Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 10.031
Filtrar
1.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(6)2021 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34078626

RESUMO

Cannabis is one of the most common illicit drugs and has been implicated with various complications which include stroke, acute myocardial infarction, arrhythmia and limb arteritis. We are reporting a case of a young man, who is a recreational cannabis smoker along with tobacco, who developed exertional progressive breathlessness for the last 4 months, mild cough for 2 months and acute left-sided hemiparesis along with ipsilateral facial palsy for 1 day that was attributed to an acute right middle cerebral artery territory infarct. There was also gangrene in his left forearm as a result of left radial artery thrombosis. Non-ischaemic-dilated cardiomyopathy was found in contrast-enhanced cardiac MRI and he was managed in the line of decompensated heart failure; the right-hand gangrene was later amputated in the subsequent follow-ups. Hence, cannabis can lead to cardiomyopathy and resulting cardioembolism. The mainstay of management remains supportive and avoidance of the offending agent. Social education is the need of the hour.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Infarto do Miocárdio , Acidente Vascular Cerebral , Cannabis/efeitos adversos , Coração , Humanos , Infarto da Artéria Cerebral Média/diagnóstico por imagem , Infarto da Artéria Cerebral Média/etiologia , Masculino , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/etiologia , Adulto Jovem
3.
Rev. SPAGESP ; 22(1): 145-159, ene.-jun. 2021. tab
Artigo em Português | LILACS, Index Psicologia - Periódicos técnico-científicos | ID: biblio-1155520

RESUMO

Este estudo teve como objetivo identificar e analisar se os sintomas de depressão, ansiedade e estresse estão relacionados com uso de álcool, tabaco e maconha em universitários da área da saúde. Trata-se de uma pesquisa com 111 universitários matriculados em cursos da área da saúde de uma universidade da região metropolitana do Rio Grande do Sul. Os instrumentos foram Questionário de dados sociodemográficos, Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21), Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Foi realizada análise descritiva dos dados e correlação de Spearman para amostras não paramétricas. As drogas mais utilizadas foram álcool, tabaco e maconha, sendo o álcool o que mais pontuou. Houve correlações significativas entre o uso de drogas com sintomas de estresse e ansiedade. Destaca-se a necessidade de atentar para o uso de substâncias realizado por universitários da área da saúde, uma vez que esta pode acarretar danos à vida acadêmica, pessoal e profissional.


This study aimed to identify the relationship between anxiety, depression, and stress symptoms and alcohol, marijuana, and tobacco use among healthcare university students. There were 111 students from healthcare courses of a private university from the state of Rio Grande do Sul's metropolitan region, Brazil, in the present sample. The instruments were sociodemographic questionnaire; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21); Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST). Descriptive statistics and Spearman’s correlation analyses were done. The most frequently used drug was alcohol, followed by marijuana and tobacco. There were significant correlationsbetween substance use and stress and anxiety symptoms. It is evidenced that there is a need to pay attention to drug use among healthcare students, since such use can cause damage to academic, personal and professional life.


Este estudio tuvo como objetivo identificar y analizar si los síntomas de estrés, ansiedad, depresión, están relacionados con el uso de alcohol, tabaco y marihuana en estudiantes universitariosen el área de la salud. Esta es una encuesta de 111 estudiantes universitarios inscritos en cursos del area de la salud de una Universidad en la región metropolitana de Rio Grande do Sul. Instrumentos: Cuestionario de datos sociodemográficos, Escala de depresión, ansiedad y estrés (DASS-21), Prueba de detección de alcohol, tabaquismo y participación de sustancias (ASSIST). Se realizó análisis descriptivo de los datos y correlación de Spearman para muestras no paramétricas. Resultados: las drogas más utilizadas fueron alcohol, tabaco y marihuana, siendo el alcohol el que obtuvo la mayor puntuación. Hubo correlaciones significativas entre el uso de drogas con síntomas de estrés y ansiedad. Se destaca la necesidad de prestar atención al uso de substancias por parte de los estudiantes universitarios en el campo de la salud, ya que esto pueden causar daños a la vida académica, personal y profesional.


