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1.
Cancer Cytopathol ; 128(10): 679-680, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33006815
2.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(10): e22596, 2020 10 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32936776

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Risk and crisis communication plays an essential role in public health emergency responses. The COVID-19 pandemic has triggered spontaneous and intensive media attention, which has affected people's adoption of personal preventive measures and their mental health. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between exposure to COVID-19-specific information and mental health (depression and sleep quality) and self-reported compliance with personal preventive measures (face mask wearing and hand sanitizing). We also tested whether these associations were moderated by thoughtful consideration of the veracity of the information to which people were exposed. METHODS: A cross-sectional, closed web-based survey was conducted among a sample of 3035 factory workers at the beginning of work resumption following the COVID-19 outbreak in Shenzhen, China. A stratified two-stage cluster sampling design was used for recruitment. Multivariate linear and logistic regression models were used for the analyses. RESULTS: The prevalence of probable moderate-to-severe depression was 170/3035 (5.6%), while that of good or excellent sleep quality was 2110/3035 (69.5%). The prevalence of self-reported consistent face mask wearing in public places was 2903/3035 (95.7%), while that of sanitizing hands every time after returning from public spaces or touching public installations was 2151/3035 (70.9%). Of the 3035 respondents, 1013 to 1638 (33.3% to 54.0%) reported >1 hour of daily exposure to COVID-19-specific information through web-based media and television. After controlling for significant background variables, higher information exposure via television and via newspapers and magazines was associated with better sleep quality and higher compliance with hand sanitizing. Higher exposure via unofficial web-based media was associated with higher compliance with hand sanitizing but was also associated with higher depressive symptoms. In contrast, higher exposure through face-to-face communication was associated with higher depressive symptoms, worse sleep quality, and lower compliance with hand sanitizing. Exposure to information about positive outcomes for patients with COVID-19, development of vaccines and effective treatments, and heroic stories about frontline health care workers were associated with both better mental health and higher compliance with preventive measures. Higher overall information exposure was associated with higher depressive symptoms among participants who were less likely to carefully consider the veracity of the information to which they were exposed; it was also associated with better sleep quality among people who reported more thoughtful consideration of information veracity. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides empirical evidence of how the amount, sources, and contents of information to which people were exposed influenced their mental health and compliance with personal preventive measures at the initial phase of work resumption in China. Thoughtful consideration of information quality was found to play an important moderating role. Our findings may inform strategic risk communication by government and public health authorities during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Desinfecção das Mãos , Comportamentos de Risco à Saúde , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adolescente , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/epidemiologia , Depressão/psicologia , Surtos de Doenças , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Autorrelato , Cooperação e Adesão ao Tratamento/psicologia , Cooperação e Adesão ao Tratamento/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
3.
Pediatrics ; 146(4)2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32958610

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Gender-incongruent (GI) youth have high rates of mental health problems. Although gender-affirming medical care (GAMC) provides psychological benefit, some GI youth present to care at older ages. Whether a relationship exists between age of presentation to GAMC and mental health difficulties warrants study. METHODS: A cross-sectional chart review of patients presenting to GAMC. Subjects were classified a priori as younger presenting youth (YPY) (<15 years of age at presentation) or older presenting youth (OPY) (≥15 years of age). Self-reported rates of mental health problems and medication use were compared between groups. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to identify determinants of mental health problems. Covariates included pubertal stage at presentation, social transition status, and assigned sex. RESULTS: Of 300 youth, there were 116 YPY and 184 OPY. After presentation, more OPY than YPY reported a diagnosis of depression (46% vs 30%), had self-harmed (40% vs 28%), had considered suicide (52% vs 40%), had attempted suicide (17% vs 9%), and required psychoactive medications (36% vs 23%), with all P < .05. After controlling for covariates, late puberty (Tanner stage 4 or 5) was associated with depressive disorders (odds ratio 5.49; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14-26.32) and anxiety disorders (odds ratio 4.18 [95% CI: 1.22-14.49]), whereas older age remained associated only with psychoactive medication use (odd ratio 1.31 [95% CI: 1.05-1.63]). CONCLUSIONS: Late pubertal stage and older age are associated with worse mental health among GI youth presenting to GAMC, suggesting that this group may be particularly vulnerable and in need of appropriate care.


