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1.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 13788, 2021 07 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34215827

RESUMO

Motor imagery (MI) is usually facilitated when performed in a congruent body position to the imagined movement, as well as after actual execution (AE). A lower-limb amputation (LLA) results in important structural and functional changes in the sensorimotor system, which can alter MI. In this study, we investigated the effects of body position and AE on the temporal characteristics of MI in people with LLA. Ten participants with LLA (mean age = 59.6 ± 13.9 years, four females) and ten gender- and age-matched healthy control participants (mean age = 60.1 ± 15.4 years, four females) were included. They performed two locomotor-related tasks (a walking task and the Timed Up and Go task) while MI times were measured in different conditions (in congruent/incongruent positions and before/after AE). We showed that MI times were significantly shorter when participants imagined walking in a congruent-standing position compared to an incongruent-sitting position, and when performing MI after actual walking compared to before, in both groups. Shorter MI times in the congruent position and after AE suggest an improvement of MI's temporal accuracy (i.e. the ability to match AE time during MI) in healthy individuals but not in the LLA group.


Assuntos
Imagens, Psicoterapia , Sistema Musculoesquelético/fisiopatologia , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia , Caminhada/fisiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Amputação/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Imaginação/fisiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Movimento/fisiologia , Postura/fisiologia , Postura Sentada , Posição Ortostática , Estudos de Tempo e Movimento , Caminhada/psicologia
2.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254017, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34297728

RESUMO

Moving in time with others-interpersonal coordination-increases affiliation, helping behaviours and gives rise to a host of other prosocial outcomes. Recent research suggests that merely imagining coordination may lead to similar social effects. In the present study, participants were asked to imagine walking with a crowd in a coordinated (versus uncoordinated) way to explore the effects of imagined coordination on individuals' perceptions of themselves and the crowd. Imagined coordination led to greater levels of deindividuation and affiliation. That is, participants were less likely to report seeing themselves as unique individuals, instead viewing themselves as a part of a group (deindividuation) and more likely to report a sense of emotional closeness (affiliation) with the imagined group. Deindividuation partially mediated the effect of imagined coordination on affiliation. This work establishes that imagined synchrony can be employed online to foster prosocial attitudes towards groups of people, and that a process of deindividuation might mediate this effect.


Assuntos
Aglomeração/psicologia , Processos Grupais , Imaginação , Individualidade , Caminhada/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Autoimagem
3.
Spine (Phila Pa 1976) ; 46(15): E826-E831, 2021 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34228693

RESUMO

STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVE: To assess the relationship of fear avoidance and demoralization on gait and balance and determine a threshold score for the Tampa Scale for Kinesophobia (TSK) and the Demoralization Scale (DS) that identifies spine patients with gait and balance dysfunction amplified by underlying psychological factors. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Fear avoidance and demoralization are crucial components of mental health that impact the outcomes in spine surgery. However, interpreting their effect on patient function remains challenging. Further establishing this correlation and identifying a threshold of severity can aid in identifying patients in whom a portion of their altered gait and balance may be amplified by underlying psychologic distress. METHODS: Four hundred five symptomatic spine patients were given the TSK and DS questionnaires. Patient's gait and balance were tested with a human motion capture system. A TSK score of 41 and a DS score of 30 were chosen as thresholds to classify moderate versus severe dysfunction based on literature and statistical analysis. RESULTS: Higher TSK and DS scores were correlated with worse walking speed (P < 0.001), longer stride time (P = 0.001), decreased stride length (P < 0.048), and wider step width (<0.001) during gait as well as increased sway across planes (P = 0.001) during standing balance. When classified by TSK scores >41, patients with more severe fear avoidance had slower walking speed (P < 0.001), longer stride time (P = 0.001), shorter stride length (P = 0.004), increased step width (P < 0.001), and increased sway (P = 0.001) compared with their lower scoring counterparts. Similarly, patients with DS > 30 had slower walking speed (P = 0.012), longer stride time (P = 0.022), and increased sway (P = 0.003) compared with their lower scoring counterparts. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that fear avoidance and demoralization directly correlate with worsening gait and balance. Furthermore, patients with TSK > 41 and DS > 30 have more underlying psychological factors that contribute to significantly worse function compared with lower scoring peers. Understanding this relationship and using these guidelines can help identify and treat patients whose gait dysfunction may be amplified by psychologic distress.Level of Evidence: 3.


