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1.
J Invasive Cardiol ; 35(1): E59, 2023 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36588097

RESUMO

Iatrogenic ventricular perforation of the myocardial wall is a rare but life-threatening complication. It has been described using pulmonary artery catheter, pigtail catheter, and Judkins catheter. Straight wires and catheters can be used to cross the aortic valve for left ventriculogram; however, the risk of perforation is higher compared with J-tip wires. Prompt recognition of cardiac tamponade and pericardial drain insertion is vital, but surgical patch repair may be required for definitive treatment. This case highlights the importance of increased vigilance and prompt management of cardiac tamponade with the use of high-risk equipment during cardiac catheterization.


Assuntos
Tamponamento Cardíaco , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Traumatismos Cardíacos , Humanos , Tamponamento Cardíaco/diagnóstico , Tamponamento Cardíaco/etiologia , Tamponamento Cardíaco/cirurgia , Cateterismo Cardíaco/efeitos adversos , Ventrículos do Coração/diagnóstico por imagem , Ventrículos do Coração/cirurgia , Pericárdio , Traumatismos Cardíacos/diagnóstico , Traumatismos Cardíacos/etiologia , Traumatismos Cardíacos/cirurgia , Cateteres/efeitos adversos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos
2.
PLoS One ; 18(1): e0280207, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36689411

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: During critical care procedural skills training (e.g., in intubation and pericardiocentesis) the appropriate supervision level is important to ensure correct use of techniques and guarantee patient safety. The appropriate teaching style should be selected to address residents' learning behavior and foster their competence. The aim of this study was to explore the number of repetitions for given skills needed to achieve a specified supervision level and a specific teaching style. METHODS: This cross-sectional multicenter survey obtained data from residents and faculty of three multidisciplinary intensive care units (ICU) in Switzerland. Using a 4-point Likert scale, participants were asked to indicate the number of repetitions required to achieve the specified supervision level and teaching style. RESULTS: Among 91 physicians, the response rate was 64% (n = 59). Their median estimations of the numbers of skill repetitions needed to achieve the final fourth level of supervision and final fourth stage of teaching style were as follows: arterial catheter insertion: supervision level 32, teaching style 17.5; peritoneal paracentesis: supervision level 27, teaching style 17; central venous catheter insertion: supervision level 38, teaching style 28; lumbar puncture: supervision level 38, teaching style 21; endotracheal intubation: supervision level 100, teaching style 45; chest drain insertion: supervision level 27, teaching style 21.5; temporary pacemaker placement: supervision level 50, teaching style 19.5; percutaneous tracheostomy: supervision level 50, teaching style 29; pericardiocentesis: supervision level 50, teaching style 35. Comparison of repetitions between supervision level and teaching style revealed no difference at the first and second levels, except for endotracheal intubation at level 2 (p = 0.03). Differences were observed at the third and fourth levels of supervision level and teaching style (p≤0.04). CONCLUSIONS: It appears that the supervision level and teaching style applied by faculty should change according to both the number of repetitions and the difficulty of critical care procedural skills.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Internato e Residência , Humanos , Estudos Transversais , Cateterismo Venoso Central/métodos , Currículo , Intubação Intratraqueal , Cuidados Críticos , Competência Clínica , Ensino
3.
J Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 45(1): 25-28, 2023 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36598960

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Central venous lines (CVL) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) provide comfortable administration of intensive chemotherapy and blood sampling. The optimal time for the insertion of CVL in patients with ALL during induction therapy is controversial. This study aimed to investigate the frequency of CVL-related complications in children with ALL concerning the time of CVL insertion. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We reviewed the records of 52 pediatric ALL patients with CVL. CVL placement before or on treatment day 15 was defined as "early insertion", and after treatment day 15 was defined as "late insertion". Demographics, preoperative blood counts, type of central line, time of CVL placement, CVL-related complications, and blood counts during complications were all noted. All the data were collected from those with the first catheter use. RESULTS: CVL was placed ≤15 days in 26 patients (50%) and after 15 days in 26 patients (50%). Regarding the infection rates, no statistical difference was found between early and late CVL-inserted groups ( P =n.s.). Five patients developed thrombosis, and risk was found to be similar between early and late CVL-inserted groups ( P =n.s.). Catheter-related mechanical complications were recorded in 7 patients (3 in early and 4 in late CVL-inserted group, ( P =n.s.). CONCLUSION: The present study showed no relation between the timing of CVL placement during induction therapy and the occurrence of infection and thrombosis. Our results suggest that CVL can be placed safely at the time of diagnosis or early induction treatment to provide a comfortable administration of chemotherapy and decrease painful blood samplings.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateteres Venosos Centrais , Leucemia-Linfoma Linfoblástico de Células Precursoras , Trombose , Humanos , Criança , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Trombose/etiologia , Cateteres Venosos Centrais/efeitos adversos , Leucemia-Linfoma Linfoblástico de Células Precursoras/complicações , Estudos Retrospectivos
4.
Zhonghua Er Ke Za Zhi ; 61(1): 43-48, 2023 Jan 02.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36594120