Assuntos
Fatores Etários , Disforia de Gênero/psicologia , Disforia de Gênero/terapia , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Transexualidade/psicologia , Transexualidade/terapia , Adolescente , Antipsicóticos/uso terapêutico , Transtornos de Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Criança , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/epidemiologia , Transtorno Depressivo/epidemiologia , Revelação , Humanos , Modelos Logísticos , Transtornos Mentais/tratamento farmacológico , Saúde Mental , Puberdade , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/epidemiologia , Fatores Sexuais , Ideação Suicida , Tentativa de Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos
4.
West J Emerg Med ; 21(5): 1059-1066, 2020 Aug 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32970555

RESUMO

At the heart of the unparalleled crisis of COVID-19, healthcare workers (HCWs) face several challenges treating patients with COVID-19: reducing the spread of infection; developing suitable short-term strategies; and formulating long-term plans. The psychological burden and overall wellness of HCWs has received heightened awareness in news and research publications. The purpose of this study was to provide a review on current publications measuring the effects of COVID-19 on wellness of healthcare providers to inform interventional strategies. Between April 6-May 17, 2020, we conducted systematic searches using combinations of these keywords and synonyms in conjunction with the controlled vocabulary of the database: "physician," "wellness, "wellbeing," "stress," "burnout," "COVID-19," and "SARS-CoV-2." We excluded articles without original data, research studies regarding the wellness of non-healthcare occupations or the general public exclusively, other outbreaks, or wellness as an epidemic. A total of 37 studies were included in this review. The review of literature revealed consistent reports of stress, anxiety, and depressive symptoms in HCWs as a result of COVID-19. We describe published data on HCW distress and burnout but urge future research on strategies to enhance HCW well-being.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/etiologia , Betacoronavirus , Esgotamento Profissional/etiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus , Depressão/etiologia , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/etiologia , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , Ansiedade/psicologia , Esgotamento Profissional/epidemiologia , Esgotamento Profissional/prevenção & controle , Esgotamento Profissional/psicologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Efeitos Psicossociais da Doença , Depressão/epidemiologia , Depressão/prevenção & controle , Depressão/psicologia , Saúde Global/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Fatores de Risco , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/epidemiologia , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/prevenção & controle , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/psicologia
5.
Nan Fang Yi Ke Da Xue Xue Bao ; 40(9): 1369-1372, 2020 Sep 30.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32990239

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the status of anxiety and depression in patients requiring emergency treatment during the epidemic of COVID-19 to identify the patients with acute psychological stress disorder. METHODS: During the COVID-19 epidemic, the medical staff divided the patients visiting the emergency department into suspected group, fever group and control group through interview of the patients at triage. Self-rating anxiety scale (SAS) and self-rating depression scale (SDS) were distributed to each patient, and a trained medical staff was responsible for assisting the patient to complete the scales. RESULTS: A total of 557 sets of scales were distributed, including 211 in suspected COVID-19 case group, 167 in fever group and 179 in the control group. A total of 516 scales were retrieved, including 197 in suspected case group, 151 in fever group and 168 in control group. In the 3 groups, the incidence rates of anxiety and depression were 57.87% and 58.88%, 48.34% and 43.71%, and 18.31% and 18.99%, respectively, and the rates were significantly higher in suspected group and fever group than in the control group (P < 0.01), and significantly higher in suspected group than in fever group (P < 0.05). The standardized anxiety and depression scale scores in suspected case group, fever group and control group were 57.38±16.25 and 42.58±14.27, 51.23±15.29 and 38.32±15.39, and 32.58±17.8 and 12.25±12.94, respectively. Compared with the control group, both suspected case group and fever group had significantly higher standard scores for anxiety and depression (P < 0.01), and suspected case group had significantly higher standardized scores than fever group (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Among the patients visiting the emergency treatment, the patients with suspected COVID-19 and common fever are more likely to develop anxiety and depressive symptoms.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Serviço Hospitalar de Emergência , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22027, 2020 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32957319

