Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 1.930
Filtrar
1.
Nutr Metab Cardiovasc Dis ; 31(2): 650-657, 2021 02 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33594987

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Continuous glucose monitoring improves glycemic control in diabetes. This study compared the accuracy of the Dexcom G5 Mobile (Dexcom, San Diego, CA) transcutaneous sensor (DG5) and the first version of Eversense (Senseonics,Inc., Germantown, MD) implantable sensor (EVS). METHODS AND RESULTS: Subjects with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and using EVS wore simultaneously DG5 for seven days. At day 3, patients were admitted to a clinical research center (CRC) to receive breakfast with delayed and increased insulin bolus to induce glucose excursions. At CRC, venous glucose was monitored every 15 min (or 5 min during hypoglycemia) for 6 h by YSI 2300 STAT PLUS™ glucose and lactate analyzer. At home patients were requested to perform 4 fingerstick glucose measurements per day. Eleven patients (9 males, age 47.4 ± 11.3 years, M±SD) were enrolled. During home-stay the median [25th-75th percentile] absolute relative difference (ARD) over all CGM-fingerstick matched-pairs was 11.64% [5.38-20.65]% for the DG5 and 10.75% [5.15-19.74]% for the EVS (p-value = 0.58). At CRC, considering all the CGM-YSI matched-pairs, the DG5 showed overall smaller median ARD than EVS, 7.91% [4.14-14.30]% vs 11.4% [5.04-18.54]% (p-value<0.001). Considering accuracy during blood glucose swings, DG5 performed better than EVS when glucose rate-of-change was -0.5 to -1.5 mg/dL/min, with median ARD of 7.34% [3.71-12.76]% vs 13.59% [4.53-20.78]% (p-value<0.001), and for rate-of-change < -1.5 mg/dl/min, with median ARD of 5.23% [2.09-15.29]% vs 12.73% [4.14-20.82]% (p-value = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: DG5 was more accurate than EVS at CRC, especially when glucose decreased. No differences were found at home.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Glicemia/metabolismo , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/diagnóstico , Transdutores , Tecnologia sem Fio/instrumentação , Adulto , Biomarcadores/sangue , Glicemia/efeitos dos fármacos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/terapia , Desenho de Equipamento , Feminino , Humanos , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Insulina/uso terapêutico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Fatores de Tempo , Resultado do Tratamento
2.
Diabetes Care ; 44(4): 1055-1058, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33563655

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The use of remote real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in the hospital has rapidly emerged to preserve personal protective equipment and reduce potential exposures during coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We linked a hybrid CGM and point-of-care (POC) glucose testing protocol to a computerized decision support system for continuous insulin infusion and integrated a validation system for sensor glucose values into the electronic health record. We report our proof-of-concept experience in a COVID-19 intensive care unit. RESULTS: All nine patients required mechanical ventilation and corticosteroids. During the protocol, 75.7% of sensor values were within 20% of the reference POC glucose with an associated average reduction in POC of 63%. Mean time in range (70-180 mg/dL) was 71.4 ± 13.9%. Sensor accuracy was impacted by mechanical interferences in four patients. CONCLUSIONS: A hybrid protocol integrating real-time CGM and POC is helpful for managing critically ill patients with COVID-19 requiring insulin infusion.


Assuntos
Glicemia/análise , Estado Terminal/terapia , Complicações do Diabetes , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Tecnologia de Sensoriamento Remoto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Algoritmos , Glicemia/metabolismo , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , /complicações , Complicações do Diabetes/sangue , Complicações do Diabetes/tratamento farmacológico , Equipamentos e Provisões , Feminino , Humanos , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sistemas Automatizados de Assistência Junto ao Leito , Estudo de Prova de Conceito , Tecnologia de Sensoriamento Remoto/instrumentação
3.
Lancet ; 397(10270): 208-219, 2021 01 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33453783

