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2.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 686, 2020 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32948149

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is limited research to guide TB treatment specifically in pregnant women and few studies have described the presentation of TB in pregnant women. We aimed to understand TB presentation and treatment outcomes in pregnant women in a low HIV burden setting. We describe a cohort of women of childbearing age treated for TB disease in Lima, Peru, and compare clinical presentation and treatment outcomes among pregnant and non-pregnant women between 2009 and 2012, including 36 pregnant women. METHODS: This is a prospective cohort study. Subjects were recruited from across 106 public health centers in Lima, Peru. Baseline demographic, medical history, and drug-susceptibility test results were collected. We used descriptive statistics to describe demographic and clinical characteristics of the women using Pearson chi-squared, Fisher's exact tests, or Kruskal-Wallis. RESULTS: Among 4500 individuals with pulmonary TB disease, 1334 women were included in analysis with 36 (2.69%) pregnant women. Pregnant women had similar demographics, past medical histories, and clinical presentation to non-pregnant women, except being more likely to be married (p = 0.01) and have cardiac disease (p = 0.04) and less likely to have weight loss (p = 0.05). Twenty (71.4%) pregnant women had pan-susceptible TB compared with 616 (63.1%) non-pregnant women; four (14.3%) pregnant women had mono-resistant TB compared with 154 (15.8%) non-pregnant women; and four (14.3%) pregnant women had multi-drug-resistant TB compared with 140 (14.3%) of non-pregnant women (p = 0.53). Twenty-eight (96.6%) pregnant women had a successful outcome (cure, completed treatment, treatment ended early by clinical team) while one (3.4%) had an unsuccessful outcome (treatment failed) and 1074 (97.3%) non-pregnant women had a successful outcome while 30 (2.7%) had an unsuccessful outcome (p = 0.56). CONCLUSION: In this cohort with low HIV co-infection, we found high TB treatment success rates in both pregnant and non-pregnant women, irrespective of drug-susceptibility profiles. If treated appropriately, pregnant women with TB disease can have successful outcomes.


Assuntos
Complicações Infecciosas na Gravidez/tratamento farmacológico , Tuberculose/tratamento farmacológico , Adolescente , Adulto , Antituberculosos/uso terapêutico , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Feminino , Infecções por HIV , Humanos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Peru , Gravidez , Estudos Prospectivos , Resultado do Tratamento , Tuberculose Pulmonar/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto Jovem
4.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 667, 2020 Sep 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32912204

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Frequencies of polymicrobial infection and pathogens evidenced in course of infected nonunion treatment are largely unknown. Therefore, this study aims at investigating microbial patterns in infected nonunions. METHODS: Surgically treated patients with long bone infected nonunion admitted between January 2010 and March 2018 were included in the study. Microbiological culture and polymerase-chain-reaction results of tissue samples of initial and follow-up revision surgeries were assessed and compared with patient and treatment characteristics. RESULTS: Forty two patients with a mean age of 53.9 ± 17.7 years were included. In six patients (14.3%) polymicrobial infection was evident. A change of pathogens evidenced in course of the treatment occurred in 21 patients (50%). In 16 patients (38.1%) previously detected bacteria could be determined by microbial testing after further revision surgery. Staphylococcus aureus was most often detected (n = 34, 30.6%), followed by Enterococcus spp. (n = 25, 22.5%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 18, 16.2%). Five Staphylococcus aureus were resistant to methicillin (MRSA). In patients without polymicrobial infection or further germ detection in course of the treatment, 86.4% of the infections were due to Staphylococcus spp.. Infections due to Streptococcus spp. and gram-negative bacteria were only present in patients with polymicrobial infection and germ-change in course of the treatment. CONCLUSION: A low rate of polymicrobial infections was evidenced in the present study. Germ-change often occurs in course of revision surgeries. Prospective studies with more sensitive diagnostic tools are necessary to elucidate the therapeutical relevance of microbiological testing results for surgical as well as medical treatment in infected nonunions.


