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2.
Int J Sports Med ; 41(3): 168-174, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31952082

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to investigate the risk factors and the incidence of injuries in high-intensity functional training (HIFT) practitioners. A survey was administered to 213 HIFT practitioners. Participants reported the number of injuries, the location of the injuries, and training exposure during the preceding six months and answered questions regarding potential risk factors for injury. We found there were 7.1 injuries for every 1000 hours of training. In addition, we found that individuals with experience in the modality (>2 years) were 3.77 times more likely to be affected by injury when compared with beginner individuals (<6 months) (CI95%=1.59-8.92; p=0.003). When the analysis was performed only for the competitive level, we found that practitioners competing at the national level were 5.69 times more likely to experience an injury than competitors who do not compete (CI95%=1.10-29.54; p=0.038). We also found that the injuries mainly affect the shoulder and lumbar regions. It was possible to conclude that subjects with a higher level of experience in the modality are more likely to be affected by injuries and that the shoulder and lumbar areas are most likely to be injured during HIFT.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas/epidemiologia , Condicionamento Físico Humano/efeitos adversos , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Adulto , Lesões nas Costas/epidemiologia , Comportamento Competitivo/fisiologia , Exercício , Feminino , Ginástica/lesões , Humanos , Incidência , Traumatismos do Joelho/epidemiologia , Masculino , Prevalência , Treinamento de Resistência/efeitos adversos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Lesões do Ombro/epidemiologia , Traumatismos do Punho/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
3.
Int J Sports Med ; 41(3): 154-160, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31902129

RESUMO

We evaluated a range of physical characteristics related to hamstring injuries, as well as the Nordic Hamstring Exercise compliance rate, and whether this influenced the rate hamstring injury. Subjects comprised 259 male soccer players from seven high schools randomly clustered into two groups, a Nordic Hamstring Exercise group and a control group. Training and match time were logged, as well as details of hamstring injury, and subsequent time lost to hamstring injury recorded over a period of 27 weeks. The Nordic Hamstring Exercise compliance rate, injury rate per 10000 playing hours and time-lost-to-sport-injury rate were calculated. The relative risk and hamstring injury severity were also calculated. The hamstring injury rate was 1.04/10 000 h in the control group and 0.88/10 000 h in the intervention group. The relative risk for hamstring injury was 1.14. The time-lost to injury rate was 1116.3/10 000 h in the control group and 113.7/10 000 h in the intervention group; with relative risk 9.81. The Nordic Hamstring Exercise in high school soccer players significantly reduced hamstring injury severity compared to a control intervention. Our results indicate that the time-lost to injury rate should be taken into account when analyzing the severity of hamstring injury.


Assuntos
Músculos Isquiotibiais/lesões , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Futebol/lesões , Adolescente , Traumatismos em Atletas/epidemiologia , Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Lesões nas Costas/epidemiologia , Lesões nas Costas/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Extremidade Inferior/lesões , Masculino , Volta ao Esporte , Fatores de Tempo , Índices de Gravidade do Trauma
5.
J Sports Sci ; 38(2): 192-205, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31724487

RESUMO

Virtual reality (VR) is a widespread technology drawing an increasing interest for players and coaches, especially in team ball sports as it offers a simple tool to simulate, analyse and train situations that are often too complex to reproduce in the field. In this review we aimed at (1) providing an overview of methodologies and outcomes of research studies using VR in team ball sports; (2) better evaluating the potential interest of VR to analyse or train team ball sports situation and (3) identifying limitations, gaps in knowledge and remaining scientific challenges. The MEDLINE and Web of Science Core Collection databases were searched, using predefined combinations of keywords. Thirty articles were retained and analysed. VR can be an interesting tool to assess or train team ball sports skills/situations as it allows researchers to control and standardise situations and focus on specific skills/subskills. Studies that used VR in team ball sports still have some limitations, mainly due to technical issues or study design. This paper also describes the way VR should be used to enhance understanding of performance in team ball sports. Additional suggestions for future research and study design are proposed.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Esportes , Realidade Virtual , Retroalimentação , Humanos , Destreza Motora
6.
J Sports Sci ; 38(1): 79-85, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31631792

