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1.
Pediatrics ; 146(Suppl 2): S218-S222, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33004643

RESUMO

Data from the past decade have revealed that neonatal mortality represents a growing burden of the under-5 mortality rate. To further reduce these deaths, the focus must expand to include building capacity of the workforce to provide high-quality obstetric and intrapartum care. Obstetric complications, such as hypertensive disorders and obstructed labor, are significant contributors to neonatal morbidity and mortality. A well-prepared workforce with the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes, and motivation is required to rapidly detect and manage these complications to save both maternal and newborn lives. Traditional off-site, didactic, and lengthy training approaches have not always yielded the desired results. Helping Mothers Survive training was modeled after Helping Babies Breathe and incorporates further evidence-based methodology to deliver training on-site to the entire team of providers, who continue to practice after training with their peers. Research has revealed that significant gains in health outcomes can be reached by using this approach. In the coronavirus disease 2019 era, we must look to translate the best practices of these training programs into a flexible and sustainable model that can be delivered remotely to maintain quality services to women and their newborns.


Assuntos
Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Capacitação em Serviço/organização & administração , Assistência Perinatal/organização & administração , Fortalecimento Institucional , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Mortalidade Infantil , Recém-Nascido , Serviços de Saúde Materno-Infantil/organização & administração , Assistência Perinatal/normas , Gravidez , Complicações na Gravidez/prevenção & controle , Complicações na Gravidez/terapia
2.
J Nepal Health Res Counc ; 18(2): 166-171, 2020 Sep 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32969371

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The study assesses the perspective of doctors working in government hospitals of Nepal regarding hospital preparedness for infection prevention measures, isolation services provisions, critical care service readiness, and training of staff for COVID-19 pandemic management. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was done in central, provincial, and local level health centers of the Government of Nepal to assess the perspective of medical doctors regarding COVID-19 pandemic readiness in their facility. Nonprobability sampling was used to collect 56 responses from doctors working in different hospitals of Nepal. An online survey was performed using a questionnaire tool, which was adapted from the guidelines of the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. RESULTS: Most of the participants were medical officers with an MBBS degree (32) followed by anesthesiologists (10). Thirteen participants worked in central hospitals (23.2%), 24 in provincial hospitals (42.8%) and 19 in local health centers (33.92%). The availability of adequate facemask was 84% in central hospitals, which was higher than provincial hospitals (66.7%), and local level health centers (77.8%). There were only 53.8% trained critical care providers in central hospitals and 29.2% in provincial hospitals. Nearly 38.5% (5) of central hospitals had measures for airborne isolation in place, whereas this was only found in 8.3% (2) of provincial hospitals surveyed for critical care facilities. Overall, only 2 hospitals had the provision of a negative pressure room with air exchanges. Only 8 participants working in central hospitals (61.5%) and 14 working in provincial hospitals (58.3%) had performed hands-on training for donning and doffing personal protective equipment. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of medical doctors working in government hospitals of Nepal perceive that provision of facemask distribution, airborne isolation rooms, critical care preparedness, and hands-on training to staff were not adequate.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Planejamento Hospitalar , Hospitais Públicos/organização & administração , Controle de Infecções/organização & administração , Capacitação em Serviço , Corpo Clínico Hospitalar/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Nepal/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Inquéritos e Questionários
4.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 36(9): 424-429, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32870615

