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1.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34058802

RESUMO

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has required educators to adapt the in-person objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) to online settings in order for it to remain a critical component of the multifaceted assessment of a student's competency. This systematic scoping review aimed to summarise the assessment methods and validity and reliability of the measurement tools used in current online OSCE (hereafter, referred to as teleOSCE) approaches. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses extension for Scoping Reviews guidelines. Articles were eligible if they reported any form of performance assessment, in any field of healthcare, delivered in an online format. Two reviewers independently screened the results and analysed relevant studies. Eleven articles were included in the analysis. Pre-recorded videos were used in 3 studies, while observations by remote examiners through an online platform were used in 7 studies. Acceptability as perceived by students was reported in 2 studies. This systematic scoping review identified several insights garnered from implementing teleOSCEs, the components transferable from telemedicine, and the need for systemic research to establish the ideal teleOSCE framework. TeleOSCEs may be able to improve the accessibility and reproducibility of clinical assessments and equip students with the requisite skills to effectively practice telemedicine in the future.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica/normas , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Internet , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Humanos , Estudantes de Medicina
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 336, 2021 Jun 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34107936

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Both simulation-based training and video-based training serve as educational adjuncts for learning TEE among medical students. In the present study, we hypothesized that simulation-based training would better enhance the performance of medical students in the interpretation of 20 cross-sectional views compared to video-based training. METHODS: A total of 120 4th-year undergraduate medical students were enrolled in the present study. The study began with a pre-test of all the participants, followed by a 90-min theoretical lecture and a post-test. Subsequently, the participants were randomly divided into the video-based group (Group V) and simulation-based group (Group S). Next, Group V received 60 min of TEE video learning, while Group S received 60 min of TEE simulator training. After the respective training, both the groups undertook the retention-test 1 and retention-test 2, 1 week and 1 month later, respectively. The performance for each test was evaluated by five views, which were selected randomly and, respectively, from a set of 20 cross-sectional views. The primary outcome was the performance of the retention-test 1. Secondary outcomes included: (1) comparison the performances of the pre-test, post-test, and retention-test 2 between two groups; (2) comparison the performances of pre-test and post-test in the same group; (3) comparison the performances of retention-test 1, and retention-test 2 in the same group. RESULTS: Better performances were observed in Group S in both retention-test 1 (Group V: 63.2 [52.6, 77.6] vs. Group S: 89.5 [68.4, 100.0], P < 0.001) and retention-test 2 (Group V: 58.0 [48.0, 72.0] vs. Group S: 74.0 [64.0, 80.0], P < 0.001) compared to Group V. No statistically significant differences were observed in the performances of pre-test (Group V: 8.3 [4.2, 12.5] vs. Group S: 8.3 [4.2, 12.5], P = 0.825) or post-test (Group V: 46.2 [38.5, 57.7] vs. Group S: 44.2 [38.5, 56.7], P = 0.694) between the two groups. The improvement had been observed in the post-test, compared with pre-test in the same group, respectively (Group V in post-test: 46.2 [38.5, 57.7] vs. Group V in pre-test: 8.3 [4.2, 12.5], P < 0.001; Group S in post-test: 44.2 [38.5, 56.7] vs. Group S in pre-test: 8.3 [4.2, 12.5], P < 0.001). However, the performance in retention-test 2 was significantly reduced, compared with retention-test 1 in the same group, respectively (Group V in retention-test 2: 58.0 [48.0, 72.0] vs. Group V in retention-test 1: 63.2 [52.6, 77.6] P = 0.005; Group S in retention-test 2: 74.0 [64.0, 80.0] vs. Group S in retention-test 1: 89.5 [68.4, 100.0], P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Following a 90-min theoretical lecture, simulation-based training better enhanced the performance of medical students in the interpretation and short-term retention of 20 cross-sectional views compared to video-based training. TRIAL REGISTRATION: http://www.chictr.org.cn ( ChiCTR2000033519 , 3/June/2020).


