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1.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 22(2): 80-85, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-27578170

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The cohort of students enrolled in the discipline-specific bioscience paper reflects a structural diversity in that it includes students of multiple ethnicities, varied age groups, differing scholastic and life experiences. These divergent identities of students are known to influence academic performance. The purpose of this retrospective quantitative study was to determine the ability of a set of variables such as age, gender, ethnicity, level of prior education, the place from which prior education was obtained, work experience and prior academic achievement to predict academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper. METHOD: The sample for this study was a purposive sample of all oral health students who had enrolled in the paper at the Auckland University of Technology from 2011 to 2014. The desensitised empirical data of 116 students from the University's database were subject to multivariable regression analysis. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated. RESULTS: Prior academic achievement was a statistically significant predictor variable (P < 0.001) for the academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper and was also positively correlated (r = 0.641, P < 0.001) to the grades in the discipline-specific bioscience paper. CONCLUSION: Prior academic achievement was the only variable that was demonstrated to be correlated to and predictive of the academic performance in the discipline-specific bioscience paper.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico , Sucesso Acadêmico , Disciplinas das Ciências Biológicas/educação , Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Saúde Bucal/educação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Nova Zelândia , Análise de Regressão , Estudos Retrospectivos
2.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 22(2): e212-e220, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28514054

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Research on integrated dental hygiene and dental therapy courses is scarce; studies reporting on how staff in these combined scope courses teach professionalism are even more scarce. This study aimed to partially fill these research gaps. METHOD AND MATERIALS: In 2016, online surveys were sent to 34 staff members who taught into the integrated Bachelor of Oral Health (BOH) course at the University of Otago's Faculty of Dentistry; 13 were returned. Two focus groups were conducted with six BOH educators. RESULTS: Aspects of professionalism were taught and nurtured in the formal curriculum, the clinic and the informal curriculum. In the formal curriculum, policies outlining the professional standards of behaviour expected of oral health practitioners and students in New Zealand and the Faculty were discussed. In the clinic, educators taught professionalism through modelling clinical skills, assessing students' performance and commenting on their reflective logbooks. In the informal curriculum, BOH teachers nurtured professionalism through discussions about standards of behaviour outside of the university. Role modelling was the most common method that participants reported they taught or nurtured professionalism in their students. DISCUSSION: Professionalism is a complex concept that is taught and nurtured in a number of ways over all aspects of the course. CONCLUSION: Oral Health educators need to maintain a high standard of professionalism when interacting with students and patients, as well as in public spaces, in order to model professionalism to their students.


Assuntos
Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Saúde Bucal/educação , Profissionalismo/educação , Currículo , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Estudos de Avaliação como Assunto , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Nova Zelândia , Competência Profissional
3.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 22(2): 109-114, 2018 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28294493

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The objective of this study was to conduct a formative evaluation of a teledentistry (TD) programme that was developed for a predominantly rural state in the Midwestern United States. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Formative evaluation data were collected on programme activities from the TD programme records. In addition, the effectiveness of the TD training programme was evaluated using a self-administered paper-based survey administered to the participants, immediately following completion of the training activity. Ninety-three dental students, oral health and other health professionals participated in the TD training programme. RESULTS: Overall, the trainees rated the TD training programme highly, with regard to the content, format and skills improvement. The evaluation also demonstrated a positive change in all trainees' attitudes following the training sessions, with most trainees acknowledging a positive impact of the training on their knowledge and competency. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: We identified challenges in the development of the TD programme and in expanding access to oral health care for rural communities. Challenges included reimbursement and a limited interest amongst established dental offices. Dental schools can play an important role in preparing both dental health professionals and other health professionals in the use of TD by providing training and oral health expertise. The use of TD by non-dental providers for consultation, referral and disease management has the potential to improve oral health outcomes, particularly for rural and underserved populations. Evaluation data provide critical feedback to programme planners and administrators.


