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2.
Rev Fac Cien Med Univ Nac Cordoba ; 77(3): 176-181, 2020 08 25.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32991105

RESUMO

Introduction: After the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 outbreak, global measures were implemented with the aim of containing its progression. On March 20, 2020, the mandatory preventive quarantine began in Argentina. As a result of these events, previous studies conducted in the framework of this pandemic in China, have shown psychological consequences. Methods: The aim of this study is to explore, through a self-administered electronic survey, attitudes and fears regarding COVID-19, the development of depressive symptoms and the pattern of alcohol consumption among the argentinian population during quarantine (n = 759). Results: As a result, we observed that fear of COVID-19 was greater in 55 to 59 years old people, with an abrupt drop above 70; that depressed mood and the increased of alcohol consumption were more frequent in youngest subjects, and that depressed mood was also frequent among subjects who lost their jobs during quarantine. Finally, we observed an elevated degree of agreement with the quarantine measure, even in some people who suffered a decrease in their income greater than 80% during quarantine. These results are useful for obtaining information about risk groups, enabling specific preventive and therapeutic strategies could be designed.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Argentina/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Depressão/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Quarentena/psicologia
3.
Trials ; 21(1): 809, 2020 Sep 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32993779

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Early reports indicate that COVID-19 may require intensive care unit (ICU) admission in 5-26% and overall mortality can rise to 11% of the recognised cases, particularly affecting the elderly. There is a lack of evidence-based targeted pharmacological therapy for its prevention and treatment. We aim to compare the effects of a World Health Organization recommendation-based education and a personalised complex preventive lifestyle intervention package (based on the same WHO recommendation) on the outcomes of the COVID-19. METHODS: PROACTIVE-19 is a pragmatic, randomised controlled clinical trial with adaptive "sample size re-estimation" design. Hungarian population over the age of 60 years without confirmed COVID-19 will be approached to participate in a telephone health assessment and lifestyle counselling voluntarily. Volunteers will be randomised into two groups: (A) general health education and (B) personalised health education. Participants will go through questioning and recommendation in 5 fields: (1) mental health, (2) smoking habits, (3) physical activity, (4) dietary habits, and (5) alcohol consumption. Both groups A and B will receive the same line of questioning to assess habits concerning these topics. Assessment will be done weekly during the first month, every second week in the second month, then monthly. The composite primary endpoint will include the rate of ICU admission, hospital admission (longer than 48 h), and mortality in COVID-19-positive cases. The estimated sample size is 3788 subjects per study arm. The planned duration of the follow-up is a minimum of 1 year. DISCUSSION: These interventions may boost the body's cardiovascular and pulmonary reserve capacities, leading to improved resistance against the damage caused by COVID-19. Consequently, lifestyle changes can reduce the incidence of life-threatening conditions and attenuate the detrimental effects of the pandemic seriously affecting the older population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study has been approved by the Scientific and Research Ethics Committee of the Hungarian Medical Research Council (IV/2428- 2 /2020/EKU) and has been registered at clinicaltrials.gov ( NCT04321928 ) on 25 March 2020.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Educação em Saúde , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Comportamento de Redução do Risco , Ensaios Clínicos Adaptados como Assunto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Exercício Físico , Comportamento Alimentar , Feminino , Nível de Saúde , Interações Hospedeiro-Patógeno , Humanos , Hungria , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Ensaios Clínicos Pragmáticos como Assunto , Fatores de Proteção , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/efeitos adversos
4.
Cien Saude Colet ; 25(9): 3475-3480, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês, Português | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32876252

RESUMO

The study aims to identify marital violence precipitating/intensifying elements during the COVID-19 pandemic. This is a narrative review of the literature, and the search was carried out in May 2020. We employed the PubCovid-19 platform, which is indexed in the United States National Library of Medicine (PubMed) and the Excerpta Medica (EMBASE) database. English descriptors "Domestic violence", "COVID-19", and "Intimate Partner Violence" were used in the search, and nine papers were selected for full-text reading. Three empirical categories were elaborated from the exploration of the selected material: Economic instability, Alcohol and other drugs use/abuse, and Weaker women's support network. Support networks for women in situations of marital violence should be expanded in this pandemic context, with emphasis on the use of digital technologies as possible tools for screening pandemic-related violence cases.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Programas de Rastreamento/métodos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Maus-Tratos Conjugais/estatística & dados numéricos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Fatores de Risco , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia
5.
J Law Med ; 27(4): 1047-1073, 2020 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32880418