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Management of type 1 diabetes is challenging. We compared outcomes using a commercially available hybrid closed-loop system versus a new investigational system with features potentially useful for adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: In this multinational, randomised, crossover trial (Fuzzy Logic Automated Insulin Regulation [FLAIR]), individuals aged 14-29 years old, with a clinical diagnosis of type 1 diabetes with a duration of at least 1 year, using either an insulin pump or multiple daily insulin injections, and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels of 7·0-11·0% (53-97 mmol/mol) were recruited from seven academic-based endocrinology practices, four in the USA, and one each in Germany, Israel, and Slovenia. After a run-in period to teach participants how to use the study pump and continuous glucose monitor, participants were randomly assigned (1:1) using a computer-generated sequence, with a permuted block design (block sizes of two and four), stratified by baseline HbA1c and use of a personal MiniMed 670G system (Medtronic) at enrolment, to either use of a MiniMed 670G hybrid closed-loop system (670G) or the investigational advanced hybrid closed-loop system (Medtronic) for the first 12-week period, and then participants were crossed over with no washout period, to the other group for use for another 12 weeks. Masking was not possible due to the nature of the systems used. The coprimary outcomes, measured with continuous glucose monitoring, were proportion of time that glucose levels were above 180 mg/dL (>10·0 mmol/L) during 0600 h to 2359 h (ie, daytime), tested for superiority, and proportion of time that glucose levels were below 54 mg/dL (<3·0 mmol/L) calculated over a full 24-h period, tested for non-inferiority (non-inferiority margin 2%). Analysis was by intention to treat. Safety was assessed in all participants randomly assigned to treatment. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03040414, and is now complete. FINDINGS: Between June 3 and Aug 22, 2019, 113 individuals were enrolled into the trial. Mean age was 19 years (SD 4) and 70 (62%) of 113 participants were female. Mean proportion of time with daytime glucose levels above 180 mg/dL (>10·0 mmol/L) was 42% (SD 13) at baseline, 37% (9) during use of the 670G system, and 34% (9) during use of the advanced hybrid closed-loop system (mean difference [advanced hybrid closed-loop system minus 670G system] -3·00% [95% CI -3·97 to -2·04]; p<0·0001). Mean 24-h proportion of time with glucose levels below 54 mg/dL (<3·0 mmol/L) was 0·46% (SD 0·42) at baseline, 0·50% (0·35) during use of the 670G system, and 0·46% (0·33) during use of the advanced hybrid closed-loop system (mean difference [advanced hybrid closed-loop system minus 670G system] -0·06% [95% CI -0·11 to -0·02]; p<0·0001 for non-inferiority). One severe hypoglycaemic event occurred in the advanced hybrid closed-loop system group, determined to be unrelated to study treatment, and none occurred in the 670G group. INTERPRETATION: Hyperglycaemia was reduced without increasing hypoglycaemia in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes using the investigational advanced hybrid closed-loop system compared with the commercially available MiniMed 670G system. Testing an advanced hybrid closed-loop system in populations that are underserved due to socioeconomic factors and testing during pregnancy and in individuals with impaired awareness of hypoglycaemia would advance the effective use of this technology FUNDING: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/tratamento farmacológico , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina , Insulina/uso terapêutico , Adulto , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Hiperglicemia/prevenção & controle , Israel , Masculino , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
4.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 172: 108638, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33358969

RESUMO

Civil aviation pilots who develop insulin-treated diabetes and want to renew a Commercial Pilot License (CPL) represent a medical, social and regulatory problem. This depends on justified concerns about hypoglycemia, the most threatening event for people who carry out jobs requiring a high level of concentration and reliability. This negatively affects social and working aspects of pilots' lives, who have a high profile and a high-cost professional qualification. It could be possible now to revise this attitude thanks to the availability of Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) devices. CGM clearly showed to prevent hypoglycemic events in insulin-treated diabetic patients by allowing strict monitoring and trend prediction of glucose levels. By systematizing available data on such devices and present regulations in CPL issuance worldwide, our review can be used as handy tool for a fruitful discussion among the scientific community, national and international civil aviation regulators, stakeholders and pilots, aimed at evaluating the evidence-based opportunity to revise CPL issuance criteria for insulin-treated diabetic pilots. For the above-mentioned reasons, there are, among the regulatory administrations of Civil Aviation around the globe, several different approaches and limitations set for the subjects with insulin-treated diabetes who want to obtain, or renew, a CPL.


Assuntos
Aviação/normas , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Pilotos/normas , Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Participação dos Interessados
5.
Biosens Bioelectron ; 172: 112750, 2021 Jan 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33129072

RESUMO

Tremendous research and commercialization efforts around the world are focused on developing novel wearable electrochemical biosensors that can noninvasively and continuously screen for biochemical markers in body fluids for the prognosis, diagnosis and management of diseases, as well as the monitoring of fitness. Researchers in North America are leading the development of innovative wearable platforms that can comfortably comply to the human body and efficiently sample fluids such as sweat, interstitial fluids, tear and saliva for the electrochemical detection of biomarkers through various sensing approaches such as potentiometric ion selective electrodes and amperometric enzymatic sensors. We start this review with a historical timeline overviewing the major milestones in the development of wearable electrochemical sensors by North American institutions. We then describe how such research efforts have led to pioneering developments and are driving the advancement and commercialization of wearable electrochemical sensors: from minimally invasive continuous glucose monitors for chronic disease management to non-invasive sweat electrolyte sensors for dehydration monitoring in fitness applications. While many countries across the globe have contributed significantly to this rapidly emerging field, their contributions are beyond the scope of this review. Furthermore, we share our perspective on the promising future of wearable electrochemical sensors in applications spanning from remote and personalized healthcare to wellness.