Assuntos
Treinamento por Simulação , Estudantes de Medicina , Competência Clínica , Estudos Transversais , Ecocardiografia , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Estudos Prospectivos
3.
Afr J Prim Health Care Fam Med ; 13(1): e1-e8, 2021 May 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34082553

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: The novel coronavirus 2019 or COVID-19 pandemic has brought about a global public health crisis. Primary care (PC) nurses render first line care, or refer for more specialised services. AIM: To investigate the preparedness of PC nurses for COVID-19 in the Western Cape. SETTING: The Western Cape province of South Africa. METHODS: We administered an online survey, with closed and open-ended questions, to 83 Stellenbosch University postgraduate PC nursing students and alumni working in the Western Cape, between 03 July and 01 September 2020. RESULTS: The results indicated that 43.3% of participants were confident about the infection, prevention, and control (IPC) training they received and 56.7% felt prepared to provide direct care to suspected cases of COVID-19. Primary care nurses were more comfortable to triage (78.3%) than to manage persons with COVID-19 (42.2%), indicating that they may not be functioning to the full capacity of their education and training. Adequate infrastructure was reported by less than a third of the participants (30.1%) and 59.1% reported that personal protective equipment (PPE) was always available. Primary care nurses needed support in coping with stress (57.8%) although few (14.5%) reported access to mental health services. CONCLUSION: Primary care nurses were not prepared optimally for the COVID-19 pandemic. Challenges included adequate training, infrastructure, the availability of personal protective equipment, COVID-19 testing of health care workers and management support. Primary care nurses need comprehensive support to manage stress and anxiety.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , COVID-19/enfermagem , Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Enfermagem de Atenção Primária/métodos , Adulto , COVID-19/diagnóstico , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Teste para COVID-19/métodos , Educação em Enfermagem , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Equipamento de Proteção Individual , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários
4.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 342, 2021 Jun 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34120607

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Assessment is a necessary part of training postgraduate medical residents. The implementation of methods located at the "shows how" level of Miller's pyramid is believed to be more effective than previous conventional tools. In this study, we quantitatively compared electronic and conventional methods in assessing ophthalmology residents. METHODS: In this retrospective study, eight different conventional methods of assessment including residents' attendance, logbook, scholarship and research skills, journal club, outpatient department participation, Multiple Choice Question (MCQ), Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), and professionalism/360-degree (as one complex) were used to assess 24 ophthalmology residents of all grades. Electronic media consisting of an online Patient Management Problem (e-PMP), and modified electronic OSCE (me-OSCE) tests performed 3 weeks later were also evaluated for each of the 24 residents. Quantitative analysis was then performed comparing the conventional and electronic assessment tools, statistically assessing the correlation between the two approaches. RESULTS: Twenty-four ophthalmology residents of different grades were included in this study. In the electronic assessment, average e-PMP scores (48.01 ± 12.40) were much lower than me-OSCE (65.34 ± 17.11). The total average electronic score was 56.67 ± 11.28, while the total average conventional score was 80.74 ± 5.99. Female and male residents' average scores in the electronic and conventional method were (59.15 ± 12.32 versus 83.01 ± 4.95) and (55.19 ± 10.77 versus 79.38 ± 6.29), respectively. The correlation between modified electronic OSCE and all conventional methods was not statistically significant (P-value >0.05). Correlation between e-PMP and six conventional methods, consisting of professionalism/360-degree assessment tool, logbook, research skills, Multiple Choice Questions, Outpatient department participation, and Journal club active participation was statistically significant (P-value < 0.05). The overall correlation between conventional and electronic methods was significant (P-value = 0.017). CONCLUSION: In this study, we conclude that electronic PMP can be used alongside all conventional tools, and overall, e-assessment methods could replace currently used conventional methods. Combined electronic PMP and me-OSCE can be used as a replacement for currently used gold-standard assessment methods, including 360-degree assessment.


