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1.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 147(1): 231-238, 2021 01 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33370071

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Non-board-certified plastic surgeons performing cosmetic procedures and advertising as plastic surgeons may have an adverse effect on a patient's understanding of their practitioner's medical training and patient safety. The authors aim to assess (1) the impact of city size and locations and (2) the impact of health care transparency acts on the ratio of board-certified and non-American Board of Plastic Surgeons physicians. METHODS: The authors performed a systematic Google search for the term "plastic surgeon [city name]" to simulate a patient search of online providers. Comparisons of board certification status between the top hits for each city were made. Data gathered included city population, regional location, practice setting, and states with the passage of truth-in-advertising laws. RESULTS: One thousand six hundred seventy-seven unique practitioners were extracted. Of these, 1289 practitioners (76.9 percent) were American Board of Plastic Surgery-certified plastic surgeons. When comparing states with truth-in-advertising laws and states without such laws, the authors found no significant differences in board-certification rates among "plastic surgery" practitioners (88.9 percent versus 92.0 percent; p = 0.170). There was a significant difference between board-certified "plastic surgeons" versus out-of-scope practitioners on Google search between large, medium, and small cities (100 percent versus 92.9 percent versus 86.5; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Non-board-certified providers tend to localize to smaller cities. Truth-in-advertising laws have not yet had an impact on the way a number of non-American Board of Plastic Surgery-certified practitioners market themselves. There may be room to expand the scope of truth-in-advertising laws to the online world and to smaller cities.


Assuntos
Publicidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Marketing de Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Cirurgiões/estatística & dados numéricos , Cirurgia Plástica/normas , Publicidade/legislação & jurisprudência , Certificação/estatística & dados numéricos , Cidades/estatística & dados numéricos , Simulação por Computador , Técnicas Cosméticas/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Internet/legislação & jurisprudência , Internet/estatística & dados numéricos , Marketing de Serviços de Saúde/legislação & jurisprudência , Segurança do Paciente , Cirurgiões/legislação & jurisprudência , Cirurgiões/normas , Cirurgia Plástica/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
2.
Pharm. pract. (Granada, Internet) ; 18(3): 0-0, jul.-sept. 2020. tab, graf
Artigo em Inglês | IBECS | ID: ibc-194194

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) prepared clinical pharmacist competencies that have specific recommendations. Recently, many efforts to advance clinical pharmacy services in Egypt exist. The literature revealed that no country has assessed the extent of applicability of ACCP competencies in its current pharmacy practice setting. Egyptian pharmacists can provide feedback about applicability of such competencies in clinical pharmacy settings in Egypt. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the extent to which ACCP competencies were implemented by Egyptian clinical pharmacists and therefore evaluate development of clinical pharmacy practice in Egypt. The study also investigated factors affecting the applicability of such competencies in the current clinical pharmacy practice setting in Egypt. METHODS: Four hundred and ninety-five randomly selected clinical pharmacists from several hospitals were invited to participate in a cross sectional survey using a self-administered validated questionnaire composed of 31 questions classified into six domains. This questionnaire was designed to determine the pharmacists' perception about applicability of ACCP competencies to clinical pharmacy practice in Egypt. RESULTS: The response rate was 64% as 317 out of 495 pharmacists completed the questionnaire. These pharmacists were categorized according to age; gender; qualifications; years of previous work experience, years since BSc. and type of hospitals they are currently working at. Analysis of data revealed the professionalism domain to have the highest percentage of acceptance among pharmacists, while the system-based care & population health domain had the lowest percentage of acceptance. Results also showed that qualifications of participants did not affect their response in three domains; "Direct Patient Care", "Systems-based Care & Population Health" and "Continuing Professional Development" (p = 0.082, 0.081, 0.060), respectively. Nevertheless, qualifications of participants did affect their response in the other three domains; "Pharmacotherapy Knowledge", "Communication" and "Professionalism" (p < 0.05). The age of pharmacists, gender, years of previous work experience, and graduation year did not affect their responses in all six domains. The type of hospital they are currently working at, though, affected their responses where, there was a highly statistically significant increase of the mean score of all domains among participants working at the NGOs/private hospitals compared to governmental hospitals (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Egyptian pharmacists generally apply high percentage of ACCP competencies but the provided clinical pharmacy services need to be improved through applying the standards of best practice


