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1.
Health Psychol ; 40(5): 305-315, 2021 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34152784

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: This study examined how standard and culturally targeted versions of gain and loss-framed messaging affect African Americans' colorectal cancer (CRC) screening receptivity and behavior, as well as their anticipation of experiencing racism in undertaking CRC screening. METHOD: Screening-deficient African Americans (N = 457) viewed an informational video about CRC risks, prevention, and screening and were randomized to receive a gain or loss-framed message about screening. Half of participants viewed an additional culturally targeted message about overcoming racial disparities in CRC by obtaining screening. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior, we measured general receptivity to CRC screening. We also measured arousal of anticipatory racism in response to messaging. Finally, we offered participants a no-cost fecal immunochemical testing kit (FIT Kit) and measured uptake and use. RESULTS: Message framing interacted with culturally targeted messaging to affect CRC screening receptivity and behavior. Participants were no more receptive to CRC screening when standard loss-framing was used, but were more favorable if loss-framing was culturally targeted. Targeted loss-framing also reduced anticipatory racism, which partially mediated effects on screening receptivity. Finally, although participants least often accepted a FIT Kit with standard loss-framing, effects of messaging on FIT Kit uptake and use were not significant. CONCLUSION: This study adds to growing recognition of important cultural nuance in effective use of message framing. Current finding also suggest that targeted and framed messaging could synergistically impact the extent to which African Americans engage in CRC screening, although specific impacts on FIT Kit screening are less certain. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Neoplasias Colorretais/etnologia , Competência Cultural , Detecção Precoce de Câncer/estatística & dados numéricos , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Neoplasias Colorretais/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Sangue Oculto , Racismo/psicologia
2.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(7): e29060, 2021 07 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34174778

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Innovative approaches to the dissemination of evidence-based COVID-19 health messages are urgently needed to counter social media misinformation about the pandemic. To this end, we designed a short, wordless, animated global health communication video (the CoVideo), which was rapidly distributed through social media channels to an international audience. OBJECTIVE: The objectives of this study were to (1) establish the CoVideo's effectiveness in improving COVID-19 prevention knowledge, and (2) establish the CoVideo's effectiveness in increasing behavioral intent toward COVID-19 prevention. METHODS: In May and June 2020, we enrolled 15,163 online participants from the United States, Mexico, the United Kingdom, Germany, and Spain. We randomized participants to (1) the CoVideo arm, (2) an attention placebo control (APC) arm, and (3) a do-nothing arm, and presented 18 knowledge questions about preventive COVID-19 behaviors, which was our first primary endpoint. To measure behavioral intent, our second primary endpoint, we randomized participants in each arm to five list experiments. RESULTS: Globally, the video intervention was viewed 1.2 million times within the first 10 days of its release and more than 15 million times within the first 4 months. Knowledge in the CoVideo arm was significantly higher (mean 16.95, 95% CI 16.91-16.99) than in the do-nothing (mean 16.86, 95% CI 16.83-16.90; P<.001) arm. We observed high baseline levels of behavioral intent to perform many of the preventive behaviors featured in the video intervention. We were only able to detect a statistically significant impact of the CoVideo on one of the five preventive behaviors. CONCLUSIONS: Despite high baseline levels, the intervention was effective at boosting knowledge of COVID-19 prevention. We were only able to capture a measurable change in behavioral intent toward one of the five COVID-19 preventive behaviors examined in this study. The global reach of this health communication intervention and the high voluntary engagement of trial participants highlight several innovative features that could inform the design and dissemination of public health messages. Short, wordless, animated videos, distributed by health authorities via social media, may be an effective pathway for rapid global health communication during health crises. TRIAL REGISTRATION: German Clinical Trials Register DRKS00021582; https://tinyurl.com/6r4zkbbn. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): RR2-10.1186/s13063-020-04942-7.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Intervenção Baseada em Internet , Mídias Sociais , Gravação em Vídeo , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Saúde Global , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Intenção
3.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 217(2): 515-520, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34076452