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Suicide is a leading cause of adolescent death, and emergency department (ED) visits are recognized as an opportunity to identify at-risk youth. For patients screening positive for mental health concerns, we implemented a quality improvement initiative to enhance documentation of results and interventions in the ED, increase communication between the ED and primary care providers (PCPs), and increase PCP follow-up. METHODS: Interventions included education, feedback, and an alert in our electronic health record. Completion of a Behavioral Health Screen (BHS-ED) initiates an alert that reminds ED providers how to document and communicate results and needed follow-up to the PCP. We reviewed a random monthly sample of ED charts for adolescents 14 to 19 years old presenting with nonpsychiatric complaints who screened positive for severe depression or suicidality. Outcome measures included documentation of BHS-ED results in the ED note, communication of positive results to the PCP, PCP follow-up of results, and ED return visits. RESULTS: Documentation of BHS-ED results increased from 73% at baseline to 88% of patients after the intervention. For patients discharged from the ED with nonpsychiatric chief complaints, communication to PCPs increased from 1% at baseline to 40% during the final 3 months of the study. When PCP communication occurred, 67% of in-network PCPs followed up with patients versus 5% when no communication took place from the ED. CONCLUSIONS: A multifaceted intervention including education and an electronic health record alert improved ED documentation, communication, and PCP follow-up of issues identified during ED-based mental health screens.


Assuntos
Comunicação , Registros Eletrônicos de Saúde , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Saúde Mental , Sumários de Alta do Paciente Hospitalar , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Adolescente , Assistência ao Convalescente , Depressão/diagnóstico , Documentação , Humanos , Capacitação em Serviço , Programas de Rastreamento , Melhoria de Qualidade , Suicídio/prevenção & controle , Adulto Jovem
5.
Simul Healthc ; 15(5): 303-309, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32910106

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Working under extreme stress can cause medical professionals to deviate from clinical guidelines even if they know of their existence, let alone in situations such as COVID-19 where guidelines are unclear, fluid, and resources limited. In situ simulation has been proven an effective tool for training medical professionals during previous healthcare crises, eg, Ebola, influenza, as well as for assessing the preparedness of centers by identifying potential latent safety threats. In this article, we describe our ongoing simulation activities to ensure that our staff is best prepared to adapt to the challenges of COVID-19. METHODS: This is a prospective preparedness assessment and training intervention at a tertiary care academic center in Lebanon during the COVID-19 pandemic. In situ simulations followed by debriefing with good judgment occur daily involving native teams of 3 to 5 professionals in the newly established COVID intensive care unit and wards, the adult and pediatric intensive care unit and wards, and the emergency department. The simulations are assessed by the instructor using the Simulation Team Assessment Tool and by the participants using the Simulation Effectiveness Tool. Transcripts of recorded simulation debriefings are analyzed for content for latent safety threats using the SHELL Framework (Software-Hardware-Equipment-Liveware). RESULTS: In 2 weeks, we conducted 15 simulations with 106 participants and 47 observers. Simulation Team Assessment Tool scores show an overall improvement across the hospital over time [101.5 ± 13 (80-134)]. Participants' feedback on the Simulation Effectiveness Tool has been predominantly positive on the educational and practical benefits of the simulation activity. Data from debriefings and observations demonstrated the following categories of latent safety threats: inadequate preparedness on infection control, uncertainty of guidelines on oxygen supplementation and intubation protocols, lack of leadership and communication, overall panic, and others. CONCLUSIONS: Our single-center preparedness intervention demonstrated multiple latent safety threats in relation to COVID-19, which can be recognized through simulation before translating into actual patient care.


Assuntos
Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/organização & administração , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Capacitação em Serviço/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Treinamento por Simulação/organização & administração , Manuseio das Vias Aéreas/métodos , Betacoronavirus , Comunicação , Humanos , Controle de Infecções , Liderança , Líbano/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente/organização & administração , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Estudos Prospectivos
7.
Crit Care Nurs Q ; 43(4): 428-450, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32833779