RESUMO

This article confirms that industry compliance and enforcement processes are an essential consideration in the growing pantheon of legal and commercial determinants of public health. While alcohol control laws vary between individual jurisdictions, their development and application are confronted by a common threat of undue industry influence or capture. This necessitates a greater understanding of this phenomenon to better inform a collective and effective international public health response. New South Wales Australia, has developed a layer of alcohol industry compliance laws in the form of disciplinary schemes. This article critically explicates the first of these, the Violent Venues Scheme (VVS), to determine the nature and extent of any capture. This would significantly compromise harm minimisation statutory objects and disrupt the democratic process and the rule of law. In contrast, an influential industry identity, attributed the earlier last drinks laws, VVS and a related scheme as causing the alleged destruction of Sydney's nighttime economy and fun. The research also analyses the indispensible role of a neoliberal paradigm in legitimising exclusive relationships between governments and industry. This is indelibly imprinted on the alcohol regulatory landscape.


Assuntos
Bebidas Alcoólicas , Indústrias , Saúde Pública , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas , Bebidas Alcoólicas/normas , Austrália , Humanos , Indústrias/normas , New South Wales
6.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(Suppl 1): 146-149, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32890379

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In Belgium, 82% of the population consumes alcohol occasionally while 10% consume in a way that can be seen as problematic. On a European level, only 8% of the people who can be characterized as having Alcohol Use Disorder (AUD) would have consulted professional assistance in the past year. In this context, the KCE (Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre) has addressed multiple recommendations to health professionals to reduce the "treatment gap" concerning the patients' care: (1) encourage screening and preventative interventions, (2) promote the acquirement of communicational and relational competences (3) develop collaborations between professionals. The objective of this article is to better understand their functioning. METHOD: We format a non-systematic literature review concerning these recommendations. RESULTS: The implementation of these Brief Interventions programs in primary care is relevant due to the moderately positive impact on the frequency and quantity of alcohol consumption but both the quality of the therapeutic relationship and collaboration with the care network would optimize Brief Interventions. The quality of the therapeutic relationship alone appears to have an impact on therapeutic outcome. CONCLUSION: Training concerning patient-professional relationship is necessary to maximize the effectiveness of BIs.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas , Alcoolismo , Atenção Primária à Saúde , Alcoolismo/diagnóstico , Bélgica , Humanos , Programas de Rastreamento
7.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(Suppl 1): 176-179, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32890386

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Obesity is public health issue; bariatric surgery is considered as the most efficient treatment. However, the risk of developing an alcohol use disorder could increase after Roux-en-Y bypass. The purpose of this review is to emphasize the further research needed in this area. METHODS: Pubmed and Sciencedirect databases were searched. Articles written in another language than French or English as well as abstracts, conference presentations, editorials and expert opinions were excluded. RESULTS: Most of studies included in this review show an increased risk of developing an AUD (alcohol use disorder) after gastric bypass surgery. Male sex, younger age, smoking, regular alcohol consumption, AUD, recreational drug use, lower sense of belonging and undergoing a RYGB (Roux-en-Y gastric bypass) were identified as risk factors. There is an alteration of alcohol metabolism after gastric bypass. Gut hormones could also play a role in the development of AUD. The hypothesis of an addiction transfer is still controversial. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of developing an AUD seems to increase after surgery. Long term follow-up, after the second post-surgery year, is needed. Further researches are needed to understand the mechanisms that underlie the development of AUD.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas , Alcoolismo , Derivação Gástrica , Humanos , Masculino , Obesidade , Fatores de Risco
8.
Croat Med J ; 61(4): 309-318, 2020 Aug 31.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32881428