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this study was to quantify improved rates of follow-up and additional important diagnoses made after notification for overdue workups recommended by radiologists. MATERIALS AND METHODS. Standard reports from imaging studies performed at our institution from October through November 2016 were searched for the words "recommend" or "advised," yielding 9784 studies. Of these, 5245 were excluded, yielding 4539 studies; reports for 1599 of these 4539 consecutive studies were reviewed to identify firm or soft recommendations or findings requiring immediate management. If recommended follow-ups were incomplete within 1 month of the advised time, providers were notified. Compliance was calculated before and after notification and was compared using a one-sample test of proportion. RESULTS. Of 1599 patients, 92 were excluded because they had findings requiring immediate management, and 684 were excluded because of soft recommendations, yielding 823 patients. Of these patients, 125 were not yet overdue for follow-up and were excluded, and 18 were excluded because of death or transfer to another institution. Of the remaining 680 patients, follow-up was completed for 503 (74.0%). A total of 177 (26.0%) of the 680 patients were overdue for follow-up, and providers were notified. Of these 177 patients, 36 (20.3%) completed their follow-ups after notification, 34 (19.2%) had follow-up designated by the provider as nonindicated, and 107 (60.5%) were lost to follow-up, yielding four clinically important diagnoses: one biopsy-proven malignancy, one growing mass, and two thyroid nodules requiring biopsy. The rate of incomplete follow-ups after communication decreased from 26.0% (177/680) to 20.7% (141/680) (95% CI, 17.7-23.9%; p = .002), with a 20.4% reduction in relative risk of noncompliance, and 39.5% (70/177) of overdue cases were resolved when nonindicated studies were included. CONCLUSION. Notification of overdue imaging recommendations reduces incomplete follow-ups and yields clinically important diagnoses.


Assuntos
Notificação de Doenças/métodos , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Perda de Seguimento , Neoplasias/diagnóstico por imagem , Cooperação do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Radiologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Seguimentos , Humanos , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto
4.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(7): e27942, 2021 07 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34117860

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: During a public health crisis such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, governments and health authorities need quick and accurate methods of communicating with the public. While social media can serve as a useful tool for effective communication during disease outbreaks, few studies have elucidated how these platforms are used by the Ministry of Health (MOH) during disease outbreaks in Saudi Arabia. OBJECTIVE: Guided by the Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication model, this study aimed to explore the MOH's use of Twitter and the public's engagement during different stages of the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: Tweets and corresponding likes and retweets were extracted from the official Twitter account of the MOH in Saudi Arabia for the period of January 1 through August 31, 2020. Tweets related to COVID-19 were identified; subsequently, content analysis was performed, in which tweets were coded for the following message types: risk messages, warnings, preparations, uncertainty reduction, efficacy, reassurance, and digital health responses. Public engagement was measured by examining the numbers of likes and retweets. The association between outbreak stages and types of messages was assessed, as well as the effect of these messages on public engagement. RESULTS: The MOH posted a total of 1393 original tweets during the study period. Of the total tweets, 1293 (92.82%) were related to COVID-19, and 1217 were ultimately included in the analysis. The MOH posted the majority of its tweets (65.89%) during the initial stage of the outbreak. Accordingly, the public showed the highest level of engagement (as indicated by numbers of likes and retweets) during the initial stage. The types of messages sent by the MOH significantly differed across outbreak stages, with messages related to uncertainty reduction, reassurance, and efficacy being prevalent among all stages. Tweet content, media type, and crisis stage influenced the level of public engagement. Engagement was negatively associated with the inclusion of hyperlinks and multimedia files, while higher level of public engagement was associated with the use of hashtags. Tweets related to warnings, uncertainty reduction, and reassurance received high levels of public engagement. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insights into the Saudi MOH's communication strategy during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our results have implications for researchers, governments, health organizations, and practitioners with regard to their communication practices during outbreaks. To increase public engagement, governments and health authorities should consider the public's need for information. This, in turn, could raise public awareness regarding disease outbreaks.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Participação da Comunidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Saúde Pública , Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Humanos , Arábia Saudita/epidemiologia
5.
J Racial Ethn Health Disparities ; 8(4): 809-820, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34143380

RESUMO

Established in 2019, the Roundtable on Black Men and Black Women in STEM convenes a broad array of stakeholders that focus on the barriers and opportunities encountered by Black men and Black women as they navigate the pathways from K-12 and postsecondary education to careers in science, engineering, and medicine. Through meetings, public workshops, and publications, the Roundtable advances discussions that raise awareness and/or highlight promising practices for increasing the representation, retention, and inclusiveness of Black men and Black women in STEM. In keeping with the charge of the Roundtable, Roundtable leadership and leaders of the COVID-19 action group conducted an informational video in January 2021 to provide an in-depth discussion around common, justified questions in the Black community pertaining to the COVID-19 vaccine. The manuscript addresses selected questions and answers relating to the different types of COVID-19 vaccines and their development, administration, and effectiveness. Discussion focuses on addressing vaccine misconceptions, misinformation, mistrust, and hesitancy; challenges in prioritizing vaccinations in diverse populations and communities; dealing with racism in medicine and public health; optimizing communication and health education; and offering practical strategies and recommendations for improving vaccine acceptance by clinicians, health care workers, and the Black community. This manuscript summarizes the content in the YouTube video ( https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdEC9c48A_k ).