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Ansiedade , Sinais e Sintomas , Estudantes de Ciências da Saúde , Tabagismo , Universidades , Cannabis , Inquéritos e Questionários , Assistência à Saúde , Depressão , Uso de Tabaco
4.
Exp Clin Psychopharmacol ; 29(2): 137-146, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34043398

RESUMO

Cannabis and synthetic cannabinoids are abused in spite of possible adverse health consequences. The current study investigated the reinforcing effects of an ecologically relevant mode of administration (inhalation) of delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive component of cannabis, and three synthetic cannabinoids detected in synthetic cannabinoid products (JWH-018, JWH-073, and HU-210) in non-human primates (NHPs). Male and female (N = 4 each) rhesus macaques were trained to inhale warm air via a metal stem to receive a candy reinforcer, an alcohol aerosol vehicle was then paired with the candy. Dose-dependent responding for inhaled aerosols of THC (2.0-16.0 µg/kg/inhalation), JWH-018 (0.2-1.6 µg/kg/inhalation), JWH-073 (2.0-8.0 µg/kg/inhalation), and HU-210 (1.0-8.0 µg/kg/inhalation) was established using a fixed-ratio five schedule of reinforcement and compared to vehicle (alcohol) self-administration. Dose-dependent responding for inhaled heroin (25.0-100.0 µg/kg/inhalation), a known reinforcer in NHPs, was also established. Responding approximated vehicle levels for many drug doses tested, but at least half of the monkeys responded for ≥ one dose of each cannabinoid and heroin above vehicle, with the exception of THC. Drug deliveries calculated as percent vehicle followed a prototypical inverted-U shaped dose-response curve for cannabinoids and heroin except for THC and JWH-018 (in males). Grouped data according to sex demonstrated that peak percent of vehicle reinforcers earned for THC was greater in males than females, whereas peak percent of vehicle reinforcers earned for JWH-018, HU-210, and heroin were greater in females than males. These findings indicate minimal reinforcing effects of CB1 receptor agonists when self-administered by NHPs via aerosol inhalation. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
Dronabinol/análogos & derivados , Dronabinol/administração & dosagem , Indóis/administração & dosagem , Naftalenos/administração & dosagem , Animais , Canabinoides/farmacologia , Cannabis/química , Relação Dose-Resposta a Droga , Feminino , Heroína/administração & dosagem , Macaca mulatta , Masculino , Receptor CB1 de Canabinoide/agonistas , Reforço Psicológico , Autoadministração
5.
J Environ Sci (China) ; 104: 11-16, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33985714

RESUMO

Determination of pesticides in cannabis facilities is increasingly important as medicinal and recreational uses of cannabis products expand rapidly. We report a method involving wipe sampling, liquid chromatography separation, and tandem mass spectrometry, which enables determination of 82 pesticides out of the 96 regulated by Health Canada. To demonstrate an application of the method, we sampled and measured pesticides in two cannabis growing facilities, representing a non-certified and a certified site. We detected 41 pesticides in surface wipe samples at the non-certified site and 6 at the certified site. This study provides the first evidence showing pesticide occurrence on common surfaces in cannabis growing facilities and points to a need for routine monitoring and strict control of pesticide use in cannabis facilities.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Resíduos de Praguicidas , Praguicidas , Canadá , Cromatografia Líquida , Resíduos de Praguicidas/análise , Praguicidas/análise , Espectrometria de Massas em Tandem
7.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 997, 2021 05 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34044802

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: From a secondary prevention perspective, it is useful to know who is at greatest risk of progressing from substance initiation to riskier patterns of future use. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine relationships between age at first use of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis and patterns of cannabis use, frequency of use and whether age of substance use onset is related to having a cannabis use disorder (CUD). METHODS: We analysed data from Ireland's 2010/11 and 2014/15 National Drug Prevalence Surveys, which recruited 5134 and 7005 individuals respectively, aged 15 years and over, living in private households. We included only those people who reported lifetime cannabis use. Multinomial, linear and binary logistic regression analyses were used to determine relationships between age of substance use onset and patterns of cannabis use, frequency of use and having a CUD. RESULTS: When compared to former users, the odds of being a current cannabis user were found to be reduced by 11% (OR = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.83, 0.95) and 4% (OR = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.92, 1.00) for each year of delayed alcohol and cannabis use onset, respectively. Among current users, significant inverse linear relationships were noted, with increasing age of first use of tobacco (ß = - 0.547; P < .001) and cannabis (ß = - 0.634; P < .001) being associated with a decreased frequency of cannabis use within the last 30 days. The odds of having a CUD were found to be reduced by 14% (OR = 0.86; 95% CI: 0.78, 0.94) and 11% (OR = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.82, 0.98) for each year of delayed tobacco and cannabis use onset respectively in analyses which examined survey participants aged 15-34 years. CONCLUSIONS: Among people who report past cannabis use, it is those with a more precocious pattern of early use of substances, including alcohol, and especially tobacco and cannabis, who are more likely to report ongoing, heavy and problematic cannabis use. Secondary prevention initiatives should prioritise people with a pattern of very early onset substance use.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Abuso de Maconha , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Abuso de Maconha/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia
8.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 843, 2021 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33933061