No disponible


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Adulto , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Prática Profissional , Profissionalismo , Egito , Sistemas de Informação em Farmácia Clínica/normas , Inquéritos e Questionários , Competência Profissional/normas , Estudos Transversais
4.
PLoS One ; 15(5): e0231073, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32365128

RESUMO

The Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) sets a standard by which sustainable fisheries can be assessed and eco-certified. It is one of the oldest and most well-known fisheries certifications, and an estimated 15% of global fish catch is MSC-certified. While the MSC is increasingly recognized by decision-makers as an indicator for fishery success, it is also criticized for weak standards and overly-lenient third-party certifiers. This gap between the standard's reputation and its actual implementation could be a result of how the MSC markets and promotes its brand. Here we classify MSC-certified fisheries by gear type (i.e. active vs. passive) as well as by length of the vessels involved (i.e. large scale vs. small scale; with the division between the two occurring at 12 m in overall length). We compared the MSC-certified fisheries (until 31 December 2017) to 399 photographs the MSC used in promotional materials since 2009. Results show that fisheries involving small-scale vessels and passive gears were disproportionately represented in promotional materials: 64% of promotional photographs were of passive gears, although only 40% of MSC-certified fisheries and 17% of the overall catch were caught by passive gears from 2009-2017. Similarly, 49% of the photographs featured small-scale vessels, although just 20% of MSC-certified fisheries and 7% of the overall MSC-certified catch used small-scale vessels from 2009 to 2017. The MSC disproportionately features photographs of small-scale fisheries although the catch it certifies is overwhelmingly from industrial fisheries.


Assuntos
Publicidade , Certificação , Conservação dos Recursos Naturais/métodos , Pesqueiros , Indústria Alimentícia , Alimentos Marinhos/provisão & distribução , Publicidade/classificação , Publicidade/métodos , Publicidade/normas , Animais , Certificação/organização & administração , Certificação/normas , Eficiência Organizacional , Pesqueiros/classificação , Pesqueiros/organização & administração , Pesqueiros/normas , Peixes/fisiologia , Indústria Alimentícia/classificação , Indústria Alimentícia/instrumentação , Indústria Alimentícia/organização & administração , Indústria Alimentícia/normas , Afiliação Institucional/organização & administração , Afiliação Institucional/normas , Alimentos Marinhos/classificação , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/organização & administração , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas
6.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg ; 28(11): e465-e468, 2020 Jun 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32324709

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted every aspect of society in a way never previously experienced by our nation's orthopaedic surgeons. In response to the challenges the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery has taken steps to adapt our Board Certification and Continuous Certification processes. These changes were made to provide flexibility for as many Candidates and Diplomates as possible to participate while maintaining our high standards. The American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery is first and foremost committed to the safety and well-being of our patients, physicians, and families while striving to remain responsive to the changing circumstances affecting our Candidates and Diplomates.


Assuntos
Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus , Saúde do Trabalhador , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/educação , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Segurança do Paciente , Pneumonia Viral , Competência Clínica/normas , Educação Médica Continuada/normas , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/normas , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias/estatística & dados numéricos , Gestão da Segurança , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Estados Unidos
7.
Pain Physician ; 23(1): E7-E18, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32013284

