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1.
Praxis (Bern 1994) ; 108(16): 1085-1090, 2019.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31822232

RESUMO

Inflammatory Diseases of the Vulva - a Dermatologist's Point of View Abstract. Inflammatory vulvar diseases include a variety of disorders - many of which have a chronic course with significant morbidity. Diagnosis and especially treatment can be challenging for the clinician and warrant an interdisciplinary approach. This review covers the most common non-infectious and non-malignant vulvar diseases - from a dermatological point of view. The typical clinical symptoms, clinical appearances, treatment modalities of the main non-infectious vulvar diseases are highlighted; additionally, important dermatological differential diagnoses which should not be forgotten will be mentioned.


Assuntos
Inflamação , Doenças da Vulva , Dermatologistas , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Feminino , Humanos , Vulva/patologia , Doenças da Vulva/diagnóstico
3.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 18(10): 980-984, 2019 Oct 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31584775

RESUMO

Background: The incidence of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is increasing likely due to improved detection and a growing elderly population. Although the prognosis of cSCC is excellent with complete surgical excision, many patients who go on to develop metastasis are initially classified as low-risk. The most commonly used staging systems, American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) and Brigham Women's Hospital (BWH), have low sensitivity and low positive predictive value for predicting metastasis. A gene expression profile test (cSCC-GEP) is in development to identify patients with cSCC at high risk for metastasis and death. Objective: To determine the impact of cSCC-GEP test results on management decisions made by dermatologists for cSCC patients. Design, Setting, and Participants: 402 dermatologists attending a national dermatology conference completed an online survey designed to determine the impact of cSCC-GEP test results on management decisions in a variety of clinical situations. Participants answered a series of questions related to three cSCC patient vignettes, each featuring different patient and lesion characteristics. Main Outcomes and Measures: Proportion of dermatologists who would recommend radiation, chemotherapy/immunotherapy, or sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNBx) for each patient vignette (without cSCC-GEP results, with a lower risk result, or with a higher risk result). The effect of the test results on the follow-up intervals recommended by dermatologists was also examined. Results: In the majority of vignettes, a lower risk cSCC-GEP test result led to a statistically significant decrease in the proportion of dermatologists who would recommend radiation, chemotherapy/immunotherapy, SLNBx, or quarterly follow-up. Conversely, a higher risk cSCC-GEP result significantly altered management toward increased intensity (more recommendations for radiation, chemotherapy/immunotherapy, SLNBx, or quarterly follow-up) in all vignettes. Conclusions and Relevance: The results of a cSCC-GEP test appear to significantly impact decisions made by dermatologists regarding subsequent management, SLNBx, and follow-up intervals for patients with cSCC. J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(10):980-984.


Assuntos
Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/terapia , Tomada de Decisão Clínica/métodos , Dermatologia/métodos , Perfilação da Expressão Gênica , Neoplasias Cutâneas/terapia , Adulto , Assistência ao Convalescente/métodos , Idoso , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/diagnóstico , Carcinoma de Células Escamosas/patologia , Dermatologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estadiamento de Neoplasias , Prognóstico , Medição de Risco/métodos , Neoplasias Cutâneas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Cutâneas/patologia , Inquéritos e Questionários/estatística & dados numéricos
4.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 18(10): 987-990, 2019 10 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31584776