Assuntos
Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Vacinas contra COVID-19 , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , COVID-19/etnologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Humanos
7.
Comunidad (Barc., Internet) ; 23(1): 0-0, mar.-jun. 2021. tab, graf, ilus
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-201955

RESUMO

Mejorar el estado de salud de la población general no es tarea fácil. Hacerlo en el caso de colectivos desfavorecidos es aún más complicado. Presentamos una intervención inédita de educación para la salud desarrollada en el Centro Penitenciario Araba/Álava mediante una estrategia de comunicación altamente eficaz y eficiente. Con acciones informativas sencillas, vehiculizadas por un canal de comunicación existente, se ha conseguido mejorar la adherencia a la medicación de la población reclusa. El Programa «Tu medicación te aporta un plus», desarrollado en un contexto de escasez de recursos y dirigido a un target de población con necesidades complejas, se ha retroalimentado a través de la participación de las personas reclusas y está plenamente implantado, con una trayectoria de más de 3 años. Detallamos su puesta en marcha y los resultados obtenidos, especialmente el impacto en la salud mental y calidad de vida de la población reclusa. Aportamos una estrategia de comunicación y educación en salud de bajo coste, que promueve el empoderamiento individual y colectivo, y es válido y aplicable tanto en el ámbito penitenciario como en otros contextos comunitarios: centros educativos, sociales y sanitarios. El objetivo del estudio es mejorar la salud y la calidad de vida de las personas reclusas a través de un programa de intervención adaptado a sus características y necesidades


Improving the health of the general population is not an easy task. In the case of disadvantaged groups it is even more complicated. We report an unprecedented health education intervention carried out at Araba/Álava Prison Centre by means of a highly effective and efficient communication strategy. With simple explanatory actions, conveyed by an existing communication channel, it was possible to improve the prison population's medication adherence. "Your medication gives you a plus" Programme, carried out against a backdrop of scarcity of resources and targeted at a population with complex needs, has been fed back through the participation of inmates and has been fully implemented over more than three years. We outline implementation of the programme and its results, especially the impact on mental health and quality of life of the prison population. We provide a low-cost health education and communication strategy, which promotes individual and group empowerment, and is valid and applicable both in the prison setting and in other community contexts: educational, social and health centres


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Prisioneiros/psicologia , Participação da Comunidade , Prisões/organização & administração , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Nível de Saúde , Educação em Saúde/métodos , Qualidade de Vida , Cooperação e Adesão ao Tratamento , Saúde Mental , Relações Profissional-Paciente , Inquéritos e Questionários , Sistemas de Medicação/organização & administração , Alfabetização/estatística & dados numéricos
8.
PLoS Med ; 18(5): e1003650, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34029338