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The US Department of Health and Human Services has recommended that physicians performing interventional pain procedures be credentialed based on criteria based guidelines and minimum training requirements. OBJECTIVES: To quantitatively assess gaps in certification related to pain medicine fellowship requirements, we studied the distribution of such procedures in Florida between 2010 and 2016. STUDY DESIGN: This research involved a retrospective analysis with a sample size of n = 1,885,442 interventional pain procedures. SETTING: Data describing interventional pain procedures performed in Florida between January 2010 and December 2016 were obtained from the Florida Department of Health. The National Provider Identifier file and board certification lists from the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), the American Board of Pain Medicine (ABPM), and the American Board of Interventional Pain Physicians (ABIPP) corresponding to this time frame were also obtained. METHODS: The datasets were linked to determine the specialty of physicians performing interventional pain procedures, and whether or not they were pain medicine diplomates of the ABMS, the ABPM, or the ABIPP. The similarity index theta was calculated for the distribution of interventional pain procedure codes among medical specialty groups, and with respect to the practitioners' pain medicine board certification status. RESULTS: Of the interventional pain procedures, anesthesiologists performed 63.5%, physiatrists 19.1%, neurologists or psychiatrists 5.2%, and other practitioners 12.3%. Among procedures performed by anesthesiologists, physiatrists, and psychiatrists or neurologists, 66.2%, 50.3%, and 50.4% were by ABMS pain board-certified practitioners, respectively. Practitioners without ABMS pain medicine boards performed 45.8% of interventional pain procedures. Practitioners without such boards from either the ABMS, ABPM, or ABIPP performed 37.7%. There was very large similarity (theta > 0.9) in the distribution of procedures comparing ABMS pain medicine board-certified practitioners to non-ABMS pain medicine board-certified anesthesiologists, physiatrists, or all other specialties. LIMITATIONS: In countries other than the United States, where pain medicine board certification is relatively recent, there may be a higher percentage of interventional pain procedures performed by individuals without certification than we report. In "opt-out" states, where nurse anesthetists can independently perform interventional pain procedures, the percentage of interventional pain procedures performed by individuals without physician pain medicine board certification may also be higher. The datasets we used do not contain information to allow assessment of outcomes or effectiveness resulting from pain medicine board certification. CONCLUSIONS: Approximately one-third of interventional pain procedures were performed by physicians without at least 1 of the 3 pain medicine board certifications. In addition, the practitioners performed very similar distributions of procedures (i.e., those without pain medicine board certification, overall, have not restricted their practice). These results suggest the need for additional accredited pain medicine fellowship training positions for newly graduated residents. The results also show that, for the recommendations of the Department of Health and Human Services to be satisfied, physicians without board certification performing intervention procedures would need to obtain ABPM or ABIPP certification, or ABMS certification after completion of a full-time Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education pain medicine fellowship. KEY WORDS: Chronic pain, education, medical, graduate, specialty boards.


Assuntos
Certificação/tendências , Manejo da Dor/tendências , Médicos/tendências , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/tendências , Acreditação/normas , Acreditação/tendências , Certificação/normas , Bolsas de Estudo/normas , Bolsas de Estudo/tendências , Florida/epidemiologia , Humanos , Dor/diagnóstico , Dor/epidemiologia , Manejo da Dor/normas , Médicos/normas , Estudos Retrospectivos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas
10.
Br J Hosp Med (Lond) ; 80(12): 726-729, 2019 Dec 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31822167

RESUMO

The General Medical Council was originally set up to 'protect, promote and maintain the health and safety of the public'. In 2012, the Privy Council instructed the General Medical Council to set up and run a licensing and revalidation system for all practicing doctors in the UK, to protect patients from actions of medical staff. Despite this mandate, the General Medical Council has been a bystander in a series of regulatory failures. Without these episodes having been highlighted by family members, public investigations would not have been carried out. The maintenance of medical performance is delegated to NHS employers, which could cause conflicts of interests when employers have to investigate doctors as part of a team. The other responsibility of the General Medical Council is to monitor teaching standards and curricula of medical schools in the UK, which it does by eliciting feedback from students and trainees. The General Medical Council has not responded to 'new ways of working' (especially in England) involving non-medical staff undertaking tasks previously carried out by doctors. Furthermore, the General Medical Council has not updated its description of the role of the future doctor in light of increasing use of technology, use or non-use of which could both be considered to be evidence of poor practice.


Assuntos
Médicos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/organização & administração , Competência Clínica/normas , Currículo , Educação Médica/normas , Humanos , Imperícia/legislação & jurisprudência , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Reino Unido
11.
BJS Open ; 3(6): 865-871, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31832594