Assuntos
Técnicas Biossensoriais/instrumentação , /diagnóstico , Dispositivos Eletrônicos Vestíveis , Biomarcadores/análise , Técnicas Biossensoriais/história , Técnicas Biossensoriais/tendências , Glicemia/análise , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Técnicas Eletroquímicas/história , Técnicas Eletroquímicas/instrumentação , Epiderme/química , Desenho de Equipamento/história , Líquido Extracelular/química , História do Século XXI , Humanos , América do Norte , Potenciometria/instrumentação , Saliva/química , Suor/química , Lágrimas/química , Dispositivos Eletrônicos Vestíveis/história , Dispositivos Eletrônicos Vestíveis/tendências
7.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(51): e23793, 2020 Dec 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33371150

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: To compare pregnancy outcomes between patients with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) with and without their own blood glucose meter.We conducted a retrospective-cohort study of 835 women with GDM at the Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, China from 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2018. Perinatal outcomes of these patients were monitored and collected in the Tianjin Maternal and Child Health System. Each patient was advised by a certified clinical nutritionist regarding dietary analysis and lifestyle recommendations. All pregnant women with GDM were divided into the following 2 groups according to whether they had their own blood glucose meter: women with self-measured blood glucose levels with a routine obstetric examination in the study group (n = 424); and those with non-self-measured blood glucose levels with a double obstetric examination in the control group (n = 411). Maternal and fetal pregnancy outcomes were compared between these 2 groups. According to different self-management modes, the women were also divided into eight subgroups to compare blood sugar control and compliance with recommended insulin therapy.The cesarean section rate was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (P < .05). The prevalence of large-for-gestational age (P < .05) and macrosomia was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (both P < .05). The prevalence of appropriate-for-gestational age was significantly higher in the study group than in the control group (P < .05). Birth weight was significantly lower in the study group than in the control group (P < .05). The mean times for blood sugar control and from the doctor recommendation for insulin treatment to the patient compliance in the study group were significantly shorter than those in the control group (both P < .05). The proportion of insulin required in the study group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P < .05). There were no significant differences in the time of controlling blood sugar and compliance among the 4 subgroups of the study group. However, subgroups with a dietary diary in the control group were better.Self-monitoring blood sugar plus a routine obstetric examination can help patients with GDM control blood sugar, even without dietary diaries and treadmills. In addition to increasing the number of obstetric examinations, recording dietary diaries is helpful for controlling blood sugar in patients with GDM who are unwilling to measure blood sugar by themselves.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Diabetes Gestacional/terapia , Resultado da Gravidez/psicologia , Adulto , Glicemia/análise , Automonitorização da Glicemia/psicologia , Automonitorização da Glicemia/normas , China , Estudos de Coortes , Diabetes Gestacional/sangue , Diabetes Gestacional/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Complicações na Gravidez/epidemiologia , Complicações na Gravidez/prevenção & controle , Estudos Retrospectivos
8.
PLoS One ; 15(12): e0243465, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33332410

RESUMO

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) improves treatment with lower blood glucose levels and less patient effort. In combination with continuous insulin application, glycemic control improves and hypoglycemic episodes should decrease. Direct feedback of CGM to continuous subcutaneous insulin application, using an algorithm is called a closed-loop (CL) artificial pancreas system. Commercial devices stop insulin application by predicting hypoglycemic blood glucose levels through direct interaction between the sensor and pump. The prediction is usually made for about 30 minutes and insulin delivery is restarted at the previous level if a rise in blood glucose is predicted within the next 30 minutes (hybrid closed loop system, HCL this is known as a predictive low glucose suspend system (PLGS)). In a fully CL system, sensor and pump communicate permanently with each other. Hybrid closed-loop (HCL) systems, which require the user to estimate the meal size and provide a meal insulin basis, are commercially available in Germany at the moment. These systems result in fewer hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic episodes with improved glucose control. Open source initiatives have provided support by building do-it-yourself CL (DIYCL) devices for automated insulin application since 2014, and are used by a tech-savvy subgroup of patients. The first commercial hybrid CL system has been available in Germany since September 2019. We surveyed 1054 patients to determine which devices are currently used, which features would be in demand by potential users, and the benefits of DIYCL systems. 9.7% of these used a DIYCL system, while 50% would most likely trust these systems but more than 85% of the patients would use a commercial closed loop system, if available. The DIYCL users had a better glucose control regarding their time in range (TIR) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c).