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pregnant and postpartum women living with HIV (WLWH) need support for HIV and maternal child health (MCH) care, which could be provided using short message service (SMS). METHODS AND FINDINGS: We compared 2-way (interactive) and 1-way SMS messaging to no SMS in a 3-arm randomized trial in 6 MCH clinics in Kenya. Messages were developed using the Health Belief Model and Social Cognitive Theory; HIV messages were integrated into an existing MCH SMS platform. Intervention participants received visit reminders and prespecified weekly SMS on antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence and MCH, tailored to their characteristics and timing. Two-way participants could message nurses as needed. Clinic attendance, viral load (VL), and infant HIV results were abstracted from program records. Primary outcomes were viral nonsuppression (VL ≥1,000 c/ml), on-time clinic attendance, loss to follow-up from clinical care, and infant HIV-free survival. Among 824 pregnant women randomized between November 2015 and May 2017, median age was 27 years, gestational age was 24.3 weeks, and time since initiation of ART was 1.0 year. During follow-up to 2 years postpartum, 9.8% of 3,150 VL assessments and 19.6% of women were ever nonsuppressed, with no significant difference in 1-way versus control (11.2% versus 9.6%, adjusted risk ratio (aRR) 1.02 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.67 to 1.54], p = 0.94) or 2-way versus control (8.5% versus 9.6%, aRR 0.80 [95% CI 0.52 to 1.23], p = 0.31). Median ART adherence and incident ART resistance did not significantly differ by arm. Overall, 88.9% (95% CI 76.5 to 95.7) of visits were on time, with no significant differences between arms (88.2% in control versus 88.6% in 1-way and 88.8% in 2-way). Incidence of infant HIV or death was 3.01/100 person-years (py), with no significant difference between arms; risk of infant HIV infection was 0.94%. Time to postpartum contraception was significantly shorter in the 2-way arm than control. Study limitations include limited ability to detect improvement due to high viral suppression and visit attendance and imperfect synchronization of SMS reminders to clinic visits. CONCLUSIONS: Integrated HIV/MCH messaging did not improve HIV outcomes but was associated with improved initiation of postpartum contraception. In programs where most women are virally suppressed, targeted SMS informed by VL data may improve effectiveness. Rigorous evaluation remains important to optimize mobile health (mHealth) interventions. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02400671.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Transmissão Vertical de Doenças Infecciosas/prevenção & controle , Telemedicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Envio de Mensagens de Texto/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Quênia , Mães , Adulto Jovem
9.
Lancet Public Health ; 6(6): e416-e427, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33991482

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of the COVID-19 vaccination programme depends on mass participation: the greater the number of people vaccinated, the less risk to the population. Concise, persuasive messaging is crucial, particularly given substantial levels of vaccine hesitancy in the UK. Our aim was to test which types of written information about COVID-19 vaccination, in addition to a statement of efficacy and safety, might increase vaccine acceptance. METHODS: For this single-blind, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial, we aimed to recruit 15 000 adults in the UK, who were quota sampled to be representative. Participants were randomly assigned equally across ten information conditions stratified by level of vaccine acceptance (willing, doubtful, or strongly hesitant). The control information condition comprised the safety and effectiveness statement taken from the UK National Health Service website; the remaining conditions addressed collective benefit, personal benefit, seriousness of the pandemic, and safety concerns. After online provision of vaccination information, participants completed the Oxford COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy Scale (outcome measure; score range 7-35) and the Oxford Vaccine Confidence and Complacency Scale (mediation measure). The primary outcome was willingness to be vaccinated. Participants were analysed in the groups they were allocated. p values were adjusted for multiple comparisons. The study was registered with ISRCTN, ISRCTN37254291. FINDINGS: From Jan 19 to Feb 5, 2021, 15 014 adults were recruited. Vaccine hesitancy had reduced from 26·9% the previous year to 16·9%, so recruitment was extended to Feb 18 to recruit 3841 additional vaccine-hesitant adults. 12 463 (66·1%) participants were classified as willing, 2932 (15·6%) as doubtful, and 3460 (18·4%) as strongly hesitant (ie, report that they will avoid being vaccinated for as long as possible or will never get vaccinated). Information conditions did not alter COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in those willing or doubtful (adjusted p values >0·70). In those strongly hesitant, COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy was reduced, in comparison to the control condition, by personal benefit information (mean difference -1·49, 95% CI -2·16 to -0·82; adjusted p=0·0015), directly addressing safety concerns about speed of development (-0·91, -1·58 to -0·23; adjusted p=0·0261), and a combination of all information (-0·86, -1·53 to -0·18; adjusted p=0·0313). In those strongly hesitant, provision of personal benefit information reduced hesitancy to a greater extent than provision of information on the collective benefit of not personally getting ill (-0·97, 95% CI -1·64 to -0·30; adjusted p=0·0165) or the collective benefit of not transmitting the virus (-1·01, -1·68 to -0·35; adjusted p=0·0150). Ethnicity and gender were found to moderate information condition outcomes. INTERPRETATION: In the approximately 10% of the population who are strongly hesitant about COVID-19 vaccines, provision of information on personal benefit reduces hesitancy to a greater extent than information on collective benefits. Where perception of risk from vaccines is most salient, decision making becomes centred on the personal. As such, messaging that stresses the counterbalancing personal benefits is likely to prove most effective. The messaging from this study could be used in public health communications. Going forwards, the study highlights the need for future health campaigns to engage with the public on the terrain that is most salient to them. FUNDING: National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Oxford Biomedical Research Centre and NIHR Oxford Health Biomedical Research Centre.