RESUMO

Background: While performance in other mandatory examinations taken at the beginning of a doctor's career are predictive of final training outcomes, the influence early postgraduate surgical examinations might have on success at Specialty Board Exams in the UK is currently unknown. The aim was to investigate whether performance at the mandatory Membership of the Royal College of Surgeons (MRCS) examination, and other variables, are predictive of success at the Fellowship of the Royal College of Surgeons (FRCS) examination, thus potentially identifying those who may benefit from early academic intervention. Methods: Pearson correlation coefficients examined the linear relationship between both examinations and logistic regression analysis identified potential independent predictors of FRCS success. All UK medical graduates who attempted either section of FRCS (Sections 1 and 2) between 2012 and 2018 were included. Results: First attempt pass rates for Sections 1 and 2 FRCS were 87.4 per cent (n = 854) and 91.8 per cent (n = 797) respectively. In logistic regression analysis, sex (male: odds ratio (OR) 2.32, 95 per cent c.i 1.43 to 3.76), age (less than 29 years at graduation: OR 3.22, 1.88 to 5.51), Part B MRCS attempts (1 attempt: OR 1.77, 1.08 to 3.00), Part A score (OR 1.14, 1.09 to 1.89) and Part B score (OR 1.06, 1.03 to 1.09) were independent predictors of Section 1 FRCS success. Predictors of Section 2 FRCS success were age (less than 29 years at graduation: OR 3.55, 2.00 to 6.39), Part A score (OR 1.06, 1.02 to 1.11) and Section 1 FRCS score (OR 1.13, 1.07 to 1.18). Conclusion: Part A and B MRCS performance were independent predictors of FRCS success, providing further evidence to support the predictive validity of this mandatory postgraduate exam. However, future research must explore the reasons between the attainment gaps observed for different groups of doctors.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Avaliação Educacional/estatística & dados numéricos , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/estatística & dados numéricos , Cirurgiões/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Competência Clínica/normas , Avaliação Educacional/normas , Feminino , Humanos , Internato e Residência/normas , Masculino , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Cirurgiões/normas , Reino Unido
12.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 32(6): 876-882, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31704756

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To demonstrate the degree to which the American Board of Family Medicine's certification examination is representative of family physician practice with regard to frequency of diagnoses encounter and the criticality of the diagnoses. METHODS: Data from 2012 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey was used to assess the frequency of diagnoses encountered by family physicians nationally. These diagnoses were also rated by a panel of content experts for how critical it was to diagnose and treat the condition correctly and then assign the condition to 1 of the 16 content categories used on the American Board of Family Medicine examination. These ratings of frequency and criticality were used to create 7 different new schemas to compute percentages for the content categories. RESULTS: The content category percentages for the 7 different schemas correlated with the 2006 to 2016 test plan percentages from 0.50 to 0.90 with the frequency conditions being more highly correlated and the criticality conditions being less correlated. CONCLUSIONS: This study supports the continued use of the current Family Medicine Certification Examination content specifications as being representative of current family medicine practice; however, small adjustments might be warranted to permit better representation of the criticality of the topics.


Assuntos
Certificação/normas , Competência Clínica/legislação & jurisprudência , Medicina de Família e Comunidade/legislação & jurisprudência , Licenciamento/normas , Médicos de Família/legislação & jurisprudência , Certificação/legislação & jurisprudência , Competência Clínica/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicina de Família e Comunidade/estatística & dados numéricos , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Licenciamento/legislação & jurisprudência , Médicos de Família/estatística & dados numéricos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/legislação & jurisprudência , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Estados Unidos
13.
J Leg Med ; 39(3): 229-233, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31626576

RESUMO

Lapses in professionalism are a common cause of disciplinary action against physicians by U.S. medical boards. However, the exact definition of "professionalism" is unclear, making it likely that a physician will not train or practice under the same framing of professionalism and so may fail to develop certain skills. The goal of this study was to identify and compare the professionalism framings of medical boards. The medical board web pages for all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and four territories were examined in June 2017 for use of the word "professionalism" or "professional" in their application, rules, or laws, which was then coded as a best fit to one of six core framings of professionalism. Of the 55 states and territories, integrity was the most common professionalism framing (40.0%), followed by excellence (23.6%), behavior (12.7%), mixed (9.1%), unclear (9.1%), and absent (5.5%). Although integrity was the most common framing, diversity exists among medical boards, which could lead to board misunderstandings of incidents labeled as professionalism violations and ineffective remediation of offenses. In order to best communicate the nature of the offense and thus best facilitate remediation, the incident should be called by its true name rather than the all-encompassing term "professionalism."