RESUMO

Introduction: Introduction: Although future atopic dermatitis (AD) clinical research is intended to improve standard-of-care treatment, how patients are currently treated is not well characterized. The purpose of this study was to determine the most frequent medications prescribed in all ages of AD. Methods: The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) is a nationally representative survey of United States office-based ambulatory visits and records demographics, diagnoses, and treatments. This is a cross-sectional study using the NAMCS of all AD outpatient office visits from 2006 to 2015. Patient visits with an ICD-9-CM code for AD (691.8) were collected and analyzed. Frequency tables were created for age, race, providers managing AD, and treatment. Results: Patient demographics of AD visits included 51% male (95% Confidence Interval [CI]: 44-58%), 71% white (65-77%), 19% African American (14-25%), and 10% Asian (6-14%). About 31% (24-37%) of visits were to pediatricians and 27% (22-33%) to dermatologists whereas per physician, dermatologists managed more AD visits than pediatricians. Topical corticosteroids (59%; 52-66%) were the most common class of medications prescribed followed by antibiotics (11%; 6-16%) and second generation antihistamines (6%; 3-10%). The most common topical corticosteroid prescribed in AD was triamcinolone (25% of office visits; 18-31%). Hydrocortisone was the most common topical corticosteroid prescribed to children <1 year of age and children aged 8 to 18, whereas triamcinolone was more common in children 2 to 7 years and adults >18 years. Discussion: Topical corticosteroids were the most frequent prescriptions provided at office-based ambulatory visits whereas antibiotics and second-generation antihistamines were the second and third most common prescribed medications, respectively. Although pediatricians manage more AD visits than dermatologists in total visits, dermatologists manage more AD visits than pediatricians per physician. Characterizing how AD patients are currently treated may build a reference for future clinical research investigating novel standard-of-care treatment in AD. J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(10):987-990.


Assuntos
Dermatite Atópica/tratamento farmacológico , Fármacos Dermatológicos/uso terapêutico , Prescrições de Medicamentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Padrão de Cuidado/estatística & dados numéricos , Administração Cutânea , Adolescente , Adulto , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos Transversais , Dermatologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Glucocorticoides/uso terapêutico , Pesquisas sobre Serviços de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Antagonistas dos Receptores Histamínicos/uso terapêutico , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Visita a Consultório Médico/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
5.
Hautarzt ; 70(11): 875-882, 2019 Nov.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31560083

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Psoriasis, atopic eczema and urticaria are chronic inflammatory skin diseases that are often associated with an impairment of affected individuals and their families. Despite constant progress in therapy of these diseases, affected people often do not consult an office-based dermatologist. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to estimate which proportion of affected individuals with severe forms of these diseases receive treatment by an office-based dermatologist in Bavaria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All dermatologists listed in the database of the Bavarian Association of Panel Doctors (KVB; Kassenärztliche Vereinigung Bayern; n = 499) were invited to participate in a paper-based cross-sectional study. The stated number of patients by each dermatologist were set in relation with the literature-based 1­year prevalence, as well as data on population and data of the KVB. Estimations were based on three approaches (conservative, medium, and progressive estimation method). RESULTS: Overall, 137 dermatologists participated (38.7% women; mean age: 53.2 ± 8.5 years). Conservative estimation indicated that 56.5% of individuals with moderate to severe psoriasis, 57.3% of individuals with moderate to severe atopic eczema and 71.9% of those suffering from chronic spontaneous urticaria are not seen by an office-based dermatologist. CONCLUSION: Many affected individuals seem not to seek an office-based dermatologist when affected by a severe skin condition. Thus, further and more precise studies to identify, address and minimize barriers to optimal patient care are needed.


Assuntos
Dermatite Atópica , Dermatologistas , Assistência Centrada no Paciente , Dermatopatias , Urticária , Adulto , Idoso , Doença Crônica , Estudos Transversais , Dermatite Atópica/terapia , Feminino , Pesquisa sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Dermatopatias/terapia , Urticária/terapia
7.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 18(9): 904-908, 2019 Sep 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31524346

RESUMO

Dermatologists are among the most inventive physicians, trained in the multiple disciplines of medical dermatology, surgical dermatology, and dermatopathology. Many of the advances in dermatology practice have been derived from inventive colleagues who identify opportunities for improvement in practice, develop viable prototypes to address these practice opportunities, and persevere through the hard work of developing new technologies to advance the practice of dermatology. In this article, we will review the basic elements of invention, patents, and the range of outcomes associated with the pursuit of invention. Examples of innovative dermatologic technologies and approaches will be reviewed. Opportunities abound for dermatologists to contribute to the advancement of medical care through invention in our specialty. J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(9):904-908.