Assuntos
Coinfecção/diagnóstico , Enterococcus/genética , Consolidação da Fratura , Staphylococcus aureus Resistente à Meticilina/genética , Infecções Estafilocócicas/diagnóstico , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Coinfecção/microbiologia , Enterococcus/isolamento & purificação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Staphylococcus aureus Resistente à Meticilina/isolamento & purificação , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase , Reoperação , Estudos Retrospectivos , Infecções Estafilocócicas/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções Estafilocócicas/microbiologia , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
5.
Top Antivir Med ; 28(2): 455-458, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32886465

RESUMO

Due to COVID-19, this year marked the first virtual Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in the conference's 27-year history. There were important studies presented that provided new insights into the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of tuberculosis (TB) and other HIV coinfections. Highlights related to TB and HIV coinfections from this year's meeting are reviewed below.


Assuntos
Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções Oportunistas/epidemiologia , Saúde Pública , Tuberculose/epidemiologia , Adulto , Fármacos Anti-HIV/uso terapêutico , Antituberculosos/uso terapêutico , Coinfecção/diagnóstico , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/organização & administração , Congressos como Assunto , Criptococose/diagnóstico , Criptococose/tratamento farmacológico , Criptococose/epidemiologia , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Lactente , Masculino , Micoses/diagnóstico , Micoses/tratamento farmacológico , Micoses/epidemiologia , Infecções Oportunistas/diagnóstico , Infecções Oportunistas/tratamento farmacológico , Gravidez , Prevalência , Prevenção Primária/métodos , Medição de Risco , Análise de Sobrevida , Tuberculose/diagnóstico , Tuberculose/tratamento farmacológico , Tuberculose Resistente a Múltiplos Medicamentos/diagnóstico , Tuberculose Resistente a Múltiplos Medicamentos/tratamento farmacológico , Tuberculose Resistente a Múltiplos Medicamentos/epidemiologia , Interface Usuário-Computador , Adulto Jovem
6.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 9(1): 153, 2020 09 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32962731

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A considerable proportion of patients hospitalized with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) acquired secondary bacterial infections (SBIs). The etiology and antimicrobial resistance of bacteria were reported and used to provide a theoretical basis for appropriate infection therapy. METHODS: This retrospective study reviewed electronic medical records of all the patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in the Wuhan Union Hospital between January 27 and March 17, 2020. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, patients who acquired SBIs were enrolled. Demographic, clinical course, etiology, and antimicrobial resistance data of the SBIs were collected. Outcomes were also compared between patients who were classified as severe and critical on admission. RESULTS: Among 1495 patients hospitalized with COVID-19, 102 (6.8%) patients had acquired SBIs, and almost half of them (49.0%, 50/102) died during hospitalization. Compared with severe patients, critical patients had a higher chance of SBIs. Among the 159 strains of bacteria isolated from the SBIs, 136 strains (85.5%) were Gram-negative bacteria. The top three bacteria of SBIs were A. baumannii (35.8%, 57/159), K. pneumoniae (30.8%, 49/159), and S. maltophilia (6.3%, 10/159). The isolation rates of carbapenem-resistant A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae were 91.2 and 75.5%, respectively. Meticillin resistance was present in 100% of Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase negative staphylococci, and vancomycin resistance was not found. CONCLUSIONS: SBIs may occur in patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and lead to high mortality. The incidence of SBIs was associated with the severity of illness on admission. Gram-negative bacteria, especially A. baumannii and K. pneumoniae, were the main bacteria, and the resistance rates of the major isolated bacteria were generally high. This was a single-center study; thus, our results should be externally examined when applied in other institutions.


Assuntos
Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana/fisiologia , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Negativas/epidemiologia , Infecções Estafilocócicas/epidemiologia , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiologia , Coinfecção/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/patologia , Feminino , Bactérias Gram-Negativas/efeitos dos fármacos , Bactérias Gram-Negativas/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Negativas/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Masculino , Staphylococcus aureus Resistente à Meticilina/efeitos dos fármacos , Staphylococcus aureus Resistente à Meticilina/isolamento & purificação , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/patologia , Estudos Retrospectivos , Infecções Estafilocócicas/tratamento farmacológico
7.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 9(1): 154, 2020 09 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32962759