Assuntos
Papel do Médico , Médicos/normas , Prática Profissional/normas , Profissionalismo/normas , Conselho Diretor/legislação & jurisprudência , Conselho Diretor/normas , Humanos , Má Conduta Profissional , Profissionalismo/tendências , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/legislação & jurisprudência , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Estados Unidos
14.
AJNR Am J Neuroradiol ; 40(10): 1610-1616, 2019 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31558498

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Insight into the status of neuroradiology subspecialty certification across the United States could help to understand neuroradiologists' perceived value of subspecialty certification as well as guide efforts to optimize pathways for broader voluntary certification participation. Our aim was to assess board certification characteristics of practicing US neuroradiologists. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The American Board of Radiology public search engine was used to link Medicare-participating radiologists with American Board of Radiology diplomates. Among linked diplomates, 4670 neuroradiologists were identified on the basis of 3 criteria: current or prior neuroradiology subspecialty certification or currently >50% clinical work effort in neuroradiology based on work relative value unit-weighted national Medicare claims ("majority-practice neuroradiologists"). Subspecialty certification status was studied in each group, using Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services data to identify additional physician characteristics. RESULTS: Of 3769 included radiologists ever subspecialty certified, 84.1% are currently subspecialty certified. Of 1777/3769 radiologists ever subspecialty-certified and with lifetime primary certificates (ie, nonmandated Maintenance of Certification), only 66.6% are currently subspecialty certified. Of 3341 included majority-practice neuroradiologists, 73.0% were ever subspecialty certified; of these, 89.1% are currently subspecialty certified. Of 3341 majority-practice neuroradiologists, the fraction currently subspecialty certified was higher for those in academic (81.3%) versus nonacademic (58.2%) practices, larger versus smaller practices (72.1% for those in ≥100 versus 36.1% for <10-member practices), US regions other than the West (64.1%-70.6% versus 56.5%), fewer years in practice (77.5% for 11-20 years versus 31.3% for >50 years), and time-limited (73.5%) versus lifetime (54.9%) primary certificates. CONCLUSIONS: More than one-quarter of majority-practice neuroradiologists never obtained neuroradiology subspecialty certification. Even when initially obtained, that certification is commonly not maintained, particularly by lifetime primary certificate diplomates and those in nonacademic and smaller practices. Further investigation is warranted to better understand neuroradiologists' decisions regarding attaining and maintaining subspecialty certification.


Assuntos
Certificação/normas , Neurologia/normas , Radiologia/normas , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, U.S. , Humanos , Neurologistas , Radiologistas , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos
15.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 27(12): 1958-1966, 2019 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31515965

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to determine the distribution of adult and pediatric American Board of Obesity Medicine (ABOM) diplomates relative to the prevalence of obesity by US state. METHODS: Data from the ABOM physician directory were used to determine original specialty and US state. Physicians were labeled as "adult medicine" physicians (i.e., internal medicine, family medicine, or internal medicine and pediatrics), "pediatric medicine" physicians (i.e., pediatrics, family medicine, or internal medicine and pediatrics), and "other physicians" (i.e., surgical specialty, other specialty, or unknown). Prevalence of obesity by state, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was used for adults and adolescents in 2017 and for children in 2014. Counts of ABOM-certified adult medicine physicians and pediatric medicine physicians were conducted relative to obesity prevalence by state. RESULTS: A total of 2,577 US-based ABOM-certified physicians were included (79% from adult medicine, 38% from pediatric medicine, and 15% from other fields). All US states had more than one ABOM-certified adult medicine physician, although geographic disparities existed in physician availability relative to obesity prevalence. Fewer pediatric medicine ABOM diplomates were available in all states. CONCLUSIONS: Promotion of ABOM training and certification in certain geographic locations and among pediatric physicians may help address disparities in ABOM diplomate availability relative to obesity burden.


Assuntos
Obesidade/epidemiologia , Médicos/organização & administração , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Adolescente , Certificação , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos
16.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 32(1-2): 14-17, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31540649