Assuntos
Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Educação em Odontologia/métodos , Saúde Bucal/educação , Telemedicina , Estudos de Avaliação como Assunto , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Nebraska , Estudos Retrospectivos
4.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 22(3): e321-e326, 2018 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29024268

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The role of dental auxiliaries in collaborative care of patients with special needs is compelling. This study was undertaken to investigate the perceptions of Special Needs Dentistry (SND) education and practice amongst students enrolled in Australian programmes in dental auxiliary, namely dental hygiene, dental therapy and oral health therapy (DH/DT/OHT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: All Australian institutions offering DH/DT/OHT programmes (n = 14) were invited to participate in a self-administered questionnaire survey, conducted online, involving students across all academic years. Twelve institutions agreed to participate, but only five institutions were included in the final analysis, with a student response rate of 31.1%. Answers to open-ended questions were coded and grouped for measurement of frequencies. Quantitative data were analysed via chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests (significance taken as P < .05). RESULTS: The majority of students could not define SND (87.0%) were not aware of the existence of this specialty (53.5%) and did not have clinical experience treating patients with special needs (68.9%). Nevertheless, they felt comfortable and positive about treating these patients independently. Most agreed that they should receive clinical and didactic education in SND, with many of them expressing interest in pursuing a specialty training in this field. CONCLUSION: DH/DT/OHT students' comfort levels, positive attitudes and supportiveness for SND suggested positive implications for these practitioners to partake in multidisciplinary management of patients with special needs, thus indicating the need for standardised training requirements and practice guidelines in this area of care.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Assistência Odontológica para Pessoas com Deficiências , Educação em Odontologia , Austrália , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
8.
Am J Public Health ; 107(S1): S81-S84, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28661807

RESUMO

Tribal and other underserved communities are struggling under the weight of devastating oral health disparities. Tribes as sovereign nations are searching for innovative solutions to address their unique barriers to oral health care. Dental therapists are primary oral health providers who work as part of the dental team to provide a limited scope of services to patients. They were first brought to tribal communities by the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium. Despite strong opposition from the American Dental Association aimed at protecting its monopoly on oral health care, dental therapists are sweeping the nation. Evidence shows that they are effective and provide high-quality care, particularly in underserved communities. A community's ability to develop public health policy solutions tailored to its needs and priorities is essential in eliminating health disparities and achieving health equity. The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community is leading the way to more effective and efficient dental teams and working hard to lay the groundwork for the elimination of oral health disparities.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde/organização & administração , Equidade em Saúde , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena/organização & administração , Índios Norte-Americanos/legislação & jurisprudência , Saúde Bucal , Alaska , Assistência à Saúde/normas , Auxiliares de Odontologia/economia , Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Auxiliares de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena/legislação & jurisprudência , Serviços de Saúde do Indígena/normas , Humanos , Estados Unidos , Populações Vulneráveis , Recursos Humanos
9.
Am J Public Health ; 107(S1): S13-S17, 2017 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28661813

RESUMO

This article seeks to chronicle how dental therapists are being used to bolster the supply of providers for the underserved and explore their potential to diversify the field of dentistry and improve public health. Of the factors that contribute to persistent oral health disparities in the United States, an insufficient oral health workforce figures prominently. A growing number of states are authorizing a midlevel dental provider (often called a dental therapist) to address this problem. Dental therapists work under the supervision of dentists to deliver routine preventive and restorative care, including preparing and filling cavities and performing extractions. They can serve all populations in 3 states, are caring for Native Americans in an additional 3 states under federal or state authority, and are being considered in about a dozen state houses.