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Glicemia/análise , Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Diabetes Mellitus/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus/tratamento farmacológico , Feminino , Alemanha , Hemoglobina A Glicada/análise , Humanos , Hipoglicemiantes/uso terapêutico , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Insulina/uso terapêutico , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
9.
Acta Diabetol ; 57(12): 1511-1517, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33026497

RESUMO

AIMS: Billions of people have been under lockdown in an attempt to prevent COVID-19 spread. Lifestyle changes during lockdown could lead to deterioration of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes (T1D). We aimed to assess the impact of COVID-19 lockdown on the glycemic control of pediatric patients with T1D. METHODS: This observational real-life study from the AWeSoMe Group assessed continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) metrics of 102 T1D patients (52.9% males, mean age 11.2 ± 3.8 years, mean diabetes duration 4.2 ± 3.8 years) who used  Dexcom G5. The data were accessed without any interface between patients, caregivers, and the diabetes team. Study variables from CGM metrics were: mean glucose level, time-in-range (TIR, 70-180 mg/dL; 3.9-10 mmol/L), hypoglycemia (< 54 mg/dL; < 3 mmol/L), hyperglycemia (> 250 mg/dL; > 13.3 mmol/L), coefficient of variation (CV), and time CGM active before and during lockdown. Delta-variable = lockdown variable minus before-lockdown variable. RESULTS: The mean TIR was 60.9 ± 14.3% before lockdown, with no significant change during lockdown (delta-TIR was 0.9 ± 7.9%). TIR during lockdown was significantly correlated with TIR before lockdown (r = 0.855, P < 0.001). Patients with improved TIR (delta-TIR > 3%) were significantly older than patients with stable or worse TIR (P = 0.028). Children aged < 10 years had a significantly higher CV before lockdown and during lockdown than children aged ≥ 10 years (P = 0.02 and P = 0.005, respectively). Among children aged < 10 years, a multiple linear regression model revealed associations of age and lower socioeconomic cluster with delta-TIR (F = 4.416, P = 0.019) and with delta-mean glucose (F = 4.459, P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: CGM metrics in pediatric patients with T1D were relatively stable during a nationwide lockdown. Intervention plans should focus on younger patients with lower socioeconomic position.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Glicemia/análise , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/metabolismo , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Glicemia/metabolismo , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Criança , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/diagnóstico , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pandemias
10.
J Diabetes Sci Technol ; 14(6): 1065-1073, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33063556

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Amidst the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has emerged as an alternative for inpatient point-of-care blood glucose (POC-BG) monitoring. We performed a feasibility pilot study using CGM in critically ill patients with COVID-19 in the intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: Single-center, retrospective study of glucose monitoring in critically ill patients with COVID-19 on insulin therapy using Medtronic Guardian Connect and Dexcom G6 CGM systems. Primary outcomes were feasibility and accuracy for trending POC-BG. Secondary outcomes included reliability and nurse acceptance. Sensor glucose (SG) was used for trends between POC-BG with nursing guidance to reduce POC-BG frequency from one to two hours to four hours when the SG was in the target range. Mean absolute relative difference (MARD), Clarke error grids analysis (EGA), and Bland-Altman (B&A) plots were calculated for accuracy of paired SG and POC-BG measurements. RESULTS: CGM devices were placed on 11 patients: Medtronic (n = 6) and Dexcom G6 (n = 5). Both systems were feasible and reliable with good nurse acceptance. To determine accuracy, 437 paired SG and POC-BG readings were analyzed. For Medtronic, the MARD was 13.1% with 100% of readings in zones A and B on Clarke EGA. For Dexcom, MARD was 11.1% with 98% of readings in zones A and B. B&A plots had a mean bias of -17.76 mg/dL (Medtronic) and -1.94 mg/dL (Dexcom), with wide 95% limits of agreement. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, CGM is feasible in critically ill patients and has acceptable accuracy to identify trends and guide intermittent blood glucose monitoring with insulin therapy.