Assuntos
Medo/psicologia , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral , Desmoralização , Humanos , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/epidemiologia , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/fisiopatologia , Doenças da Coluna Vertebral/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Teste de Caminhada , Caminhada/psicologia
4.
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act ; 18(1): 87, 2021 07 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34215259

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Relationships between park access, park use, and wellbeing remain poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to investigate: (1) perceived and objective park access in relation to park use and physical activity in parks; and; (2) perceived and objective park access, park use and physical activity in parks and their associations with wellbeing. METHODS: An interviewer-assisted survey collected data on perceived time to walk to parks, park use time, park physical activity time and wellbeing (using a scale containing nine domains) amongst adult participants of the Singapore Multi-Ethnic Cohort. Geospatial maps of parks and the "walkable" street networks were created for the city-state of Singapore to objectively determine distances to accessible points on park boundaries. Multiple linear regression models estimated the importance of park access to park use and associations of park access and park use with wellbeing, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: Participants' (n = 3435) average age was 48.8 years (SD, 12.8), 44.8% were male and 72.6% were of Chinese ethnicity. Better perceived but not true park access was significantly associated with greater park use. Park access (perceived or true) was not associated with physical activity time in parks. Greater participant park time and physical activity time in parks were associated with higher wellbeing scores (p < 0.001). The differences in wellbeing scores between the reference groups, who spent negligible time in parks, and the highest quartiles of time in parks (10.8 h/month) and physical activity in parks (8.3 h/month) were 3.2 (95% CI 2.1-4.4) and 4.2 (95% CI 4.1-6.3) points out of 100 respectively. These associations were similar for most domains of wellbeing, with clear dose-response relationships. CONCLUSIONS: While perceived park access was strongly associated with park use and well-being, true park access was not, and neither park access measure was associated with park physical activity. Future studies could investigate the influence of park attributes on park use, physical activity in parks and wellbeing. The consistent associations of park use and particularly physical activity in parks with wellbeing suggest that promoting park use, and especially physical activity in parks, is a promising strategy for improving wellbeing in urban settings.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico , Parques Recreativos , Recreação , Caminhada , Adulto , Cidades , Estudos Transversais , Planejamento Ambiental , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recreação/psicologia , Características de Residência , Inquéritos e Questionários , População Urbana , Caminhada/psicologia , Caminhada/estatística & dados numéricos
5.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0253374, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34242215

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The reciprocal relation between falling and concern about falling is complex and not well understood. We aimed to determine whether concern about falling increases after a fall and whether concern about falling increases the odds of future falls in community-dwelling older adults without a recent fall history. METHODS: We selected 118 community-dwelling older adults (mean age: 71.4 (SD: 5.3) years) without a self-reported history of falling, one year prior to baseline assessment, from the one-year VIBE cohort for analyses. On a monthly basis, we recorded concern about falling (using the Falls Efficacy Scale-International, FES-I), as well as the occurrence of falls (through questionnaires and telephone calls). We determined 1) whether falling predicts an increase in concern about falling and 2) whether a high concern about falling is predictive of falling. Standard linear (fixed-effects) regression and mixed effects regression analyses were performed over long-term, i.e. one year, and short-term, i.e. one-month, intervals, respectively and were adjusted for gender, age and physical activity (quantified as the average total walking duration per day). Analyses were performed separately for all reported falls and for injurious falls only. RESULTS: High concern about falling at baseline did not predict falls over the course of one year, nor over the course of one month. Furthermore, falls in between baseline assessment and one year thereafter did not predict increased concern about falling from baseline to one year later, independent of whether all falls or only injurious falls were considered. However, falls, either all or injurious only, happening somewhere over the course of a one-month interval, significantly predicted small increases in concern about falling (1.49 FES-I points, 95% CI [0.74, 2.25], p<0.001 for all falls; 2.60 FES-I points, 95% CI [1.55, 3.64], p<0.001 for injurious falls) from the start to the end of that one-month interval. CONCLUSION: Older adults without a recent history of falling seem to be resilient against developing concern about falling after having fallen, resulting in a short-term temporary effect of falling on concern about falling. Furthermore, we found no evidence that a high concern about falling predicts future falls over a one-month or a one-year follow-up period, suggesting that concern is not a primary cause for falls in older adults without a recent history of falling.