Assuntos
Internato e Residência , Oftalmologia , Competência Clínica , Avaliação Educacional , Eletrônica , Bolsas de Estudo , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos
5.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 24(6): 883-891, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34121737

RESUMO

Background: Endotracheal suctioning is a vital procedure performed by intensive care nurses to maintain airway patency and optimal gas exchange in critically ill patients under mechanical ventilation. As the procedure can cause several complications, intensive care nurses should have adequate evidence-based knowledge on how to perform the procedure. Aims: This study aimed at examining intensive care nurses' knowledge and experience of the closed suctioning system. This study was a prospective, cross-sectional, descriptive, and multi-centered study conducted with 195 nurses working in the tertiary intensive care units in five Turkish hospitals. Subjects and Methods: The data were collected with a questionnaire developed by the researchers in light of the literature. The data were evaluated with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results: The mean age of the nurses was 30.58 ± 6.28 years. The mean knowledge score of the nurses for the closed system was 27.35 ± 12.05 (range = 0-80) and 80.5% of them obtained scores ranging between 0 and 40. Also, 71.8% stated that they did not have any difficulty performing suctioning with the closed system catheter, and 85% said that they saved time with the closed system. However, 50.8% of the nurses said they were not able to suction viscous and sticky secretions efficiently, 44.6% stated they did not need to irrigate the inside of the catheter, and 45.1% of them were undecided whether the coude tip catheter led to hemorrhagic secretion more than straight tip catheter. Conclusions: Almost one-fifth of the nurses had good scores on evidence-based knowledge of suctioning. Most of the nurses' experiences regarding the use and manipulation of the closed system were positive. However, almost half of the nurses pointed out that the closed system was not effective enough to suction viscous and sticky secretions. Regular in-service training sessions may help to improve nurses' current knowledge and experiences.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Enfermeiras e Enfermeiros , Adulto , Cuidados Críticos , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Intubação Intratraqueal , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem
6.
Z Orthop Unfall ; 159(3): 332-335, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês, Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34111895

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Digitalisation now almost covers all areas of medical student teaching. Teaching videos are a good way to help students learn practical skills. The existing evidence is a recognised aid for the classification of the respective technology. METHOD: This video presents the usual examination techniques of the shoulder joint on a patient with an unstable shoulder. The respective techniques, if available, were backed up with appropriate evidence. CONCLUSION: The examination techniques presented allow students to view them in a standardized manner on a patient. The evidence for the examination techniques can help with the classification of the respective technique.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Articulação do Ombro , Estudantes de Medicina , Competência Clínica , Humanos , Exame Físico , Articulação do Ombro/diagnóstico por imagem , Ensino
7.
S Afr Fam Pract (2004) ; 63(1): e1-e5, 2021 05 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34082556

RESUMO

Clinicians notify positive results of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 polymerase chain reaction to patients and/or relatives, whilst short message service (SMS) has been adopted as a means of disseminating negative results. Therefore, clinicians should be adequately equipped to provide telephonic consultation whilst delivering a positive test result to patients. The news of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) test result often invokes fear of impending death in patients, especially the elderlies and those with comorbidities. In addition, several survivors have reported persistent symptoms and COVID-19-related stigma, which precludes them from immediate re-integration into their workplaces. Consequently, COVID-19 results are perceived as bad news by the members of the public. This article justifies why COVID-19 test results are bad news and also discusses the notification steps to follow when delivering COVID-19 results, whilst also addressing patients' immediate concerns. The article concludes by highlighting an important safety net for COVID-19 patients and the attending clinician.