Assuntos
Glicemia/análise , Infecções por Coronavirus/sangue , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Estado Terminal/terapia , Monitorização Fisiológica/instrumentação , Pneumonia Viral/sangue , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Adulto , Idoso , Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Glicemia/metabolismo , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Estado Terminal/epidemiologia , Estado Terminal/mortalidade , Diabetes Mellitus/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnóstico , Diabetes Mellitus/mortalidade , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Estudos de Viabilidade , Feminino , Humanos , Hiperglicemia/sangue , Hiperglicemia/diagnóstico , Hiperglicemia/mortalidade , Hiperglicemia/terapia , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Monitorização Fisiológica/métodos , Pandemias , Projetos Piloto , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Sistemas Automatizados de Assistência Junto ao Leito , Prognóstico , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Estudos Retrospectivos
11.
Nutr. hosp ; 37(5): 909-917, sept.-oct. 2020. tab, graf, ilus, mapas
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-198005

RESUMO

INTRODUCCIÓN Y OBJETIVOS: la hipoglucemia neonatal sigue ofreciendo múltiples controversias. El objetivo del estudio es presentar la situación actual en torno a la forma de detección de la hipoglucemia neonatal y conocer el glucómetro portátil más utilizado en las unidades neonatales españolas en la actualidad. MÉTODOS: se elaboró un cuestionario "online" sobre el uso de glucómetros en neonatos y los dispositivos más utilizados, que fue enviado a los integrantes de la Sociedad Española de Neonatología. Participaron 75 centros. RESULTADOS: los glucómetros portátiles siguen teniendo un uso generalizado en la población neonatal. Más del 75 % de las unidades realizan un despistaje de la hipoglucemia neonatal en circunstancias clínicas concretas; el 13 % de los centros lo continúan realizando a todos los recién nacidos en las unidades neonatales. A mayor nivel asistencial, mayor es el porcentaje de detección de la hipoglucemia por otros sistemas de análisis (como gasometrías capilares): chi2, p = 0,019. Se usan múltiples modelos de glucómetro actualmente, encontrándose diferencias según el nivel asistencial (chi2, p = 0,01), siendo los modelos de la firma Nova Biomedical, Abbott y Roche Diagnostics los más usados. CONCLUSIONES: se observa que existen diferencias en la realización del despistaje de la hipoglucemia neonatal, por lo que es de gran importancia consensuar los procedimientos y acotar la población neonatal de mayor riesgo, para disminuir la variabilidad en la práctica clínica y mejorar la calidad de la asistencia neonatal


INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE: neonatal hypoglycemia persistently offers multiple diagnostic controversies. This study aims to present the current situation regarding neonatal hypoglycaemia detection, and to gain insight into the most widely used portable glucometers in neonatal units today. METHODS: an online questionnaire was prepared and sent to the members of the Spanish Society of Neonatology; a total of 75 hospitals participated. RESULTS: portable glucometers continue to be widely used in the neonatal population. More than 75 % of units perform neonatal hypoglycemia screening in specific clinical circumstances, and 13 % of units continue to perform protocolized screening on all newborns at neonatal units. The higher the level of care, the higher the percentage of hypoglycaemia detection by other tests (such as blood gas analysis): chi2, p = 0.019. Multiple models of portable glucometers are currently used, with differences according to level of care (chi2, p = 0.01). Nova Biomedical, Abbott, and Roche Diagnostics models are most commonly used. CONCLUSIONS: differences in the performance of neonatal hypoglycaemia screening are observed, so standardised procedures and limiting the neonatal population at risk are important to reduce variability in clinical practice, and to improve the quality of neonatal care


Assuntos
Humanos , Hipoglicemia/diagnóstico , Hipoglicemia/epidemiologia , Serviços de Saúde da Criança/estatística & dados numéricos , Glicemia/análise , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Doenças do Recém-Nascido/epidemiologia , Espanha/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Sociedades Médicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais
12.
Nat Med ; 26(9): 1380-1384, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32908282