RESUMO

AIM: To investigate the effect of the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown on lifestyle behaviors and mood changes in the Croatian general population. METHODS: During ten days of the COVID-19 lockdown in Croatia, 3027 respondents (70.3% female) from the general population completed an online, self-report questionnaire. Demographic data and data on lifestyle habits and mood changes before and during the COVID-19 lockdown were collected. RESULTS: A total of 95.64% of respondents reported to follow most or all restrictions, with female sex (P<0.001) and higher education level (P<0.001) being associated with higher restriction compliance. Women smoked an increased number of cigarettes (P<0.001). The proportion of respondents of both sexes who did not drink or drank 7 drinks per week or more increased (P<0.001). Women also reported lower frequency (P=0.001) and duration of physical exercise (P<0.001). In total, 30.7% of respondents gained weight, with female sex (OR, 2.726) and higher BMI (OR, 1.116; both P<0.001) being associated with an increased likelihood of gaining weight. Both men and women felt more frequently afraid (P<0.001), discouraged (P<0.001), and sad (P<0.001). CONCLUSION: Public health authorities should promote the adoption of healthy lifestyles in order to reduce long-term negative effects of the lockdown.


Assuntos
Afeto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Fumar Cigarros/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Exercício Físico , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Quarentena/estatística & dados numéricos , Ganho de Peso , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Índice de Massa Corporal , Coronavirus , Croácia/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Medo , Feminino , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Razão de Chances , Pandemias , Admissão e Escalonamento de Pessoal , Quarentena/psicologia , Tristeza , Inquéritos e Questionários
9.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(39): e22413, 2020 Sep 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32991472

RESUMO

Stroke is the acute onset of neurological deficits and is associated with high morbidity, mortality, and disease burden. In the present study, we aimed to develop a scientific, nomogram for non-invasive predicting risk for early ischemic stroke, in order to improve stroke prevention efforts among high-risk groups. Data were obtained from a total of 2151 patients with early ischemic stroke from October 2017 to September 2018 and from 1527 healthy controls. Risk factors were examined using logistic regression analyses. Nomogram and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn, cutoff values were established. Significant risk factors for early ischemic stroke included age, sex, blood pressure, history of diabetes, history of genetic, history of coronary heart disease, history of smoking. A nomogram predicting ischemic stroke for all patients had an internally validated concordance index of 0.911. The area under the ROC curve for the logistic regression model was 0.782 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.766-0.799, P < .001), with a cutoff value of 2.5. The nomogram developed in this study can be used as a primary non-invasive prevention tool for early ischemic stroke and is expected to provide data support for the revision of current guidelines.


Assuntos
Isquemia Encefálica/epidemiologia , Nomogramas , Acidente Vascular Cerebral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiologia , Feminino , Predisposição Genética para Doença , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Curva ROC , Medição de Risco , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Fumar/epidemiologia
10.
Am J Public Health ; 110(11): 1628-1634, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32941066

RESUMO

Objectives. To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental distress in US adults.Methods. Participants were 5065 adults from the Understanding America Study, a probability-based Internet panel representative of the US adult population. The main exposure was survey completion date (March 10-16, 2020). The outcome was mental distress measured via the 4-item version of the Patient Health Questionnaire.Results. Among states with 50 or more COVID-19 cases as of March 10, each additional day was significantly associated with an 11% increase in the odds of moving up a category of distress (odds ratio = 1.11; 95% confidence interval = 1.01, 1.21; P = .02). Perceptions about the likelihood of getting infected, death from the virus, and steps taken to avoid infecting others were associated with increased mental distress in the model that included all states. Individuals with higher consumption of alcohol or cannabis or with history of depressive symptoms were at significantly higher risk for mental distress.Conclusions. These data suggest that as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, mental distress may continue to increase and should be regularly monitored. Specific populations are at high risk for mental distress, particularly those with preexisting depressive symptoms.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/etnologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Seguro Saúde , Masculino , Fumar Maconha/epidemiologia , Pessoas sem Cobertura de Seguro de Saúde , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pneumonia Viral/etnologia , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
11.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 9: CD010022, 2020 09 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32960976