Assuntos
Tecnologia Biomédica/métodos , Dermatologia/métodos , Invenções/legislação & jurisprudência , Dermatopatias/terapia , Tecnologia Biomédica/legislação & jurisprudência , Fármacos Dermatológicos/uso terapêutico , Dermatologistas , Dermatologia/instrumentação , Dermatologia/legislação & jurisprudência , Desenho de Equipamento , Humanos , Patentes como Assunto , Dermatopatias/diagnóstico
8.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 18(8): 798-802, 2019 Aug 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31424710

RESUMO

Cutaneous fungal infections account for millions of office visits per year, yet their varied presentations often lead to misdiagnosis. If dermatology clinics are Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendment (CLIA) certified, direct microscopy with potassium hydroxide or other stains can be used to inexpensively and rapidly diagnose fungal infections. In this survey, we examined dermatologists' perceptions of fungal preparations and CLIA certification to identify barriers that prevent the use of these bedside diagnostics. The response rate was 13% (n=308, based on the number of emails opened). When a cutaneous fungal infection is suspected, 20.94% rarely/never and 19.86% sometimes perform fungal preparations, often because they think clinical diagnosis is adequate or that preparations take too long. 21.32% reported not having CLIA certification, most frequently because the process requires too much work, or they do not know how to apply. Of providers with CLIA certification, over 25% thought it was difficult to obtain. Our results demonstrate that numerous barriers prevent the common use of fungal preparations, including the perception that clinical diagnosis is sufficient and the lack of required CLIA certification. These barriers emphasize the need for additional education about cutaneous fungal infections and use of bedside diagnostics. Additionally, policy-based interventions are necessary to ease the process of CLIA certification.


Assuntos
Dermatomicoses/diagnóstico , Fungos/isolamento & purificação , Indicadores e Reagentes/química , Adulto , Idoso , Dermatologistas/estatística & dados numéricos , Dermatologia/métodos , Dermatologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Dermatomicoses/microbiologia , Dermatomicoses/patologia , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Feminino , Humanos , Hidróxidos/química , Masculino , Técnicas Microbiológicas/métodos , Técnicas Microbiológicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Microscopia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Visita a Consultório Médico/estatística & dados numéricos , Compostos de Potássio/química , Padrões de Prática Médica/estatística & dados numéricos , Pele/microbiologia , Pele/patologia , Inquéritos e Questionários/estatística & dados numéricos
10.
Postgrad Med ; 131(7): 445-452, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31443616

RESUMO

Given the complexity of neurocutaneous syndromes, a multidisciplinary approach has been advocated in order to provide optimum care. Subjects and Methods: Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 157 patients during a 3-year period, seen at a newly developed neurocutaneous clinic in a pediatric tertiary care hospital in Athens (Greece); and systematic chart review of the patients diagnosed with neurofibromatosis type 1 during this time period. Results: The most frequent neurocutaneous syndromes were neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in 89 patients and tuberous sclerosis complex in 17. In 20.38% of patients a neurocutaneous syndrome was not confirmed. Approximately 2/3 of the NF1 patients underwent genetic analysis, and for 76.67% of them, a pathogenic mutation on the NF1 gene was revealed. Eighty-one patients manifested with generalized NF1 and eight with mosaic NF1. Dermatological manifestations included café-au-lait macules in all patients, followed by axillary and/or inguinal freckling (n = 57), external plexiform neurofibromas (n = 17), and cutaneous and subcutaneous neurofibromas (n = 11). Approximately half of patients had learning disabilities and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, followed by mental retardation (n = 9), autistic spectrum disorders (n = 4), headaches (n = 3) and seizures (n = 2). Neuroimaging showed characteristic areas of hyperintensity on T2-weighted images in 74.07% of patients and optic pathway glioma in 19.75%. Two patients developed malignant peripheral sheath nerve tumor. Conclusions: Neurocutaneous syndromes are clinically heterogeneous and the surveillance of potential clinical complications is challenging. The availability of genetic diagnosis and novel imaging methods in this group of disorders is likely to further expand their clinical spectrum. Guidelines for assessment and management will need to be modified based on new available data.