RESUMO

Despite the increasing adoption of insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring devices, most people with type 1 diabetes do not achieve their glycemic goals1. This could be related to a lack of expertise or inadequate time for clinicians to analyze complex sensor-augmented pump data. We tested whether frequent insulin dose adjustments guided by an automated artificial intelligence-based decision support system (AI-DSS) is as effective and safe as those guided by physicians in controlling glucose levels. ADVICE4U was a six-month, multicenter, multinational, parallel, randomized controlled, non-inferiority trial in 108 participants with type 1 diabetes, aged 10-21 years and using insulin pump therapy (ClinicalTrials.gov no. NCT03003806). Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive remote insulin dose adjustment every three weeks guided by either an AI-DSS, (AI-DSS arm, n = 54) or by physicians (physician arm, n = 54). The results for the primary efficacy measure-the percentage of time spent within the target glucose range (70-180 mg dl-1 (3.9-10.0 mmol l-1))-in the AI-DSS arm were statistically non-inferior to those in the physician arm (50.2 ± 11.1% versus 51.6 ± 11.3%, respectively, P < 1 × 10-7). The percentage of readings below 54 mg dl-1 (<3.0 mmol l-1) within the AI-DSS arm was statistically non-inferior to that in the physician arm (1.3 ± 1.4% versus 1.0 ± 0.9%, respectively, P < 0.0001). Three severe adverse events related to diabetes (two severe hypoglycemia, one diabetic ketoacidosis) were reported in the physician arm and none in the AI-DSS arm. In conclusion, use of an automated decision support tool for optimizing insulin pump settings was non-inferior to intensive insulin titration provided by physicians from specialized academic diabetes centers.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Glicemia/análise , Sistemas de Apoio a Decisões Clínicas/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/tratamento farmacológico , Insulina/uso terapêutico , Adolescente , Inteligência Artificial , Criança , Humanos , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
13.
J Diabetes Sci Technol ; 14(6): 1035-1064, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32985262

RESUMO

This article is the work product of the Continuous Glucose Monitor and Automated Insulin Dosing Systems in the Hospital Consensus Guideline Panel, which was organized by Diabetes Technology Society and met virtually on April 23, 2020. The guideline panel consisted of 24 international experts in the use of continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) and automated insulin dosing (AID) systems representing adult endocrinology, pediatric endocrinology, obstetrics and gynecology, advanced practice nursing, diabetes care and education, clinical chemistry, bioengineering, and product liability law. The panelists reviewed the medical literature pertaining to five topics: (1) continuation of home CGMs after hospitalization, (2) initiation of CGMs in the hospital, (3) continuation of AID systems in the hospital, (4) logistics and hands-on care of hospitalized patients using CGMs and AID systems, and (5) data management of CGMs and AID systems in the hospital. The panelists then developed three types of recommendations for each topic, including clinical practice (to use the technology optimally), research (to improve the safety and effectiveness of the technology), and hospital policies (to build an environment for facilitating use of these devices) for each of the five topics. The panelists voted on 78 proposed recommendations. Based on the panel vote, 77 recommendations were classified as either strong or mild. One recommendation failed to reach consensus. Additional research is needed on CGMs and AID systems in the hospital setting regarding device accuracy, practices for deployment, data management, and achievable outcomes. This guideline is intended to support these technologies for the management of hospitalized patients with diabetes.


Assuntos
Glicemia/análise , Equipamentos e Provisões , Hospitalização , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Monitorização Fisiológica/instrumentação , Adulto , Glicemia/efeitos dos fármacos , Glicemia/metabolismo , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Automonitorização da Glicemia/normas , Criança , Consenso , Infecções por Coronavirus/sangue , Infecções por Coronavirus/complicações , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Complicações do Diabetes/sangue , Complicações do Diabetes/epidemiologia , Complicações do Diabetes/terapia , Diabetes Mellitus/sangue , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Cálculos da Dosagem de Medicamento , Equipamentos e Provisões/normas , Feminino , Hospitais/normas , Humanos , Sistemas de Infusão de Insulina/normas , Monitorização Fisiológica/métodos , Monitorização Fisiológica/normas , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/sangue , Pneumonia Viral/complicações , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Gravidez
14.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 168: 108379, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32853692
15.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 168: 108393, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32858098

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Jordan implemented abrupt and extreme lockdown measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19. This study aims to evaluate the effect of these measures on paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes in terms of acute metabolic complications and shortages in insulin and glucose measuring supplies. It also evaluates the caregivers' perceptions of the use of telemedicine during the lockdown. METHODS: This is a questionnaire-based cross-sectional study. It was completed using Google forms and patients/caregivers were asked to consent if they agreed to answer. RESULTS: 235 patients/families participated in the study. The mean age of the patients was 10.8 years ± 3.9 years (N = 229). Twenty-four children (10.2%) needed to visit the emergency department during the lockdown period which lasted for 10 weeks. Of these, eight (3.4%) were hospitalized due to acute metabolic complications. Families (58.3%) faced insulin shortages and 14% had to ration insulin, i.e., decrease the dose, during the lockdown. Glucose monitoring strips were rationed by 43.4% of families leading to more frequent low/high glucose readings in 75.5% of children of these families. Telemedicine using phones and social media applications was utilized for communication with healthcare professionals and continuing medical care. Most of the participants (85.5%) described it as a smooth and positive experience. CONCLUSIONS: The extreme lockdown due to COVID-19 pandemic caused insulin and glucose measuring equipment shortages in children with diabetes in Jordan. However, the use of telemedicine for providing guidance and support was perceived positively by the families.