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The opioid overdose epidemic in Canada and the United States has become a public health crisis - with exponential increases in opioid-related morbidity and mortality. Recently, there has been an increasing body of evidence focusing on the opioid-sparing effects of medical cannabis use (reduction of opioid use and reliance), and medical cannabis as a potential alternative treatment for chronic pain. The objective of this study is to assess the effect of medical cannabis authorization on opioid use (oral morphine equivalent; OME) between 2013 and 2018 in Alberta, Canada. METHODS: All adult patients defined as chronic opioid users who were authorized medical cannabis by their health care provider in Alberta, Canada from 2013 to 2018 were propensity score matched to non-authorized chronic opioid using controls. A total of 5373 medical cannabis patients were matched to controls, who were all chronic opioid users. The change in the weekly average OME of opioid drugs for medical cannabis patients relative to controls was measured. Interrupted time series (ITS) analyses was used to assess the trend change in OME during the 26 weeks (6 months) before and 52 weeks (1 year) after the authorization of medical cannabis among adult chronic opioid users. RESULTS: Average age was 52 years and 54% were female. Patients on low dose opioids (< 50 OME) had an increase in their weekly OME per week (absolute increase of 112.1 OME, 95% CI: 104.1 to 120.3); whereas higher dose users (OME > 100), showed a significant decrease over 6 months (- 435.5, 95% CI: - 596.8 to - 274.2) compared to controls. CONCLUSIONS: This short-term study found that medical cannabis authorization showed intermediate effects on opioid use, which was dependent on initial opioid use. Greater observations of changes in OME appear to be in those patients who were on a high dosage of opioids (OME > 100); however, continued surveillance of patients utilizing both opioids and medical cannabis is warranted by clinicians to understand the long-term potential benefits and any harms of ongoing use.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Maconha Medicinal , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides , Adulto , Alberta/epidemiologia , Analgésicos Opioides/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Maconha Medicinal/uso terapêutico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/tratamento farmacológico , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Opioides/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos
11.
Talanta ; 230: 122313, 2021 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33934778

RESUMO

Cannabis sativa is traditionally classified according to five chemotypes based on the concentration of the main phytocannabinoids tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), and cannabigerol (CBG). However, cannabis chemovars and varieties very often present similar concentrations of such phytocannabinoids but different chemical profiles, which is unavoidably translated into different pharmacological effects when used for therapeutic purposes. For this reason, a more refined approach is needed for chemovar distinction, which is described in this study and named phytocannabinomics. The classification was achieved by a comprehensive characterization of the phytocannabinoid composition, by liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry untargeted metabolomics for the detection of over a hundred phytocannabinoids, and data analysis by chemometrics for chemovars differentiation. The method was developed on fifty cannabis varieties, grown under the same conditions, and was validated to discriminate between the standard chemotypes by partial least squares discriminant analysis. Then, the method was extended to consider the entire chemical variety of the cannabis accessions, by an unsupervised approach based on the principal component analysis. The latter approach clearly indicated several new subgroups within the traditional classifications, which arise from a unique composition of the minor phytocannabinoids. The existence of these subgroups, which were never described before, is of critical importance for evaluating the pharmacological effects of cannabis chemovars.


Assuntos
Canabidiol , Cannabis , Alucinógenos , Dronabinol , Metabolômica
12.
Compend Contin Educ Dent ; 42(3): 122-126; quiz 127, 2021 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34010572

RESUMO

To achieve restorative success for esthetic cases a process is needed that can be reproduced repeatedly. As with any process there are critical steps that must be followed to ensure accurate and precise results. This article outlines a verification process of provisional restorations in order to obtain appropriate esthetics, phonetics, and function. Additionally, the article discusses how newly created contours can be transferred intraorally to the laboratory benchtop and then to the final restorations. Through the process of verification, the clinician can establish restorative predictability to enhance the restorative success of any esthetic case.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Sistemas Eletrônicos de Liberação de Nicotina , Estética Dentária
13.
Adv Ther ; 38(5): 2513-2531, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33826089