Assuntos
Neurofibromatose 1/fisiopatologia , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Esclerose Tuberosa/fisiopatologia , Adolescente , Transtorno do Deficit de Atenção com Hiperatividade/complicações , Transtorno do Espectro Autista/complicações , Manchas Café com Leite/complicações , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Estudos de Coortes , Dermatologistas , Feminino , Genes da Neurofibromatose 1 , Testes Genéticos , Genética Médica , Grécia , Humanos , Lactente , Deficiência Intelectual/complicações , Masculino , Mosaicismo , Síndromes Neurocutâneas/genética , Síndromes Neurocutâneas/fisiopatologia , Síndromes Neurocutâneas/terapia , Neurofibroma Plexiforme/complicações , Neurofibromatose 1/complicações , Neurofibromatose 1/genética , Neurofibromatose 1/terapia , Neurologistas , Neuropsicologia , Oncologistas , Oftalmologistas , Cirurgiões Ortopédicos , Ambulatório Hospitalar , Pediatras , Radiologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/diagnóstico , Neoplasias Cutâneas/genética , Neoplasias Cutâneas/fisiopatologia , Neoplasias Cutâneas/terapia , Esclerose Tuberosa/complicações , Esclerose Tuberosa/genética , Esclerose Tuberosa/terapia
11.
Cutis ; 103(6): 329-332, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31348457

RESUMO

Recent changes to military medicine precipitated by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 are expected to result in civilian specialists playing a larger role in the care of our military population. Medical readiness and deployment eligibility should be taken into consideration when establishing a treatment plan for service members. This article highlights unique factors civilian dermatologists must consider when treating active-duty military patients with acne, atopic dermatitis (AD), psoriasis, dissecting cellulitis of the scalp (DCS), and lupus erythematosus (LE).


Assuntos
Medicina Militar , Militares , Dermatopatias/terapia , Dermatologistas/organização & administração , Humanos , Dermatopatias/fisiopatologia , Estados Unidos
12.
J Drugs Dermatol ; 18(7): 608-612, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31329380

RESUMO

Rosacea is among the most common facial skin conditions diagnosed by dermatologists. Typical clinical features include erythema, flushing, telangiectasia, papules, and pustules distributed on the central face. While the prevalence of rosacea is highest among white populations of Northern European descent, recent reports have found that rosacea frequently occurs in people from a broad range of racial/ethnic backgrounds and skin types. When rosacea presents in darker skin types, the diagnosis is often more challenging due to masking of features by increased epidermal melanin. As such, under-diagnosis and underreporting may contribute to misconceptions about the prevalence of rosacea in populations with skin of color. Recognizing the unique presentations and complications associated with darker skin types is necessary to reduce the disparities in rosacea treatment, especially as the American population continues to become increasingly heterogeneous. Although rosacea is most common in middle-aged females, patients of other demographics may have more negative impacts on quality of life due to their disease. In this article, we review rosacea management with a focus on special patient groups: people with skin of color, and less common forms of rosacea, in order to diminish the physical and psychosocial burden of rosacea in all patient groups. Due to the variability inherent to rosacea, we advocate for an individualized, patient-centered approach to disease management.