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: High blood pressure constitutes one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity all over the world. At the same time, heavy drinking increases the risk for developing cardiovascular diseases, including cardiomyopathy, hypertension, atrial arrhythmias, or stroke. Several studies have already assessed specifically the relationship between alcohol intake and hypertension. However, the potential effect on blood pressure of alcohol intake reduction interventions is largely unknown. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effect of any intervention to reduce alcohol intake in terms of blood pressure decrease in hypertensive people with alcohol consumption compared to a control intervention or no intervention at all. To determine additional effects related to mortality, major cardiovascular events, serious adverse events, or quality of life. SEARCH METHODS: The Cochrane Hypertension Information Specialist searched the following databases for randomised controlled trials up to June 2020: the Cochrane Hypertension Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (Issue 5, 2020), MEDLINE Ovid (from 1946), MEDLINE Ovid Epub Ahead of Print, and MEDLINE Ovid In-Process, Embase Ovid (from 1974), ClinicalTrials.gov and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform. Trial authors were contacted when needed and no language restrictions were applied. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials with minimum 12 weeks duration and including 50 or more subjects per group with quantitative measurement of alcohol consumption and/or biological measurement of the outcomes of interest. Participants were adults (16 years of age or older) with systolic blood pressure (SBP) greater than 140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) greater than 90 mmHg, and SBP ≥ 130 or DBP ≥ 80 mmHg in participants with diabetes. We included any intervention implemented to reduce their alcohol intake. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently assessed search results and extracted data using standard methodological procedures adopted by Cochrane. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 1210 studies were screened. We included one randomised controlled trial involving a total of 269 participants with a two-year follow-up. Individual patient data for all participants were provided and used in this review. No differences were found between the cognitive-behavioural intervention group and the control group for overall mortality (RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.16 to 3.17; low-certainty evidence), cardiovascular mortality (not estimable) and cardiovascular events (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.79; very low-certainty evidence). There was no statistical difference in systolic blood pressure (SBP) reduction (Mean Difference (MD) -0.92 mmHg, 95% confidence interval (CI) -5.66 to 3.82 mmHg; very low-certainty evidence) or diastolic blood pressure (DBP) decrease (MD 0.98 mmHg, 95% CI -1.69 to 3.65 mmHg; low-certainty evidence) between the cognitive-behavioural intervention group and the control group. We also did not find any differences in the proportion of subjects with SBP < 140 mmHg and DBP < 90 mmHg (Risk Ratio (RR) 1.21, 95% CI 0.88 to 1.65; very low-certainty evidence). Concerning secondary outcomes, the alcohol intake was significantly reduced in the cognitive-behavioural intervention compared with the control group (MD 191.33 g, 95% CI 85.36 to 297.30 g). We found no differences between the active and control intervention in the proportion of subjects with lower-risk alcohol intake versus higher-risk and extreme drinkers at the end of the study (RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.68 to 1.60). There were no estimable results for the quality of life outcome. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: An intervention for decreasing alcohol intake consumption did not result in differences in systolic and diastolic blood pressure when compared with a control intervention, although there was a reduction in alcohol intake favouring the active intervention. No differences were found either for overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality or cardiovascular events. No data on serious adverse events or quality of life were available to assess. Adequate randomised controlled trials are needed to provide additional evidence on this specific question.


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/prevenção & controle , Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental , Hipertensão/prevenção & controle , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/mortalidade , Viés , Pressão Sanguínea , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Hipertensão/etiologia , Hipertensão/mortalidade , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
12.
Pediatrics ; 146(4)2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32968030

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Adolescents often display heterogenous trajectories of alcohol use. Initiation and escalation of drinking may be important predictors of later harms, including alcohol use disorder (AUD). Previous conceptualizations of these trajectories lacked adjustment for known confounders of adolescent drinking, which we aimed to address by modeling dynamic changes in drinking throughout adolescence while adjusting for covariates. METHODS: Survey data from a longitudinal cohort of Australian adolescents (n = 1813) were used to model latent class alcohol use trajectories over 5 annual follow-ups (mean age = 13.9 until 17.8 years). Regression models were used to determine whether child, parent, and peer factors at baseline (mean age = 12.9 years) predicted trajectory membership and whether trajectories predicted self-reported symptoms of AUD at the final follow-up (mean age = 18.8 years). RESULTS: We identified 4 classes: abstaining (n = 352); late-onset moderate drinking (n = 503); early-onset moderate drinking (n = 663); and early-onset heavy drinking (n = 295). Having more alcohol-specific household rules reduced risk of early-onset heavy drinking compared with late-onset moderate drinking (relative risk ratio: 0.31; 99.5% confidence interval [CI]: 0.11-0.83), whereas having more substance-using peers increased this risk (relative risk ratio: 3.43; 99.5% CI: 2.10-5.62). Early-onset heavy drinking increased odds of meeting criteria for AUD in early adulthood (odds ratio: 7.68; 99.5% CI: 2.41-24.47). CONCLUSIONS: Our study provides evidence that parenting factors and peer influences in early adolescence should be considered to reduce risk of later alcohol-related harm. Early initiation and heavy alcohol use throughout adolescence are associated with increased risk of alcohol-related harm compared with recommended maximum levels of consumption (late-onset, moderate drinking).