RESUMO

To understand the self-rated depression scores of military recruits and to analyze the relationship between depression, the family environment, and coping styles.Multistage stratified cluster random sampling was used to study participants who, in September 2014, had enrolled as military personnel in the Xinjiang military. The participants were requested to complete the Chinese versions of the Self-rated Depression Scale (SDS), the Family Environment Scale (FES-CV), and the Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). Between-groups comparisons were performed using a t test and Mann-Whitney U test. Correlations were determined utilizing Spearman rank correlation coefficient, and the influencing factors of the SDS scores were analyzed using logistic regression.The average score of the SDS among the 323 participants was 42.53 ±â€Š8.51. Specifically, the score of the "high school and below" group was higher than that of the "college and above" group [i.e., (43.98 ±â€Š8.30)] vs [(40.43.98 ±â€Š8.30) vs (37.94 ±â€Š5.50), P < .05]. The SDS score of the "nonstudent" (i.e., social status before enlistment) group was higher than that of the "student" group [(i.e., 45.00 ±â€Š7.60) vs (40.42 ±â€Š8.02), P < .05] and the SDS score of the "smoking" group was higher than that of the "nonsmoking" group [i.e., (45.33 ±â€Š7.74 vs 40.34 ±â€Š7.58, P < .05)]. In addition, the scores related to the entertainment, organization, and controllability of the SDS≥50 group were lower than those observed for the SDS < 50 group, (i.e., Ps < .05). The SDS score was positively correlated with the SCSQ (r = 0.30) negative copying style score (r = 0.30), positively correlated with the FES-CV contradiction score (r = 0.32), and negatively correlated with the FES-CV knowledge score (r = -0.43), entertainment score (r = -0.42), organization score (r = -0.37), and controllability score (r = -0.28), respectively, (Ps < .05). The results of the logistic regression analysis showed that entertainment was contained in the final regression equation (P < .001) with odds radio (95% confidence interval) of 0.512 (0.319-0.824).A correlation was found between depression among military personnel and their family environment, and entertainment may be a potential protective factor against depression.


Assuntos
Adaptação Psicológica , Depressão/epidemiologia , Relações Familiares/psicologia , Militares/psicologia , Adulto , Fatores Etários , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Masculino , Fumar/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
7.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1442, 2020 Sep 23.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32967642

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There has been an increase in older rural-to-urban migrant workers (aged 50 and above) in mainland China, little known about their depressive symptoms. The aim of this study was to identify depressive symptoms among older rural-to-urban migrant workers, as well as explored the factors leading to differences in depressive symptoms between older rural-to-urban migrant workers and their rural counterparts (older rural dwellers) and urban counterparts (older urban residents) in mainland China. The results provided a comprehensive understanding of the depressive symptoms of older rural-to-urban migrant workers, and had great significance for improving the depressive symptoms for this vulnerable group. METHODS: Data were derived from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) conducted in 2015, and coarsened exact matching (CEM) method was employed to control confounding factors. This study employed a Chinese version 10-item short form of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D 10) to measure depressive symptoms, and used the Social-Ecological Model as a framework to explore influential factors related to depressive symptoms. Specifically, the approach of Fairlie's decomposition was used to parse out differences into observed and unobserved components. RESULTS: After matching, our findings indicated that the prevalence of depressive symptoms in older rural-to-urban migrant workers was lower than older rural dwellers; and the prevalence of depressive symptoms in older rural-to-urban migrant workers was higher than older urban residents. Fairlie's decomposition analysis indicated that type of in-house shower, sleeping time at night and ill in the last month were proved to be major contributors to the differences in depressive symptoms between older rural-to-urban migrant workers and older rural dwellers; self-reported health and sleeping time at night were proved to be major contributors to the differences in depressive symptoms between older rural-to-urban migrant workers and older urban residents. CONCLUSIONS: Differences in depressive symptoms between older rural-to-urban migrant workers and their rural and urban counterparts did exist. Our findings contributed to a more reliable understanding in depressive symptoms among older rural-to-urban migrant workers. Our findings would be of referential significance for improving older rural-to-urban migrant workers' depressive symptoms.


Assuntos
Depressão/epidemiologia , Disparidades nos Níveis de Saúde , População Rural/estatística & dados numéricos , Migrantes/psicologia , População Urbana/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , China/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Migrantes/estatística & dados numéricos
8.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0240008, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32997705

RESUMO

Ecuador has been one of the most affected countries by the Corona Virus Disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, by April 2020 this country presented the highest rates of mortality in Latin America. The purpose of the present study was to identify behaviors during confinement and sociodemographic variables associated with the mental health status of confirmed or suspected COVID-19 patients who were part of the epidemiological surveillance program in Ecuador that included mandatory confinement and self-isolation. A cross-sectional study was performed from March 22th to April 18th, 2020 using an online survey. The survey collected socio-demographic information and severity of depressive symptoms using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and anxiety symptoms through the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7. A total of 759 patients completed the questionnaire, 20.3% presented moderate to severe symptoms of depression and 22.5% moderate to severe symptoms of anxiety. Being a woman and from the Coastal region were risk factors. Exercising, maintaining daily routines, and keeping informed about the COVID-19 but limiting to an hour was associated with better mental health. Regression analysis indicated that the mentioned behaviors explained approximately 17% of the variance for depression sum scores and 11.8% of the variance for anxiety sum scores while controlling for gender and region. Understanding the association between sociodemographic variables and psychological states in patients with COVID-19 is relevant to tackle future public mental health problems and to implement health policies that are intended to palliate further psychiatric complications. Promotion of modifiable behaviors such as exercising, maintaining daily routines, and keeping informed about the COVID-19 but limiting to less than an hour is recommended.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Atividades Cotidianas , Adolescente , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Busca de Comunicante , Estudos Transversais , Equador/epidemiologia , Monitoramento Epidemiológico , Exercício Físico , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Questionário de Saúde do Paciente , Quarentena , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Adulto Jovem
9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32957702