Assuntos
Medo/psicologia , Equilíbrio Postural/fisiologia , Caminhada/psicologia , Idoso , Estudos de Coortes , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Autorrelato , Inquéritos e Questionários
6.
J Prev Med Public Health ; 54(3): 199-207, 2021 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34092066

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Physical inactivity is the fourth leading global risk factor for mortality, followed by obesity. The combination of these risk factors is associated with non-communicable diseases, impaired physical function, and declining mental function. The World Health Organization recommends physical activity to reduce the mortality rate. Thus, this study examined the effects on anthropometric measurements of a 12-week walking program for elderly people in Samarahan, Sarawak, Malaysia with a 7000-step goal and weekly group walking activities. METHODS: A quasi-experimental study was conducted involving 109 elderly people with a body mass index (BMI) ≥25.0 kg/m2. BMI, body composition, and average daily steps were measured at baseline, 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 26.0, and repeated-measures analysis of variance with the paired t-test for post-hoc analysis was conducted. RESULTS: In total, 48 participants in the intervention group and 61 participants in the control group completed the study. A significant interaction was found between time and group. The post-hoc analysis showed a significant difference between pre-intervention and post-intervention (within the intervention group). The post-intervention analysis revealed an increase in the mean number of daily steps by 3571.59, with decreases in body weight (-2.20 kg), BMI (-0.94 kg/m2), body fat percentage (-3.52%), visceral fat percentage (-1.29%) and waist circumference (-2.91 cm). Skeletal muscle percentage also showed a significant increase (1.67%). CONCLUSIONS: A 12-week walking program combining a 7000-step goals with weekly group walking activities had a significant effect on the anthropometric measurements of previously inactive and overweight/obese elderly people.


Assuntos
Objetivos , Sobrepeso/terapia , Caminhada/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Índice de Massa Corporal , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Malásia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sobrepeso/psicologia , Caminhada/fisiologia , Caminhada/psicologia
7.
J Alzheimers Dis ; 82(3): 1015-1031, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34151792

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Exercise training (ET) has neuroprotective effects in the hippocampus, a key brain region for memory that is vulnerable to age-related dysfunction. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effects of ET on functional connectivity (FC) of the hippocampus in older adults with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and a cognitively normal (CN) control group. We also assessed whether the ET-induced changes in hippocampal FC (Δhippocampal-FC) are associated with changes in memory task performance (Δmemory performance). METHODS: 32 older adults (77.0±7.6 years; 16 MCI and 16 CN) participated in the present study. Cardiorespiratory fitness tests, memory tasks (Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) and Logical Memory Test (LM)), and resting-state fMRI were administered before and after a 12-week walking ET intervention. We utilized a seed-based correlation analysis using the bilateral anterior and posterior hippocampi as priori seed regions of interest. The associations of residualized ET-induced Δhippocampal-FC and Δmemory performance were assessed using linear regression. RESULTS: There were significant improvements in RAVLT Trial 1 and LM test performance after ET across participants. At baseline, MCI, compared to CN, demonstrated significantly lower posterior hippocampal FC. ET was associated with increased hippocampal FC across groups. Greater ET-related anterior and posterior hippocampal FC with right posterior cingulate were associated with improved LM recognition performance in MCI participants. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that hippocampal FC is significantly increased following 12-weeks of ET in older adults and, moreover, suggest that increased hippocampal FC may reflect neural network plasticity associated with ET-related improvements in memory performance in individuals diagnosed with MCI.


Assuntos
Disfunção Cognitiva/diagnóstico por imagem , Disfunção Cognitiva/terapia , Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Hipocampo/diagnóstico por imagem , Memória , Rede Nervosa/diagnóstico por imagem , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Disfunção Cognitiva/psicologia , Teste de Esforço/métodos , Teste de Esforço/psicologia , Teste de Esforço/tendências , Terapia por Exercício/psicologia , Terapia por Exercício/tendências , Feminino , Hipocampo/fisiologia , Humanos , Imageamento por Ressonância Magnética/tendências , Masculino , Memória/fisiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Rede Nervosa/fisiologia , Plasticidade Neuronal/fisiologia , Caminhada/fisiologia , Caminhada/psicologia , Caminhada/tendências
8.
Phys Ther ; 101(9)2021 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34160022