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Currently, hospitals have been forced to divert substantial resources to cope with the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. It is unclear if this situation will affect long-standing infection prevention practices and impact on healthcare associated infections. Here, we report a nosocomial cluster of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) that occurred on a COVID-19 dedicated intensive care unit (ICU) despite intensified contact precautions during the current pandemic. Whole genome sequence-based typing (WGS) was used to investigate genetic relatedness of VRE isolates collected from COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients during the outbreak and to compare them to environmental VRE samples. METHODS: Five VRE isolated from patients (three clinical and two screening samples) as well as 11 VRE and six vancomycin susceptible Enterococcus faecium (E. faecium) samples from environmental sites underwent WGS during the outbreak investigation. Isolate relatedness was determined using core genome multilocus sequence typing (cgMLST). RESULTS: WGS revealed two genotypic distinct VRE clusters with genetically closely related patient and environmental isolates. The cluster was terminated by enhanced infection control bundle strategies. CONCLUSIONS: Our results illustrate the importance of continued adherence to infection prevention and control measures during the COVID-19 pandemic to prevent VRE transmission and healthcare associated infections.


Assuntos
Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Infecção Hospitalar/epidemiologia , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Positivas/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Positivas/epidemiologia , Enterococos Resistentes à Vancomicina/efeitos dos fármacos , Betacoronavirus , Coinfecção/microbiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/patologia , Infecção Hospitalar/tratamento farmacológico , Infecção Hospitalar/microbiologia , Surtos de Doenças , Genoma Bacteriano/genética , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Positivas/microbiologia , Humanos , Controle de Infecções , Unidades de Terapia Intensiva , Tipagem de Sequências Multilocus , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/patologia , Prevenção Primária , Enterococos Resistentes à Vancomicina/genética , Enterococos Resistentes à Vancomicina/isolamento & purificação , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(30): e21270, 2020 Jul 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32791706

RESUMO

In a hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-positive Brazilian cohort, evaluate the safety and efficacy of HCV DAAs, the frequency of resistance substitutions in the HCV NS5A and NS5B genes and identify predictors of treatment failure.Retrospective multicenter study of HCV/HIV patients treated with sofosbuvir (SOF)-based regimens at 10 reference centers in Brazil.Clinical and virological data were collected. Genetic diversity in the NS5A and NS5B genes was assessed by direct nucleotide sequencing. The primary outcome was sustained virological response (SVR) 12 weeks after DAA completion.Of 643 HCV/HIV patients analyzed, 74.7% were male, median CD4+ T cell count was 617 cells/mm, 90% had an undetectable HIV viral load. HCV genotype 1 was detected in 80.2%, and 60% were taking at least 1 medication other than antiretroviral drugs during their DAA therapy. Cirrhosis was present in 42%. An SOF/daclatasvir (DCV) regimen was used in most patients (98%). The frequency of NS5A polymorphisms associated with clinically relevant resistance to DCV was 2%; no relevant NS5B variants were identified. The SVR12 rate was 92.8% in an intention to treat (ITT) analysis and 96% in a modified ITT (m-ITT) analysis. AE occurred in 1.6% of patients. By multivariate analysis, therapeutic failure was associated, in the m-ITT analysis, with concomitant use of anticonvulsant drugs (P = .001), age (P = .04), and female gender (P = .04).SOF/DCV regimens were associated with a high SVR rate in an HCV/HIV population. The use of concurrent anticonvulsant drugs and DAAs decreases the chances of achieving an SVR.


Assuntos
Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Hepatite C Crônica/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Quimioterapia Combinada , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/complicações , Hepatite C Crônica/complicações , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Resposta Viral Sustentada
9.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 572, 2020 Aug 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32758158

