapeutic action: First for their loved ones helping them to overcome their loss and second for the individual himself to be able to face his own death. What may be the possible origin of this rite and the influence of culture and personal and community values on it


O rito funeral tem um componente terapêutico claro para as pessoas que fazem isso, mas quando a morte é anunciada, a pessoa que vai morrer pode fazer o que tenho chamado de "reverse rito funeral." Neste rito iria ocorrer uma acção terapêutica dupla: em primeiro lugar para os seus entes queridos ajudá-los a superar sua perda e segunda para o indivíduo a ser capaz de enfrentar sua própria morte em si. O que pode ser a possível origem deste rito ea influência da cultura e dos valores pessoais e comunitários na mesma


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto Jovem , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Rituais Fúnebres , Práticas Mortuárias/métodos , Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Características Culturais
17.
BMC Geriatr ; 18(1): 114, 2018 05 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29751741

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pre-death grief (PDG) is a key challenge faced by caregivers of persons with dementia (PWD). Marwit-Meuser Caregiver Grief Inventory (MM-CGI) and its abbreviated MM-CGI-Short-Form (MM-CGI-SF) are among the few empirically-developed scales that detect PDG. However, they have not had a Mandarin-Chinese version even though Chinese-speaking populations have among the largest number of PWD. We produced a Mandarin-Chinese version of MM-CGI and evaluated whether it had equivalent scores and similar psychometric properties to the English version. METHODS: We produced the Chinese MM-CGI through the methods of forward-backward translation and cognitive debriefing. Then, we recruited family caregivers of PWD (n = 394) to complete either the Chinese (n = 103) or English (n = 291) version. The two versions were compared in their score-difference (adjusting for potential confounders using multiple linear regression), internal-consistency reliability (using Cronbach's α) and test-retest reliability (using intraclass correlation-coefficient), known-group validity (based on the relationship with the PWD and stage of dementia) and construct validity (using Spearman's correlation-coefficient). RESULTS: The two versions showed similar mean scores, with the adjusted score-difference of 1.2 (90% CI -5.6 to 7.9) for MM-CGI and - 0.4 (90% CI -2.9 to 2.1) for MM-CGI-SF. The 90% CI for adjusted score-difference fell within predefined equivalence-margin (±8 for MM-CGI and ± 3 for MM-CGI-SF) and indicated equivalence of the scores. The two versions also demonstrated similar characteristics in reliability and validity. CONCLUSIONS: The Chinese MM-CGI opens the way for PDG assessment and intervention among Chinese-speaking caregivers. Establishing its measurement equivalence with the English version paves the way for cross-cultural research on PDG in dementia caregiving.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Cuidadores/psicologia , Demência/etnologia , Demência/psicologia , Pesar , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Adulto , Idoso , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/etnologia , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/psicologia , China/etnologia , Comparação Transcultural , Morte , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Psicometria , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Tradução
18.
J Transcult Nurs ; 29(6): 563-569, 2018 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29606033

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: To date, death acceptance is not well investigated in the Vietnamese population. Cultural influences may affect death acceptance. The purpose of this phenomenological study is to describe Vietnamese cancer patients' lived experience with death acceptance. METHOD: Eleven Vietnamese patients with various cancer diagnoses participated in the study. Data were analyzed using the Giorgian method of data analysis. RESULTS: Themes of death acceptance found were (1) accepting destiny, (2) knowing and sacrificing the self, (3) believing in living persons and handing over responsibilities, (4) accepting death while continuing to fight for life, and (5) looking for a "role model death." DISCUSSION: Death acceptance is a contextually bound concept, which needs further investigation. To help patients with their death acceptance, nurses should include spiritual support and the involvement of loved ones in patients' care plans.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Neoplasias/etnologia , Neoplasias/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Entrevistas como Assunto/métodos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Neoplasias/mortalidade , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Vietnã/etnologia
19.
Nurs Health Sci ; 20(3): 380-386, 2018 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29520976

RESUMO

The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and attitudes of students of health sciences faculties (medicine, nursing, and physiotherapy) regarding specific issues related to death and end of life in both professional and personal realms. A descriptive, cross-sectional, and multi-center approach was used. The modified Bugen Scale for facing death was used. The study population (411 students) encompassed three distinct groups: students from the degrees of medicine, nursing, and physiotherapy. In total, 12 items showed significant differences between the three groups. The sample presented a moderate level of perceived competency in the ability to face death. We found significant differences in the scores obtained by the three groups regarding their ability to face the death of people who are emotionally close. Furthermore, the sample demonstrated a good level of self-efficacy when facing death, with nursing students displaying the greatest emotional involvement when compared to their colleagues studying medicine and physiotherapy. It is therefore recommended that study curricula of future health professionals contain specific training in end-of-life care.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Estudos Transversais , Currículo/normas , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Hispano-Americanos/educação , Humanos , Masculino , Cuidados Paliativos/psicologia , Cuidados Paliativos/normas , Percepção , Modalidades de Fisioterapia/psicologia , Psicometria/instrumentação , Psicometria/métodos , Estatísticas não Paramétricas , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Estudantes de Enfermagem/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Ann Palliat Med ; 7(Suppl 1): AB008, 2018 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29402102

RESUMO

What does it take to light a fire to create cultural change about the way we do death, dying and bereavement in Australia? The GroundSwell Project set out to embark on a bold journey to create cultural change in the death and dying space in Australia. For 7 years we have delivered over 55 arts/health projects and have punched well above our weight. What have we learned about change and innovation? We've learned that we had to set up a fiercely independent organisation, drawing on short term funding so that we were never locked into delivering results that perpetuated 'systemic malaise'. We grew a network of activators across Health and Palliative care, community as well as other non-health related workplaces. We sought to find the right people, likening them to 'positive outliers' and engaged their head, heart and hands so they may influence others for a ripple effect. We work well with power or rank, a critical skill when leaning into complex social change. We've learned that we must engage leaders not just in health but ALL sectors, institutions, all walks of life...why not make it possible for any change to be truly 'social'? In this presentation, you will glean highlights from a range of our innovations and our approach to leadership, social research and collaboration. You'll have pause to reflect on how in your current role in the health system, you too can create change, by drawing on non-health specific discourse, using a stronger social lens. Wanting to engage all walks of life to improve public health is one thing, doing it and maintaining momentum is another! Join Jessie from the GroundSwell Project, Australia to learn about what they have gleaned from 7 years of being just a little too ahead of their time.


Assuntos
Atitude Frente a Morte/etnologia , Luto , Liderança , Administração em Saúde Pública/métodos , Mudança Social , Austrália , Humanos
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