RESUMO

COVID-19 created an environment that required rapid implementation of procedures and processes to minimize transmission. This led to an urgent response from the Department of Professional Practice and Education to implement education to a large number of personnel. This article describes strategies and methods employed to meet the training demands at a time when resources and supplies were limited. This study aims at developing and implementing education on infection prevention and management of patients with suspected or known COVID-19 for the nursing staff providing care. Following guidelines from the hospital's COVID-19 oversight committee, the Department of Professional Practice and Education rapidly initiated education on several key topics. This was accomplished by teamwork within the department to quickly identify priorities and suspend noncritical programs. Multiple training methods were deployed while a smaller group of educators developed additional training. Sixty to seventy percent of 1015 staff were trained within 6 days. Soon after, several additional educational topics were identified and training was concluded over a 3-week period. Training can be provided on an urgent basis with the use of multiple educational methods, suspension of noncritical programs, and teamwork. A smaller committee within the department allows for concentrated efforts in the design of additional training.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/enfermagem , Educação em Enfermagem/organização & administração , Capacitação em Serviço/organização & administração , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Recursos Humanos de Enfermagem no Hospital/educação , Pneumonia Viral/enfermagem , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(31): e21385, 2020 Jul 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32756129

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: To perform a cost-error analysis based on a quasi-experimental pre-post study of the preanalytical errors in 2 hospital laboratories. The real cost and theoretical cost are defined as the cost resulting from errors with or without the training intervention. The real impact associated to the training program was estimated, calculated as the total associated to the preanalytical errors cost difference. The costs were measured using Andalusian Public Health Service fees. Cost analysis of an educational intervention presented in a previous study from 2017. Preanalytical errors were detected in the laboratories of the University Hospital Virgen de la Victoria (Málaga, Spain) and in the University Hospital Juan Ramón Jiménez (Huelva, Spain). METHODS: The founded errors were divided into blood and urine samples. Univariate sensitivity analysis was used to assess how parameter uncertainty impacted on overall results. Variations of parameters between 0% and 5% were substituted into the base case. RESULTS: The real impact associated with educational intervention in LAB1 was an increase of &OV0556;16,961.378, and the expected impact was an increase &OV0556;78,745.27 (difference of &OV0556;61,783.9). In LAB2, the real impact in the same period amounted to &OV0556;260,195.37, and the expected impact was &OV0556;193,905.83 (difference of -&OV0556;66,289.54). The results were different in the 2 laboratories, proving the intervention in only one of them to be more effective. CONCLUSIONS: Costs analysis determined that this training intervention can provide saves in the costs, as the effectiveness of the educational sessions in reducing preanalytical errors currently results in a significant decrease of the costs associated with these errors.


Assuntos
Erros de Diagnóstico/economia , Capacitação em Serviço/economia , Laboratórios Hospitalares/normas , Análise Custo-Benefício , Erros de Diagnóstico/prevenção & controle , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina/economia , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina/normas , Humanos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados não Aleatórios como Assunto , Atenção Primária à Saúde/organização & administração , Manejo de Espécimes/normas
10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32806769

RESUMO

We aimed to investigate the management of urgent dental care, the perception of risk and workplace preparedness among dental staff in Norway during the COVID-19 pandemic. An electronic questionnaire regarding the strictest confinement period in Norway (13 March-17 April 2020) was distributed to dental staff. Among the 1237 respondents, 727 (59%) treated patients, of whom 170 (14%) worked in clinics designated to treat patients suspected or confirmed to have COVID-19. Out of them 88% (143) received training and 64% (103) simulation in additional infection prevention procedures, while 27 (24%) respondents reported deviation. In total, 1051 (85%) respondents perceived that dental staff had a high risk of being infected, 1039 (84%) that their workplace handled the current situation well, 767 (62%) that their workplace had adequate infection control equipment and 507 (41%) agreed that their workplace is well equipped to handle an escalation. Before an appointment, 1182 (96%) respondents always/often inquired per phone information if a patient experienced symptoms of COVID-19, and 1104 (89%) asked about a history of travel to affected areas. Twice as many patients on average per week were treated by phone than in a clinic. A lower proportion of dental staff in high incidence counties applied additional infection prevention measures compared to low and medium incidence counties. To conclude, urgent dental health care was managed relatively well in Norway. Additional training of the dental staff in adequate infection prevention and step-by-step procedures may be needed. These results may be used to improve the dental health service's response to future outbreaks.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Serviços de Saúde Bucal/organização & administração , Controle de Infecções/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Estudos Transversais , Serviços de Saúde Bucal/normas , Feminino , Humanos , Controle de Infecções/normas , Capacitação em Serviço/organização & administração , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Noruega/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Medição de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Telemedicina/organização & administração , Telefone , Local de Trabalho/organização & administração
11.
Public Health Rep ; 135(1_suppl): 50S-56S, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32735197