RESUMO

Mental health effects secondary to the COVID-19 pandemic were till recently considered less important or were neglected. Portugal and Brazil are facing the pandemic in quite different ways. This study aimed to describe the mental health status of the general adult population in Portugal and Brazil during the COVID-19 pandemic and analyze the differences between the two countries. A cross-sectional quantitative study was based on an online questionnaire. Socio-demographic data were collected in addition to four validated scales: CAGE (acronym cut-annoyed-guilty-eye) Questionnaire, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire-2. For each outcome, a multiple linear regression was performed. Five hundred and fifty people answered the questionnaire (435 women). The median age was 38 (Q1, Q3: 30, 47) years, 52.5% resided in Brazil and 47.5% in Portugal. The prevalence of anxiety was 71.3% (mild anxiety was present in 43.1%), the prevalence of depression was 24.7% and 23.8% of the sample had both depression and anxiety. Isolation was a significant factor for depression but not for anxiety. Well-being was below average. Mental illness was considerably higher than pre-COVID-19 levels. Portugal and Brazil will have to be prepared for future consequences of poor mental health and contribute immediate psychological support to their adult populations.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Adulto , Ansiedade/psicologia , Betacoronavirus , Brasil/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/psicologia , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Portugal/epidemiologia
10.
BMJ Open ; 10(9): e040620, 2020 09 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32933965

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Previous pandemics have resulted in significant consequences for mental health. Here, we report the mental health sequelae of the COVID-19 pandemic in a UK cohort and examine modifiable and non-modifiable explanatory factors associated with mental health outcomes. We focus on the first wave of data collection, which examined short-term consequences for mental health, as reported during the first 4-6 weeks of social distancing measures being introduced. DESIGN: Cross-sectional online survey. SETTING: Community cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: N=3097 adults aged ≥18 years were recruited through a mainstream and social media campaign between 3 April 2020 and 30 April 2020. The cohort was predominantly female (n=2618); mean age 44 years; 10% (n=296) from minority ethnic groups; 50% (n=1559) described themselves as key workers and 20% (n=649) identified as having clinical risk factors putting them at increased risk of COVID-19. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Depression, anxiety and stress scores. RESULTS: Mean scores for depression ([Formula: see text] =7.69, SD=6.0), stress ([Formula: see text] =6.48, SD=3.3) and anxiety ([Formula: see text] = 6.48, SD=3.3) significantly exceeded population norms (all p<0.0001). Analysis of non-modifiable factors hypothesised to be associated with mental health outcomes indicated that being younger, female and in a recognised COVID-19 risk group were associated with increased stress, anxiety and depression, with the final multivariable models accounting for 7%-14% of variance. When adding modifiable factors, significant independent effects emerged for positive mood, perceived loneliness and worry about getting COVID-19 for all outcomes, with the final multivariable models accounting for 54%-57% of total variance. CONCLUSIONS: Increased psychological morbidity was evident in this UK sample and found to be more common in younger people, women and in individuals who identified as being in recognised COVID-19 risk groups. Public health and mental health interventions able to ameliorate perceptions of risk of COVID-19, worry about COVID-19 loneliness and boost positive mood may be effective.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Emprego , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Afeto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Ansiedade/psicologia , Betacoronavirus , Estudos de Coortes , Depressão/psicologia , Grupos Étnicos , Feminino , Humanos , Solidão/psicologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Grupos Minoritários , Pandemias , Fatores de Risco , Fatores Sexuais , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Reino Unido/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
11.
Rev Fac Cien Med Univ Nac Cordoba ; 77(3): 176-181, 2020 08 25.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32991105