RESUMO

Objective: To compare the dwelling time and complications of low lying umbilical venous catheterization (UVC) in preterm infants with that of central UVC. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study. A total of 3 020 preterm infants from 44 neonatal intensive care units (NICU) who had UVC inserted from October 2019 to August 2021 were enrolled. Demographic and general baseline data, dwelling time of UVC and reasons for removal, complications and their occurrence time were collected. According to the position of the catheter tip, the preterm infants were divided into low lying UVC group (insertion depth of 3-5 cm) and central UVC group (the catheter tip was close to the entrance of right atrium, or at the 8th-9th thoracic vertebra level). The Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare the dwelling time and incidence of complications (cases/1 000 catheter days), and the independent t test and Chi-square test were used to compare the characteristics between the 2 groups. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the optimal cut-off value of UVC dwelling time. Results: Among the included 3 020 preterm infants, 1 624 (53.8%) were males, the gestational age was 29.9 (28.4, 31.6) weeks, the birth weight was (1 264±301) g, and 2 172 (71.9%) premature babies had central UVC. There were no significant differences in the proportion of males, the gestational age and the birth weight of neonates between the 2 groups (all P>0.05). There were also no significant differences in the rate of maternal history, PPROM>18 hours, chorioamnionitis, antenatal antibacterial angents exposure and antibacterial angents usage through UVC (all P>0.05). The dwelling time of central UVC was longer than that of low lying UVC (7 (6, 10) vs. 4 (3, 7) days, U=23.42, P<0.001). The complication incidence of central and low lying UVC were 20.0 and 70.8 cases/1 000 catheter days, respectively. The top 3 complications of central UVC were occlusion, catheter tip migration, and CLABSI (9.3, 3.5, 3.0 cases/1 000 catheter days). The top 3 complications of low lying UVC were catheter occlusion, CLABSI, and catheter tip migration (45.8, 6.3, 5.4 cases/1 000 catheter days). The ROC curve of UVC dwelling time and complications showed that the cut-off values ​​of central UVC and low lying UVC were 6.5 and 4.5 days, respectively. The 2 groups both showed a trend of increases in the 3 complications with the prolonged dwelling time. Cox regression analysis showed that the overall difference in the proportion of occlusion between the central UVC and low lying UVC groups was statistically significant (χ2=30.18, P=0.024). There were both no significant differences in catheter tip migration and CLABSI (both P>0.05). Conclusions: The most common UVC complication in preterm infants is occlusion. It is not recommended to keep a low lying UVC for longer than 4.5 days. During the whole dwelling period, a close monitoring for UVC complications is required.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateterismo Periférico , Gravidez , Masculino , Recém-Nascido , Humanos , Feminino , Lactente , Recém-Nascido Prematuro , Peso ao Nascer , Estudos Prospectivos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Antibacterianos , Cateterismo Periférico/efeitos adversos , Estudos Retrospectivos
5.
Med Sci Monit ; 29: e938851, 2023 Jan 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36627833

RESUMO

BACKGROUND Ultrasound-guided procedures have become more reliable and efficient in daily anesthesiology practice, with increased patient comfort, better antimicrobial pattern, and easer care, and can be used in routine central vein catheterization practice. The infraclavicular subclavian vein approach provides all these advandages and in some clinical scenarios ensures the only appropriate route to central vein access. Therefore, this study of 105 patients aimed to implement and evaluate the use of ultrasound-guided infraclavicular subclavian venous catheterization. MATERIAL AND METHODS We enrolled 108 patients who were scheduled for elective major abdominal surgery and had an indication for central venous access. Catheterization was done according to the developed protocol. Anesthesiologists with at least 1 year of experience in regional ultrasound-guided anesthesia participated in this study. Data were collected and compared with the existing literature. RESULTS Out of 108 patients enrolled, 3 were excluded due to unfulfilled protocol. The successful catheterization rate was 98.1%. A significant relationship with deeper and narrower vein and failure was noted. On average, the distance between the vein entry point and acoustic shadow of the clavicle was 10.45 mm, at this point the depth was 22.01 mm and the diameter of the vein was 10.74 mm. The length of catheter intratissue passage was 42.06 mm. The angle between the skin and catheter passage was 31.58°. The malposition rate was 8.7%, and no predictive factors were identified. Equations to predict vein diameter and depth were generated. Patient weight more than 119.5 kg predicted procedure failure. There were no complications. CONCLUSIONS Ultrasound-guided infraclavicular subclavian vein catheterization can be easily and safely integrated into daily clinical practice, with high success rates and low complication rates.