Assuntos
Cuidado da Criança , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Países em Desenvolvimento , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/terapia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Quarentena , Telemedicina , Adolescente , Betacoronavirus , Glicemia/metabolismo , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Cuidadores/psicologia , Criança , Cuidado da Criança/métodos , Pré-Escolar , Estudos Transversais , Países em Desenvolvimento/estatística & dados numéricos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/sangue , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Lactente , Insulina/administração & dosagem , Jordânia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pandemias , Pais/psicologia , Percepção , Quarentena/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telemedicina/instrumentação , Telemedicina/organização & administração , Telemedicina/normas , Adulto Jovem
17.
JAMA ; 323(23): 2397-2406, 2020 06 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32543682

RESUMO

Importance: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) provides real-time assessment of glucose levels and may be beneficial in reducing hypoglycemia in older adults with type 1 diabetes. Objective: To determine whether CGM is effective in reducing hypoglycemia compared with standard blood glucose monitoring (BGM) in older adults with type 1 diabetes. Design, Setting, and Participants: Randomized clinical trial conducted at 22 endocrinology practices in the United States among 203 adults at least 60 years of age with type 1 diabetes. Interventions: Participants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to use CGM (n = 103) or standard BGM (n = 100). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was CGM-measured percentage of time that sensor glucose values were less than 70 mg/dL during 6 months of follow-up. There were 31 prespecified secondary outcomes, including additional CGM metrics for hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, and glucose control; hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c); and cognition and patient-reported outcomes, with adjustment for multiple comparisons to control for false-discovery rate. Results: Of the 203 participants (median age, 68 [interquartile range {IQR}, 65-71] years; median type 1 diabetes duration, 36 [IQR, 25-48] years; 52% female; 53% insulin pump use; mean HbA1c, 7.5% [SD, 0.9%]), 83% used CGM at least 6 days per week during month 6. Median time with glucose levels less than 70 mg/dL was 5.1% (73 minutes per day) at baseline and 2.7% (39 minutes per day) during follow-up in the CGM group vs 4.7% (68 minutes per day) and 4.9% (70 minutes per day), respectively, in the standard BGM group (adjusted treatment difference, -1.9% (-27 minutes per day); 95% CI, -2.8% to -1.1% [-40 to -16 minutes per day]; P <.001). Of the 31 prespecified secondary end points, there were statistically significant differences for all 9 CGM metrics, 6 of 7 HbA1c outcomes, and none of the 15 cognitive and patient-reported outcomes. Mean HbA1c decreased in the CGM group compared with the standard BGM group (adjusted group difference, -0.3%; 95% CI, -0.4% to -0.1%; P <.001). The most commonly reported adverse events using CGM and standard BGM, respectively, were severe hypoglycemia (1 and 10), fractures (5 and 1), falls (4 and 3), and emergency department visits (6 and 8). Conclusions and Relevance: Among adults aged 60 years or older with type 1 diabetes, continuous glucose monitoring compared with standard blood glucose monitoring resulted in a small but statistically significant improvement in hypoglycemia over 6 months. Further research is needed to understand the long-term clinical benefit. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03240432.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Glicemia/análise , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/sangue , Hemoglobina A Glicada/análise , Hipoglicemia/prevenção & controle , Idoso , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/tratamento farmacológico , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Hiperglicemia/diagnóstico , Hipoglicemia/induzido quimicamente , Hipoglicemia/diagnóstico , Hipoglicemiantes/administração & dosagem , Hipoglicemiantes/efeitos adversos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Monitorização Ambulatorial/instrumentação , Medidas de Resultados Relatados pelo Paciente
18.
JAMA ; 323(23): 2388-2396, 2020 06 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32543683