Assuntos
COVID-19/diagnóstico , Comunicação , Papel do Médico , Revelação da Verdade , Fatores Etários , COVID-19/psicologia , Competência Clínica , Comorbidade , Medo , Humanos , Estigma Social
8.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 21(1): 560, 2021 Jun 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34098942

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Medical education should ensure graduates are equipped for practice in modern health-care systems. Practicing effectively in complex health-care systems requires contemporary attributes and competencies, complementing core clinical competencies. These need to be made overt and opportunities to develop and practice them provided. This study explicates these attributes and generic competencies using Group Concept Mapping, aiming to inform pre-vocational medical education curriculum development. METHODS: Group Concept Mapping is a mixed methods consensus building methodology whereby ideas are generated using qualitative techniques, sorted and grouped using hierarchical cluster analysis, and rated to provide further quantitative confirmation of value. Health service providers from varied disciplines (including medicine, nursing, allied health), health profession educators, health managers, and service users contributed to the conceptual model's development. They responded to the prompt 'An attribute or non-clinical competency required of doctors for effective practice in modern health-care systems is...' and grouped the synthesized responses according to similarity. Data were subjected to hierarchical cluster analysis. Junior doctors rated competencies according to importance to their practice and preparedness at graduation. RESULTS: Sixty-seven contributors generated 338 responses which were synthesised into 60 statements. Hierarchical cluster analysis resulted in a conceptual map of seven clusters representing: value-led professionalism; attributes for self-awareness and reflective practice; cognitive capability; active engagement; communication to build and manage relationships; patient-centredness and advocacy; and systems awareness, thinking and contribution. Logic model transformation identified three overarching meta-competencies: leadership and systems thinking; learning and cognitive processes; and interpersonal capability. Ratings indicated that junior doctors believe system-related competencies are less important than other competencies, and they feel less prepared to carry them out. CONCLUSION: The domains that have been identified highlight the competencies necessary for effective practice for those who work within and use health-care systems. Three overarching domains relate to leadership in systems, learning, and interpersonal competencies. The model is a useful adjunct to broader competencies frameworks because of the focus on generic competencies that are crucial in modern complex adaptive health-care systems. Explicating these will allow future investigation into those that are currently well achieved, and those which are lacking, in differing contexts.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Médicos , Atenção à Saúde , Humanos , Liderança , Profissionalismo
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 332, 2021 Jun 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34103030

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Teaching is an important professional skill for physicians and providing feedback is an important part of teaching. Medical students can practice their feedback skills by giving each other peer feedback. Therefore, we developed a peer feedback training in which students observed a peer that modelled the use of good feedback principles. Students then elaborated on the modelled feedback principles through peer discussion. This combination of peer modelling and discussing the modelled feedback principles was expected to enhance emulation of the feedback principles compared to (1) only peer modelling and (2) discussing the feedback principles without previous modelling. METHODS: In a quasi-experimental study design, 141 medical students were assigned randomly to three training conditions: peer modelling plus discussion (MD), non-peer modelled example (NM) or peer modelling without discussion (M). Before and after the training, they commented on papers written by peers. These comments served as a pre- and a post-measure of peer feedback. The comments were coded into different functions and aspects of the peer feedback. Non-parametrical Kruskall-Wallis tests were used to check for pre- and post-measure between-group differences in the functions and aspects. RESULTS: Before the training, there were no significant between-group differences in feedback functions and aspects. After the training, the MD-condition gave significantly more positive peer feedback than the NM-condition. However, no other functions or aspects were significantly different between the three conditions, mainly because the within-group interquartile ranges were large. CONCLUSIONS: The large interquartile ranges suggest that students differed substantially in the effort placed into giving peer feedback. Therefore, additional incentives may be needed to motivate students to give good feedback. Teachers could emphasise the utility value of peer feedback as an important professional skill and the importance of academic altruism and professional accountability in the peer feedback process. Such incentives may convince more students to put more effort into giving peer feedback.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Médicos , Estudantes de Medicina , Competência Clínica , Retroalimentação , Humanos , Grupo Associado
10.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 319, 2021 Jun 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34088296