Assuntos
Vacinas contra COVID-19/administração & dosagem , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Comunicação Persuasiva , Vacinação/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Método Simples-Cego , Reino Unido , Adulto Jovem
10.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(21)2021 05 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33975906

RESUMO

Public health experts have advocated for wearing protective face masks to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, yet some populations are resistant. Can certain messages shift attitudes toward masks? We investigate the effect of value-consistent messages within a mask-skeptical population: White evangelicals in the United States. An experiment within a national survey of White evangelicals (n = 1,212) assigned respondents to one of three conditions: One group was given a religious message equating mask use with loving your neighbor, another was given a message by Donald Trump saying mask use is patriotic, and a control group received no message. Those exposed to the religious message were more likely to see mask use as important and were more supportive of mask mandates. Republican evangelicals exposed to the patriotism message had similar responses. These findings show that messages that align with individuals' core values-in this case, religious tenets and patriotism-can shift certain views on mask use and government mask policies to combat COVID-19, even among a comparatively mask-resistant group.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Máscaras , Protestantismo , Atitude Frente a Saúde , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/psicologia , Humanos , Protestantismo/psicologia , Opinião Pública , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
11.
Public Underst Sci ; 30(5): 515-534, 2021 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33892612

RESUMO

As an unprecedented global disease outbreak, the COVID-19 pandemic is also accompanied by an infodemic. To better cope with the pandemic, laypeople need to process information in ways that help guide informed judgments and decisions. Such information processing likely involves the reliance on various evidence types. Extending the Risk Information Seeking and Processing model via a two-wave survey (N = 1284), we examined the predictors and consequences of US-dwelling Chinese's reliance on four evidence types (i.e. scientific, statistical, experiential, and expert) regarding COVID-19 information. Overall, Risk Information Seeking and Processing variables such as information insufficiency and perceived information gathering capacity predicted the use of all four evidence types. However, other Risk Information Seeking and Processing variables (e.g. informational subjective norms) did not emerge as important predictors. In addition, different evidence types had different associations with subsequent disease prevention behaviors and satisfaction with the US government's action to address the pandemic. Finally, discrete emotions varied in their influences on the use of evidence types, behaviors, and satisfaction. The findings provide potentially valuable contributions to science and health communication theory and practice.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Comportamento de Busca de Informação , Ciência , Estatística como Assunto , Emoções , Comunicação em Saúde/normas , Humanos , Modelos Psicológicos , Pandemias , Medição de Risco , SARS-CoV-2 , Mídias Sociais
12.
Nat Hum Behav ; 5(6): 706-715, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33911228

RESUMO

Anti-intellectualism (the generalized distrust of experts and intellectuals) is an important concept in explaining the public's engagement with advice from scientists and experts. We ask whether it has shaped the mass public's response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We provide evidence of a consistent connection between anti-intellectualism and COVID-19 risk perceptions, social distancing, mask usage, misperceptions and information acquisition using a representative survey of 27,615 Canadians conducted from March to July 2020. We exploit a panel component of our design (N = 4,910) to strongly link anti-intellectualism and within-respondent change in mask usage. Finally, we provide experimental evidence of anti-intellectualism's importance in information search behaviour with two conjoint studies (N ~ 2,500) that show that preferences for COVID-19 news and COVID-19 information from experts dissipate among respondents with higher levels of anti-intellectual sentiment. Anti-intellectualism poses a fundamental challenge in maintaining and increasing public compliance with expert-guided COVID-19 health directives.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis , Comunicação em Saúde , Máscaras/estatística & dados numéricos , Percepção Social , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , COVID-19/psicologia , Canadá/epidemiologia , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/organização & administração , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Comunicação em Saúde/normas , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Comportamento de Busca de Informação/ética , Comportamento de Massa , Saúde Pública/métodos , Opinião Pública , SARS-CoV-2 , Mídias Sociais/ética , Participação Social , Percepção Social/ética , Percepção Social/psicologia , Confiança
13.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e115, 2021 04 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33843539