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Management of co-infections including cryptococcal meningitis, tuberculosis and other opportunistic infections in persons living with HIV can lead to complex polypharmacotherapy and increased susceptibility to drug-drug interactions (DDIs). Here we characterize the frequency and types of potential DDIs (pDDIs) in hospitalized HIV patients presenting with suspected cryptococcal or tuberculous meningitis. METHODS: In a retrospective review of three cryptococcal meningitis trials between 2010 and 2017 in Kampala, Uganda, medications received over hospitalization were documented and pDDI events were assessed. IBM Micromedex DRUGDEX® online drug reference system was used to identify and describe potential interactions as either contraindicated, major, moderate or minor. For antiretroviral DDIs, the Liverpool Drug Interactions Checker from the University of Liverpool was also used to further describe interactions observed. RESULTS: In 1074 patients with suspected meningitis, pDDIs were present in 959 (overall prevalence = 89.3%) during the analyzed 30 day window. In total, 278 unique interacting drug pairs were identified resulting in 4582 pDDI events. Of all patients included in this study there was a mean frequency of 4.27 pDDIs per patient. Of the 4582 pDDI events, 11.3% contraindicated, 66.4% major, 17.4% moderate and 5% minor pDDIs were observed. Among all pDDIs identified, the most prevalent drugs implicated were fluconazole (58.4%), co-trimoxazole (25.7%), efavirenz (15.6%) and rifampin (10.2%). Twenty-one percent of the contraindicated pDDIs and 27% of the major ones involved an antiretroviral drug. Increased likelihood of QT interval prolongation was the most frequent potential clinical outcome. Dissonance in drug interaction checkers was noted requiring clinicians to consult more than one database in making clinical decisions about drug combinations. CONCLUSIONS: The overall prevalence of pDDIs in this population is high. An understanding of drug combinations likely to result in undesired clinical outcomes, such as QT interval prolongation, is paramount. This is especially important in resource limited settings where availability of therapeutic drug monitoring and laboratory follow-up are inconsistent. Adequate quantification of the increased likelihood of adverse clinical outcomes from multiple drug-drug interactions of the same kind in a single patient is needed to aid clinical decisions in this setting.


Assuntos
Infecções Oportunistas Relacionadas com a AIDS/tratamento farmacológico , Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Antifúngicos/uso terapêutico , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Cryptococcus neoformans , HIV-1 , Hospitalização , Meningite Criptocócica/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções Oportunistas Relacionadas com a AIDS/virologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Coinfecção/virologia , Interações Medicamentosas , Monitoramento de Medicamentos/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Meningite Criptocócica/diagnóstico , Meningite Criptocócica/microbiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Resultado do Tratamento , Uganda/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
10.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 576, 2020 Aug 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32758169

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: China ranks second in the world in terms of numbers of tuberculosis (TB) cases and is one of the top three countries with the largest number of multidrug-resistant and rifampicin-resistant TB (MDR/RR-TB). It also has high mortality and low cure rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive TB patients. This study aimed to analyse, under the integrated TB control model, the characteristics of TB patients seeking healthcare in the largest designated TB hospital in Chongqing. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of TB registers in a health facility. Record data of 1827 TB patients who had attended the Chongqing Public Health Medical Center (CPHMC) from 1 January to 31 December 2018 were included. The Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS 18.0; IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA) was used to analyse the data. Counting data were compared using the chi-square test or Fisher' s exact test. Among the results of the univariate analysis, the variables with statistical significance were included in the binomial stepwise logistic regression, with odds ratio and 95% confidence interval calculated. A two-tailed probability level of P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: The majority of registered patients were men (1197), of Han ethnicity (1670), aged 21-60 years (1331), farmer/unemployed (1075), and living in county/district (1207). Approximately 24.9% of patients (455/1827) contracted DR-TB, 6% (110/1827) were co-infected with HIV, and 41.0% (749/1827) had drug-related hepatotoxicity. Among those patients, DR-TB was more likely to develop among farmers who received retreatment and had drug-related hepatotoxicity (P < 0.05). Women who received retreatment and lived in county/district were less likely to be HIV positive (P < 0.05). Compared with farmers, patients who were unemployed were more likely to be HIV positive, and those aged 21-60 years had a higher risk of being tested as HIV positive (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Farmers who received retreatment and had drug-related hepatotoxicity are more susceptible to DR-TB; young unemployed men have a higher risk of contracting HIV-positive TB. The demographic and clinical characteristics of TB patients should be taken into consideration in DR-TB and HIV-positive TB screening in the future.