Assuntos
Dermatologia/organização & administração , Carga Global da Doença , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/métodos , Rosácea/diagnóstico , Pigmentação da Pele , Adolescente , Adulto , Idade de Início , Dermatologistas/educação , Dermatologia/educação , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/educação , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/organização & administração , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Relações Médico-Paciente , Guias de Prática Clínica como Assunto , Prevalência , Qualidade de Vida , Rosácea/epidemiologia , Rosácea/terapia , Adulto Jovem
13.
Pediatr Rheumatol Online J ; 17(1): 32, 2019 Jul 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31262324

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Childhood-onset systemic erythematosus lupus (cSLE) is characterized by more severe disease, widespread organ involvement and higher mortality compared to adult-onset SLE. However, cSLE is largely underfunded to carry out necessary research to advance the field. Few commonly used SLE medications have been studied in children, and important knowledge gaps exist concerning epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology and optimal treatments for cSLE. METHODS: In order to assess highest cSLE research priority areas, the Lupus Foundation of America (LFA) and Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) administered a cSLE research prioritization survey to pediatric rheumatologists, dermatologists and nephrologists with expertise in lupus. Members of LFA and CARRA's SLE Committee identified a list of cSLE research domains and developed a 17-item tiered, web-based survey asking respondents to categorize the research domains into high, medium, or low priority areas. For domains identified as high priority, respondents ranked research topics within that category. For example, for the domain of nephritis, respondents ranked importance of: epidemiology, biomarkers, long-term outcomes, quality improvement, etc. The survey was distributed to members of CARRA, Midwestern Pediatric Nephrology Consortium (MWPNC) and Pediatric Dermatology Research Alliance (PeDRA) Connective Tissue Disease group. RESULTS: The overall response rate was 256/752 (34%). The highest prioritized research domains were: nephritis, clinical trials, biomarkers, neuropsychiatric disease and refractory skin disease. Notably, nephritis, clinical trials and biomarkers were ranked in the top five by all groups. Within each research domain, all groups showed agreement in identifying the following as important focus areas: determining best treatments, biomarkers/pathophysiology, drug discovery/novel treatments, understanding long term outcomes, and refining provider reported quality measures. CONCLUSION: This survey identified the highest cSLE research priorities among leading rheumatology, dermatology and nephrology clinicians and investigators engaged in care of children with lupus. There is a strong need for multidisciplinary collaboration moving forward, which was indicated as highly important among stakeholders involved in the survey. These survey results should be used as a roadmap to guide funding and specific research programs in cSLE to address urgent, unmet needs among this population.


Assuntos
Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/complicações , Pesquisa , Adolescente , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Biomarcadores/metabolismo , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Comportamento Cooperativo , Fármacos Dermatológicos/uso terapêutico , Dermatologistas , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Relações Interprofissionais , Lúpus Eritematoso Sistêmico/tratamento farmacológico , Transtornos Mentais/complicações , Nefrite/complicações , Nefrologistas , Doenças do Sistema Nervoso/complicações , Neurologistas , Reumatologistas , Dermatopatias/complicações , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
BMC Res Notes ; 12(1): 364, 2019 Jun 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31253172

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Several skin aging assessment scales exist but no standard scale is widely used. Dermatologists may be the most appropriate persons for skin assessment but their perceptions regarding the signs of skin aging are unexplored. To develop a simple global skin aging assessment score from the perspective of dermatologists, an online questionnaire, the Thai Dermatologist Survey of Skin Aging Assessment, was conducted from October to December, 2016. Twenty-nine signs with published evidence of their relevancy to skin aging were included. Certified dermatologists were asked to score each sign using a 5-point Likert scale. Descriptive statistics and exploratory factor analysis (EFA) were used for data analysis. RESULTS: Of 213 randomly selected dermatologists, 145 responded to the survey. EFA revealed 3 important factors related to skin aging: Factor 1 comprised 8 signs related to atrophy (deep/superficial wrinkles, eye bags, lax appearance, etc.); Factor 2 comprised 7 signs related to discoloration (freckles, lentigines, melasma, etc.); and Factor 3 comprised 3 malignant skin lesions. The Global Subjective Skin Aging Assessment (GS2A2) score is a simple numerical score that can be used to evaluate the anti-aging effects of a cosmetic product or dermatologic intervention. This score should be tested further for validity and reliability.