RESUMO

In 2014, California passed Assembly Bill 966, which required condom access for persons incarcerated in all 35 California state prisons (33 men's and 2 women's prisons). The California Correctional Health Care Services and the Sexually Transmitted Disease Control Branch and the Office of AIDS of the California Department of Public Health collaborated in a prison administration-led multidisciplinary implementation workgroup. Our workgroup, representing public health, correctional health, legal and legislative affairs, labor relations, and prison staff members, participated in 4 planning meetings during May-September 2015. We surveyed prison staff members and incarcerated men to identify and address potential challenges; conceptualized a tamper-resistant condom dispenser; developed educational materials, frequently asked questions for staff members, and fact sheets for the public; and conducted forums for custody and medical staff members at each prison. Key lessons learned included the need for high-level custody support, engagement of labor unions early in the decision-making process, and flexibility within defined parameters for sites to determine best practices given their unique institutional population, culture, and physical layout. Condom access was initiated at 4 prisons in July 2015 and expanded incrementally to the remaining 29 men's prisons through July 2016. A total of 243 563 condoms were accessed in the men's prisons, for an average of 354 condoms per 1000 population per month. The start-up dispenser cost was $69 825 (735 dispensers at $95 each). We estimated an annual condom cost of $0.60 per person. Although staff members and incarcerated men expressed concern that this legislation would condone sex and provide repositories for contraband, no serious adverse incidents involving condoms were reported. California demonstrated that condom access is a safe, low-cost intervention with high uptake for a large correctional system and provided a replicable implementation model for other states. Prison condom programs have the potential to decrease transmission of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among incarcerated persons and their communities, which are often disproportionately affected by STIs, HIV, and other chronic diseases.


Assuntos
Preservativos/provisão & distribução , Prisões/organização & administração , Saúde Pública , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , California/epidemiologia , Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Educação em Saúde/organização & administração , Humanos , Capacitação em Serviço/organização & administração , Sindicatos/organização & administração , Masculino , Prisões/economia , Prisões/normas , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia
13.
J Investig Med ; 68(6): 1128-1134, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32641352

RESUMO

Mentorship is a critical component of career development, particularly in academic medicine. Peer mentorship, which does not adhere to traditional hierarchies, is perhaps more accessible for underrepresented groups, including women and minorities. In this article, we review various models of peer mentorship, highlighting their respective advantages and disadvantages. Structured peer mentorship groups exist in different settings, such as those created under the auspices of formal career development programs, part of training grant programs, or through professional societies. Social media has further enabled the establishment of informal peer mentorship through participatory online groups, blogs, and forums that provide platforms for peer-to-peer advice and support. Such groups can evolve rapidly to address changing conditions, as demonstrated by physician listserv and Facebook groups related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Peer mentorship can also be found among colleagues brought together through a common location, interest, or goal, and typically these relationships are informal and fluid. Finally, we highlight here our experience with intentional formation of a small peer mentoring group that provides structure and a safe space for professional and social-emotional growth and support. In order to maximize impact and functionality, this model of peer mentorship requires commitment among peers and a more formalized process than many other peer mentoring models, accounting for group dynamics and the unique needs of members. When done successfully, the depth of these mentoring relationships can produce myriad benefits for individuals with careers in academic medicine including, but not limited to, those from underrepresented backgrounds.