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review was to systematically evaluate the effectiveness of exergaming on walking in older adults. In addition, the aim was to investigate the relationship between the exergaming effect and age, baseline walking performance, exercise traits, technology used, and the risk of bias. METHODS: A literature search was carried out in the databases MEDLINE, CINAHL, CENTRAL, EMBASE, WoS, PsycInfo, and PEDro up to January 10, 2020. Studies with a randomized controlled trial design, people ≥60 years of age without neurological disorders, comparison group with other exercise or no exercise, and walking-related outcomes were included. Cochrane RoB2, meta-analysis, meta-regression, and Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation were used to estimate quality, treatment effect, covariates' effect, and the certainty of evidence, respectively. RESULTS: In the studies included (n = 66), the overall risk of bias was low (n = 2), unclear (n = 48), or high (n = 16). Compared with comparison groups, exergaming interventions were more effective for walking improvements (standardized mean difference = -0.21; 95% CI = -0.36 to -0.06; 3102 participants, 58 studies; moderate-quality evidence) and more or equally effective (standardized mean difference = -0.32; 95% CI = -0.64 to 0.00; 1028 participants, 13 studies; low-quality evidence) after nonexergaming follow-up. The strongest effect for covariates was observed with the type of comparison group, explaining 18.6% of the variance. CONCLUSION: For older adults without neurological disorders, exergame-based training improved walking, and improvements were maintained at follow-up. Greater benefits were observed when exergaming groups were compared with inactive comparison groups. To strengthen the evidence, further randomized controlled trials on the effectiveness of gamified exercise intervention are needed. IMPACT: Exergaming has an effect equivalent to other types of exercising on improving walking in older adults. Physical therapists and other rehabilitation professionals may consider exergaming as a promising form of exercise in this age group.


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Jogos de Vídeo/psicologia , Caminhada/psicologia , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Feminino , Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Humanos , Masculino , Força Muscular , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
9.
J Clin Neurosci ; 89: 211-215, 2021 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34119269

RESUMO

Robot-assisted gait training using a voluntary-driven wearable cyborg, Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL), has been shown to improve the mobility of patients with neurological disorders; however, its effect on the quality of life (QOL) of patients is not clear. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of HAL-assisted gait training on QOL and mobility in patients with neuromuscular diseases (NMDs). Ten patients with NMDs (seven men and three women, mean age: 57 ± 11 years), with impairment in mobility but could walk alone with aids underwent two courses of gait training with HAL over 6 months, and the single course consisted of nine sessions of training for 4 weeks. We compared the findings of the 2 min walk test, 10 m walk test, the Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaire, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale at baseline, after the 1st training, before the 2nd training, and after the 2nd training using the Friedman test. A significant improvement was observed in the 2 min walking distance from baseline (93 ± 50 m) to after the 2nd training (115 ± 48 m, P = 0.034), as well as in the domains of vitality (P = 0.019) and mental component summary score (P = 0.019) of SF-36. The improvement in 10 m walking speed was significantly correlated with that in the physical functioning (R = 0.831, P = 0.003) and role physical (R = 0.697, P = 0.025) domains in the SF-36. Our findings suggest that HAL-assisted gait training is effective in improving QOL associated with mental health as well as gait ability in selected patients with NMDs.


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Exoesqueleto Energizado , Marcha/fisiologia , Doenças Neuromusculares/terapia , Robótica/métodos , Caminhada/fisiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Terapia por Exercício/instrumentação , Terapia por Exercício/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doenças Neuromusculares/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Robótica/instrumentação , Caminhada/psicologia
10.
Arq. ciências saúde UNIPAR ; 25(2): 87-94, maio-ago. 2021.
Artigo em Português | LILACS | ID: biblio-1252350

RESUMO

O objetivo do presente estudo foi comparar os níveis de estado de humor de mulheres adultas praticantes de atividade física regular com os de mulheres adultas sedentárias. Participaram do estudo 57 mulheres (53,36 ± 10,68 anos de idade), divididas em dois grupos: ativas e sedentárias. Utilizou-se um questionário para caracterização da amostra e a Escala de Humor de Brunel (BRUMS). Os resultados do presente estudo demonstraram que as mulheres ativas apresentaram estado de humor positivo, além de apresentaram baixos escores para o estado de humor negativo, quando comparadas aos escores das mulheres sedentárias. Pode-se concluir que a atividade física pode influenciar positivamente o estado de humor.


The aim of this study was to compare mood levels of adult women engaged in regular physical activity with those of sedentary adult women. Fifty-seven women participated in the study (53.36 ± 10.68 years' old), divided into two groups: active and sedentary. A questionnaire was used to characterize the sample, and the Brunel Mood Scale (BRUMS) was also applied. The results demonstrated that active women had a positive mood state in addition to having low scores for negative mood state when compared to the scores of sedentary women. It can be concluded that physical activity can have a positive influence on mood state.