RESUMO

In 2009, the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the 16 German federal state public health authorities (PHAs) established a weekly epidemiological teleconference (EpiLag) to discuss infectious disease (ID) events and foster horizontal and vertical information exchange. We present the procedure, discussed ID topics and evaluation results of EpiLag after 10 years. We analysed attendance, duration of EpiLag and the frequency of reported events. Participants (RKI and state PHA) were surveyed regarding their satisfaction with logistics, contents and usefulness of EpiLag (Likert scales). Between 2009 and 2018, RKI hosted 484 EpiLag conferences with a mean duration of 25 min (range: 4-60) and high participation (range: 9-16; mean: 15 PHAs). Overall, 2975 ID events (39% international, 9% national and 52% subnational) were presented (mean: 6.1 per EpiLag), most frequently on measles (18%), salmonellosis (8%) and influenza (5%). All responding participants (14/16 PHAs and 9/9 at RKI) were satisfied with the EpiLag's organization and minutes and deemed EpiLag useful for an overview and information distribution on ID events relevant to Germany. EpiLag is time efficient, easily applicable and useful for a low-threshold event communication. It supports PHAs in crises and strengthens the network of surveillance stakeholders. We recommend its implementation to other countries or sectors.


Assuntos
Doenças Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Telecomunicações , Monitoramento Epidemiológico , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Troca de Informação em Saúde , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Participação dos Interessados , Telecomunicações/organização & administração , Telecomunicações/estatística & dados numéricos
14.
Clin Pediatr (Phila) ; 60(6-7): 273-278, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33884910

RESUMO

Managing the anxiety of the parents of pediatric patients with head trauma is challenging. This study aimed to examine the factors that affect anxiety levels of parents whose children were admitted to the emergency department with minor head trauma. In this prospective study, the parents of 663 consecutive pediatric patients were invited to answer a questionnaire. Parents of 600 children participated in the study. The parents who believed they were provided sufficient information and who were satisfied with the service received had significantly more improvement in anxiety-related questions. Cranial X-ray assessment had a significantly positive impact on the anxiety of the parents, whereas cranial computed tomography and neurosurgery consultation did not. In assessing pediatric minor head trauma, cranial computed tomography imaging and neurosurgery consultation should not be expected to relieve the anxiety of the parents. However, adequately informing them and providing satisfaction are the factors that could lead to improvement.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/psicologia , Traumatismos Craniocerebrais/psicologia , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Pais/psicologia , Adulto , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Traumatismos Craniocerebrais/diagnóstico por imagem , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Radiografia/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X/psicologia , Turquia
15.
Radiography (Lond) ; 27(3): 873-876, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33678541

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: A chest X-ray (CXR), taken in full inspiration, is important to ensure pathology in the lungs will not be missed. To achieve this, effective communication on breathing instructions for patients is crucial. During the COVID-19 pandemic, radiographers in Sengkang General Hospital (SKH) were challenged when performing CXR for the patients whose native language is not English. Most of these patients were foreign workers living in the same dormitory which had formed the largest COVID-19 cluster in Singapore. These dormitory residents found it difficult to understand and adhere to breathing instructions, resulting in a suboptimal degree of inspiration when the CXRs were taken. This may ultimately affect the diagnostic value of the radiographs. This paper aims to share and evaluate how radiographers tackled this issue and continued to acquire fully-inspired CXR for the dormitory residents despite the language barrier. METHODS: Using a combination of online survey and retrospective analysis of the rejection rates of CXR done over the period of early April to early June, a team of radiographers evaluated the effectiveness of using audio recordings in managing the issue of not achieving a fully inspired CXR for patients due to language barrier. RESULTS: The rejection rate for CXR due to suboptimal inspiration decreased from 26% to 9% upon implementation of the audio recordings. 92.3% of the CXRs taken within this period also fulfilled the criteria of a fully-inspired CXR, as evidenced by having at least 9 posterior ribs seen above the right hemi-diaphragm. Survey results found a fairly balanced number of radiographers who agreed and disagreed that a fully-inspired CXR was achieved for most of their patients after utilisation of translation manuals and audio recordings. CONCLUSION: After the implementation of audio recordings, the decrease in rejection rate of CXR and an audit which demonstrated that CXR quality was upheld had proven that the radiographers successfully achieved fully-inspired CXR for suspected COVID-19 patients. This confirmed that using pre-recorded audio instructions was an efficient intervention albeit being a one-way communication, leads to more accurate imaging results, aligning with existing literature on communication experiences between radiographers and patients. Moreover, the decreased rejection rate of CXRs had increased department efficiency consequently reducing departmental expenses in the long run. IMPLICATIONS OF PRACTICE: Given that we have an ageing population and the vast majority of the elderly converse in their various dialects, positive feedback from radiographers presented opportunities to expand the translation manual and audio recordings to include local dialects. These can be seamlessly integrated in CXR and other procedures in the hospital setting. To ensure that the translations are culturally sensitive, attention should be paid to the translation process of instructions into other languages and local dialects by enlisting the help of native speakers.


