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2.
Cutis ; 104(2): 103-105, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31603962

RESUMO

Dermatology hospitalists (DHs) provide consultative care to inpatients with skin conditions. In this study, we surveyed current members of the Society for Dermatology Hospitalists (SDH) regarding barriers to care, current and ideal compensation models, and overall job satisfaction to evaluate the overall job satisfaction of DHs and further describe potential barriers to inpatient dermatology consultations.


Assuntos
Dermatologistas/psicologia , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Médicos Hospitalares/psicologia , Satisfação no Emprego , Dermatologistas/organização & administração , Feminino , Médicos Hospitalares/organização & administração , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários
3.
Actas dermo-sifiliogr. (Ed. impr.) ; 110(6): 460-468, jul.-ago. 2019. tab
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-185273

RESUMO

Antecedentes y objetivo: El carcinoma de células de Merkel es un tipo de cáncer de piel infrecuente y agresivo. Hay una gran variación en su manejo y las diferentes guías extranjeras que existen cubren parcialmente los problemas identificados como principales. El objetivo de la presente guía es servir de referencia a los dermatólogos españoles para mejorar aspectos controvertidos del diagnóstico, estadificación y tratamiento del carcinoma de células de Merkel. Materiales y métodos: Se empleó el método ADAPTE: se escogió a miembros del Grupo Español de Dermato-Oncología y Cirugía (GEDOC) con experiencia en el tratamiento de estos tumores y con interés en participar en la elaboración de la guía. Tras resumir el proceso de atención y elaborar las preguntas clínicas relevantes, se hizo una búsqueda de guías, que se seleccionaron según su puntuación mediante el instrumento Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II). Tras la búsqueda de las respuestas en dichas guías, se elaboraron posteriormente las recomendaciones. Por último, se sometió la guía a revisión externa. Resultados: Las guías con mejor puntuación fueron las de National Comprehensive Cancer Network, la European consensus-based interdisciplinary guideline, Alberta Healthservices Clinical practice guideline, American Cancer Society y Cutaneous Oncology Group of the French Society of Dermatology. Se obtuvieron en total 9 preguntas clínicas, contestadas a partir de estas guías. Conclusiones: Esta guía responde a preguntas habituales en la práctica clínica diaria y sirve a los dermatólogos como referencia en la toma de decisiones, siempre teniendo presentes los recursos y preferencias del paciente


Background and objective: Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive skin cancer that is managed in a great variety of ways. However, international clinical practice guidelines give only partial coverage to issues considered major problems.The recommendations presented here aim to provide Spanish dermatologists with a guide to improving disputed aspects of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of localized Merkel cell carcinomas. Material and methods: The ADAPTE process was used. Members of the Spanish Group of Oncologic Dermatology and Surgery (GEDOC) with experience in treating Merkel cell carcinoma and interest in drafting these guidelines were selected. The group described the care process and listed the most important clinical questions. They then searched for guidelines and assessed them with the AGREE II (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool. After consulting the guidelines for answers to their clinical questions, the group drafted the present statementand sent it for external review. Results: The guidelines that scored highest in the AGREE II assessment step were the consensus-based interdisciplinary guideline of the European Association of Dermato-Oncology and the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer, and those of the Comprehensive Cancer Network, the Alberta Health Services in Canada, the American Cancer Society, and the Cutaneous Oncology Group of the French Society of Dermatology. A total of 9 clinical questions were answered based on these guidelines. Conclusions: The guidelines presented here answer clinical questions that arise in routine practice. They can provide dermatologists with a starting point for decision-making, although available resources and patient preferences must always be borne in mind


Assuntos
Humanos , Carcinoma de Célula de Merkel/diagnóstico , Carcinoma de Célula de Merkel/terapia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Cutâneas/terapia , Carcinoma de Célula de Merkel/patologia , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Departamentos Hospitalares , Unidades Hospitalares , Neoplasias Cutâneas/patologia , Espanha , Estadiamento de Neoplasias
4.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 18(7): 608-612, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31329380

RESUMO

Rosacea is among the most common facial skin conditions diagnosed by dermatologists. Typical clinical features include erythema, flushing, telangiectasia, papules, and pustules distributed on the central face. While the prevalence of rosacea is highest among white populations of Northern European descent, recent reports have found that rosacea frequently occurs in people from a broad range of racial/ethnic backgrounds and skin types. When rosacea presents in darker skin types, the diagnosis is often more challenging due to masking of features by increased epidermal melanin. As such, under-diagnosis and underreporting may contribute to misconceptions about the prevalence of rosacea in populations with skin of color. Recognizing the unique presentations and complications associated with darker skin types is necessary to reduce the disparities in rosacea treatment, especially as the American population continues to become increasingly heterogeneous. Although rosacea is most common in middle-aged females, patients of other demographics may have more negative impacts on quality of life due to their disease. In this article, we review rosacea management with a focus on special patient groups: people with skin of color, and less common forms of rosacea, in order to diminish the physical and psychosocial burden of rosacea in all patient groups. Due to the variability inherent to rosacea, we advocate for an individualized, patient-centered approach to disease management.