RESUMO

Introduction: After the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 outbreak, global measures were implemented with the aim of containing its progression. On March 20, 2020, the mandatory preventive quarantine began in Argentina. As a result of these events, previous studies conducted in the framework of this pandemic in China, have shown psychological consequences. Methods: The aim of this study is to explore, through a self-administered electronic survey, attitudes and fears regarding COVID-19, the development of depressive symptoms and the pattern of alcohol consumption among the argentinian population during quarantine (n = 759). Results: As a result, we observed that fear of COVID-19 was greater in 55 to 59 years old people, with an abrupt drop above 70; that depressed mood and the increased of alcohol consumption were more frequent in youngest subjects, and that depressed mood was also frequent among subjects who lost their jobs during quarantine. Finally, we observed an elevated degree of agreement with the quarantine measure, even in some people who suffered a decrease in their income greater than 80% during quarantine. These results are useful for obtaining information about risk groups, enabling specific preventive and therapeutic strategies could be designed.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Consumo de Bebidas Alcoólicas/epidemiologia , Argentina/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Depressão/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Quarentena/psicologia
12.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(9): e22142, 2020 09 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32877349

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In a global pandemic, digital technology offers innovative methods to disseminate public health messages. As an example, the messenger app WhatsApp was adopted by both the World Health Organization and government agencies to provide updates on the coronavirus disease (COVID-19). During a time when rumors and excessive news threaten psychological well-being, these services allow for rapid transmission of information and may boost resilience. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we sought to accomplish the following: (1) assess well-being during the pandemic; (2) replicate prior findings linking exposure to COVID-19 news with psychological distress; and (3) examine whether subscription to an official WhatsApp channel can mitigate this risk. METHODS: Across 8 weeks of the COVID-19 outbreak (March 7 to April 21, 2020), we conducted a survey of 1145 adults in Singapore. As the primary outcome measure, participants completed the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale (DASS-21). As predictor variables, participants also answered questions pertaining to the following: (1) their exposure to COVID-19 news; (2) their use of the Singapore government's WhatsApp channel; and (3) their demographics. RESULTS: Within the sample, 7.9% of participants had severe or extremely severe symptoms on at least one DASS-21 subscale. Depression scores were associated with increased time spent receiving COVID-19 updates, whereas use of the official WhatsApp channel emerged as a protective factor (b=-0.07, t[863]=-2.04, P=.04). Similarly, increased anxiety scores were associated with increased exposure to both updates and rumors, but this risk was mitigated by trust in the government's WhatsApp messages (b=-0.05, t[863]=-2.13, P=.03). Finally, although stress symptoms increased with the amount of time spent receiving updates, these symptoms were not significantly related to WhatsApp use. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that messenger apps may be an effective medium for disseminating pandemic-related information, allowing official agencies to reach a broad sector of the population rapidly. In turn, this use may promote public well-being amid an "infodemic." TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04305574; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04305574.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Aplicativos Móveis , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Saúde Pública/métodos , Saúde Pública/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Estudos Transversais , Surtos de Doenças , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias
13.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(9): e22817, 2020 09 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32897868

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic has generally increased levels of stress and depression among the public. However, the impact on college students in the United States has not been well-documented. OBJECTIVE: This paper surveys the mental health status and severity of depression and anxiety of college students in a large university system in the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was conducted among undergraduate and graduate students recruited from Texas A&M University via email. The survey consisted of two standardized scales-the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the General Anxiety Disorder-7-for depression and anxiety, and additional multiple-choice and open-ended questions regarding stressors and coping mechanisms specific to COVID-19. RESULTS: Among the 2031 participants, 48.14% (n=960) showed a moderate-to-severe level of depression, 38.48% (n=775) showed a moderate-to-severe level of anxiety, and 18.04% (n=366) had suicidal thoughts. A majority of participants (n=1443, 71.26%) indicated that their stress/anxiety levels had increased during the pandemic. Less than half of the participants (n=882, 43.25%) indicated that they were able to cope adequately with the stress related to the current situation. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of respondents showing depression, anxiety, and/or suicidal thoughts is alarming. Respondents reported academic-, health-, and lifestyle-related concerns caused by the pandemic. Given the unexpected length and severity of the outbreak, these concerns need to be further understood and addressed.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Estudantes/psicologia , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Universidades , Adolescente , Adulto , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Ideação Suicida , Adulto Jovem
14.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(9): e22181, 2020 09 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32924951