Assuntos
Infecções Oportunistas Relacionadas com a AIDS/epidemiologia , Doença Hepática Induzida por Substâncias e Drogas/epidemiologia , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , HIV , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/efeitos dos fármacos , Tuberculose Resistente a Múltiplos Medicamentos/epidemiologia , Infecções Oportunistas Relacionadas com a AIDS/virologia , Adulto , Antituberculosos/efeitos adversos , Antituberculosos/uso terapêutico , China/epidemiologia , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Coinfecção/virologia , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/efeitos dos fármacos , Fazendeiros , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Tuberculose Resistente a Múltiplos Medicamentos/tratamento farmacológico , Tuberculose Resistente a Múltiplos Medicamentos/microbiologia , Desemprego , Adulto Jovem
11.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237162, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32750098

RESUMO

Viral diversity is an important feature of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and an important predictor of disease progression and treatment response. HIV/HCV co-infection is associated with enhanced HCV replication, increased fibrosis, and the development of liver disease. HIV also increases quasispecies diversity of HCV structural genes, although limited data are available regarding the impact of HIV on non-structural genes of HCV, particularly in the absence of direct-acting therapies. The genetic diversity and presence of drug resistance mutations within the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5B) gene were examined in 3 groups of women with HCV genotype 1a infection, including those with HCV mono-infection, antiretroviral (ART)-naïve women with HIV/HCV co-infection and CD4 cell count <350 cells/mm3, and ART-naïve women with HIV/HCV co-infection and CD4 cell count ≥350 cells/mm3. None had ever been treated for HCV infection. There was evidence of significant diversity across the entire NS5B gene in all women. There were several nucleotides and amino acids with distinct distributions across the three study groups, although no obvious clustering of NS5B sequences was observed based on HIV co-infection or CD4 cell count. Polymorphisms at amino acid positions associated with resistance to dasabuvir and sofosbuvir were limited, although the Q309R variant associated with ribavirin resistance was present in 12 individuals with HCV mono-infection, 8 HIV/HCV co-infected individuals with CD4 <350 cells/mm3, and 12 HIV/HCV co-infected individuals with CD4 ≥350 cells/mm3. Previously reported fitness altering mutations were rare. CD8+ T cell responses against the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) B57-restricted epitopes NS5B2629-2637 and NS5B2936-2944 are critical for HCV control and were completely conserved in 44 (51.8%) and 70 (82.4%) study participants. These data demonstrate extensive variation across the NS5B gene. Genotypic variation may have a profound impact on HCV replication and pathogenesis and deserves careful evaluation.


Assuntos
Infecções Oportunistas Relacionadas com a AIDS/genética , Coinfecção/genética , Variação Genética , HIV , Hepacivirus/genética , Hepatite C/genética , Proteínas não Estruturais Virais/genética , Infecções Oportunistas Relacionadas com a AIDS/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções Oportunistas Relacionadas com a AIDS/virologia , Adulto , Sequência de Aminoácidos , Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Contagem de Linfócito CD4 , Estudos de Coortes , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Coinfecção/virologia , Farmacorresistência Viral/genética , Feminino , Genótipo , Hepatite C/tratamento farmacológico , Hepatite C/virologia , Humanos , Filogenia , RNA Replicase/genética , RNA Viral/genética , RNA Viral/isolamento & purificação , Sofosbuvir/uso terapêutico , Sulfonamidas/uso terapêutico , Uracila/análogos & derivados , Uracila/uso terapêutico
12.
Circ J ; 84(10): 1887, 2020 09 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32779609
13.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0237345, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32813724

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Mixed/polyclonal infections due to different genotypes are reported in Tuberculosis. The current study was designed to understand the fate of mixed infections during the course of treatment and follow-up and its role in disease pathogenesis. METHODS: Sputum samples were collected on 0,1,2,3,6,12 and 24 months from 157 treatment-naïve patients, cultures subjected to Drug-Susceptibility-testing (MGIT 960), spoligotyping, MIRU-VNTR and SNP genotyping. All isolated colonies on thin layer agar (7H11) were subjected to spoligotyping. FINDINGS: One thirty three baseline cultures were positive (133/157, 84.7%), 43(32.3%) had mixture of genotypes. Twenty-four of these patients (55.8%) showed change in genotype while six showed different drug-susceptibility patterns while on treatment. Twenty-three (53.5%) patients with polyclonal infections showed resistance to at least one drug compared to 10/90 (11.1%) monoclonal infections (P<0.0001). Eight patients had recurrent TB, two with a new genotype and two with altered phenotypic DST. CONCLUSIONS: The coexistence of different genotypes and change of genotypes during the same disease episode, while on treatment, confirms constancy of polyclonal infections. The composition of the mixture of genotypes and the relative predominance may be missed by culture due to its limit of detection. Polyclonal infections in TB could be a rule rather than exception and challenges the age-old dogma of reactivation/reinfection.