Assuntos
Capacitação em Serviço , Relações Interprofissionais , Tutoria , Mentores , Escolha da Profissão , Infecções por Coronavirus , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Grupos Minoritários , Exposição Ocupacional , Pandemias , Grupo Associado , Médicos , Médicas , Pneumonia Viral , Mídias Sociais , Apoio Social , Sociedades Médicas , Estados Unidos , Universidades
14.
Am Surg ; 86(6): 585-590, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32683963

RESUMO

This is the second installment of a series of interviews, conducted by the senior author (S.D.W.) and the American College of Surgeons (ACS), that feature international leaders in surgery telling of the challenges they faced during the global COVID-19 pandemic. The disease arrived in the United Kingdom with devastating effects within a few weeks of its spread to Western Europe from China. In Oxford, Professor Neil Mortensen used his position as the President-elect of the Royal College of Surgeons of England to help coordinate efforts among the 4 Royal Colleges in the United Kingdom (his own, London, Edinburgh, and Ireland) to mobilize and retrain surgeons for duty helping to support in the critical care of patients with respiratory illness from the virus. In London, Lord Ara Darzi, a colon and rectal surgeon and leading innovator in minimally invasive surgery, underwent re-education himself in respiratory care to help his medical colleagues. As a member of the House of Lords involved in matters regarding the National Health Service as former Parliamentary Undersecretary of Health, he facilitated legislative measures to increase the physician workforce necessary to meet the demand for skilled personnel. Professor Mortensen and Lord Darzi have been recognized as honorary fellows of the ACS for their contributions to surgery. "Lots of people do not think it can possibly happen to them", Professor Mortensen said, "Our experience is that it will happen to you, and you cannot be prepared enough. Preparation, preparation, preparation is what you need to do."


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Pandemias , Papel do Médico , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Cirurgiões , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Cuidados Críticos , Humanos , Transmissão de Doença Infecciosa do Profissional para o Paciente/prevenção & controle , Capacitação em Serviço , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Cirurgiões/educação , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Operatórios , Triagem , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
16.
Pediatrics ; 146(2)2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32690806

RESUMO

Long-acting reversible contraceptives are the most effective methods to prevent pregnancy and also offer noncontraceptive benefits such as reducing menstrual blood flow and dysmenorrhea. The safety and efficacy of long-acting reversible contraception are well established for adolescents, but the rate of use remains low for this population. The pediatrician can play a key role in increasing access to long-acting reversible contraception for adolescents by providing accurate patient-centered contraception counseling and by understanding and addressing the barriers to use.


Assuntos
Contracepção Reversível de Longo Prazo , Adolescente , Amenorreia/induzido quimicamente , Confidencialidade , Aconselhamento , Pessoas com Deficiência , Dismenorreia/tratamento farmacológico , Feminino , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Consentimento Livre e Esclarecido , Capacitação em Serviço , Dispositivos Intrauterinos , Contracepção Reversível de Longo Prazo/efeitos adversos , Contracepção Reversível de Longo Prazo/economia , Menorragia/tratamento farmacológico , Pediatras/educação , Relações Médico-Paciente , Gravidez , Gravidez na Adolescência/prevenção & controle , Estados Unidos
17.
Pediatrics ; 146(2)2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32632023