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Current standards for identifying recent cannabis use are based on body fluid testing. The Cognalyzer® is a novel electroencephalography (EEG) measurement device and algorithm designed to objectively characterize brainwave alterations associated with cannabis. The objective of this study was to assess the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity levels of the Cognalyzer® to characterize brainwave alterations following cannabis inhalation. METHODS: Seventy-five participants, aged 19-55 years, were enrolled, and oral fluid samples were collected pre-cannabis inhalation. EEG and subjective drug effects questionnaire (DEQ) were administered pre- and post-ad libitum cannabis inhalation. Fifty participants remained in the clinic for 4 h post-inhalation. Blinded analyses of the EEG files were conducted by Zentrela Inc. using two versions (V1 and V2) of the Cognalyzer® algorithm. Pre- vs. post-inhalation comparison status was characterized by the Cognalyzer® and summarized for: sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, percent false positive, percent false negative and positive and negative predictive value. The null hypothesis was tested using McNemar's test. Cognalyzer® results pre- and post-inhalation were combined with the oral fluid tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) concentration to evaluate potential to improve current drug testing. RESULTS: The two versions of the Cognalyzer® algorithm had similar diagnostic results. Diagnostic outcomes were improved when participants with missing EEG recordings or electrode placement errors were removed. The Cognalyzer® accuracy was 85.5% and 83.9%, sensitivity was 87.1% and 88.7%, and specificity was 83.9% and 79.0% for algorithm V1 and V2, respectively. Combining Cognalyzer® results with oral fluid concentrations reduced false-positive oral fluid test results by up to 49%. CONCLUSION: The Cognalyzer® characterized brainwave alterations associated with cannabis inhalation with high levels of accuracy in a population of participants with varied cannabis inhalation histories, relative to the comparison standard of pre- vs. post-inhalation status. The Cognalyzer® allows the results to be generalized to the larger population addressing a limitation in currently accepted standards.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Fumar Maconha , Adulto , Dronabinol , Eletroencefalografia , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Saliva , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Adulto Jovem
14.
Addict Behav ; 119: 106944, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33872847

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Alcohol, nicotine, and marijuana are the three most widely used substances among adolescents and young adults, with co-use of multiple substances being common. Few longitudinal studies have examined risk factors of alcohol, marijuana, and nicotine poly-substance use. We examined frequency of alcohol, marijuana, and cigarette poly-substance use over time and how key risk factors contribute to this substance use during adolescence and young adulthood. METHODS: Participants (N = 1263 9th and 10th graders) were oversampled for ever-smoking a cigarette at baseline from 16 Chicago-area high schools between 2004 and 2006. Many participants progressed to heavier cigarette use, as well as alcohol and marijuana use over time. Participants completed questionnaires assessing substance use and psychosocial factors at baseline, 6-, 15-, 24-, 33-months, and 5-, 6-, and 7-years. RESULTS: Longitudinal multi-level models demonstrated that at baseline and over time, more depression symptoms, more anxiety symptoms, negative mood regulation expectancies, and lower grade point average (GPA) were each associated with more poly-substance use over time. In addition, there were a number of interaction effects of gender (e.g., depression was related to substance use in males) and developmental stage moderated these relationships. CONCLUSIONS: Depression, anxiety, negative mood regulation expectancies, and GPA all significantly influence both initial and longitudinal levels of substance use across adolescence and young adulthood. Our findings underscore the importance of identifying and treating youth with depression and anxiety symptoms, as well as providing resources early for those struggling in school in order to help with substance use prevention and intervention efforts.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Fumar Maconha , Produtos do Tabaco , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Chicago , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Fumar Maconha/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
15.
J Int Acad Periodontol ; 23(2): 150-166, 2021 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33929931

RESUMO

Aims: To assess the periodontal status in cannabis smokers in comparison with non-cannabis smokers. Materials and methods: Electronic databases were searched as well as hand searches performed. Eligible studies followed the Population Exposure Comparison Outcome Study (PECOS) structure: P: dentate humans, E: cannabis smoking, C: non-cannabis smoking, O: Primary outcomes: periodontitis case definition, clinical attachment loss, probing depth; Secondary outcomes: bleeding on probing/ gingival inflammation, plaque index and calculus; S: observational studies. Qualitative analyses of the studies were done. The quality of cohort studies was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale and cross-sectional studies were assessed using a modified Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Results: 2661 records were screened, of which 14 articles were included. Data from a cohort study showed that highly exposed participants were at higher risk of clinical attachment loss progression. Six cross-sectional studies reported worse gingival or periodontal conditions in cannabis smokers. Nevertheless, one did not find such association, neither did three case series. Three studies were of high, two of moderate and six were of low quality. Conclusions: Based on the available data, frequent cannabis smoking could be detrimental for periodontal tissues and this could be dose-dependent. Studies including long-term cannabis smokers, and stratified for periodontal disease etiologic factors and risk factors/indicators are needed.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Doenças Periodontais , Periodontite , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Perda da Inserção Periodontal , Doenças Periodontais/epidemiologia , Fumantes
16.
Addict Behav ; 119: 106932, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33892310