Assuntos
Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Alcoolismo/etiologia , Consumo de Álcool por Menores/psicologia , Adolescente , Fatores Etários , Alcoolismo/diagnóstico , Austrália/epidemiologia , Intervalos de Confiança , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Poder Familiar , Pais , Grupo Associado , Análise de Regressão , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Adulto Jovem
13.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(35): e21360, 2020 Aug 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32871863

RESUMO

HIV prevalence is higher among Men who have Sex with Men (MSM), owing to their unsafe sexual behavior. Further, MSM indulge in behaviors such as consumption of alcohol/oral drugs and/or injecting during/before sex that poses the risk of unsafe behaviors, thereby increasing their vulnerability to HIV. The study aims to analyze the factors associated with HIV infection among the multi-risk MSM using any substances with those MSM who do not use substances.Community-based cross-sectional survey design using probability-based sampling between October 2014 and November 2015.For the nation-wide Integrated Biological and Behavioral Surveillance (IBBS), 23,081 MSM were recruited from 4067 hotspots in 108 districts across India. Information on demographics, sexual behaviors, substance use, sexual partners, and awareness on HIV and its management was collected from the consented respondents using computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) by trained personnel. Blood samples were tested for HIV. Statistical analyses were done, to study the associations between substance use and its influence on high-risk sexual behaviors and HIV infection.One in 3 MSM (33.88%) in India were substance users, thus exhibiting "multi-risk" (MR) behaviors. Significantly higher HIV prevalence (3.8%, P < .05) was reported among MR-MSM, despite 97.2% of them being aware of HIV. Higher HIV prevalence among MSM exhibiting homosexual behavior for ≤1 year is of specific concern, as this accounts to recent infections and indicates the increased vulnerability of the infection among the new entrants.Substance-use resulting in high-risk sexual behavior was significantly associated with higher HIV prevalence among MR-MSM. Integrated targeted interventions focusing on safe sex and safe-IDU practices among MR-MSM are required to end the disease transmission.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/transmissão , Homossexualidade Masculina/estatística & dados numéricos , Comportamento Sexual/etnologia , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Conscientização , Estudos Transversais , Usuários de Drogas/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Homossexualidade Masculina/etnologia , Humanos , Índia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Prevalência , Assunção de Riscos , Comportamento Sexual/psicologia , Parceiros Sexuais/classificação , Adulto Jovem
14.
Pediatrics ; 146(3)2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32868471

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Legal performance-enhancing substance(s) (PES) (eg, creatine) are widely used among adolescent boys and young men; however, little is known about their temporal associations with substance use behaviors. METHODS: We analyzed prospective cohort data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Waves I to IV (1994-2008). Logistic regressions were used to first assess adolescent substance use (Wave I) and use of legal PES (Wave III) and second to assess use of legal PES (Wave III) and subsequent substance use-associated risk behaviors (Wave IV), adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: Among the sample of 12 133 young adults aged 18 to 26 years, 16.1% of young men and 1.2% of young women reported using legal PES in the past year. Adolescent alcohol use was prospectively associated with legal PES use in young men (odds ratio 1.39; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.70). Among young men, legal PES use was prospectively associated with higher odds of problematic alcohol use and drinking-related risk behaviors, including binge drinking (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.35; 95% CI 1.07-1.71), injurious and risky behaviors (aOR 1.78; 95% CI 1.43-2.21), legal problems (aOR 1.52; 95% CI 1.08-2.13), cutting down on activities and socialization (aOR 1.91; 95% CI 1.36-2.78), and emotional or physical health problems (aOR 1.44; 95% CI 1.04-1.99). Among young women, legal PES use was prospectively associated with higher odds of emotional or physical health problems (aOR 3.00; 95% CI 1.20-7.44). CONCLUSIONS: Use of legal PES should be considered a gateway to future problematic alcohol use and drinking-related risk behaviors, particularly among young men.