Assuntos
Humanos , Feminino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Senso de Humor e Humor como Assunto/psicologia , Exercício Físico/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico , Caminhada/psicologia , Confusão/prevenção & controle , Depressão , Fadiga/psicologia , Comportamento Sedentário , Psicologia do Esporte
11.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(16): e25561, 2021 Apr 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33879709

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: Walking is an effective, well accepted, inexpensive, and functional intervention. This study compared the outcomes and changes in walking behavior of self-monitored (SM) and supervised (SU) walking interventions for older adults.Participants were assigned to SM (n = 21) and SU (n = 21) walking groups according to their place of residence. Both groups exercised and wore a pedometer for 3 months.The outcome measures were step count, body mass index (BMI), and physical function. Two-way repeated-measure ANOVA and independent t tests were used to compare the intervention effects. We also plotted the trends and analyzed the walking steps weekly.Only BMI exhibited a group × time interaction. The pre-posttest differences showed knee extension muscle strength (KEMS) and Timed Up and Go test were significantly improved in the SM group, whereas BMI, KEMS, 30-s sit-to-stand, functional reach were significantly improved, but 5-m gait speed significantly slower in the SU group. For participants attending ≥50% of the sessions, those in the SM and SU groups had similar results for all variables, except for 2-min step (2MS) and daily walking step counts.Both self-monitored and supervised walking benefit older adults in most physical functions, especially lower-extremity performance, such as muscle strength, balance, and mobility. The effects of both programs do not differ significantly, except for BMI and 2MS (ie cardiopulmonary endurance). We recommend pedometer-assisted self-monitored walking for older adults because of its ability to cultivate exercise habits over the long term, whereas supervised walking to establish effective exercise intensity.


Assuntos
Actigrafia/estatística & dados numéricos , Terapia por Exercício/psicologia , Autogestão/estatística & dados numéricos , Caminhada/fisiologia , Caminhada/psicologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Análise de Variância , Índice de Massa Corporal , Feminino , Humanos , Joelho/fisiologia , Masculino , Força Muscular , Resistência Física , Taiwan , Estudos de Tempo e Movimento
12.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 102(10): 1880-1887.e1, 2021 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33894218

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify homogeneous subsets of survivors of chronic stroke who share similar characteristics across several domains and test if these groups differ in real-world walking activity. We hypothesized that variables representing the domains of walking ability, psychosocial, environment, and cognition would be important contributors in differentiating real-world walking activity in survivors of chronic stroke. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, secondary data analysis. SETTING: University/laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 283 individuals with chronic (≥6mo) stroke (N=238). INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Thirteen variables representing 5 domains were included: (1) walking ability: 6-minute walk test (6MWT), self-selected speed (SSS) of gait; (2) psychosocial: Patient Health Questionnaire-9, Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) scale; (3) physical health: low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, body mass index, Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI); (4) cognition: Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA); and (5) environment: living situation and marital status, work status, Area Deprivation Index (ADI), Walk Score. Mixture modeling was used to identify latent classes of survivors of stroke. After identifying the latent classes, walking activity, measured as steps per day (SPD), was included as a distal outcome to understand if classes were meaningfully different in their real-world walking RESULTS: A model with 3 latent classes was selected. The 6MWT, SSS, ABC scale, and Walk Score were significantly different among all 3 classes. Differences were also seen for the MoCA, ADI, and CCI between 2 of the 3 classes. Importantly, the distal outcome of SPD was significantly different in all classes, indicating that real-world walking activity differs among the groups identified by the mixture model. CONCLUSIONS: Survivors of stroke with lower walking ability, lower self-efficacy, lower cognitive abilities, and greater area deprivation had lower SPD. These results demonstrate that the physical and social environment (including socioeconomic factors) and cognitive function should also be considered when developing interventions to improve real-world walking activity after stroke.


Assuntos
Transtornos Neurológicos da Marcha/fisiopatologia , Transtornos Neurológicos da Marcha/psicologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/fisiopatologia , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/psicologia , Caminhada/fisiologia , Caminhada/psicologia , Acelerometria , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Recuperação de Função Fisiológica , Sobreviventes , Teste de Caminhada
13.
Games Health J ; 10(2): 130-138, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33818134