Assuntos
Anestesia por Condução , Anestesiologia , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Humanos , Lituânia , Cateterismo Venoso Central/métodos , Ultrassonografia de Intervenção/métodos
6.
BMC Pediatr ; 23(1): 21, 2023 Jan 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36639748

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) with its tip preferably in the vena cava is essential in caring for patients with chronic conditions in general pediatrics. However, PICC-related complications are concerning and warrant further investigations. OBJECTIVES: To share the experience of a nurse-inserted peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) program initiated in a general pediatric department. METHODS: A retrospective descriptive cohort study based on a prospectively collected database was conducted. All PICCs inserted in the departments of gastroenterology and pulmonology in a tertiary pediatric center from Dec. 2015 to Dec. 2019 were included in the study. Complications and risk factors were analyzed by comparing cases with and without complications. We also reported arm movements in correcting mal-positioned newly-inserted PICCs. RESULTS: There were 169 cases with a median (IQR) age of 42(6, 108) months who received PICC insertion during a 4-year period. Inflammatory bowel disease was the leading diagnosis accounting for 25.4% (43/169) of all cases. The overall complication rate was 16.4 per 1000 catheter days with malposition and occlusion as the two most common complications. Multivariate models performed by logistic regression demonstrated that young age [p = 0.004, OR (95%CI) = 0.987(0.978, 0.996)] and small PICC diameter (1.9Fr, p = 0.003, OR (95%CI) = 3.936(1.578, 9.818)] were risk factors for PICC complications. Correction of malpositioned catheters was attempted and all succeeded in 9 eligible cases by using arm movements. CONCLUSION: The nurse-inserted PICC program in general pediatrics is feasible with a low rate of complications. PICC tip malposition and occlusion were two major PICC-related complications when low age and small catheter lumina were major risk factors. Furtherly, arm manipulation potentially is an easy and effective approach for correcting malpositioned newly-inserted PICC catheters.


Assuntos
Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateterismo Periférico , Cateteres Venosos Centrais , Humanos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Estudos de Coortes , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Cateteres , Cateterismo Periférico/efeitos adversos , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/etiologia
7.
Indian Pediatr ; 60(1): 72-74, 2023 Jan 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36639975

RESUMO

We retrieved data of ultrasound-guided neonatal internal jugular vein (IJV) cannulations done between November, 2020 and March, 2021. Of the 33 ultrasound-guided IJV cannulation in neonates, 32 were successful with overall success rate of 97%. Median (IQR) number of attempts per insertion was 2 (1,3.5). There were no major complications observed during the insertion of the catheter. In one instance, inadvertent carotid artery puncture was encountered, without significant bleeding.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Recém-Nascido , Humanos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Veias Jugulares/diagnóstico por imagem , Neonatologistas , Ultrassonografia de Intervenção , Estudos Prospectivos
9.
Pediatr Blood Cancer ; 70(1): e30029, 2023 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36331108

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Central venous access devices (CVAD) are vital for cancer therapeutics in pediatric oncology. Tunneled vascular access devices (TVAD) are preferred in children for prolonged and frequent vascular access. Data on insertion, care, and complications of CVAD in children from low middle-income countries (LMIC) are scarce, heterogeneous, and retrospective. PROCEDURE: This prospective observational study on eligible children <12 years with pediatric malignancies requiring chemotherapy for minimum 6 months from diagnosis excluded children with mucosal bleeding, coagulopathy, and infections. TVAD insertion was ultrasound (USG) guided. Number of catheter-days, surgical and nonsurgical complications, and risk factors for catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) were noted TVAD removal due to complications, therapy completion, tumor progression, or death. RESULTS: Data from 61 of 86 eligible children with median age 42 months (range 1-144) were analyzed. Hematological malignancy and severe thrombocytopenia were seen in 37/61 (61%) and 18/61 (30%) children, respectively. First-attempt success rate was 74%. Surgical complications were seen in four of 61 (7%). Nonsurgical complications were seen in 33/61 (54%) children; CRBSI was commonest 24/61 (39%), causing removal of TVAD in 14/61 (23%). Incidence per 1000 catheter-days for CRBSI was 3.24. Antibiotic lock therapy could salvage nine of 24 TVAD with CRBSI. Thrombus and accidental removal was seen in six of 61 (10%) and four of 61 (7%). None of the studied risk factors were significantly associated with CRBSI. The mean insertion duration of TVAD was 121 ± 90 days. CONCLUSION: USG-guided TVAD insertion is safe and reliable way for chemotherapy administration with acceptable complications in children with malignancies in LMIC, including children with severe thrombocytopenia.