RESUMO

Although autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be reliably detected in the second year of life, the average age of diagnosis is 4 to 5 years. Limitations in access to timely ASD diagnostic evaluations delay enrollment in interventions known to improve developmental outcomes. As such, developing and testing streamlined methods for ASD diagnosis is a public health and research priority. In this report, we describe the Early Autism Evaluation (EAE) Hub system, a statewide initiative for ASD screening and diagnosis in the primary care setting. Development of the EAE Hub system involved geographically targeted provision of developmental screening technical assistance to primary care, community outreach, and training primary care clinicians in ASD evaluation. At the EAE Hubs, a standard clinical pathway was implemented for evaluation of children, ages 18 to 48 months, at risk for ASD. From 2012 to 2018, 2076 children were evaluated (mean age: 30 months; median evaluation wait time: 62 days), and 33% of children received a diagnosis of ASD. Our findings suggest that developing a tiered system of developmental screening and early ASD evaluation is feasible in a geographic region facing health care access problems. Through targeted delivery of education, outreach, and intensive practice-based training, large numbers of young children at risk for ASD can be identified, referred, and evaluated in the local primary care setting. The EAE Hub model has potential for dissemination to other states facing similar neurodevelopmental health care system burdens. Implementation lessons learned and key system successes, challenges, and future directions are reviewed.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/diagnóstico , Programas de Rastreamento , Transtorno do Espectro Autista/epidemiologia , Pré-Escolar , Procedimentos Clínicos , Diagnóstico Precoce , Humanos , Indiana/epidemiologia , Lactente , Capacitação em Serviço , Profissionais de Enfermagem Pediátrica/educação , Pediatras/educação , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Vigilância em Saúde Pública
18.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 302(3): 585-593, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32661755

RESUMO

PUPROSE: An emergency caesarean section is a potentially life-threatening situation both for the mother and the newborn. Non-technical skills can be improved by simulation training and are necessary to manage this urgent situation successfully. The objective of this study was to investigate, if training of emergency caesarean section can be transferred into daily work to improve the outcome parameters pH an APGAR of the newborn. METHODS: In this pre-post study, 141 professionals took part in a training for emergency caesarean section. Participants received a questionnaire, based on the tools "Training Evaluation Inventory" and "Transfer Climate Questionnaire" 1 year after training. Outcome data of the newborn were collected from the hospitals information system. RESULTS: Except the scale "extinction", Cronbach's alpha was higher than 0.62. All scales were rated lower than 2.02 on a 5-point Likert Scale (1 = fullest approval; 5 = complete rejection). "Negative reinforcement" was rated with 2.87 (SD 0.73). There were no significant differences in outcome data prior. The questionnaire fulfils criteria for application except the scale "extinction". CONCLUSION: The presented training course was perceived as useful by the professionals and attitudes toward training were positive; the content was positively reinforced in practice 1 year after training. Parameters of the newborn did not change. It is conceivable that other outcome parameters (e.g. posttraumatic stress disorder) are addressed by the training. The development of relevant outcome parameters for the quality of emergency sections needs further investigation.


Assuntos
Cesárea/educação , Serviços Médicos de Emergência/métodos , Capacitação em Serviço/métodos , Comunicação Interdisciplinar , Adulto , Cesárea/estatística & dados numéricos , Avaliação Educacional , Emergências , Tratamento de Emergência , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Recém-Nascido , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Gravidez , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
19.
Recurso educacional aberto em Português | CVSP - Regional | ID: oer-3894

RESUMO

Coleção de estratégias de busca elaboradas pela BIREME e Rede de Referencistas para apoiar a construção de filtros temáticos para Instâncias BVS, datas comemorativas ou campanhas de promoção da saúde, estudos com análises da produção científica, entre outras aplicações.


Assuntos
Bibliotecas Digitais , Capacitação em Serviço
20.
J Prev Med Public Health ; 53(3): 175-177, 2020 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-530179

RESUMO

Public health doctors of Korea contributed significantly to massive coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) testing. They were immediately dispatched to epicenters of the COVID-19 pandemic, and have run tests at screening centers, airport quarantines and hospitals. However, their expertise from in-field experience has been often neglected. It is time to reorganize public health doctor system to better prepare for future epidemics. Transforming and strengthening their roles as public health experts through systematic training is crucial.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Papel do Médico , Médicos/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Prática de Saúde Pública , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Planejamento em Desastres/organização & administração , Humanos , Capacitação em Serviço , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , República da Coreia/epidemiologia
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