RESUMO

In Australian Football (AF), small sided games have been used extensively as an alternative training method for technical and physical adaptations. Considering their application to AF, it is surprising a valid and reliable small-sided game kicking assessment remains absent. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a valid and reliable 5v6 Australian football small-sided game kicking proficiency assessment. Youth male AF players (n = 145) from different stages within the AF talent pathway were recruited. Validity (i.e., logical and construct) and reliability (i.e., test re-test) were assessed. The largest kicking proficiency difference was between U13 and U16 players and between novice and sub-elite players. Between the ages of U16 and U18 kicking proficiency appears to stabilise. The Australian football small-sided kicking assessment was 97% successful in identifying players as either novice or sub-elite. Larger physical performance (i.e., odometer, m/min-1 and %HIR) outputs were noted between U14 and U18 players and novice and sub-elite players. Collectively, these findings suggest the Australian football small-sided kicking assessment is a valid and reliable AF kicking proficiency assessment tool and may provide worthwhile information to coaches regarding kicking performance along the AFL pathway, to profile player strengths whilst identifying specific areas of improvement.


Assuntos
Aptidão , Destreza Motora/fisiologia , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Futebol/fisiologia , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Austrália , Criança , Humanos , Masculino , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Adulto Jovem
7.
Sports Health ; 12(1): 66-73, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31469616

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The relationship of training load to injury using wearable technology has not been investigated in professional American football players. The primary objective of this study was to determine the correlation between player workload and soft tissue injury over the course of a football season utilizing wearable global positioning system (GPS) technology. HYPOTHESIS: Increased training load is associated with a higher incidence of soft tissue injuries. STUDY DESIGN: Case-control study. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level 3. METHODS: Player workloads were assessed during preseason and regular-season practice sessions using GPS tracking and triaxial accelerometry from 2014 to 2016. Soft tissue injuries were recorded during each season. Player workload during the week of injury (acute) and average weekly workload during the 4 weeks (chronic) prior to injury were determined for each injury and in uninjured position-matched controls during the same week. A matched-pairs t test was used to determine differences in player workload. Subgroup analysis was also conducted to determine whether observed effects were confounded by training period and type of injury. RESULTS: In total, 136 lower extremity injuries were recorded. Of the recorded injuries, 101 injuries with complete GPS and clinical data were included in the analysis. Injuries were associated with greater increases in workload during the week of injury over the prior month when compared with uninjured controls. Injured players saw a 111% (95% CI, 66%-156%) increase in workload whereas uninjured players saw a 73% (95% CI, 34%-112%) increase in workload during the week of injury (P = 0.032). Individuals who had an acute to chronic workload ratio higher than 1.6 were 1.5 times more likely to sustain an injury relative to time- and position-matched controls (64.6% vs 43.1%; P = 0.004). CONCLUSION: Soft tissue injuries in professional football players were associated with sudden increases in training load over the course of a month. This effect seems to be especially pronounced during the preseason when player workloads are generally higher. These results suggest that a gradual increase of training intensity is a potential method to reduce the risk of soft tissue injury. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Preseason versus regular-season specific training programs monitored with wearable technology may assist team athletic training and medical staff in developing programs to optimize player performance.


Assuntos
Acelerometria/instrumentação , Comportamento Competitivo/fisiologia , Monitores de Aptidão Física , Futebol Americano/lesões , Condicionamento Físico Humano/efeitos adversos , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Lesões dos Tecidos Moles/etiologia , Adulto , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Extremidade Inferior/lesões , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Lesões dos Tecidos Moles/prevenção & controle , Adulto Jovem
8.
J Sports Sci ; 38(3): 238-247, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31755824

RESUMO

Rugby union is a popular team sport that demands high levels of physical fitness and skill. The study aim was to examine trends in training volume and its impact on injury incidence, severity and burden over an 11-season period in English professional rugby. Data were recorded from 2007/08 through 2017/18, capturing 1,501,606 h of training exposure and 3,782 training injuries. Players completed, on average, 6 h 48 minutes of weekly training (95% CI: 6 h 30 mins to 7 h 6 mins): this value remained stable over the 11 seasons. The mean incidence of training-related injuries was 2.6/1000 player-hours (95% CI: 2.4 to 2.8) with a mean severity rising from 17 days in 2007/08 to 37 days in 2017/18 (Change/season = 1.773, P <0.01). Rate of change in severity was dependent on training type, with conditioning (non-gym-based) responsible for the greatest increase (2.4 days/injury/season). As a result of increasing severity, injury burden rose from 51 days absence/1000 player-hours in 2007/08 to 106 days' absence/1000 player-hours in 2017/18. Despite the low incidence of injury in training compared to match-play, training accounted for 34% of all injuries. Future assessments of training intensity may lead to a greater understanding of the rise in injury severity.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas/epidemiologia , Futebol Americano/lesões , Condicionamento Físico Humano/efeitos adversos , Condicionamento Físico Humano/tendências , Inglaterra/epidemiologia , Humanos , Incidência , Escala de Gravidade do Ferimento , Estudos Longitudinais , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Análise de Regressão
10.
Dev Neurorehabil ; 23(1): 59-63, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31342814