Assuntos
Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateteres Venosos Centrais , Neoplasias , Trombocitopenia , Humanos , Lactente , Pré-Escolar , Criança , Cateteres Venosos Centrais/efeitos adversos , Estudos Prospectivos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/epidemiologia , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/etiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Neoplasias/terapia , Neoplasias/etiologia , Ultrassonografia de Intervenção , Trombocitopenia/etiologia
10.
J Infus Nurs ; 46(1): 28-35, 2023.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36571825

RESUMO

The use of midline catheters has increased to reduce excessive use of central venous access devices, and additional data on midline catheter complications are needed. This study aimed to describe midline catheter complications among hospitalized patients. This retrospective study included a random sample of 300 hospitalized patients with a midline catheter insertion in 2019. The primary outcome was a composite end point of 8 complications: occlusion, bleeding at insertion site, infiltration/extravasation, catheter-related thrombosis, accidental removal, phlebitis, hematoma, and catheter-related infection. Midline catheter failure was defined as removal prior to the end of therapy due to complications. Among 300 midline catheters, the incidence of the composite end point of 1 or more midline complications was 38% (95% confidence interval, 33%-44%). Complications included occlusion (17.0%), bleeding at insertion site (12.0%), infiltration/extravasation (10.0%), catheter-related thrombosis (4.0%), accidental removal (3.0%), phlebitis (0.3%), hematoma (0.3%), and catheter-related infection (0.3%). Midline catheter failure occurred in 16% of midline catheters (n = 48) due to infiltration/extravasation (n = 27), accidental removal (n = 10), catheter-related thrombosis (n = 9), occlusion (n = 4), and catheter-related infection (n = 1). Three catheters had 2 types of failure. The most common complications of occlusion and bleeding rarely resulted in midline catheter failure. The most common causes of midline catheter failure were infiltration/extravasation, accidental removal, and catheter-related thrombosis.


Assuntos
Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateterismo Periférico , Flebite , Trombose , Humanos , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/etiologia , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/complicações , Incidência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Cateteres/efeitos adversos , Flebite/epidemiologia , Flebite/etiologia , Trombose/etiologia , Trombose/complicações , Cateterismo Periférico/métodos , Hematoma/etiologia , Hematoma/complicações , Cateteres de Demora/efeitos adversos
11.
Cardiovasc Intervent Radiol ; 46(1): 43-48, 2023 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36509940

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Clinical outcomes of implantable port catheters (IPCs) placed via alternative veins such as the external jugular and cervical collaterals have not been well established. This investigation evaluates the short- and long-term outcomes of IPCs inserted via alternate cervical veins (ACV) compared to traditionally inserted IPCs via the internal jugular vein (IJV). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 24 patients who received an IPC between 2010 and 2020 via an ACV-defined as the external jugular vein, superficial cervical vein, or unnamed collateral veins-were identified. Based on power analysis, a matched control group of 72 patients who received IPCs via the IJV was identified. Non-inferiority analysis for port complications was performed between the two groups based on the selected non-inferiority margin of 20%. Secondary end points included complication-free survival and comparison of complications by the time at which they occurred. RESULTS: ACV access was non-inferior to traditional access for overall complications. Alternate access resulted in fewer complications than traditional access with an estimated reduction of - 7.0% [95% CI - 23.6%, 39.7%]. There was no significant difference in peri-procedural and post-procedural complications between the two groups. Complication-free survival was also equivalent between the two groups. CONCLUSION: IPC placement via ACVs was non-inferior to IPCs placed via traditional access through the IJV. When abnormal pathology obviates the use of IJV access, other cervical veins may be considered prior to seeking alternate locations such as femoral, translumbar, inferior vena cava, and hepatic veins.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Dispositivos de Acesso Vascular , Humanos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/métodos , Cateteres de Demora , Veias Jugulares , Veia Cava Inferior
12.
Crit Care Med ; 51(2): e37-e44, 2023 Feb 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36476809

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: This clinical trial aimed to compare the ultrasound-guided in-plane infraclavicular cannulation of the axillary vein (AXV) and the ultrasound-guided out-of-plane cannulation of the internal jugular vein (IJV). DESIGN: A prospective, single-blinded, open label, parallel-group, randomized trial. SETTING: Two university-affiliated ICUs in Poland (Opole and Lublin). PATIENTS: Mechanically ventilated intensive care patients with clinical indications for central venous line placement. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomly assigned into two groups: the IJV group ( n = 304) and AXV group ( n = 306). The primary outcome was to compare the IJV group and AXV group through the venipuncture and catheterization success rates. Secondary outcomes were catheter tip malposition and early mechanical complication rates. All catheterizations were performed by advanced residents and consultants in anesthesiology and intensive care. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The IJV puncture rate was 100%, and the AXV was 99.7% (chi-square, p = 0.19). The catheterization success rate in the IJV group was 98.7% and 96.7% in the AXV group (chi-square, p = 0.11). The catheter tip malposition rate was 9.9% in the IJV group and 10.1% in the AXV group (chi-square, p = 0.67). The early mechanical complication rate in the IJV group was 3% (common carotid artery puncture-4 cases, perivascular hematoma-2 cases, vertebral artery puncture-1 case, pneumothorax-1 case) and 2.6% in the AXV group (axillary artery puncture-4 cases, perivascular hematoma-4 cases) (chi-square, p = 0.79). CONCLUSIONS: No difference was found between the real-time ultrasound-guided out-of-plane cannulation of the IJV and the infraclavicular real-time ultrasound-guided in-plane cannulation of the AXV. Both techniques are equally efficient and safe in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients.