Assuntos
Antituberculosos/farmacologia , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla/genética , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/genética , Tuberculose Pulmonar/microbiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Antituberculosos/uso terapêutico , Técnicas de Tipagem Bacteriana , Evolução Clonal , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Coinfecção/microbiologia , DNA Bacteriano/genética , DNA Bacteriano/isolamento & purificação , Feminino , Seguimentos , Técnicas de Genotipagem , Humanos , Limite de Detecção , Masculino , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/isolamento & purificação , Mycobacterium tuberculosis/patogenicidade , Filogenia , Polimorfismo de Nucleotídeo Único , Prevalência , Recidiva , Tuberculose Pulmonar/tratamento farmacológico , Tuberculose Pulmonar/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
14.
Drug Saf ; 43(8): 691-698, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32696429

RESUMO

The global COVID-19 pandemic has led to a race to find medications that can improve the prognosis of the disease. Azithromycin, in association with hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine, has been proposed as one such medication. The aim of this review is to describe the pharmacological mechanism, clinical evidence and prescribing guidelines concerning azithromycin in COVID-19 patients. There is weak evidence on the antiviral and immunomodulating effects of azithromycin, which in addition is not based on results from COVID-19 patients specifically. Therefore, this antibacterial should be considered only as empirical treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP), although not all current treatment guidelines are in agreement. After the initial expectations raised by a small trial, more recent evidence has raised serious safety concerns on the use of hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine with azithromycin to treat COVID-19 patients, as all these drugs have arrhythmogenic potential. The World Health Organization has not made recommendations suggesting the use of azithromycin with hydroxychloroquine or chloroquine as treatment for COVID-19, but some national organisations have taken a different position, recommending this as first-line treatment. Several scientific societies, including the American College of Cardiology, have cautioned about the risks of this treatment in view of the lack of evidence concerning its benefits.


Assuntos
Azitromicina/farmacologia , Betacoronavirus , Coinfecção , Infecções por Coronavirus , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Betacoronavirus/efeitos dos fármacos , Betacoronavirus/fisiologia , Coinfecção/diagnóstico , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/imunologia , Humanos , Conduta do Tratamento Medicamentoso/normas , Seleção de Pacientes , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/imunologia , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Resultado do Tratamento
15.
J Laryngol Otol ; 134(7): 592-596, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32713390

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Fungal otitis externa is prevalent in tropical and sub-tropical climates; however, over the past two decades, there has been a reported increase in the prevalence of otomycosis in paediatric patients from more temperate climates. This study aimed to review the children diagnosed with otomycosis at the University Hospital Limerick with reference to frequency, causative organism, predisposing factors and management. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted of paediatric patients from 2001 to 2015. Patients with positive fungal ear swabs and a diagnosis of otomycosis were identified. RESULTS: Ninety-three patients were positive for candida (mean age, 5.8 years), 10 patients were positive for aspergillus (mean age, 9.1 years) and 1 patient had mixed fungal infection containing both fungi. There was a positive correlation between a diagnosis of otomycosis and prior treatment with topical fluoroquinolones (r = 0.8; p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The incidence of otomycosis has been increasing since 2001, which correlates with an increase in the use of topical fluoroquinolones. Previous studies identify aspergillus as the commonest causative fungi; however, this study found that candida was the commonest isolated fungi in the paediatric population.


Assuntos
Otomicose/epidemiologia , Antifúngicos/uso terapêutico , Aspergilose/diagnóstico , Aspergilose/tratamento farmacológico , Aspergilose/epidemiologia , Aspergilose/microbiologia , Candidíase/diagnóstico , Candidíase/tratamento farmacológico , Candidíase/epidemiologia , Candidíase/microbiologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Coinfecção/diagnóstico , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Coinfecção/microbiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Irlanda/epidemiologia , Masculino , Otomicose/diagnóstico , Otomicose/tratamento farmacológico , Otomicose/microbiologia , Estudos Retrospectivos
16.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 470, 2020 Jul 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32615937