Assuntos
Dermatologia/organização & administração , Carga Global da Doença , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/métodos , Rosácea/diagnóstico , Pigmentação da Pele , Adolescente , Adulto , Idade de Início , Dermatologistas/educação , Dermatologia/educação , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/educação , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/organização & administração , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Relações Médico-Paciente , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Prevalência , Qualidade de Vida , Rosácea/epidemiologia , Rosácea/terapia , Adulto Jovem
7.
Actas Dermosifiliogr ; 110(6): 460-468, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30961887

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, aggressive skin cancer that is managed in a great variety of ways. However, international clinical practice guidelines give only partial coverage to issues considered major problems.The recommendations presented here aim to provide Spanish dermatologists with a guide to improving disputed aspects of diagnosis, staging, and treatment of localized Merkel cell carcinomas. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The ADAPTE process was used. Members of the Spanish Group of Oncologic Dermatology and Surgery (GEDOC) with experience in treating Merkel cell carcinoma and interest in drafting these guidelines were selected. The group described the care process and listed the most important clinical questions. They then searched for guidelines and assessed them with the AGREE II (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation) tool. After consulting the guidelines for answers to their clinical questions, the group drafted the present statementand sent it for external review. RESULTS: The guidelines that scored highest in the AGREE II assessment step were the consensus-based interdisciplinary guideline of the European Association of Dermato-Oncology and the European Organization of Research and Treatment of Cancer, and those of the Comprehensive Cancer Network, the Alberta Health Services in Canada, the American Cancer Society, and the Cutaneous Oncology Group of the French Society of Dermatology. A total of 9 clinical questions were answered based on these guidelines. CONCLUSIONS: The guidelines presented here answer clinical questions that arise in routine practice. They can provide dermatologists with a starting point for decision-making, although available resources and patient preferences must always be borne in mind.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Célula de Merkel/diagnóstico , Carcinoma de Célula de Merkel/terapia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Cutâneas/terapia , Carcinoma de Célula de Merkel/patologia , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Medicina Baseada em Evidências , Departamentos Hospitalares , Unidades Hospitalares , Humanos , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Neoplasias Cutâneas/patologia , Espanha
11.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 81(1): 297-305, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30878565

RESUMO

The development of core outcome sets (COSs; ie, a minimum set of core outcomes that should be measured and reported in all trials or in clinical practice for a specific condition) in dermatology is increasing in pace. A total of 44 dermatology-related COS projects have been registered in the online Core Outcome Measures in Effectiveness Trials database (http://www.comet-initiative.org/studies/search) and include studies on 26 different skin diseases. With the increasing number of COSs in dermatology, care is needed to ensure the delivery of high-quality COSs that meet quality standards when using state-of-the-art methods. In 2015, the Cochrane Skin-Core Outcome Set Initiative (CS-COUSIN) was established. CS-COUSIN is an international, multidisciplinary working group aiming to improve the development and implementation of COSs in dermatology. CS-COUSIN has developed guidance on how to develop high-quality COSs for skin diseases and supports dermatology-specific COS initiatives. Currently, 17 COS development groups are affiliated with CS-COUSIN and following standardized COS development processes. To ensure successful uptake of COSs in dermatology, researchers, clinicians, systematic reviewers, guideline developers, and other stakeholders should use existing COSs in their work.