Assuntos
Veia Axilar , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Humanos , Veia Axilar/diagnóstico por imagem , Estudos Prospectivos , Veias Jugulares/diagnóstico por imagem , Estado Terminal/terapia , Respiração Artificial , Ultrassonografia de Intervenção/métodos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/métodos
13.
Support Care Cancer ; 30(2): 1673-1679, 2022 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34562168

RESUMO

PURPOSE: Central venous catheters (CVCs) are widely used in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients. Complications associated with CVCs are frequently encountered and contribute to morbidity and mortality. Prospective studies investigating and comparing complications of different types of CVCs in AML patients and their effects on the quality of life are limited. METHODS: We conducted a prospective observational study and evaluated the complications associated with the use of CVCs in adult AML patients during induction chemotherapy and evaluated quality of life outcomes as reported by the patients during and after their hospitalization. RESULTS: Fifty newly diagnosed patients with AML (median age, 59 years) who received intensive induction chemotherapy were enrolled in the study. Twenty-nine patients (58%) had a peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) placed and 21 (42%) patients received a Hickmann tunneled central catheter (TCC). Three percent of cases developed catheter-related thrombosis in PICCs and no thrombosis in TCCs. Catheter-related bloodstream infection was diagnosed in 8% of patients. CVC occlusion occurred in 44 patients (88%). The total number of occlusion events was 128; 97% of patients with PICCs and 76% of patients with TCCs (p = 0.003). All patients reported that the use of CVC simplified their course of treatment. Most patients reported similar restrictions in activity associated with TCCs and PICCs. CONCLUSION: The present study demonstrates that thrombosis and catheter-related bloodstream infections remain important complications of CVCs in AML patients. Occlusion rates were higher with the use of PICCs and the use of CVCs impacted the quality of life.


Assuntos
Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateterismo Periférico , Cateteres Venosos Centrais , Leucemia Mieloide Aguda , Adulto , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/epidemiologia , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Cateterismo Periférico/efeitos adversos , Cateteres Venosos Centrais/efeitos adversos , Humanos , Quimioterapia de Indução , Leucemia Mieloide Aguda/tratamento farmacológico , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Qualidade de Vida , Fatores de Risco
14.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 12: CD013434, 2022 12 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36507736