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Strongyloidiasis is a gastrointestinal parasitic infection caused by percutaneous infection with Strongyloides stercoralis. Digestive symptoms such as diarrhea and abdominal pain are the main manifestation, but serious infections such as septicemia, purulent meningitis, and bacterial pneumonia may occur in individuals harboring human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) or who are immunocompromised. Although coinfection with Strongyloides stercoralis and HTLV-1 can lead to chronic strongyloidiasis and a disseminated form of the disease, there is a high rate of response to the anthelmintic ivermectin. CASE PRESENTATION: We report a case of strongyloidiasis infection syndrome that was difficult to differentiate from immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) for various reasons. The patient had been treated with the corticosteroids tacrolimus (Tac) and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with lupus nephritis and pancytopenia. When the steroid was reduced, she developed cytomegalovirus (CMV) enteritis, and her respiratory status rapidly deteriorated immediately after the withdrawal of Tac and MMF. It was difficult to distinguish immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome from strongyloidiasis infection syndrome because stool cultures were negative and eosinophils were not increased. Bronchoscopy revealed viable Strongyloides, leading to a diagnosis of strongyloidiasis infection syndrome, but the patient died despite treatment. CONCLUSIONS: Both corticosteroid therapy and HTLV-1 infection can be associated with a decrease of eosinophils, despite the presence of parasitic infection. In conclusion, even if multiple culture tests are negative, the risk of parasitic infection should be assessed in patients receiving immunosuppressants and steroids even in non-endemic areas.


Assuntos
Infecções por Citomegalovirus/complicações , Citomegalovirus/imunologia , Infecções por HTLV-I/complicações , Vírus Linfotrópico T Tipo 1 Humano/isolamento & purificação , Imunossupressão/efeitos adversos , Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/complicações , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Strongyloides stercoralis/isolamento & purificação , Estrongiloidíase/complicações , Idoso , Animais , Anti-Helmínticos/uso terapêutico , Antivirais/uso terapêutico , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Citomegalovirus/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Citomegalovirus/virologia , Evolução Fatal , Feminino , Ganciclovir/uso terapêutico , Infecções por HTLV-I/diagnóstico , Infecções por HTLV-I/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por HTLV-I/virologia , Humanos , Hospedeiro Imunocomprometido , Imunossupressores/efeitos adversos , Ivermectina/uso terapêutico , Estrongiloidíase/diagnóstico , Estrongiloidíase/tratamento farmacológico , Estrongiloidíase/parasitologia , Síndrome
20.
J Microbiol Immunol Infect ; 53(4): 505-512, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32482366

RESUMO

Co-infection has been reported in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome, but there is limited knowledge on co-infection among patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The prevalence of co-infection was variable among COVID-19 patients in different studies, however, it could be up to 50% among non-survivors. Co-pathogens included bacteria, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumonia, Legionella pneumophila and Acinetobacter baumannii; Candida species and Aspergillus flavus; and viruses such as influenza, coronavirus, rhinovirus/enterovirus, parainfluenza, metapneumovirus, influenza B virus, and human immunodeficiency virus. Influenza A was one of the most common co-infective viruses, which may have caused initial false-negative results of real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Laboratory and imaging findings alone cannot help distinguish co-infection from SARS-CoV-2 infection. Newly developed syndromic multiplex panels that incorporate SARS-CoV-2 may facilitate the early detection of co-infection among COVID-19 patients. By contrast, clinicians cannot rule out SARS-CoV-2 infection by ruling in other respiratory pathogens through old syndromic multiplex panels at this stage of the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, clinicians must have a high index of suspicion for coinfection among COVID-19 patients. Clinicians can neither rule out other co-infections caused by respiratory pathogens by diagnosing SARS-CoV-2 infection nor rule out COVID-19 by detection of non-SARS-CoV-2 respiratory pathogens. After recognizing the possible pathogens causing co-infection among COVID-19 patients, appropriate antimicrobial agents can be recommended.


Assuntos
Anti-Infecciosos/uso terapêutico , Coinfecção/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Coronavirus/tratamento farmacológico , Pneumonia Viral/tratamento farmacológico , Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Técnicas de Laboratório Clínico , Coinfecção/diagnóstico , Coinfecção/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Quimioterapia Combinada , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Kit de Reagentes para Diagnóstico
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