Assuntos
Ensaios Clínicos como Assunto , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Sistema de Registros , Dermatopatias/diagnóstico , Dermatopatias/terapia , Feminino , Saúde Global , Humanos , Masculino , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Projetos de Pesquisa
13.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 81(2): 412-416, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30771420

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Access to dermatologists is low among Medicaid-insured patients. Higher clinic nonattendance among Medicaid-insured patients might affect provider decisions to accept these patients. OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of different scheduling policies on the attendance among children seen at a pediatric dermatology clinic. METHODS: In this retrospective review, we compared nonattendance among children for 3 different scheduling policies implemented over 3 consecutive years. The scheduling policies used were a first-available open scheduling policy, a 2-week in advance scheduling policy, and a 4-week in advance scheduling policy. Subset analyses were performed by clinic location and insurance type. RESULTS: The interval between scheduling and appointment date was directly related to nonattendance rates; rates were higher for Medicaid-insured than privately insured patients. Open scheduling was associated with a 37% nonattendance rate for Medicaid-insured patients and 18% nonattendance rate for privately insured patients. A 4-week in advance scheduling policy significantly decreased the nonattendance rate to 19% among Medicaid-insured and 7% among privately insured patients. A 2-week in advance policy further decreased the nonattendance rate to 11% among Medicaid-insured patients and 4% among privately insured patients. LIMITATIONS: This is a retrospective study, and same-day cancellations were not tracked. CONCLUSION: Decreasing the time interval between scheduling and appointment dates can significantly decrease nonattendance. This strategy might help dermatologists incorporate more Medicaid-insured patients into their practices.


Assuntos
Agendamento de Consultas , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Dermatologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Seguro Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicaid/estatística & dados numéricos , Pacientes não Comparecentes/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores de Tempo , Estados Unidos
14.
JAMA Dermatol ; 155(4): 460-464, 2019 04 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30698625

RESUMO

Importance: Patient advocacy organizations are nonprofit organizations that represent patients with medical conditions. Although these organizations may increase disease awareness and influence health care policy, reports have suggested financial relationships between organizations and drug, device, and biotechnology companies, which may lead to potential conflicts of interest. The extent of these conflicts has not been explored among patient advocacy organizations in dermatology. Objective: To examine potential financial conflicts of interest and characterize disclosure practices among dermatology patient advocacy organizations. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study of the largest dermatology patient advocacy organizations using the Kaiser Health News database acquired data on total revenue from each organization's Form 990 for the year 2015. Tax forms and annual reports from 2017 were used for 2 organizations that were missing donor information for 2015. Annual reports, websites, and LinkedIn profiles were manually examined to ascertain donations and determine disclosure practices pertaining to financial support and board membership. Main Outcomes and Measures: The amount and minimum proportion of donations attributable to industry sponsorship among organizations as well as the proportion of organizations disclosing (1) industry-sponsored financial support, (2) the amount of industry-derived donations, and (3) current and past relationships between governing board members and industry sponsors. Results: This study identified 24 dermatology patient advocacy organizations with annual revenues that exceeded $500 000. Of these, 5 (21%) had total donations that exceeded $5 million and 4 (17%) reported industry donations that exceeded $500 000. Two organizations (8%) reported having at least 40% of total donations from industry sponsorship. Overall, 17 organizations (71%) reported receiving donations from industry on the annual report or the website and 12 (50%) reported the amount of donations in ranges. None of the organizations reported the exact amount or use of donations. On the basis of annual reports and websites, 3 organizations (13%) reported having a current or former industry executive on the organization's governing board. When this search was replicated using LinkedIn, this figure was at least 54%. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest inconsistent disclosure of industry-derived financial support and board membership that may represent conflicts of interest. Policies that support the transparency and consistency of disclosure practices between industry and patient advocacy organizations appear to be needed to fully characterize the extent of conflicts of interest among patient advocacy organizations in dermatology and maintain trust in these important institutions.


Assuntos
Conflito de Interesses , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Indústria Farmacêutica/economia , Defesa do Paciente/estatística & dados numéricos , Padrões de Prática Médica/economia , Estudos Transversais , Bases de Dados Factuais , Revelação , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Padrões de Prática Médica/ética , Prevalência , Estados Unidos
15.
Br J Dermatol ; 180(1): 122-129, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29927480

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Despite the high and rising incidence rate of keratinocyte cancer (KC) and the importance of incorporating patient values into evidence-based care, few studies have focused on the perspectives of patients with KC. OBJECTIVES: To identify the needs and preferences of patients with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) regarding care. METHODS: A qualitative study was conducted consisting of three focus groups with patients with BCC and three focus groups with patients with SCC. In total 42 patients participated. In each focus group, the patients' needs and preferences regarding treatment and follow-up were discussed, using a predefined topic list. All sessions were transcribed verbatim and analysed by two researchers. RESULTS: The following needs and preferences were identified: (i) the need to receive all relevant, tailored information; (ii) a physician who takes you seriously and communicates well; (iii) a short waiting period and the best treatment with direct results; (iv) to be seen by the same physician; a preference for a dermatologist during (v) treatment and (vi) follow-up; (vii) a general need for structured follow-up care and (viii) a full-body skin examination during follow-up. Patients with BCC additionally expressed the need for openness and transparency and wanting to participate in shared decision making. CONCLUSIONS: It is advocated to organize skin cancer care that is better tailored to the needs of patients with KC, providing patient-centred care. This should include investing in the patient-physician relationship, and personalizing the type and form of information and the follow-up schedules. Adding the patient's perspective to current guidelines could facilitate this process.