Assuntos
Auxiliares de Odontologia/economia , Auxiliares de Odontologia/provisão & distribução , Odontologia , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Saúde Bucal , Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Odontólogos/provisão & distribução , Humanos , Grupos Minoritários , Saúde Pública
10.
Br Dent J ; 222(9): 700-707, 2017 May 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28496255

RESUMO

Background The need for periodontal management is great and increasing; thus, the oral and dental workforce should be suitably equipped to deliver contemporary care. Health Education London developed a training scheme to extend the skills of dentists and dental care professionals (DCPs).Aim To examine the feasibility of assessing a skill-mix initiative established to enhance skills in clinical periodontology involving the views of patients, clinicians and key stakeholders, together with clinical and patient outcomes in London.Methods This mixed methods feasibility and pilot study involved four parallel elements: a postal questionnaire survey of patients; analysis of clinical logbooks; self-completion questionnaire survey of clinicians; and semi-structured interviews of key stakeholders, including clinicians.Results Twelve of the 19 clinicians participated in the evaluation, returning completed questionnaires (63%) and providing access to log diaries and patients. Periodontal data from 42 log-diary cases (1,103 teeth) revealed significant improvement in clinical outcomes (P = 0.001 for all). Eighty-four percent (N = 99) of the 142 patients returning a questionnaire reported improved dental health; however, responses from hospital patients greatly exceeded those from dental practice. Interviews (N = 22) provided evidence that the programme contributed to professional healthcare across four key domains: 'service', 'quality care', 'professional' and 'educational'. Clinicians, while supportive of the concept, raised concerns regarding the mismatch of their expectations and its educational and service outcomes.Discussion The findings suggest that it is feasible to deliver and evaluate inter-professional extended skills training for dentists and dental care professionals, and this may be evaluated using mixed methods to examine outcomes including clinical log diaries, patient questionnaires and stakeholder interviews. This inter-professional course represents a positive development for patient care using the expertise of different members of the dental team; however, its formal integration to the health and educational sectors require further consideration.


Assuntos
Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Educação Continuada em Odontologia/métodos , Periodontia/educação , Adulto , Idoso , Competência Clínica , Odontólogos/educação , Educação Continuada em Odontologia/normas , Avaliação Educacional , Feminino , Humanos , Londres , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Projetos Piloto
17.
Dent Update ; 42(3): 215-8, 2015 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26076539

RESUMO

This paper explores the implications of the Francis Report for education of the dental team. It considers selection of candidates for training, issues relating to the curriculum itself, including assessment and the importance of listening to trainees. The overriding importance of the 'informal' or 'hidden' curriculum, through which students and trainees observe their teachers and develop a sense of the professional and ethical culture within an educational institution, is stressed. Clinical relevance: Sound education, rooted in the recognized ethical principles highlighted in the Francis Report, is essential to the delivery of a dental work force that will deliver care according to the fundamental standards laid down by the GDC.


Assuntos
Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Educação em Odontologia , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Assistência Centrada no Paciente , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde/normas , Padrão de Cuidado , Comunicação , Currículo , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Ética Odontológica/educação , Humanos , Relações Interprofissionais , Aprendizagem , Dano ao Paciente/prevenção & controle , Critérios de Admissão Escolar , Estudantes , Estudantes de Odontologia , Reino Unido
18.
J Dent Educ ; 79(5): 472-83, 2015 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25941140

RESUMO

Revised accreditation standards for dental and dental hygiene education programs have increased emphasis on faculty development that can improve teaching and learning, foster curricular change including use of teaching and learning technologies, and enhance retention and satisfaction of faculty. The American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Academy for Academic Leadership (AAL) established the Institute for Allied Health Educators (IAHE) in 2007 to address faculty development needs for allied dental and allied health educators. In 2009, it was transitioned to an online program, which resulted in increased enrollment and diversity of participants. After seven years, a comprehensive program evaluation was warranted. The authors developed an online questionnaire based on Kirkpatrick's four-level model of training evaluation; for this study, levels one (satisfaction), two (knowledge and skill acquisition), and three (behavior change) were examined. Of the 400 program participants invited to take part in the study, a 38% response rate was achieved, with the majority indicating full-time faculty status. Nearly all (95-97%) of the respondents agreed or strongly agreed the program contributed to their teaching effectiveness, and 88-96% agreed or strongly agreed it enhanced their knowledge of educational concepts and strategies. In addition, 83% agreed or strongly agreed the program helped them develop new skills and confidence with technology, with 69% agreeing or strongly agreeing that it helped them incorporate technology into their own educational setting. Nearly 90% were highly positive or positive in their overall assessment of the program; 95% indicated they would recommend it to a colleague; and 80% agreed or strongly agreed they had discussed what they learned with faculty colleagues at their home institutions who had not attended the program. Positive findings from this evaluation provide evidence that the IAHE has been able to meet its goals.