RESUMO

Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are at increased risk for being overweight/obese and face a variety of challenges with achieving the recommended levels of physical activity. Physical activity level has additionally been linked to motor skills, sleep, cognitive function and academic performance, and mental health in children with ASD. We pilot tested the feasibility and preliminary efficacy of walking routes as a novel approach to increasing physical activity among children with ASD. Physical activity was measured by accelerometry in 21 children ages 6-10 years. Participants received feedback on their physical activity and were counseled on using their surrounding neighborhoods to increase their physical activity. Non-completion (n = 9) reasons included equipment discomfort, family challenges, and diagnosis misattribution. While small changes in physical activity level and sedentary time were observed, neither was statistically significant. Further controlled studies on walking route interventions should continue to explore the potential benefits among this high-risk population.


Assuntos
Transtorno do Espectro Autista/reabilitação , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Caminhada , Transtorno do Espectro Autista/fisiopatologia , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Reabilitação Neurológica/métodos , Sobrepeso/prevenção & controle , Condicionamento Físico Humano/psicologia , Condicionamento Físico Humano/normas
12.
Br J Sports Med ; 54(1): 51-57, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31511232

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions that aim to prevent sports injuries, the intention-to-treat principle is a recommended analysis method and one emphasised in the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement that guides quality reporting of such trials. However, an important element of injury prevention trials-compliance with the intervention-is not always well-reported. The purpose of the present educational review was to describe the compliance during follow-up in eight large-scale sports injury trials and address compliance issues that surfaced. Then, we discuss how readers and researchers might consider interpreting results from intention-to-treat analyses depending on the observed compliance with the intervention. METHODS: Data from seven different randomised trials and one experimental study were included in the present educational review. In the trials that used training programme as an intervention, we defined full compliance as having completed the programme within ±10% of the prescribed running distance (ProjectRun21 (PR21), RUNCLEVER, Start 2 Run) or time-spent-running in minutes (Groningen Novice Running (GRONORUN)) for each planned training session. In the trials using running shoes as the intervention, full compliance was defined as wearing the prescribed running shoe in all running sessions the participants completed during follow-up. RESULTS: In the trials that used a running programme intervention, the number of participants who had been fully compliant was 0 of 839 (0%) at 24-week follow-up in RUNCLEVER, 0 of 612 (0%) at 14-week follow-up in PR21, 12 of 56 (21%) at 4-week follow-up in Start 2 Run and 8 of 532 (1%) at 8-week follow-up in GRONORUN. In the trials using a shoe-related intervention, the numbers of participants who had been fully compliant at the end of follow-up were 207 of 304 (68%) in the 21 week trial, and 322 of 423 (76%), 521 of 577 (90%), 753 of 874 (86%) after 24-week follow-up in the other three trials, respectively. CONCLUSION: The proportion of runners compliant at the end of follow-up ranged from 0% to 21% in the trials using running programme as intervention and from 68% to 90% in the trials using running shoes as intervention. We encourage sports injury researchers to carefully assess and report the compliance with intervention in their articles, use appropriate analytical approaches and take compliance into account when drawing study conclusions. In studies with low compliance, G-estimation may be a useful analytical tool provided certain assumptions are met.