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Comparing people's momentary and retrospective reports of substance use and sexual activity can illuminate discrepant recall biases across these behaviors. Extant research suggests that people tend to underreport alcohol use on retrospective surveys and overreport sexual activity. We provided an updated account of these biases, extending previous work by looking at alcohol- and cannabis-involved sexual activity as well as potential gender differences in recall biases. METHOD: Using a sample of adults (n = 110; 58.2% women), we administered surveys three times a day for 28 days to measure momentary alcohol and cannabis use, sexual activity, and substance-involved sexual activity. At the end of this momentary assessment, participants completed a retrospective survey assessing how frequently they engaged in these behaviors during the 28-day period. RESULTS: We compared participants' momentary reports-which were scaled to account for compliance rates-and retrospective surveys. While there were no significant differences in momentary and retrospective reports of alcohol or cannabis use, participants reported higher rates of sexual activity and alcohol-involved sexual activity on the retrospective surveys than the momentary reports. Effect sizes for significant differences were medium to large (Cohen's d: 0.26-0.67). CONCLUSIONS: Alcohol- and cannabis-involved sexual activity tend to be overreported on retrospective surveys, and preliminary findings suggest that these recall biases may vary by gender. Researchers interested in the co-occurrence of substance use and sexual activity should be aware of this potential random error and consider how to reduce recall biases based on method of data collection.


Assuntos
Cannabis , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Comportamento Sexual
17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33920188

RESUMO

Epilepsy is a neurological disorder mainly characterised by recurrent seizures that affect the entire population diagnosed with the condition. Currently, there is no cure for the disease and a significant proportion of patients have been deemed to have treatment-resistant epilepsy (TRE). A patient is deemed to have TRE if two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) fail to bring about seizure remission. This inefficacy of traditional AEDs, coupled with their undesirable side effect profile, has led to researchers considering alternative forms of treatment. Phytocannabinoids have long served as therapeutics with delta-9-THC (Δ9-THC) receiving extensive focus to determine its therapeutic potential. This focus on Δ9-THC has been to the detriment of analysing the plethora of other phytocannabinoids found in the cannabis plant. The overall aim of this review is to explore other novel phytocannabinoids and their place in epilepsy treatment. The current review intends to achieve this aim via an exploration of the molecular targets underlying the anticonvulsant capabilities of cannabidiol (CBD), cannabidavarin (CBDV), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabivarin (Δ9-THCV) and cannabigerol (CBG). Further, this review will provide an exploration of current pre-clinical and clinical data as it relates to the aforementioned phytocannabinoids and the treatment of epilepsy symptoms. With specific reference to epilepsy in young adult and adolescent populations, the exploration of CBD, CBDV, Δ9-THCV and CBG in both preclinical and clinical environments can guide future research and aid in the further understanding of the role of phytocannabinoids in epilepsy treatment. Currently, much more research is warranted in this area to be conclusive.


Assuntos
Canabidiol , Cannabis , Epilepsia , Adolescente , Anticonvulsivantes/uso terapêutico , Canabidiol/uso terapêutico , Epilepsia/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Convulsões
18.
Curr Opin Psychol ; 38: 80-85, 2021 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33873044

RESUMO

In the United States, policies regarding the medical and nonmedical use of cannabis are changing rapidly. In 2021, a total of 34 US states have legalized cannabis for adult medical use, and 15 of these states have legalized adult non-medical use. These changing policies have raised questions about increasing prevalences of cannabis use, changing perceptions regarding frequent use, and potentially related outcomes such as comorbid psychiatric illness or driving under the influence of cannabis. Research regarding the correlates of any and frequent cannabis use is also developing quickly. This article reviews recent empirical studies concerning (1) adult trends in cannabis use, (2) state cannabis laws and related outcomes, and (3) emerging evidence regarding how the global coronavirus 19 pandemic may impact cannabis use patterns. We summarize recent findings and conclude with suggestions to address unanticipated effects of rapidly changing cannabis laws and policies.


Assuntos
Fumar Maconha/epidemiologia , Adulto , Cannabis , Alucinógenos , Humanos , Legislação de Medicamentos , Fumar Maconha/legislação & jurisprudência , Maconha Medicinal , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
19.
Ann Emerg Med ; 77(5): 555-556, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33902835
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...