Assuntos
Substâncias para Melhoria do Desempenho/efeitos adversos , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Substâncias/etiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Intoxicação Alcoólica/complicações , Aminoácidos/efeitos adversos , Atletas/estatística & dados numéricos , Índice de Massa Corporal , Intervalos de Confiança , Creatina/efeitos adversos , Desidroepiandrosterona/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Masculino , Fumar Maconha/efeitos adversos , Razão de Chances , Estudos Prospectivos , Assunção de Riscos , Fatores Sexuais , Fumar/efeitos adversos , Esteroides/efeitos adversos , Consumo de Álcool por Menores , Adulto Jovem
15.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1364, 2020 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32891134

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The co-morbidity of cardiometabolic diseases in patients with Tuberculosis adds a significant burden in current health systems in developing countries including Nepal. The main objective of this study was to explore cardiometabolic risk factors among patients with Tuberculosis. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study conducted among patients with tuberculosis in 12 tuberculosis treatment centers from eight districts of Nepal between May and July 2017. Interviews with participants were conducted using a structured questionnaire and were supplemented by anthropometric measurements and on-site blood glucose tests. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. RESULTS: Among 221 study participants, 138 (62.4%) had new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis, 24 (10.9%) had new smear-negative pulmonary tuberculosis and 34 (15.4%) had new extra- pulmonary tuberculosis. Overall, 43.1% of the patients with tuberculosis had at least one cardiometabolic risk factor. The prevalence of at least one cardiometabolic risk factor was more in male than female (47.8% versus 33.8%). Prevalence of tobacco (18.9% versus 4.8%), and alcohol (12.6% versus 6.5%) use was proportionately higher in male compared to female. The prevalence of hypertension (17% vs. 21%) and obesity (11.9% vs. 12.9%) was lower in male compared to females. Female (AOR = 0.47; CI: 0.23-0.94), those from Gandaki Province (AOR = 0.32; CI: 0.13-0.79) and literate (AOR = 0.49; CI: 0.25-0.96) had reduced risk of cardiometabolic disease risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: This study highlights the role of gender and socio-demographic characteristics associated with the risk of cardiometabolic diseases in patients with Tuberculosis. The findings from this study can guide medical practitioners and policy makers to consider clinical suspicion, diagnosis and treatment. National treatment guideline can benefit by integrating the management of non-communicable diseases in Tuberculosis treatment centers.


Assuntos
Hipertensão/epidemiologia , Obesidade/epidemiologia , Tuberculose Pulmonar/epidemiologia , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/efeitos adversos , Comorbidade , Estudos Transversais , Assistência à Saúde , Feminino , Instalações de Saúde , Humanos , Hipertensão/etiologia , Hipertensão/terapia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nepal/epidemiologia , Doenças não Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Obesidade/etiologia , Obesidade/terapia , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Uso de Tabaco/efeitos adversos , Tuberculose/epidemiologia , Tuberculose Pulmonar/terapia
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22036, 2020 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32957321