Assuntos
Traumatismos em Atletas/prevenção & controle , Cooperação do Paciente , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/normas , Interpretação Estatística de Dados , Humanos , Análise de Intenção de Tratamento , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto/estatística & dados numéricos , Corrida/lesões , Sapatos
13.
Int J Sports Med ; 41(2): 98-105, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31842246

RESUMO

This study investigated the effect of endurance training and regular post-exercise cold water immersion on changes in microvascular function. Nine males performed 3 sessions∙wk-1 of endurance training for 4 weeks. Following each session, participants immersed one leg in a cold water bath (10°C; COLD) for 15 min while the contra-lateral leg served as control (CON). Before and after training, microvascular function of the gastrocnemius was assessed using near-infrared spectroscopy, where 5 min of popliteal artery occlusion was applied and monitored for 3 min upon cuff release. Changes in Hbdiff (oxyhemoglobin - deoxyhemoglobin) amplitude (O-AMP), area under curve (O-AUC) and estimated muscle oxygen consumption (mVO2) were determined during occlusion, while the reperfusion rate (R-RATE), reperfusion amplitude (R-AMP) and hyperemic response (HYP) were determined following cuff release. Training increased O-AMP (p=0.010), O-AUC (p=0.011), mVO2 (p=0.013), R-AMP (p=0.004) and HYP (p=0.057). Significant time (p=0.024) and condition (p=0.026) effects were observed for R-RATE, where the increase in COLD was greater compared with CON (p=0.026). In conclusion, R-RATE following training was significantly higher in COLD compared with CON, providing some evidence for enhanced microvascular adaptations following regular cold water immersion.


Assuntos
Adaptação Fisiológica , Temperatura Baixa , Imersão , Microcirculação , Músculo Esquelético/irrigação sanguínea , Condicionamento Físico Humano/fisiologia , Resistência Física/fisiologia , Área Sob a Curva , Hemoglobinas/metabolismo , Humanos , Masculino , Consumo de Oxigênio/fisiologia , Oxiemoglobinas/metabolismo , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Artéria Poplítea/fisiologia , Espectroscopia de Luz Próxima ao Infravermelho/métodos , Adulto Jovem
14.
J Sports Sci ; 38(4): 470-475, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31856662

RESUMO

This project examined the interrelationships between power production and upper body kinematics during a series of medicine ball push-press (MBP-P) throws. Twenty-five regular weight trainers (body mass = 86 ± 10 kg) performed a series of ballistic vertical MBP-P throws at loads representing 5% and 10% of their assessed 5RM bench press. Throws were performed lying supine on a force platform (1 kHz) with upper body kinematics assessed using standard infra-red motion capture techniques (0.5 kHz). Gross measures of performance and power production such as peak vertical ball velocity (Velpeak), peak force (Fpeak) and power (Ppeak) were recorded during the propulsive phase of the movement. Comparative analyses indicated that despite significant reductions in Velpeak from the 5% to 10% loads (P < 0.001), Fpeak remained largely unchanged (P = 0.167). Analysis of inter-trial variability showed that the gross measures of performance and power were relatively stable (Coefficient of Variation [CV%] <13%), while most upper limb segmental kinematics varied considerably between trials (CV% up to 70%). This project highlights the complexity of the relationships between power production and upper body kinematics during light load ballistic MBP-P throwing. Additionally, it shows how trained athletes can achieve similar outcomes during ballistic movements using a variety of movement strategies.


Assuntos
Força Muscular/fisiologia , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Extremidade Superior/fisiologia , Fenômenos Biomecânicos , Teste de Esforço/métodos , Humanos , Condicionamento Físico Humano/fisiologia , Equipamentos Esportivos , Estudos de Tempo e Movimento , Levantamento de Peso/fisiologia
15.
J Sports Sci Med ; 18(4): 680-694, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31827353

RESUMO

Agility plays a crucial role in ice hockey training, and it can be developed directly on the ice or by additional off-ice training. Since the effectiveness of on-ice and off-ice training on players' agility have not been previously described, the purpose of this research is to compare the effects of on-ice and off-ice agility training on skating performance. Fourteen ice hockey players performed agility training on-ice for 4 weeks and off-ice for 4 weeks in a crossover design; they were tested before the agility program, after the first month and after finishing both training programs. The players were randomly assigned into one of two groups (n = 7 in each group), either performing the on-ice training protocol first (Ice1) followed by the off-ice agility training or performing the off-ice protocol first and the on-ice training second (Ice2). The test battery included straight sprints to 6.1 m and 35 m and the S corner test, test with break, weave agility with puck test and reactive agility test. The magnitude based decision showed the effect of agility training in both groups in the weave agility (Ice1, 2.9±2.8% likely improvement; Ice2, 3.1±2.5% possible improvement) and reactive agility tests (Ice1, 3.1 ±2.5% likely improvement; Ice2, 1.7±2.1% possible improvement), where the Ice1 protocol resulted in a likely positive change and Ice2 resulted in a possible positive change. The comparison of the training effect resulted in a possibly harmful change of performance in Ice2 protocol (-0.5 ± 8.9%) compared to Ice1 protocol (-1.0 ± 5.1%). On-ice training is more effective in the development of specific types of agility in adolescent U16 players. However, there is evidence that off-ice agility have motor transfer to on-ice agility. Therefore, we recommend developing on-ice agility with additional off-ice agility training during the ice hockey season.