Assuntos
Pessoal Técnico de Saúde , COVID-19/diagnóstico por imagem , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Idioma , Radiografia Torácica/métodos , Humanos , Pulmão/diagnóstico por imagem , Multilinguismo , Pandemias , Estudos Retrospectivos , SARS-CoV-2 , Singapura
16.
J Med Syst ; 45(4): 50, 2021 Mar 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33675427

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic changed expectations for information dissemination and use around the globe, challenging accepted models of communications, leadership, and social systems. We explore how social media discourse about COVID-19 in Italy was affected by the rapid spread of the virus, and how themes in postings changed with the adoption of social distancing measures and non-pharmaceutical interventions (NPI). We used topic modeling and social network analysis to highlight critical dimensions of conversations around COVID-19: 1) topics in social media postings about the Coronavirus; 2) the scope and reach of social networks; and 3) changes in social media content as the nation moved from partial to full social distancing. Twitter messages sent in Italy between February 11th and March 10th, 2020. 74,306 Tweets sent by institutions, news sources, elected officials, scientists and social media influencers. Messages were retweeted more than 1.2 million times globally. Non-parametric chi-square statistic with residual analysis to identify categories, chi-square test for linear trend, and Social Network Graphing. The first phase of the pandemic was dominated by social media influencers, followed by a focus on the economic consequences of the virus and placing blame on immigrants. As the crisis deepened, science-based themes began to predominate, with a focus on reducing the spread of the virus through physical distancing and business closures Our findings highlight the importance of messaging in social media in gaining the public's trust and engagement during a pandemic. This requires credible scientific voices to garner public support for effective mitigation. Fighting the spread of an infectious disease goes hand in hand with stemming the dissemination of lies, bad science, and misdirection.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Educação em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Meios de Comunicação de Massa/estatística & dados numéricos , Distanciamento Físico , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Itália , Saúde Pública , Opinião Pública , Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos , Rede Social
17.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 12: 21501327211007026, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33787395

RESUMO

The development of highly efficacious COVID-19 vaccines has brought a feeling of hope to many in the US (United States) and across the globe. However, it is estimated that approximately one-third of the US and international population are hesitant to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. For most Western countries with the economic means to purchase sufficient vaccine for their citizens, the medical community now has the opportunity to lead the vaccination communication campaign. Because frontline clinicians were the first to be vaccinated in the United States (US), they are uniquely positioned to be the most trusted source of vaccine information. Primary care clinicians, more than other groups of clinicians, scientists, government officials, media, etc. have the greatest chance for instilling confidence about the vaccine to their patients, including the most vulnerable and the most distrusting. They are considered credible and trustworthy allies for their patients in the US, however, clinicians receive little to no formal training in communication related to controversial topics, such as vaccine hesitancy. With the increasing worry about highly transmissible COVID-19 viral mutations and possible related vaccine resistance, it becomes even more critical to accelerate vaccination efforts across every community. Educating primary care clinicians regarding the importance of talking to their patients regarding their COVID-19 vaccination plans is essential.


Assuntos
Vacinas contra COVID-19/uso terapêutico , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Médicos de Atenção Primária/educação , Humanos , SARS-CoV-2 , Estados Unidos , Recusa de Vacinação
18.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 558, 2021 03 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33743647