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Real-time global mental health surveillance is urgently needed for tracking the long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to use Google Trends data to investigate the impact of the pandemic on global mental health by analyzing three keywords indicative of mental distress: "insomnia," "depression," and "suicide." METHODS: We examined increases in search queries for 19 countries. Significant increases were defined as the actual daily search value (from March 20 to April 19, 2020) being higher than the 95% CIs of the forecast from the 3-month baseline via ARIMA (autoregressive integrated moving average) modeling. We examined the correlation between increases in COVID-19-related deaths and the number of days with significant increases in search volumes for insomnia, depression, and suicide across multiple nations. RESULTS: The countries with the greatest increases in searches for insomnia were Iran, Spain, the United States, and Italy; these countries exhibited a significant increase in insomnia searches on more than 10 of the 31 days observed. The number of COVID-19-related deaths was positively correlated to the number of days with an increase in searches for insomnia in the 19 countries (ρ=0.64, P=.003). By contrast, there was no significant correlation between the number of deaths and increases in searches for depression (ρ=-0.12, P=.63) or suicide (ρ=-0.07, P=.79). CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis suggests that insomnia could be a part of routine mental health screening during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Saúde Global/estatística & dados numéricos , Internacionalidade , Internet/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Ferramenta de Busca/estatística & dados numéricos , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Depressão/epidemiologia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos
15.
Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol ; 27(2): 79-85, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32874039

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To assess the psychological impact and mental health outcomes including depression, anxiety, and insomnia during COVID-19 crisis among ophthalmologists. METHODS: This was a simple random study in which ophthalmologists practicing in Saudi Arabia were asked to fill in a self-administered online survey during the period from March 28, 2020, to April 04, 2020. Four validated psychiatric assessment tools were used to detect symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and stress perception. RESULTS: One hundred and seven participants successfully completed the survey with a response rate of 30.6%. Males constituted 56.1% (n = 60). Ophthalmology residents constituted the majority (n = 66, 61.7%). About half of the physicians exhibited symptoms of depression (n = 56, 50.5%), anxiety (n = 50, 46.7%), and insomnia (n = 48, 44.9%). Symptoms of stress ranged between low (28%), moderate (68.2%), and high (3.7%). According to the cutoff values for severe symptoms, 29% were identified as having depression, 38.3% had anxiety, and 15% had insomnia.Depression was found to be more common among female ophthalmologists (P = 0.06), those living with an elderly (P = 0.003), and fellows (P = 0.006). Female ophthalmologists suffering from anxiety were significantly more than male ophthalmologists (P = 0.046). There was a trend toward suffering from anxiety in frontline health-care providers (P = 0.139) and in ophthalmologists who are living with an elderly (P = 0.149). Female participants exhibited significantly more moderate-to-high symptoms of stress (P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmologists' psychological needs, females in particular, should be addressed appropriately during the COVID-19 pandemic. Establishing psychological support units, especially for high-risk individuals, should be considered to minimize psychological adverse effects.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/psicologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Depressão/psicologia , Oftalmologistas/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/psicologia , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Adulto , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus , Depressão/epidemiologia , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Determinação de Necessidades de Cuidados de Saúde , Oftalmologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Pandemias , Arábia Saudita/epidemiologia , Fatores Sexuais , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/epidemiologia , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(35): e21606, 2020 Aug 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32871876

RESUMO

The increasing availability of antiretroviral therapy (ART) worldwide is yet to result in decreasing HIV-related mortality among adolescents (10-19 years old) living with HIV (ALHIV) in part because of poor adherence. the poor adherence might itself be due to high level of depression. We assess the prevalence of depressive symptomatology and it's associated with adherence among ALHIV receiving ART care in Brazzaville and Pointe Noire, Republic of Congo (RoC).Adolescents aged 10 to 19 years, on antiretroviral therapy (ART), followed in the two Ambulatory Treatment Centers (ATC) in Brazzaville and Pointe Noire, RoC were included in this cross-sectional study. From April 19 to July 9, 2018, participants were administered face to face interviews using a standardized questionnaire that included the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9). Participants who reported failing to take their ART more than twice in the 7 days preceding the interview were classified as non-adherent. Bivariate and multivariable log-binomial models were used to estimate the prevalence ratio (PR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI) assessing the strength of association between predictors and presence of depressive symptoms (PHQ-9 score ≥9).Overall, 135 adolescents represented 50% of ALHIV in active care at the 2 clinics were interviewed. Of those, 67 (50%) were male, 81 (60%) were 15 to 19 years old, 124 (95%) had been perinatally infected, and 71 (53%) knew their HIV status. Depressive symptoms were present in 52 (39%) participants and 78 (58%) were adherent. In univariate analyses, the prevalence of depressive symptoms was relative higher among participants who were not adherent compared to those who were (73% vs 33%; PR: 2.20 [95%CI: 1.42-3.41]). In multivariate analysis, after adjustment for report of been sexually active, alcohol drinking, age category (10-14 and 15-19), not in school, loss of both parents, the association between depression and adherence was strengthened (PR: 2.06 [95%CI: 1.23-3.45]).The prevalence of depressive symptoms in adolescents living with HIV is high and was strongly associated with poor adherence even after adjustment of potential confounders. Efforts to scale-up access to screening and management of depression among ALHIV in sub-Saharan is needed for them to realize the full of ART.