Assuntos
Desempenho Atlético/fisiologia , Hóquei/fisiologia , Destreza Motora/fisiologia , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Adolescente , Desempenho Atlético/psicologia , Estudos Cross-Over , Hóquei/psicologia , Humanos , Análise e Desempenho de Tarefas
16.
J Sports Sci Med ; 18(4): 708-715, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31827355

RESUMO

The purpose of the present study was to relate the training intensity distribution with performance in a Half-Ironman distance triathlon competition. A total of 18 recreational-level triathletes were divided into two training groups according to their training intensity distribution: Polarized (POL) and Pyramidal (PYR). Prior to the specific training period of the study, subjects performed a ramp-protocol test, running and cycling to determine ventilatory thresholds (VT) through gas-exchange analysis. For swimming, subjects performed an 800-metre test to establish their training zones. Training was quantified based on the cumulative time spent in 3 intensity zones: zone 1 (low intensity, VT2). POL competed 84.5%/4.2%/11.3% and PYR 77.9%/18.8%/3.3% of total training time for zones 1,2 and 3 respectively. The goal of the training period was a half Ironman distance triathlon. Training time in zone 2 inversely correlated with swimming and cycling race time in POL and with running and total race time in PYR. Power at VT2 on bike and speed at VT2 as well as maximum aerobic power and speed in the physiological post test inversely correlated with bike and run segment respectively and with total race time. These results suggest that training time in zone 2 was related with better performance on a Half-Ironman race in amateur triathletes. Future experimental research is needed to clarify the importance of training intensity distribution regarding performance.


Assuntos
Ciclismo/fisiologia , Comportamento Competitivo/fisiologia , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Resistência Física/fisiologia , Corrida/fisiologia , Natação/fisiologia , Adulto , Limiar Anaeróbio/fisiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Consumo de Oxigênio/fisiologia , Troca Gasosa Pulmonar/fisiologia , Adulto Jovem
17.
J Sports Sci Med ; 18(4): 722-728, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31827357

RESUMO

The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the progressive walking program on lower limb muscle size and strength and evaluated whether the stair-climbing exercise provided additional training effects when combined with the walking program. Fifteen elderly subjects (age 69 ± 1 years, height 1.63 ± 0.02 m, body weight 64.5 ± 2.0 kg) were randomly assigned to a walking group or a walking and stair-climbing group. The progressive walking program comprised continuous (week 1-8) and interval (week 9-17) exercises. The walking and stair-climbing group also performed stair climbing. Muscle thickness, strength, and walking performance were evaluated before and 8 and 17 weeks after the start of the program. The muscle thickness of the anterior and posterior parts of the thigh significantly (p < 0.05) increased in both groups. There was also a significant (p < 0.01) main effect of time in isometric maximal strength and the values expressed relative to body mass for both knee extension and flexion. However, no group × time interactions were noted. Furthermore, the percentage change of knee flexion strength after the training period was significantly (p < 0.01) correlated with the pre-intervention value. Seventeen weeks of the progressive walking program can increase thigh muscle size and strength for older adults; however, an added stair-climbing exercise may not provide additional training effects. Furthermore, the magnitude of improvement in knee flexion strength would depend on the pre-intervention value.