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Before the COVID-19 pandemic occurred in January 2020, the number of overseas visitors to Japan had increased threefold over the last decade. To minimize the risk of health problems, visitors should be able to access information on the health care systems of the places they visit. Most short-term overseas visitors are young adults. Although they are not very likely to get sick from noncommunicable diseases, they are at high risk for injury and often experience stomach ailments, fever, or nausea when travelling. The objective of this study is to evaluate culturally and linguistically appropriate health information on preventive health behaviours and the health care system in Japan. We will examine the level of satisfaction of overseas visitors to Japan with health care-related educational materials using a five-minute digital game named Sa-Chan Japan. METHODS: Our study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT). We will assess both satisfaction and motivation before, during, and after the interventions and examine the changes over time. The intervention group will comprise overseas visitors who will view and answer questions in an animation named Sa-Chan Japan. The control group will comprise overseas visitors who will watch an English digital animation named Mari Info Japan. We will recruit 1002 participants through the Macromill Internet portal. We will contact overseas visitors who have either visited or wish to visit Japan from the United Kingdom, United States, and Australia. The participants will fill out a self-administered questionnaire online in the first quarter of 2021. We will determine the participants' levels of satisfaction with the CSQ-8 (8-item Client Satisfaction Questionnaire). We will analyse the median score of the overseas visitors with both the Wilcoxon rank-sum and the Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Our protocol of randomized controlled trials follows the SPIRIT guidelines. DISCUSSION: Our research will utilize unique digital education strategies in a game that promotes health and safety among overseas visitors to Japan. We believe the results of this study will be useful in overcoming the current challenges regarding pretravel health requirements for overseas visitors worldwide. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Version 1 of this trial was registered in the UMIN-CTR (University Hospital Medical Information Network Center Clinical Trials Registry), and the trial registration data are available on UMIN000042483 , November 17, 2020.


Assuntos
Atenção à Saúde , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Promoção da Saúde/métodos , Intervenção Baseada em Internet , Viagem , Adulto , Compreensão , Humanos , Japão , Motivação , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
19.
Public Health Res Pract ; 31(1)2021 Mar 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33690789

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To consider the challenges of communicating COVID-19 directives to culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in Australia, and present evidence-based solutions to influence policy and practice on promoting relevant health behaviours; to advance participatory research methodologies for health behaviour change. Type of program or service: We present a case study of a participatory research collaboration between CALD community leaders and health behaviour change scientists during the COVID-19 crisis. The goal was to better understand the role of community leaders in shaping health behaviours in their communities and how that role might be leveraged for better health outcomes. METHODS: This article is the culmination of a series of dialogues between CALD community and advocacy leaders, and health behaviour change scientists in July 2020. The academic authors recruited 12 prominent CALD community leaders, conducted five semi-structured dialogues with small groups, and worked with all participants to develop insights that were applicable to the many different CALD communities represented in the research collaboration. RESULTS: Three key findings emerged: 1) partnerships between CALD leaders, communities and government are critical for effective health communication; 2) shifting behaviour requires moving beyond disseminating information to designing tailored solutions; and 3) the diverse needs and circumstances of people and communities must be at the centre of health communication and behaviour change strategies. LESSONS LEARNT: The collaborative process we undertook in this study enabled us to identify key challenges experienced and solutions offered by CALD leaders in communicating health information throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Partnering with communities that are subject to health messaging can reduce inequalities in healthcare communication by enabling the development of strategies that help align human behaviour with the recommendations of health experts. This - along with sustained partnership and collaboration with CALD communities, understanding the cultural context, and the appropriate tailoring and delivery of communications - will ensure health-related messages are not lost in translation. The lessons provided in this paper are applicable not only to the current pandemic but also to post-pandemic social and economic recovery.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Diversidade Cultural , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Idioma , Austrália , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Informação de Saúde ao Consumidor/métodos , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Características de Residência , SARS-CoV-2 , Tradução
20.
GMS J Med Educ ; 38(1): Doc31, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33659636

RESUMO

As a result of the corona pandemic, the amount of digital health information has increased substantially. As the quantity and diversity of information increased, so does the need for evidence based and reliable health information. In the special course of study "Health Communication", students of the Bachelors program "Health Promotion" at Fulda University of Applied Sciences are enabled to develop and disseminate evidence-based health information and preventive messages that meet the demands of the target group. Due to the corona-related university closure, the module "Digital Health Communication" was realized in a digital format during the summer semester 2020. In order to activate students and promote teamwork, the study course used the approach of problem-based and research-based learning. Moreover, the course concept is based on a variety of methods, including MS Teams with screencasts, videos, synchronous teaching sessions, gamified audience response systems, the online Inverted Classroom Model and a final oral examination. Despite various challenges such as the short planning period or the necessary restructuring of a part previously planned as "en bloc", the experiences are mostly positive. Among other things, the use of MS Teams as an integrated learning, collaboration and communication platform has proven to be useful. In the students' feedback, the broad use of methods, the gamification elements and the flexibility of the lecturers are evaluated positively.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Tecnologia Digital/organização & administração , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Comunicação em Saúde/métodos , Letramento em Saúde/métodos , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2
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