Assuntos
Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Técnicos em Prótese Dentária/educação , Docentes , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal , Adulto , Idoso , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Instrução por Computador , Currículo , Auxiliares de Odontologia/psicologia , Higienistas Dentários/psicologia , Técnicos em Prótese Dentária/psicologia , Educação Continuada , Educação a Distância , Tecnologia Educacional , Feminino , Humanos , Liderança , Aprendizagem , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , América do Norte , Sistemas On-Line , Satisfação Pessoal , Seleção de Pessoal , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Sociedades Odontológicas , Ensino/métodos
19.
J Dent Educ ; 79(5): 584-91, 2015 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25941152

RESUMO

Dental diseases are a major burden on health; however, they are largely preventable. Dental treatment alone will not eradicate dental disease with a shift to prevention required. Prevention of dental diseases is a role of dental professionals, with most countries having formalized health promotion competencies for dental and oral health graduates. In spite of this, there may be minimal health promotion being undertaken in clinical practice. Therefore, the aim of this study was to conduct a scoping review to identify some published studies on health promotion training in dental and oral health degrees. Key search terms were developed and used to search selected databases, which identified 84 articles. Four articles met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were included in the review. Of these studies, the type of oral health promotion tasks and instructions received before the tasks varied. However, for all studies the health promotion content was focused on health education. In terms of evaluation of outcomes, only two studies evaluated the health promotion content using student reflections. More good-quality information on health promotions training is needed to inform practice.


Assuntos
Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Educação em Odontologia , Promoção da Saúde , Saúde Bucal/educação , Educação em Saúde Bucal , Humanos , Odontologia Preventiva/educação
20.
J Dent Educ ; 79(4): 353-61, 2015 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25838005

RESUMO

The Lancet Commission on Education of Health Professionals for the 21(st) Century calls for enhancing health education for the needs and challenges of the 21st century to improve health status globally. To complement the Lancet report, this article makes recommendations for including core global health competencies in the education of health care professionals and specific groups of the public who are relevant to oral health in a global context in order to tackle the burden of oral diseases. Experts from various professional backgrounds developed global oral health competencies for four target groups: Group 1 was defined as dental students, residents/trainee specialists (or equivalent), and dentists; Group 2 was community health workers, dental hygienists, and dental therapists (or the equivalent); Group 3 was health professionals such as physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists; and Group 4 was non-health professionals in the public arena such as parents, teachers, decision makers, key opinion leaders, and health and consumer advocates. Key competencies for members of each of the four target groups are presented in a matrix. The suggested competency matrix shows that many other health professions and groups in society have potentially crucial roles in the prevention, control, and management of oral diseases globally. Workforce models including a wider range of professionals working together as a team will be needed to tackle the burden of oral diseases in an integrated way in the broader context of non-communicable diseases. Further discussion and research should be conducted to validate or improve the competencies proposed here with regard to their relevance, appropriateness, and completeness.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Educação Profissionalizante , Saúde Global/educação , Saúde Bucal/educação , Agentes Comunitários de Saúde/educação , Auxiliares de Odontologia/educação , Higienistas Dentários/educação , Odontólogos , Educação em Saúde Bucal , Letramento em Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Promoção da Saúde , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Doenças da Boca/prevenção & controle , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Especialidades Odontológicas/educação , Estudantes de Odontologia , Doenças Dentárias/prevenção & controle
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