Assuntos
Extremidade Inferior/fisiologia , Força Muscular/fisiologia , Músculo Esquelético/anatomia & histologia , Músculo Esquelético/fisiologia , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Subida de Escada/fisiologia , Caminhada/fisiologia , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Joelho/fisiologia , Masculino , Coxa da Perna
18.
Clin Interv Aging ; 14: 1567-1577, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31695345

RESUMO

Purpose: Exercise programs designed for falls prevention have been proven effective in reducing falls by approximately 21%. Virtual reality may provide a viable alternative intervention for falls prevention. This study compared the effects of virtual reality training using the Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU) versus exercise using a modified Otago Exercise Programme (EX) on improving balance and physical performance in the short-term restorative care setting of the Gait and Balance Gym (Gabagym). Patients and methods: This was a pre- and post-intervention study of 195 participants (median age 78 years, IQR 73-84; 67% female) who presented with a risk and/or history of falls. Participants were assigned to either EX (n=82) or BRU (n=63). Supervised sessions occurred twice a week for 6 weeks. Participants receiving interventions were compared to a separate group (n=50) with similar characteristics who did not receive any intervention. Balance and physical performance were assessed at initial and final attendance and included the 5 Times Sit to Stand (5STS) test, Timed Up and Go (TUG), gait speed and posturography assessment using the BRU. Fear of falling was assessed using the Falls Efficacy Scale. Handgrip strength and adherence were also monitored. Results: Post-intervention, EX and BRU groups achieved similar improvements and reported similar adherence rates (71% vs 72%, respectively). Both intervention groups improved in balance and physical performance measures. Both interventions showed significantly better improvement than the non-intervention group in TUG (p<0.001), gait speed (p=0.021), limits of stability in posturography assessment (p=0.008), FES-I score (p=0.013) and handgrip strength (p=0.021). Only the BRU group improved control of static posture in the eyes closed (p=0.002) and foam eyes closed (p=0.006) tasks. Conclusion: This study highlights the potential use of virtual reality as a practical alternative to improve outcomes of balance training for reduction of falls risk in older adults.


Assuntos
Acidentes por Quedas/prevenção & controle , Exercício , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Condicionamento Físico Humano/fisiologia , Equilíbrio Postural , Realidade Virtual , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Medo , Feminino , Força da Mão , Humanos , Masculino , Desempenho Físico Funcional , Velocidade de Caminhada
19.
Curr Sports Med Rep ; 18(11): 387-393, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31702720

RESUMO

Exercise is universally recognized for its health benefits and distance running has long been a popular form of exercise and sport. Ultramarathons, defined as races longer than a marathon, have become increasingly popular in recent years. The diverse ultramarathon distances and courses provide additional challenges in race performance and medical coverage for these events. As the sport grows in popularity, more literature has become available regarding ultramarathon-specific illnesses and injuries, nutrition guidelines, psychology, physiologic changes, and equipment. This review focuses on recent findings and trends in ultramarathon running.


Assuntos
Corrida/tendências , Humanos , Necessidades Nutricionais , Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Corrida/lesões , Corrida/fisiologia
20.
J Sports Sci ; 37(23): 2711-2719, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31608830

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of sleep hygiene (SH) education on sleep quality in soccer players after a late-evening small-sided-game (SSG) training session. Twenty-nine non-professional players were recruited and allocated to either an experimental group (EG, n = 17) that received SH education, or a control group (CG, n = 12). SSG consisted of 3 × 4 min in a 4vs4, with 3 min of recovery and was performed at 8.00 p.m. Sleep quality was monitored via actigraphy and sleep diary entries before (PRE) and two nights after (POST1, POST2) the SSG. Sleep latency (SL) differed between the two groups at POST1 (4.9 ± 5.4 vs. 15.5 ± 16.1 for EG and CG, respectively; p = 0.017, effect size [ES] = 2.0); SL values were lower at POST1 compared to PRE for the EG (-47%; p = 0.021, ES = 0.6). Subjective sleep quality was better in the EG than the CG at POST1 (8.6 ± 1.0 vs. 7.1 ± 2.0 for EG and CG, respectively; p = 0.016, ES = 0.9) with a significant improvement over PRE-values (+11.0%, p = 0.004, ES = 0.8). Although SL and subjective sleep quality did not decrease significantly from POST1 to POST2 values at POST2 no longer differed significantly form baseline and, hence, indicate that observed effects may be short-lasting. No other objective sleep indices were influenced by late-evening training or SH practices implemented by the EG. Soccer players may benefit from acute SH strategies to reduce the time to sleep onset after late-evening training sessions.


Assuntos
Condicionamento Físico Humano/métodos , Higiene do Sono/fisiologia , Latência do Sono/fisiologia , Futebol/fisiologia , Actigrafia , Adulto , Humanos , Masculino , Fatores de Tempo , Adulto Jovem
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