Assuntos
Dermatologistas , Envelhecimento da Pele/fisiologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Inquéritos e Questionários
17.
BMC Neurol ; 19(1): 130, 2019 Jun 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31202258

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Interferon (IFN) beta drugs have been approved for the treatment of relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (RMS) for more than 20 years and are considered to offer a favourable benefit-risk profile. In July 2014, subcutaneous (SC) peginterferon beta-1a 125 µg dosed every 2 weeks, a pegylated form of interferon beta-1a, was approved by the EMA for the treatment of adult patients with RRMS and in August 2014 by the FDA for RMS. Peginterferon beta-1a shows a prolonged half-life and increased systemic drug exposure resulting in a reduced dosing frequency compared to other available interferon-based products in MS. In the Phase 3 ADVANCE trial peginterferon beta-1a demonstrated significant positive effects on clinical and MRI outcome measures versus placebo after one year. Furthermore, in the ATTAIN extension study, sustained efficacy with long-term treatment for nearly 6 years was shown. MAIN TEXT: In July 2016, an interdisciplinary panel of German and Austrian experts convened to discuss the management of side effects associated with peginterferon beta-1a and other interferon beta-based treatments in MS in daily practice. The panel was composed of experts from university hospitals and private clinics comprised of neurologists, dermatologists, and an MS nurse. In this paper we report recommendations regarding best practices for adverse event management, focussing on peginterferon beta-1a. Injection site reactions (ISRs) and influenza-like illness are the most common adverse effects of interferon beta therapies and can present a burden for MS patients leading to non-adherence and discontinuation of therapy. Peginterferon beta-1a shows improved pharmacological properties. In clinical trials, the adverse event (AE) profile of peginterferon beta-1a was similar to other interferon beta formulations. The most common AEs were mild to moderate ISRs, influenza-like illness, pyrexia, and headache. Current information on the underlying cause of skin reactions associated with SC interferon treatment, and the management strategies for these AEs are limited. In pivotal trials, ISRs were mainly characterized and classified by neurologists, while dermatologists were only rarely consulted. CONCLUSIONS: This report addresses expert recommendations on the management of most relevant adverse effects related to peginterferon beta-1a and other interferon betas, based on literature and interdisciplinary experience.


Assuntos
Imunossupressores/uso terapêutico , Interferon beta/uso terapêutico , Esclerose Múltipla Recidivante-Remitente/tratamento farmacológico , Polietilenoglicóis/uso terapêutico , Adulto , Áustria , Dermatologistas , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Masculino , Neurologistas
18.
Yakugaku Zasshi ; 139(10): 1313-1325, 2019 Oct 01.
Artigo em Japonês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31231102

RESUMO

Compared to oral medication, the base plays a large role in the external preparation for skin, and dermatologists select the dosage form based on understanding of the effect of the base as well as according to skin symptoms and conditions, application site, age, season, etc. Further, in treatment with external preparations, it is important for patients to understand the application method and continue to apply an adequate amount to achieve the treatment goal. However, there is little evidence regarding the relationship between base properties or usability and the application amount. In this study, we investigated the usability and application amount of three bases with different properties (ointment base, cream base, and lotion base) in 62 adult subjects and exploratively examined the effect of the different base properties on the application amount. The results of this clinical study showed that the usability and preference for the base used for external preparations varies, and poor usability and low preference may lead to a reduction in the application amount. Even with good usability and high preference, there were many cases in which an adequate amount was not applied due to lack of specific instructions on external use. When selecting or changing the base in an external therapy, it is important for not only dermatologists but also pharmacists providing instructions on external use to be aware of the importance of the base and actively instruct patients to apply an adequate amount of the preparation.


Assuntos
Bases para Pomadas , Sensação/fisiologia , Creme para a Pele/administração & dosagem , Fenômenos Fisiológicos da Pele , Administração Tópica , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Cross-Over , Dermatologistas , Feminino , Fricção , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Percepção , Farmacêuticos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
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