RESUMO

Objective: Two self-selected playing styles of Pokémon Go (PG) have been observed: intermittent and continuous. However, it is unknown how playing style impacts volume and pattern of physical activity (PA) compared with a traditional walking bout. Materials and Methods: Twenty experienced PG players followed a 1.77 km walking loop during two randomly ordered, 30-minute walking conditions: PG and traditional walking. Objective measurement tools (pedometer, accelerometer, heart rate monitor, GPS watch) were used to measure steps, caloric expenditure, intensity, heart rate, and distance traveled, and direct observation was used to determine number of stops and playing style. Results: Most PG players used the intermittent playing style (60%). Traditional walking resulted in significantly greater PA than PG. There was a significant interaction between the PG playing style (continuous, intermittent) and condition (PG, traditional walking). There was no difference in PA variables between continuous and intermittent PG during traditional walking; however, total steps (3394.3 ± 255.8 vs. 2779.1 ± 317.5), aerobic steps (3314.3 ± 318.9 vs. 2387.5 ± 771.8), caloric expenditure (146.00 [130.0-201.3] vs. 110.0 [89.3-132.3 Kcals]), distance (2.4 [2.3-2.6] vs. 2.0 [1.8-2.1 km]), and moderate minutes (29.7 [27.5-29.8] vs. 25.8 [23.1-27.1]) were significantly greater, while sedentary minutes (0.2 [0-1.0] vs. 2.7 [1.7-4.3]) and number of stops (0 [0-0.8] vs. 4.5 [2.3-7.0]) were less, for continuous compared with intermittent PG. There was a main effect of condition on PA for intermittent PG players, but not continuous PG players. Conclusion: Continuous PG produced similar PA to traditional walking, while intermittent PG reduced PA, nevertheless PG may be a strategy for increasing PA participation.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico/psicologia , Jogos de Vídeo/normas , Caminhada/fisiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Jogos de Vídeo/psicologia , Caminhada/psicologia
14.
J Neuroeng Rehabil ; 18(1): 53, 2021 03 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33752704

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A recent literature review emphasized the importance of assessing dual-task (DT) abilities with tasks that are representative of community ambulation. Assessing DT ability in real-life activities using standardized protocols remains difficult. Virtual reality (VR) may represent an interesting alternative enabling the exposure to different scenarios simulating community walking. To better understand dual-task abilities in everyday life activities, the aims of this study were (1) to assess locomotor and cognitive dual-task cost (DTC) during representative daily living activities, using VR, in healthy adults; and 2) to explore the influence of the nature and complexity of locomotor and cognitive tasks on DTC. METHODS: Fifteen healthy young adults (24.9 ± 2.7 years old, 8 women) were recruited to walk in a virtual 100 m shopping mall corridor, while remembering a 5-item list (DT condition), using an omnidirectional platform and a VR headset. Two levels of difficulty were proposed for the locomotor task (with vs. without virtual agent avoidance) and for the cognitive task (with vs. without items modification). These tasks were also performed in single task (ST) condition. Locomotor and cognitive DTC were measured by comparing performances in ST and DT conditions. Locomotor performance was characterized using walking speed, walking fluidity, and minimal distance between the participant and the virtual agent during avoidance. Cognitive performance was assessed with the number of items correctly recalled. Presence of DTC were determined with one-sample Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. To explore the influence of the tasks' complexity and nature on DTC, a nonparametric two-way repeated measure ANOVA was performed. RESULTS: No locomotor interference was measured for any of the outcomes. A cognitive DTC of 6.67% was measured (p = .017) while participants performed simultaneously both complex locomotor and cognitive tasks. A significant interaction between locomotor task complexity and cognitive task nature (p = .002) was identified on cognitive DTC. CONCLUSIONS: In challenging locomotor and cognitive conditions, healthy young adults present DTC in cognitive accuracy, which was influenced by the locomotor task complexity task and the cognitive task nature. A similar VR-based protocol might be used to investigate DT abilities in older adults and individuals with a stroke.


Assuntos
Atividades Cotidianas , Cognição , Caminhada/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Rememoração Mental , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Realidade Virtual , Velocidade de Caminhada , Adulto Jovem
15.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(7): 1846-1855, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33755991