Assuntos
Antirretrovirais/uso terapêutico , Depressão/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Adesão à Medicação/psicologia , Adolescente , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Criança , Congo/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/psicologia , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/tratamento farmacológico , Humanos , Masculino , Programas de Rastreamento/métodos , Programas de Rastreamento/psicologia , Adesão à Medicação/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência Perinatal/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência Perinatal/tendências , Prevalência , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
17.
Transl Psychiatry ; 10(1): 319, 2020 09 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32950999

RESUMO

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is rapidly spreading worldwide, with a staggering number of cases and deaths. However, available data on the psychological impacts of COVID-19 on pregnant women are limited. The purposes of this study were to assess the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among pregnant women, and to compare them with non-pregnant women. From February 28 to March 12, 2020, a cross-sectional study of pregnant and non-pregnant women was performed in China. The online questionnaire was used to collect information of participants. The mental health status was assessed by patient health questionnaire, generalized anxiety disorder scale, insomnia severity index, somatization subscale of the symptom checklist 90, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) checklist-5. Totally, 859 respondents were enrolled, including 544 pregnant women and 315 non-pregnant women. In this study, 5.3%, 6.8%, 2.4%, 2.6%, and 0.9% of pregnant women were identified to have symptoms of depression, anxiety, physical discomfort, insomnia, and PTSD, respectively. However, the corresponding prevalence rates among non-pregnant women were 17.5%, 17.5%, 2.5%, 5.4%, 5.7%, respectively. After adjusting for other covariates, we observed that pregnancy was associated a reduced risk of symptoms of depression (OR = 0.23; 95% CI: 0.12-0.45), anxiety (OR = 0.26; 95% CI: 0.16-0.42), insomnia (OR = 0.19; 95% CI: 0.06-0.58), and PTSD (OR = 0.15; 95% CI: 0.04-0.53) during the COVID-19 epidemic. Our results indicate that during the COVID-19 epidemic in China, pregnant women have an advantage of facing mental problems caused by COVID-19, showing fewer depression, anxiety, insomnia, and PTSD symptoms than non-pregnant women.


Assuntos
Ansiedade , Infecções por Coronavirus , Depressão , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Gestantes/psicologia , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono , Transtornos Somatoformes , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos , Adulto , Ansiedade/diagnóstico , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , China/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/diagnóstico , Depressão/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Gravidez , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/diagnóstico , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/epidemiologia , Transtornos Somatoformes/diagnóstico , Transtornos Somatoformes/epidemiologia , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/diagnóstico , Transtornos de Estresse Pós-Traumáticos/epidemiologia
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22235, 2020 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32957366

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, has emerged to be the biggest global health threat worldwide. COVID-19 marks the emergence of the third large-scale epidemic related to the coronavirus, after SARS-CoV in 2002 and Middle-East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERSCoV) in 2012. The pandemic has had a harmful effect on the public mental health, especially on depression. Increasing systematic reviews (SRs) of coronavirus were focusing on depression. However, the methodological quality of these SRs is unclear. Therefore, to evaluate and compare the normativity of report of SR, we conducted a comprehensive overview of depression during the SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 pandemics. METHODS: Two independent reviewers will conduct comprehensively searches in PubMed, EMBASE.com, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Chinese biomedical literature database (CBM), Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wan fang Database, Chongqing VIP (CQVIP). Reference lists of articles, gray literature, and conference proceedings will also be searched. We will extract the data and assess the methodological quality using the Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews-2 (AMSTAR-2) measurement tool and the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. General characteristics of the eligible SRs will be summarized and described. We will provide AMSTAR-2 and PRISMA assessments in tabular form for each review, the total percentage of each item will be calculated. Endnote X8 and EXCEL will be used. RESULTS: Using the draft search strategy of databases, 8 SRs met the a priori criteria and were included. The overview of SRs will be published in a peer-reviewed journal. CONCLUSION: Our overview will be a comprehensive synthesis of the existing systemic review on depression with SARS, MERS, and COVID-19. PROTOCOL REGISTRATION: INPLASY202080003.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Pandemias/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/psicologia , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Depressão/virologia , Humanos , Coronavírus da Síndrome Respiratória do Oriente Médio , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Prevalência , Projetos de Pesquisa , Vírus da SARS , Síndrome Respiratória Aguda Grave/epidemiologia , Revisões Sistemáticas como Assunto
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(38): e22260, 2020 Sep 18.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32957375