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peripheral intravenous cannulation is one of the most fundamental and common procedures in medicine. Securing a peripheral line is occasionally difficult with the landmark method. Ultrasound guidance has become a standard procedure for central venous cannulation, but its efficacy in achieving peripheral venous cannulation is unclear. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of ultrasound guidance compared to the landmark method for peripheral intravenous cannulation in adults.  SEARCH METHODS: We used standard, extensive Cochrane search methods. The latest search date was 29 November 2021. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs (RCTs in which participants are systematically allocated based on data such as date of birth or recruitment) comparing the effects of ultrasound guidance to the landmark method for peripheral intravenous cannulation in adults. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: We used standard Cochrane methods. Our primary outcomes were first-pass success of cannulation, overall success of cannulation, and pain. Our secondary outcomes were procedure time for first-pass cannulation, procedure time for overall cannulation, number of attempts, patient satisfaction, and overall complications. We used GRADE to assess the certainty of the evidence.  Placing a peripheral intravenous line in individuals can be classed as 'difficult', 'moderate', or 'easy'. We use the terms 'difficult participants', 'moderate/moderately difficult participants' and 'easy participants' as shorthand to characterise the difficulty level in placing a peripheral line using the landmark method. We used the original studies' definitions of difficulty levels of peripheral intravenous cannulation with the landmark method. We analysed the results in these subgroups: 'difficult participants', 'moderate participants', and 'easy participants'. We did this because we expected the effect of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous cannulation to be largest in participants classed as 'difficult' and smaller in participants classed as 'moderate' and 'easy'.  MAIN RESULTS: We included 14 RCTs and two quasi-RCTs involving 2267 participants undergoing peripheral intravenous cannulation. Participants were classed as 'difficult' in 12 studies (880 participants), 'moderate' in one study (401 participants), and 'easy' in one study (596 participants). Two studies (390 participants) did not restrict by landmark method difficulty level. The overall risk of bias assessments ranged from low to high. We judged studies to be at high risk of bias mainly because of concerns about blinding for subjective outcomes. In difficult participants, ultrasound guidance increased the first-pass success of cannulation (risk ratio (RR) 1.50, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.15 to 1.95; 10 studies, 815 participants; low-certainty evidence), and the overall success of cannulation (RR 1.40, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.77; 10 studies, 670 participants; very low-certainty evidence). There was no clear difference in pain (mean difference (MD) -0.20, 95% CI -1.13 to 0.72; 4 studies, 323 participants; very low-certainty evidence; numerical rating scale (NRS) 0 to 10 where 10 is maximum pain). Ultrasound guidance increased the procedure time for first-pass cannulation (MD 119.9 seconds, 95% CI 88.6 to 151.1; 2 studies, 219 participants; low-certainty evidence), and patient satisfaction (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.49, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.92; 5 studies, 333 participants; very low-certainty evidence; NRS 0 to 10 where 10 is maximum satisfaction). Ultrasound guidance decreased the number of cannulation attempts (MD -0.33, 95% CI -0.64 to -0.02; 9 studies, 568 participants; very low-certainty evidence). Ultrasound guidance showed no clear difference in the procedure time for overall cannulation (MD -24.9 seconds, 95% CI -323.1 to 273.3; 8 studies, 413 participants; very low-certainty evidence) and overall complications (RR 0.64, 95% CI 0.37 to 1.10; 5 studies, 431 participants; low-certainty evidence).  In moderate participants, ultrasound guidance increased the first-pass success of cannulation (RR 1.14, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.27; 1 study, 401 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). No studies assessed the overall success of cannulation. There was no clear difference in pain (MD 0.10, 95% CI -0.47 to 0.67; 1 study, 401 participants; low-certainty evidence; NRS 0 to 10 where 10 is maximum pain). Ultrasound guidance increased the procedure time for first-pass cannulation (MD 95.2 seconds, 95% CI 72.8 to 117.6; 1 study, 401 participants; high-certainty evidence). Ultrasound guidance showed no clear difference in overall complications (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.38 to 1.82; 1 study, 401 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). No studies assessed the procedure time for overall cannulation, number of cannulation attempts, or patient satisfaction.  In easy participants, ultrasound guidance decreased the first-pass success of cannulation (RR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85 to 0.94; 1 study, 596 participants; high-certainty evidence). No studies assessed the overall success of cannulation. Ultrasound guidance increased pain (MD 0.60, 95% CI 0.17 to 1.03; 1 study, 596 participants; moderate-certainty evidence; NRS 0 to 10 where 10 is maximum pain). Ultrasound guidance increased the procedure time for first-pass cannulation (MD 94.8 seconds, 95% CI 81.2 to 108.5; 1 study, 596 participants; high-certainty evidence). Ultrasound guidance showed no clear difference in overall complications (RR 2.48, 95% CI 0.90 to 6.87; 1 study, 596 participants; moderate-certainty evidence). No studies assessed the procedure time for overall cannulation, number of cannulation attempts, or patient satisfaction.  AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is very low- and low-certainty evidence that, compared to the landmark method, ultrasound guidance may benefit difficult participants for increased first-pass and overall success of cannulation, with no difference detected in pain. There is moderate- and low-certainty evidence that, compared to the landmark method, ultrasound guidance may benefit moderately difficult participants due to a small increased first-pass success of cannulation with no difference detected in pain. There is moderate- and high-certainty evidence that, compared to the landmark method, ultrasound guidance does not benefit easy participants: ultrasound guidance decreased the first-pass success of cannulation with no difference detected in overall success of cannulation and increased pain.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateterismo Periférico , Adulto , Humanos , Cateterismo Periférico/efeitos adversos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/métodos , Dor , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
15.
J Ayub Med Coll Abbottabad ; 34(4): 883-887, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36566421

RESUMO

Central catheterization can be placed in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) for some purposes such as dialysis, nutrition, and hemodynamic monitoring. Air embolism is a very rare complication of central catheterization. A 46-year-old male patient with no known comorbidities underwent laparoscopic total colectomy and protective loop ileostomy for colon cancer. He was taken to the general surgery ICU for close hemodynamic follow-up in the postoperative period. Since he was cachectic and could not reach the target of oral nutrition within 1 week, a central catheter was inserted in the right internal jugular vein with ultrasonographic imaging, and total parenteral nutrition (TPN) was started. The patient, who had no additional problems in the follow-up, was transferred to the general surgery ward. Three and half hours after the transfer, the patient became unconscious and had extensor posture. Therefore, emergency cranial computed tomography (CT) was performed and he was taken back to the ICU. There was no finding in favour of bleeding in cranial CT. The patient was intubated to protect the airway, as he had a generalized tonic-clonic seizure during his follow-up. Air bubbles were seen in the main pulmonary artery and right ventricle in the multidetector thorax CT. Cranial CT angiography was taken at the 24th hour, and diffusion cranial MRI was performed for diagnosis of central air embolism. No air was detected to be aspirated in the cerebral arteries in cranial CT angiography. On the 6th day, the patient regained consciousness, extubated, and physical therapy was started. On the 12th day of hospitalization, the patient was discharged with 2/5 loss of motor power in the left upper extremity. When the patient's wife's anamnesis was detailed, it was learned that in order to mobilize the patient, she separated the TPN from the catheter and left the catheter tip open.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Embolia Aérea , Masculino , Feminino , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Embolia Aérea/diagnóstico por imagem , Embolia Aérea/etiologia , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Cateteres/efeitos adversos
16.
Tunis Med ; 100(7): 520-524, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36571740