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Undergraduate medical education is supposed to equip medical students with basic competences to select any specialty of their choice for postgraduate training. Medical specialties are characterized by a great diversity of their daily work routines and require different sets of competence facets. This study examines the self-assessed competence profiles of final-year undergraduate medical students and their specialty choice for postgraduate training. Students' profiles, who wish to choose anaesthesiology, internal medicine, or paediatrics, are compared with the physicians' competence profiles from these three disciplines. METHODS: In this study, 148 volunteer final-year undergraduate medical students completed the modified requirement-tracking (R-Track) questionnaire for self-assessment of their competence profiles. The R-Track questionnaire contains 63 competence facets assigned to six areas of competence: "Mental abilities", "Sensory abilities", "Psychomotor & multitasking abilities", "Social interactive competences", "Motivation", and "Personality traits". The expression of the different competence facets had to be assessed on a 5-point Likert scale (1: "very low" to 5: "very high"). Additionally, socio-demographic data and the participants' first choice of a medical speciality for postgraduate education were collected. We used analysis of variance (ANOVA) for mean score comparison of subgroups and least significant difference (LSD) tests for post hoc analysis. RESULTS: The competence area with the highest rating was "Motivation" (3.70 ± 0.47) while "Psychomotor & multitasking abilities" received the lowest rating (3.34 ± 0.68). Individual facets of competence ranked from "In need of harmony" (4.36 ± 0.72), followed by "Tactfulness" (4.26 ± 0.64), and "Cooperation/Agreeableness" (4.24 ± 0.53) to "Risk orientation" (2.90 ± 0.92), "Mathematical reasoning" (2.87 ± 1.25), and "Sanctioning" (2.26 ± 0.93). The students' competence profiles showed 100 % congruence with physicians' competence profiles of the postgraduate specialty of their choice for internal medicine, 33.3 % for paediatrics, and 0 % for anaesthesiology. CONCLUSIONS: Undergraduate medical students could define their competence profiles with the modified R-Track questionnaire and compare them with the profile of their desired specialty for postgraduate training to discover possible learning gaps or to detect good specialty matches. A combination of students' competence self-assessment with an external assessment of students' facets of competence could provide curricular planners with useful information how to design learning opportunities for specific facets of competence.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Estudantes de Medicina , Criança , Competência Clínica , Humanos , Autoavaliação (Psicologia) , Inquéritos e Questionários
11.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 320, 2021 Jun 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34090439

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Self-regulated learning (SRL) is an important contributing element to the academic success of students. Literature suggests that the understanding of SRL among medical students is obscure as there is still some uncertainty about whether high performing medical students use SRL. This study explored the characteristics of high performing medical students from the SRL perspective to gain a better understanding of the application of SRL for effective learning. METHODS: Twenty-one students who scored at the 90th percentile in written knowledge-based assessment consented to participate in this study. Each student wrote a guided reflective journal and subsequently attended a semi-structured interview. Students were prompted to explain the rationales for their answers. The data were then analysed using thematic analysis to identify patterns among these students from the SRL perspective. Two coders analysed the data independently and discussed the codes to reach a consensus. RESULTS: High performing students set goals, made plans, and motivated themselves to achieve the goals. They put consistent efforts into their studies and applied effective learning strategies. They also employed coping mechanisms to deal with challenges. High performing students regularly evaluated their performance and adopted new strategies. CONCLUSIONS: This study reported that high performing students applied SRL and described the rationales of practice. Medical schools could design SRL-driven interventions to enhance the learning experiences of medical students. Recommendations are made for students on how to apply SRL.