RESUMO

Studies about the effects of metabolically healthy obesity on cardiovascular disease (CVD) have yielded conflicting results. These heterogeneous results could be due to the limited usefulness of BMI in measuring general adiposity, as body mass index (BMI) does not accurately reflect body composition. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of body shape on CVD outcomes across different obesity phenotypes, and to provide an explanation for the heterogeneous effects of metabolically healthy obese (MHO) phenotype on CVD.We analyzed data from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study, a population-based cohort study conducted between 2001 and 2012. We divided the participants into 4 groups: metabolically healthy non-obese (MHNO), MHO, metabolically unhealthy non-obese (MUNO), and metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO). To assess body shape, we calculated the z-score of the log-transformed a body shape index (LBSIZ). We computed Pearson correlation coefficients to examine the association of LBSIZ with muscle mass index, percentage of total fat mass (%Total FM), and percentage of abdominal fat mass (%Abdominal FM). We also used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate the effect of LBSIZ on CVD events according to the obesity phenotypes.A total of 9460 participants were assessed in this study. The incidence of CVD was 8.53 cases per 1000 person-year. LBSIZ showed strong positive correlation with %Total FM and %Abdominal FM, but negative correlation with muscle mass index. In Cox regression, MHO individuals did not show increased risk of CVD compared with MHNO individuals (hazard ratio [HR], 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.96-1.73). However, MHO individuals in the 3rd (HR, 2.40; 95% CI, 1.28-4.51) and 4th (HR, 3.67; 95% CI, 1.99-6.74) quarters of LBSIZ showed significantly higher risk of CVD compared with MHNO individuals in the 1st quarter of LBSIZ. Moreover, LBSIZ showed a linear relationship with CVD among MHO individuals.While the MHO individuals showed similar CVD risk to the MHNO individuals, CVD risk increases with LBSIZ among the MHO individuals. LBSIZ appears to be a useful measure for CVD risk assessment in clinical practice and epidemiologic studies, especially for MHO patients.


Assuntos
Composição Corporal/fisiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Obesidade Metabolicamente Benigna/epidemiologia , Obesidade Metabolicamente Benigna/patologia , Adiposidade , Adulto , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Glicemia , Índice de Massa Corporal , Pesos e Medidas Corporais , Fumar Cigarros/epidemiologia , Feminino , Comportamentos Relacionados com a Saúde , Nível de Saúde , Humanos , Incidência , Lipídeos/sangue , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fenótipo , Modelos de Riscos Proporcionais , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos
18.
Epidemiol Serv Saude ; 29(4): e2020407, 2020.
Artigo em Português, Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32997069

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To describe lifestyle changes with regard to consumption of tobacco and alcohol, food intake and physical activity, in the period of social restriction resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in Brazil with data from the ConVid online health behavior survey. The data were collected via an online questionnaire answered by the survey participants. Post-stratification procedures were used to calculate prevalence rates and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: 45,161 individuals aged 18 years or more participated. During the period of social restriction participants reported a decrease in practicing physical activity and an increase in time spent using computers or tablets or watching TV, intake of ultra-processed foods, number of cigarettes smoked and alcoholic beverage consumption. Differences were observed according to sex and age group. CONCLUSION: The results indicate a worsening of lifestyles and an increase in health risk behaviors.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Estilo de Vida , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Brasil/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Exercício Físico , Fast Foods/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Qualidade dos Alimentos , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Comportamento Sedentário , Fatores Sexuais , Fumar/epidemiologia , Lanches , Adulto Jovem
19.
Washington, D.C.; PAHO; 2020-09-21.
em Inglês | PAHO-IRIS | ID: phr-52705

RESUMO

This report is designed to complement the WHO’s 2018 Global Status Report on Alcohol and Health by providing greater detail on the current status on alcohol consumption, harms, barriers, and breakthroughs in the Region of the Americas in relation to alcohol’s impact on health and the associated burden of disease. This is the third regional report dedicated to alcohol and health in the Americas. The information provided is based on country responses to the WHO Global Survey on Alcohol and Health, undertaken in 2016, which informed the WHO Global Report of 2018. Data were reviewed and accepted by each country before the publication of the global report and the information used for the regional report largely relies on the global information system on alcohol and health (GISAH) of the WHO. The report provides an update on alcohol consumption in the region and each Member State, trends in consumption over time, alcohol-related harms, and current alcohol policies being implemented in each Member State and to what extent they are in line with the WHO global alcohol strategy and regional plan of action. It provides examples of studies done in the Region that were not reported in the WHO Global Status Report. The report discusses gaps and challenges in reducing the harmful use of alcohol and how countries can reverse current trends in a cost-effective and expedited way, particularly if the WHO SAFER technical package is implemented at the national level.


Assuntos
Doenças não Transmissíveis , Fatores de Risco , Doença Crônica , Gênero e Saúde , Direitos Humanos , Origem Étnica e Saúde , Transtornos Relacionados ao Uso de Álcool , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas , Violência , América
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