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Several clinical practice guidelines strongly support the use of ultrasound guidance (USG) for internal jugular vein catheterization. The level of evidence concerning the use of USG for subclavian vein (SCV) cannulation remains low. AIM: To compare the effectiveness and safety of USG and anatomical landmarks approaches for cannulation of SCV. METHODS: This was a prospective randomized study. Patients aged over 18 years old who requiring elective central venous catheterization were included. Non-inclusion criteria were thrombosis of the vein or major coagulopathy. All catheterizations were performed by two anaesthesiology residents. Patients were randomized into two groups: ultrasound guidance group (US group) and anatomical landmarks (LM group). The main outcome was the success rate. The secondary outcomes were the first attempt success rate and the incidence of complications. RESULTS: Seventy patients were included (35 in each group). The success rate was higher in US group compared to LM group without statistical significance (100% vs 85.7%; p=0.054). The first attempt success rate was significantly higher in the US group (82.9% vs. 40%; p <10-3). The incidence of mechanical complications was significantly lower in the US group compared to LM group (5.7% vs. 37.1%; p=0,001). CONCLUSION: according to our study, US guidance for SCV catheterization seems to be an interesting alternative to anatomical landmarks approaches.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Veia Subclávia , Humanos , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Veia Subclávia/diagnóstico por imagem , Ultrassonografia de Intervenção/efeitos adversos , Ultrassonografia , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Veias Jugulares/diagnóstico por imagem
17.
PLoS One ; 17(12): e0277618, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36534662

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Chest X-ray (CXR) is routinely required for assessing Central Venous Catheter (CVC) tip position after insertion, but there is limited data as to the movement of the tip location during hospitalization. We aimed to assess the migration of Central Venous Catheter (CVC) position, as a significant movement of catheter tip location may challenge some of the daily practice after insertion. DESIGN AND SETTINGS: Retrospective, single-center study, conducted in the Intensive Care and Cardiovascular Intensive Care Units in Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center 'Ichilov', Israel, between January and June 2019. PATIENTS: We identified 101 patients with a CVC in the Right Internal Jugular (RIJ) with at least two CXRs during hospitalization. MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: For each patient, we measured the CVC tip position below the carina level in the first and all consecutive CXRs. The average initial tip position was 1.52 (±1.9) cm (mean±SD) below the carina. The maximal migration distance from the initial insertion position was 1.9 (±1) cm (mean±SD). During follow-up of 2 to 5 days, 92% of all subject's CVCs remained within the range of the Superior Vena Cava to the top of the right atrium, regardless of the initial positioning. CONCLUSIONS: CVC tip position can migrate significantly during a patient's early hospitalization period regardless of primary location, although for most patients it will remain within a wide range of the top of the right atrium and the middle of the Superior Vena Cava (SVC), if accepted as well-positioned.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateteres Venosos Centrais , Humanos , Veia Cava Superior , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estado Terminal
18.
Sci Prog ; 105(4): 368504221146066, 2022.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36540044

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We assessed the outcomes of a push-pull monorail technique to overcome a difficult anatomical course through the left internal jugular vein in implantable port insertions. METHODS: From December 2018 to May 2021, a total of 5326 patients were referred for implantable port insertion in our interventional unit, among which 472 cases were requested for insertion on the left side. Our monorail technique was applied only when the catheter tip entered the azygos vein instead of the superior vena cava (n = 8). The technique consists of a puncture at the distal tip of the port catheter with a 21-gauge micropuncture needle, advancing a 0.018-inch hair-wire to the guide, providing support for the pre-assembled port, and advancing the microsheath over the hair-wire to prevent extrusion of the catheter. RESULTS: The push-pull monorail technique was performed in eight patients, and all cases were technically successful, exhibiting a technical success rate of 100%. There were no immediate or delayed complications. CONCLUSIONS: The push-pull monorail technique is helpful in overcoming the difficult anatomical course through the left internal jugular vein during implantable port insertion.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Humanos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/métodos , Veia Cava Superior , Veias Jugulares , Punções/métodos
19.
Beijing Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 54(6): 1167-1171, 2022 Dec 18.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36533350