Assuntos
Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Estudantes de Medicina , Competência Clínica , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Pesquisa Qualitativa
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 322, 2021 Jun 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34090441

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The traditional curriculum for medical students in Japan does not include sufficient opportunities for students to develop their skills for musculoskeletal (MSK) examination and clinical reasoning and diagnosis. Therefore, an effective programme is required to help medical students and residents improve their clinical skills in MSK. This paper aims to assess the clinical skills of medical students who have participated in a peer role-playing simulation programme using a mini clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX). METHODS: Participants were 90 female medical students who were completing their first orthopaedic clinical clerkship. They were divided into two groups. The simulation group participated in a role-play focussed on MSK cases as low-fidelity simulation, a structured debriefing with the course supervisor, and a self-reflection on Day 1 (n = 64). The control group did not participate in the role-play due to randomised clerkship schedules (n = 26). On Day 2 of the intervention, we observed and assessed all participants' performances during MSK outpatient encounters using the mini-CEX. We compared the mini-CEX score between the simulation group and the control group; the Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mini-CEX scores for physical examination, clinical reasoning and diagnosis, and overall clinical competency were significantly higher in the simulation group than in the control group (p < .05, physical examination: p = .014, clinical reasoning: p = .042, overall: p = .016). These findings suggest that medical students who partake in a peer role-playing simulation programme could experience improved clinical skills for physical examination, clinical reasoning and diagnosis, and overall clinical competency in real-life MSK outpatient encounters. CONCLUSIONS: Through a mini-CEX assessment, our findings indicate that medical students who participated in our peer role-playing simulation programme have improved clinical skills. Peer role-playing as a low-fidelity simulation and practical educational opportunity will enable educators to polish the competency of medical students in musculoskeletal physical examinations and clinical reasoning and diagnosis in a clinical setting.


Assuntos
Estágio Clínico , Competência Clínica , Feminino , Humanos , Japão , Exame Físico , Desempenho de Papéis
13.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 71(5): 1458-1466, 2021 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34091635

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To identify nursing instructors' clinical education competencies. METHODS: The integrative review comprised research articles published between 2008 and 2018 on Medline, Scopus, Web of Science and Education Information Resource Centre databases searched through relevant key words. All the short listed papers were reviewed and quality assessment was done. Data was analysed using content analysis method. Nursing instructors' clinical education competencies were extracted from the original texts in the form of initial codes which were categorised into subcategories and categories based on comparisons of their similarities and differences. Finally, themes were extracted as expression of content hidden in the data to generate new insights. RESULTS: Of the 17 studies selected, 6(35.3%) were quantitative, 4(23.5%) qualitative, 3(17.6%) review studies and 4(23.5%) were mixed-methods studies. Three overarching themes identified were clinical teaching process competencies, students' supervision competencies in clinical settings and nursing instructors' professional ethics. CONCLUSIONS: The review provides insightful information on nursing instructors' clinical education competencies. Nursing educational institutions need to be encouraged to incorporate these concepts into educational curricula to empower nursing instructors and to enhance the quality of clinical education.


Assuntos
Bacharelado em Enfermagem , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Competência Clínica , Currículo , Docentes de Enfermagem , Humanos
17.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 21(3): e257-e262, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34001581

RESUMO

The annual review of competence progression (ARCP) is a high-stakes assessment which all UK postgraduate trainees undertake to ensure competence progression. Previous evaluations of the effectiveness of the ARCP as an assessment have reported deficiencies in both validity and reliability, however, there has been little focus on the educational impact of the ARCP.We conducted a mixed methods case study involving questionnaire, interviews and a focus group examining the impact of the ARCP on a respiratory higher specialist training programme. Participants included both trainers and trainees.Perceptions of impact were mixed. The ARCP was reported to promote broad curriculum coverage, enable educational planning, provide educational governance and facilitate relationships with supervisors. However, participants reported that activities promoted by the ARCP may detract from learning and that issues of reliability and validity undermined the process. In some cases, this was reported to lead to disillusionment and stress for trainees. Concerns were raised that the process promoted a reductionist approach to education.This research has resulted in several changes to local training, however, it has potential implications for the ARCP as a wider process. Trainers should be cognisant of the shortcomings of assessments and their impact on trainees, training and the future of the profession.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Avaliação Educacional , Competência Clínica , Humanos , Percepção , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
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