RESUMO

We explored the psychological changes in suspected patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic and obtained evidence for early psychological guidance and intervention in this group. A total of 31 inpatients with suspected COVID-19 were identified at our hospital. The depression module of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), the General Anxiety Disorder (GAD)-7 scale, and the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) mental health self-assessment questionnaire were used to assess depression, anxiety, and overall mental health. Among the patients, 32.3% had symptoms of depression and 19.4% had symptoms of anxiety. Levels of anxiety and fear varied. In comparing the PHQ-9 and 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale scores of suspected and confirmed patients, there was no significant difference in the distribution of severity of anxiety or depression in the 2 groups. The PHQ-9 scores indicated mild depression symptoms in 25.8% of suspected patients, moderate symptoms in 0%, and severe symptoms in 6.5%. Overall, 50% of confirmed patients had symptoms, with 30.8% classified as mild, 15.4% classified as moderate, and 3.8% classified as severe. The 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale scores in the group of suspected patients showed that 9.7% had mild symptoms, 0% had moderate symptoms, and 9.7% had severe symptoms. In the group of confirmed patients, 38.4% had symptoms (34.6% mild, 0% moderate, and 3.8% severe). Diagnosed patients had more visible symptoms of depression and different total PHQ-9 scores. During the COVID-19 epidemic, suspected and diagnosed patients had different levels of mental health problems. Diagnosed patients had more visible symptoms. The performance of suspected patients was higher, but their mental state was more polarized. It may thus be important to monitor the psychological state of suspected patients as early as possible to enable timely interventions that promote psychological rehabilitation.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/diagnóstico , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Depressão/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/virologia , China/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Depressão/virologia , Medo/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/virologia , Escalas de Graduação Psiquiátrica , Índice de Gravidade de Doença , Inquéritos e Questionários
20.
Global Health ; 16(1): 89, 2020 09 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32977818

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Health care workers exposed to COVID-19 might be at increased risk of developing mental health problems. The study aimed to identify factors associated with anxiety, depression and insomnia among health workers involved in COVID-19 response in Nepal. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional web-based survey conducted between April 26 and May 12, 2020. A total of 475 health workers participated in the study. Anxiety and depression were measured using a 14-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS: 0-21) and insomnia was measured by using a 7-item Insomnia Severity Index (ISI: 0-28). Multivariable logistic regression analysis was done to determine the risk factors of mental health outcomes. RESULTS: Overall, 41.9% of health workers had symptoms of anxiety, 37.5% had depression symptoms and 33.9% had symptoms of insomnia. Stigma faced by health workers was significantly associated with higher odds of experiencing symptoms of anxiety (AOR: 2.47; 95% CI: 1.62-3.76), depression (AOR: 2.05; 95% CI: 1.34-3.11) and insomnia (AOR: 2.37; 95% CI: 1.46-3.84). History of medication for mental health problems was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of experiencing symptoms of anxiety (AOR: 3.40; 95% CI:1.31-8.81), depression (AOR: 3.83; 95% CI: 1.45-10.14) and insomnia (AOR: 3.82; 95% CI: 1.52-9.62) while inadequate precautionary measures in the workplace was significantly associated with higher odds of exhibiting symptoms of anxiety (AOR: 1.89; 95% CI: 1.12-3.19) and depression (AOR: 1.97; 95% CI: 1.16-3.37). Nurses (AOR: 2.33; 95% CI: 1.21-4.47) were significantly more likely to experience anxiety symptoms than other health workers. CONCLUSION: The study findings revealed a considerate proportion of anxiety, depression and insomnia symptoms among health workers during the early phase of the pandemic in Nepal. Health workers facing stigma, those with history of medication for mental health problems, and those reporting inadequate precautionary measures in their workplace were more at risk of developing mental health outcomes. A focus on improving mental wellbeing of health workers should be immediately initiated with attention to reduction of stigma, ensuring an adequate support system such as personal protective equipments, and family support for those with history of mental health problems.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Pessoal de Saúde/psicologia , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Distúrbios do Início e da Manutenção do Sono/epidemiologia , Adulto , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Pessoal de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nepal/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Fatores de Risco , Adulto Jovem
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