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To summarize the surgical experience of totally implantable venous access port in children with malignant tumors, and to explore the coping methods of surgical complications. METHODS: The clinical data of 165 children with malignant tumors implanted in totally implantable venous access port in Department of Pediatric Surgery, Peking University First Hospital from January 2017 to December 2019 were retrospectively analyzed. The operation process, complications and treatment of complications were observed and counted. RESULTS: The children in this group were divided into external ju-gular vein incision group (n=27) and internal jugular vein puncture group (n=138) according to different surgical methods, and the latter was divided into ultrasound guided puncture group (n=95) and blind puncture group (n=43). No puncture complications occurred in the external jugular vein incision group, and the average time for successful catheterization and the number of times for catheter to enter the superior vena cava were more than those in the internal jugular vein puncture group [(9.26±1.85) min vs. (5.76±1.56) min, (1.93±0.87) times vs. 1 time], with statistical significance. The average time of successful catheterization, the success rate of one puncture, the average number of punctures and the incidence of puncture complications in the ultrasound guided right internal jugular vein puncture group were better than those in the blind puncture group [(5.36±1.12) min vs. (6.67±1.99) min, 93.68% (89/95) vs. 74.42% (32/43), (1.06±0.24) times vs. (1.29±0.55) times, 2.11% (2/95) vs. 11.63% (5/43)], with statistically significant differences. The total incidence of complications in this study was 12.12% (20/165). Pneumothorax occurred in 1 case, artery puncture by mistake in 1 case, local hematoma in 5 cases, venous access port related infection in 4 cases (venous access port local infection in 2 cases, catheter related blood flow infection in 2 cases), subcutaneous tissue thinning on the surface of port seat in 2 cases, port seat overturning in 1 case, poor transfusion in 4 cases (catheter discount in 1 case, catheter blockage in 3 cases), and foreign bodies gathered around the subcutaneous pipeline in 2 cases. There were no complications, such as catheter rupture, detachment and catheter clamping syndrome. CONCLUSION: Totally implantable venous access port can provide safe and effective infusion channels for children with malignant tumors. Right external jugular vein incision and ultrasound-guided right internal jugular vein puncture are reliable surgical methods for children's totally implantable venous access port implantation. Surgeons should fully understand the complications of the venous access port, take measures to reduce the occurrence of complications, and properly handle the complications that have occurred.


Assuntos
Cateterismo Venoso Central , Neoplasias , Humanos , Criança , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Cateterismo Venoso Central/métodos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Veia Cava Superior , Veias Jugulares/cirurgia , Neoplasias/tratamento farmacológico , Neoplasias/cirurgia
20.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 11(1): 137, 2022 Nov 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-36352414

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) serve as an alternative to short-term central venous catheters (CVCs) for providing intravenous access in hospitalized patients. Although a number of studies suggest that PICCs are associated with a lower risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) than CVCs, recent data concerning specific patient groups support the contrary. In this regard, we are comparing CVC- and PICC-related CLABSI rates developed in a selected group of critically ill inpatients and evaluating the CLABSI microbiological distribution. METHODS: The study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital in Greece between May 2017 and May 2019. We performed a two-year retrospective analysis of the data collected from medical records of consecutive adult patients who underwent PICC or CVC placement. RESULTS: A total of 1187 CVCs placed for 9774 catheter-days and 639 PICCs placed for 11,110 catheter-days, were reported and analyzed during the study period. Among CVCs, a total of 59 (4.9%) CLABSIs were identified, while among PICCs, 18 (2.8%) cases presented CLABSI (p = 0.029). The CLABSI incidence rate per 1,000 catheter-days was 6.03 for CVC group and 1.62 for PICC group (p < 0.001). The CLABSI rate due to multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) among the two groups was 3.17 in CVC group and 0.36 in PICC group (p < 0.001). Within CLABSI-CVC group, the most common microorganism detected was MDR Acinetobacter baumannii (27.1%) followed by MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae (22%). In CLABSI-PICC group, the predominant microorganism was Candida spp. (33.3%) followed by non-MDR gram-negative pathogens (22.2%). CONCLUSIONS: PICC lines were associated with significantly lower CLABSI rates comparing to CVC although they were in place longer than CVC lines. Given their longer time to the development of infection, PICCs may be a safer alternative for prolonged inpatient IV access. The high prevalence of CLABSI-MDROs depicts the local microbial ecology, emphasizing the need of public health awareness.


Assuntos
Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter , Cateterismo Venoso Central , Cateteres Venosos Centrais , Sepse , Adulto , Humanos , Cateteres Venosos Centrais/efeitos adversos , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/epidemiologia , Infecções Relacionadas a Cateter/etiologia , Cateterismo Venoso Central/efeitos adversos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estado Terminal , Fatores de Risco , Sepse/epidemiologia
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