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Understanding the factors that influence hospital mobility, especially in the context of a heightened focus on falls prevention, is needed to improve care. OBJECTIVE: This qualitative study uses a socioecological framework to explore factors that influence hospital mobility in older adults. DESIGN: Qualitative research PARTICIPANTS: Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were conducted with medically-ill hospitalized older adults (n = 19) and providers (hospitalists, nurses, and physical and occupational therapists (n = 48) at two hospitals associated with an academic health system. APPROACH: Interview and focus group guides included questions on perceived need for mobility, communication about mobility, hospital mobility culture, and awareness of patients' walking activity. Data were analyzed thematically and mapped onto the constructs of the socioecological model. KEY RESULTS: A consistent theme among patients and providers was that "mobility is medicine." Categories of factors reported to influence hospital walking activity included intrapersonal factors (patients' health status, fear of falls), interpersonal factors (patient-provider communication about mobility), organizational factors (clarity about provider roles and responsibilities, knowledge of safe patient handling, reliance on physical therapy for mobility), and environmental factors (falls as a never event, patient geographical locations on hospital units). Several of these factors were identified as potentially modifiable targets for intervention. Patients and providers offered recommendations for improving awareness of patient's ambulatory activity, assigning roles and responsibility for mobility, and enhancing education and communication between patients and providers across disciplines. CONCLUSION: Patients and providers identified salient factors for future early mobility initiatives targeting hospitalized older adults. Consideration of these factors across all stages of intervention development and implementation will enhance impact and sustainability.


Assuntos
Deambulação Precoce/psicologia , Estado Funcional , Pacientes Internados/psicologia , Recursos Humanos em Hospital/psicologia , Caminhada/psicologia , Acidentes por Quedas/prevenção & controle , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Limitação da Mobilidade , Pesquisa Qualitativa
16.
Health Place ; 69: 102544, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33714180

RESUMO

In Japan, a state of emergency (SoE) was declared in early April 2020 until late May in response to the first wave of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). This longitudinal study analyzed the step counts of 18,817 citizens in Yokohama city in the first half of 2020 compared to the previous year, and investigated the association between the change in step counts and the individuals' neighborhood environment by sex and age using generalized linear mixed models. Step counts decreased especially in women and non-elderly people during the SoE. Older women were more susceptible to the neighborhood environment: high walkability (i.e., high population density, proximity to railway stations) adversely affected their step counts, whereas proximity to large parks came to have a positive effect during the SoE.


Assuntos
Ambiente Construído/estatística & dados numéricos , COVID-19/psicologia , Características de Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Caminhada/psicologia , Caminhada/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Cidades , Planejamento Ambiental , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Distribuição por Sexo , Adulto Jovem
17.
Gait Posture ; 85: 151-156, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33578307

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Osteoarthritis (OA) can hinder physical activity in older adults for reasons that are not fully understood. Functional barriers may exist such as reduced muscle strength around the affected joint, potentially affecting physical activity. Aging-associated declines in energy capacity may also be exacerbated by OA. These factors may work together to influence physical activity in people with OA. RESEARCH QUESTION: Our objective was to evaluate the combined role of walking energetics and hip abductor strength on physical activity in older women with hip OA. METHODS: We evaluated 30 women with moderately symptomatic hip OA (61 ± 10 yrs; 30.7 ± 4.9 kg/m2) in this cross-sectional observational study. We measured physical activity using the UCLA activity score and quantified activity frequency and intensity using accelerometers worn for seven days (7 ± 2 days). We used a portable oxygen exchange system to measure energy used during walking at preferred speeds (relative to total energy capacity assessed using a six-minute walk test) and a dynamometer to measure hip abductor strength. We used Pearson correlations and regression analysis to test our hypotheses. RESULTS: Greater energy used during walking was associated with lower self-reported physical activity (R=-0.626, p < 0.001), more sedentary time (R = 0.567, p = 0.002), and less light activity time (R=-0.644, p < 0.001). Lower hip abductor strength was associated with lower self-reported physical activity (R = 0.406, p = 0.039). While there was no association between hip abductor strength and energy used during walking, together these variables predicted 55.5 % of the variance in self-reported physical activity. SIGNIFICANCE: Results suggest intervention targets to promote physical activity in this population.


Assuntos
Metabolismo Energético/fisiologia , Força Muscular/fisiologia , Músculo Esquelético/fisiopatologia , Osteoartrite do Quadril/fisiopatologia , Comportamento Sedentário , Caminhada/fisiologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Quadril/fisiopatologia , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Debilidade Muscular/etiologia , Debilidade Muscular/fisiopatologia , Osteoartrite do Quadril/psicologia , Estudos Prospectivos , Caminhada/psicologia
18.
Am J Mens Health ; 15(1): 1557988321993560, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33576283