Assuntos
Carcinoma Basocelular/terapia , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/terapia , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Preferência do Paciente , Neoplasias Cutâneas/terapia , Assistência ao Convalescente/métodos , Assistência ao Convalescente/organização & administração , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Carcinoma Basocelular/diagnóstico , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/diagnóstico , Tomada de Decisões , Dermatologia/métodos , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Dermatologia/normas , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/métodos , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/organização & administração , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/normas , Feminino , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos , Participação do Paciente , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/métodos , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/organização & administração , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/normas , Relações Médico-Paciente , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Neoplasias Cutâneas/diagnóstico
16.
J Am Acad Dermatol ; 81(1): 287-296.e8, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30296541

RESUMO

Within the past 2 decades, for-profit financial groups have become increasingly involved in health care. Outlier dermatology practices with high volumes of well-reimbursed procedures are attractive to consolidation backed by private equity. With fewer choices for independent or group private practice, junior dermatologists are increasingly seeking employment without ownership in private equity-backed corporate groups whose primary fiscal responsibility lies with their investors. Medicare's response to corporatization and consolidation has already changed the practice of dermatopathology. Dermatologists should be aware of this history, given the ability of corporations and private equity groups to shape the present and future of our field.


Assuntos
Assistência à Saúde/tendências , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Formulação de Políticas , Padrões de Prática Médica/economia , Privatização/tendências , Assistência à Saúde/métodos , Feminino , Previsões , Reforma dos Serviços de Saúde , Política de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Medicare/economia , Privatização/economia , Estados Unidos
19.
Clin Dermatol ; 37(1): 21-28, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30554618

RESUMO

The Ibero Latin American College of Dermatology, CILAD, the largest dermatologic organization in the region, was established in 1948 during the course of the V International Congress of Leprosy held in Havana, Cuba. Constituted in its beginning with fewer than 100 dermatologists from nine countries, its growth has been exponential, reaching now around 4000 members spread throughout Latin America, the Iberian Peninsula, and other regions of the world. In recent years, academic activity has been intense, such as the development of several institutional programs, like its community health care program, designed for geographic areas lacking dermatologic care in the Latin American region. This contribution presents a review of its history, noting the dermatologists and personalities who ennoble the institution. The multiple areas of interest of this growing dermatologic organization are described, and the projections toward the future are discussed.


Assuntos
Dermatologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Sociedades Médicas , Mão de Obra em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Mão de Obra em Saúde/tendências , Humanos , América Latina/epidemiologia , Pesquisa/estatística & dados numéricos , Sociedades Médicas/tendências
20.
Clin Dermatol ; 37(1): 29-37, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30554619

RESUMO

Throughout history, physicians have traveled extensively to acquire new knowledge or to learn the latest therapeutic techniques from colleagues and academicians. This "wanderlust" persists in many who want to understand the world around them and learn from others, physicians or nonphysicians. Before the era of instantaneous online telecommunication, dermatologists would enhance their education by traveling abroad to learn from world-renowned experts in Europe and elsewhere and return with a treasure trove of knowledge and new skills. With the Internet, webinars, and teledermatology, the attraction for travel has diminished, mainly due to our ever-increasing demanding world of obligations; however, face-to-face interaction with colleagues of a different culture and educational background still has an inexorable educational value. To facilitate such endeavors, many insightful educators have taken the opportunity to establish several international societies and academies, where on-site educational activities can take place. Currently, a few of the more active and popular dermatologic organizations that are conducting meetings around the world are the International League of Dermatologic Societies; International Society of Dermatology; North American Clinical Dermatologic Society; International Society of Dermatologic Surgery; International Academy of Cosmetic Dermatology; and European Society of Cosmetic and Aesthetic Dermatology, all of which exemplify "travel as a teaching tool."


Assuntos
Dermatologia/educação , Dermatologia/tendências , Educação Médica Continuada/métodos , Educação Médica Continuada/tendências , Comunicação Interdisciplinar , Medicina/tendências , Viagem , Congressos como Assunto , Dermatologia/organização & administração , Humanos , Cooperação Internacional , Sociedades Médicas
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