RESUMO

The recognition of vascular surgery as an independent surgical specialty is inevitable, but the pathway to full autonomy remains uncertain. Vascular surgery emerged from general surgery in the mid-1950s with the advent of synthetic grafts and microvascular techniques. By the early 1980s, Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved fellowships were established in most large academic medical centers. The American Board of Surgery recognized this additional specialty training by awarding vascular graduates a Certificate of Special Qualifications distinguishing them from general surgeons. The emergence of endovascular surgery radically changed the face of vascular surgery from a general surgery subspecialty to a unique surgical specialty with a growing array of minimally invasive tools. With the establishment of a primary Certificate in Vascular Surgery and the subsequent development of integrated residencies, vascular surgery moved ever closer to recognition as an independent surgical specialty. Despite the remarkable progress that has been observed over the past 50 years, there is a desire in the vascular community for formal recognition of the unique body of knowledge and surgical skills that serve as the foundation of contemporary vascular care.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Autonomia Profissional , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional , Cirurgiões/educação , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/educação , Competência Clínica , Currículo , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/história , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/normas , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/tendências , Previsões , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Humanos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/história , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/tendências , Cirurgiões/história , Cirurgiões/normas , Cirurgiões/tendências , Estados Unidos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/história , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/normas , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/tendências
17.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 32(1-2): 5-10, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31540658

RESUMO

The American Board of Surgery (ABS) has more than 80 years of both direct and indirect involvement in US surgical education, with its primary role being certification of graduates of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-approved surgical training programs. The ABS's impact on education has been at multiple levels, including the development of the content and administration of qualifying and certifying examinations; original education research based on the Board's unique data sets; and surgical training and education-related initiatives in partnership with multiple regulatory bodies and surgical societies. Within these efforts, by incremental steps, the specialty of vascular surgery attained recognition as a primary specialty of the ABS, and the Vascular Surgery Board of the ABS was established 20 years ago, in 1998. The 2 decades that followed have witnessed significant transformations in the evaluation and treatment of vascular disease, the paradigms for training vascular and endovascular surgeons, and the Vascular Surgery Board has partnered with stakeholder organizations to continually ensure quality education for the evolving vascular surgical workforce. Looking forward, while surgical education remains outside of its primary mission, the ABS and Vascular Surgery Board will continue as key stakeholders and leaders in the complex network of professional societies and training institutions that will guide the evolution of vascular surgery training.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional , Cirurgiões/educação , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/educação , Competência Clínica , Currículo , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/história , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/normas , História do Século XX , História do Século XXI , Humanos , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/história , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Cirurgiões/história , Cirurgiões/normas , Estados Unidos , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/história , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/normas
19.
Pap. psicol ; 40(1): 21-30, ene.-abr. 2019. graf, tab
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-181995

RESUMO

El cuestionario para la Evaluación de los Tests (CET; Prieto y Muñiz, 2000) y su revisión (CET-R; Hernández et al., 2016) se han venido aplicando sistemáticamente desde 2010, impulsado por la Comisión de tests del Consejo General de la Psicología del Colegio Oficial de Psicólogos. El objetivo es proporcionar información contrastada sobre la calidad de las pruebas a los profesionales, con el fin de mejorar el uso de los tests. El presente trabajo tiene un doble objetivo. El primero, presentar los resultados de la sexta evaluación de tests psicológicos y educativos, en la que se han revisado un total de 10 tests. El segundo, evaluar el impacto que la aplicación del CET/CET-R ha tenido durante estos años en dos agentes cruciales: las editoriales de tests, y los profesores universitarios encargados de formar a los futuros profesionales usuarios de tests. Los resultados de la sexta evaluación, así como los resultados de la encuesta para evaluar el impacto del CET/CET-R, se pueden considerar en general satisfactorios. Sin embargo, se identifican varios aspectos que son susceptibles de mejora


The Questionnaire for the Assessment of Tests (CET; Prieto & Muñiz, 2000) and the revised version of this questionnaire (CET-R; Hernández et al., 2016) have been applied systematically since 2010 by the Test Commission of the Spanish Psychological Association. The main goal is to provide practitioners with reliable information on the quality of the tests in order to improve test use. The aim of this paper is twofold. First, to present the results of the sixth review of psychological and educational tests, in which a total of 10 tests have been evaluated. Second, to assess the impact that the application of CET/CET-R has had over these years on two key agents: test publishers and university lecturers who are responsible for training future test users. Both the results of the sixth review and the results of the survey to assess the impact of CET/CET-R are satisfactory in general terms. However, some issues where there is room for improvement have been identified


Assuntos
Humanos , Testes Psicológicos , Psicometria/educação , Psicologia Educacional/métodos , Psicologia Educacional/organização & administração , Docentes/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/organização & administração , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional/normas , Editoração/estatística & dados numéricos , Psicologia Educacional/estatística & dados numéricos
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