RESUMO

Prostate cancer is a significant impediment that can reduce physical functional status. Mobility is fundamental for quality of life and church attendance to be associated with improved physical functioning. Few studies have examined how religious participation have implications for mobility limitation among men in general and among prostate cancer survivors in particular. The purpose of this study was to assess the association between church attendance and mobility limitation among Black and White prostate cancer patients and survivors. Data for this investigation were drawn from the Diagnosis and Decisions in Prostate Cancer Treatment Outcomes Study that consisted of 804 Black and White men with complete information on the primary outcome and predictor variables. Mobility limitation was the primary outcome variable, and church attendance was the main independent variable. The analytic sample was almost equally divided between Black (N = 382) and White men (N = 422). The proportion of Black men reporting mobility limitation (30.09%) more than doubled the corresponding percentage for White men (14.7%). Black men had a higher proportion of individuals who reported weekly church attendance (49.2% vs. 45.0%). Fully adjusted modified Poisson regression models produced results indicating that respondents attending church weekly had a lower mobility limitation prevalence (PR = 0.56, 95% CI [0.39, 0.81]) than those never attending church. Results from this study contribute to the body of evidence asserting the health benefits of church attendance. These findings suggest that health providers should consider how religion and spirituality can present opportunities for improved outcomes in prostate cancer patients and survivors.


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Sobreviventes de Câncer/psicologia , Neoplasias da Próstata/etnologia , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Religião , Caminhada/psicologia , /psicologia , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Limitação da Mobilidade , Neoplasias da Próstata/reabilitação
19.
Accid Anal Prev ; 152: 106004, 2021 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33540347

RESUMO

Interactive pedestrian simulators have become a valuable research tool for investigating street-crossing behavior and developing solutions for improving pedestrian safety. There are two main kinds of pedestrian simulators: one uses a technology based on rear-projection screens (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment, or CAVE), the other a head-mounted display (HMD). These devices are used indiscriminately, regardless of the research objective, and it is not yet known whether they are equally effective for studying street crossing. The present study was aimed at comparing the street crossing behavior and subjective evaluations of younger and older adult pedestrians when they are using a CAVE-like or HMD-based (HTC Vive Pro) pedestrian simulator. Thirty younger adults and 25 older adults performed 36 street-crossing trials (combining different speeds, two-way traffic conditions, and gap sizes) on each of the two types of simulators. The results indicated that participants in the HMD condition crossed the street significantly more often (58.6 %) than in the CAVE condition (42.44%) and had shorter safety margins. The most striking difference pertained to crossing initiation, which occurred considerably earlier (1.78 s) in the HMD condition than in the CAVE condition. Synchronization of crossing initiation with oncoming traffic was not as good in the CAVE condition because visual information in front of the pedestrian was missing due to the absence of ground projection. In both simulators, older adults caused more collisions than did younger ones, had shorter safety margins, and a slower crossing speed. Hence, the HMD reproduced classical age-related differences in most street-crossing behaviors already found on the CAVE. Usually observed speed effects were also found for both simulators. Neither cybersickness nor any adverse effects on stereoacuity or postural balance were found for either simulator. The HMD produced a higher level of presence and preference than the CAVE did. These findings provide evidence that HMDs have a clear potential for studying pedestrian behaviour.


Assuntos
Tomada de Decisões , Pedestres/psicologia , Pedestres/estatística & dados numéricos , Caminhada/psicologia , Dispositivos Eletrônicos Vestíveis , Acidentes de Trânsito/prevenção & controle , Acidentes de Trânsito/psicologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Segurança , Acuidade Visual
20.
J Phys Act Health ; 18(3): 247-253, 2021 02 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33601334

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Financial incentives and feedback on behavior offer promise for promoting physical activity. However, evidence for the effect of each of these techniques is inadequate. The present study evaluated the effects of daily versus weekly feedback and incentives contingent on reaching a daily walking goal versus noncontingent incentives in a 2 × 2 trial. METHODS: Participants (N = 57) had a body mass index >25 kg/m2 and were insufficiently active. Participants received a daily walking goal that adapted weekly. RESULTS: Participants receiving daily feedback increased daily steps (P = .03) more than those receiving weekly feedback. Participants receiving contingent incentives did not significantly increase steps (P = .12) more than those receiving noncontingent incentives. A trend-level effect (P = .09) suggested that there may be an interaction such that the combination of daily feedback and contingent incentives is most effective. CONCLUSIONS: Results indicate that feedback is an important component of remotely delivered PA interventions and that evaluating each component of low-intensity interventions may help to improve efficacy. Moreover, results indicate that possible synergistic effects of feedback and rewards should be investigated further to help optimize interventions.


Assuntos
Exercício Físico/psicologia , Motivação , Recompensa , Caminhada , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Exercício Físico/fisiologia , Retroalimentação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Caminhada/psicologia
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