RESUMO

Importance: Adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes exhibit the worst glycemic control among individuals with type 1 diabetes across the lifespan. Although continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has been shown to improve glycemic control in adults, its benefit in adolescents and young adults has not been demonstrated. Objective: To determine the effect of CGM on glycemic control in adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes. Design, Setting, and Participants: Randomized clinical trial conducted between January 2018 and May 2019 at 14 endocrinology practices in the US including 153 individuals aged 14 to 24 years with type 1 diabetes and screening hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of 7.5% to 10.9%. Interventions: Participants were randomized 1:1 to undergo CGM (CGM group; n = 74) or usual care using a blood glucose meter for glucose monitoring (blood glucose monitoring [BGM] group; n = 79). Main Outcomes and Measures: The primary outcome was change in HbA1c from baseline to 26 weeks. There were 20 secondary outcomes, including additional HbA1c outcomes, CGM glucose metrics, and patient-reported outcomes with adjustment for multiple comparisons to control for the false discovery rate. Results: Among the 153 participants (mean [SD] age, 17 [3] years; 76 [50%] were female; mean [SD] diabetes duration, 9 [5] years), 142 (93%) completed the study. In the CGM group, 68% of participants used CGM at least 5 days per week in month 6. Mean HbA1c was 8.9% at baseline and 8.5% at 26 weeks in the CGM group and 8.9% at both baseline and 26 weeks in the BGM group (adjusted between-group difference, -0.37% [95% CI, -0.66% to -0.08%]; P = .01). Of 20 prespecified secondary outcomes, there were statistically significant differences in 3 of 7 binary HbA1c outcomes, 8 of 9 CGM metrics, and 1 of 4 patient-reported outcomes. The most commonly reported adverse events in the CGM and BGM groups were severe hypoglycemia (3 participants with an event in the CGM group and 2 in the BGM group), hyperglycemia/ketosis (1 participant with an event in CGM group and 4 in the BGM group), and diabetic ketoacidosis (3 participants with an event in the CGM group and 1 in the BGM group). Conclusions and Relevance: Among adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes, continuous glucose monitoring compared with standard blood glucose monitoring resulted in a small but statistically significant improvement in glycemic control over 26 weeks. Further research is needed to understand the clinical importance of the findings. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03263494.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/sangue , Hemoglobina A Glicada/análise , Hipoglicemiantes/administração & dosagem , Adolescente , Glicemia/análise , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 1/tratamento farmacológico , Cetoacidose Diabética , Feminino , Humanos , Hiperglicemia/diagnóstico , Hiperglicemia/prevenção & controle , Hipoglicemia/induzido quimicamente , Hipoglicemia/diagnóstico , Hipoglicemia/prevenção & controle , Hipoglicemiantes/efeitos adversos , Masculino , Aplicativos Móveis , Monitorização Ambulatorial/instrumentação , Adulto Jovem
19.
Rev Med Suisse ; 16(694): 1022-1025, 2020 May 20.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32432418

RESUMO

New technologic devices are presented: insulin pumps and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices as well as morphine pumps to help general practitioners to deal different intensive situations. Insulin pumps and CGM devices are revolutionary for the management of diabetes. However, their use requires strong patient involvement, the opposite of automated diabetes management. Morphine pumps are a great help when patients in end-of-life stage cannot swallow oral morphine anymore. This article summarizes the main principles of use of these technological devices, common problems and situations at risk primary care practice.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/métodos , Glicemia/análise , Medicina de Família e Comunidade/métodos , Morfina/administração & dosagem , Glicemia/metabolismo , Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolismo , Diabetes Mellitus/terapia , Humanos , Morfina/uso terapêutico
20.
Postgrad Med ; 132(4): 305-313, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32223687

RESUMO

Use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) improves clinical outcomes in type 1 diabetes, and significant benefits been demonstrated in patients with type 2 diabetes, including improved glycemic control, better treatment adherence, and an increased understanding of their treatment regimens. Currently, there are two types of CGM systems: real-time CGM (rtCGM) and flash CGM (FCGM). Retrospective analysis of CGM data allows patients and their clinicians to identify glycemic patterns that support and facilitate informed therapy decisions. With the increasing prevalence of diabetes, primary care physicians will be compelled to take on more responsibility for managing patients with diabetes. This article focuses on practical approaches and decision-making strategies for utilizing FCGM in primary care settings.


Assuntos
Automonitorização da Glicemia/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus/sangue , Atenção Primária à Saúde/organização & administração , Dispositivos Eletrônicos Vestíveis , Fatores Etários , Tomada de Decisões , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Preferência do Paciente , Estudos Retrospectivos
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...