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1.
J Dent Res ; 100(1): 50-57, 2021 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32857641

RESUMO

Unemployment rates in the United States are rapidly increasing as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and attendant economic disruption. As employees lose their jobs, many will lose their employer-sponsored dental insurance (ESDI). Changes in insurance coverage are directly related to the oral health of the population, with many at risk of losing access to dental care. We assessed the impact of recent unemployment rates on insurance coverage and dental utilization. We estimated changes in dental insurance coverage at the state level, using previously applied econometric estimates. Expected changes in types of dental procedures performed at dental practices nationwide were assessed using a microsimulation model, using national practice survey data. Changes in emergency department (ED) visits for dental problems were estimated by fitting trendlines to ED visit patterns by payer type. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to assess how variations in unemployment rates and rates of ESDI in response to unemployment could alter the results. Since March 2020, the national unemployment rate has increased by 8.40 percentage points, an increase expected to result in more than 16 million individuals losing ESDI in the United States. Of these individuals, 45.0% are likely to enroll in their state's Medicaid and Children's Health Insurance Program, and 47.0% are expected to become uninsured. With these expected changes in dental insurance coverage, the average dental practice would experience decreases in routine checkup visits but increases in tooth extraction, a procedure that is highly used by publicly insured or uninsured patients. In addition, dental-related ED visits would be expected to grow by 4.0%. Losses of employment caused by the COVID-19 in the United States can have countervailing effects on people's health by impeding access to dental care. Lack of dental insurance is expected to be more pronounced in states that have not expanded Medicaid or do not provide Medicaid dental benefits for adults.


Assuntos
/economia , Cobertura do Seguro , Seguro Odontológico , Pandemias/economia , Adulto , Children's Health Insurance Program , Odontologia , Humanos , Medicaid , Pessoas sem Cobertura de Seguro de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
2.
Psychiatry Res ; 295: 113631, 2021 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33310417

RESUMO

Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, many jurisdictions, including Canada, have made use of public health measures such as COVID-19 quarantine to reduce the transmission of the virus. To examine associations between these periods of quarantine and mental health, including suicidal ideation and deliberate self-harm, we examined data from a national survey of 3000 Canadian adults distributed between May 14-29, 2020. Notably, participants provided the reason(s) for quarantine. When pooling all reasons for quarantine together, this experience was associated with higher odds of suicidal ideation and deliberate self-harm in the two weeks preceding the survey. These associations remained even after controlling for age, household income, having a pre-existing mental health condition, being unemployed due to the pandemic, and living alone. However, the associations with mental health differed across reasons for quarantine; those who were self-isolating specifically due to recent travel were not found to have higher odds of suicidal ideation or deliberate self-harm. Our research suggests the importance of accounting for the reason(s) for quarantine in the implementation of this critical public health measure to reduce the mental health impacts of this experience.


Assuntos
Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Quarentena/estatística & dados numéricos , Comportamento Autodestrutivo/epidemiologia , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Ideação Suicida , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Canadá/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino
3.
Infez Med ; 28(4): 545-550, 2020 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33257629

RESUMO

In late December 2019, the COVID-19 pandemic started to spread from Hubei province in China. Currently there are many affected countries worldwide, including Saudi Arabia. This study aimed to assess the use of social media as a source for COVID-19 awareness in Saudi Arabia. An online survey was conducted between 9 and 13 May 2020 and a total of 3,204 subjects participated in the survey. We used snowball sampling techniques through an online structured questionnaire. The data were cleaned, coded and analysed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences SPSS version 25.0. A chi-square test was used to find the associations between variables. Of all participants, 75.4% had a high level of awareness of the COVID-19 pandemic. Saudi participants above 18 years old and medical practitioners showed a high level of awareness. All participants from all regions of Saudi Arabia showed a high level of awareness except for those from the northern region. The most common source of information was the official government social media, and 44.1% reported the use of Twitter. Our findings show that social media have a positive impact on the circulation of information about the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Disseminação de Informação/métodos , Pandemias , Mídias Sociais/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Conscientização , Distribuição de Qui-Quadrado , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Médicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Arábia Saudita/epidemiologia , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
4.
N Z Med J ; 133(1526): 89-98, 2020 12 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33332343

RESUMO

Despite success with eliminating the COVID-19 pandemic in Aotearoa New Zealand (at least to early August 2020), the response to the pandemic threat has resulted in a range of negative social and economic impacts, including job losses. Understanding the health consequences of these impacts will be increasingly important in the 'recovery' phase. This article contributes to this understanding by exploring the relationship between unemployment and cardiovascular disease (CVD)-a major contributor to health loss in Aotearoa New Zealand. We reviewed the literature about the impact of unemployment on CVD. The totality of the evidence suggested that increased unemployment arising from economic shocks is associated with increased CVD incidence, particularly for middle-aged men. Continued monitoring and active policy responses are required to prevent increases in CVD (and other health outcomes) as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic response. For example, quantifying the CVD-related health loss from pandemic-associated unemployment, along with the health costs and impact on health inequalities, could help with government decision-making to reduce CVD burdens. This could be via intensifying tobacco control, regulating the food supply (eg, to reduce salt/sodium levels), and improving uptake of CVD preventive medications such as statins and anti-hypertensives.


Assuntos
/epidemiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/epidemiologia , Doenças Cardiovasculares/prevenção & controle , Política de Saúde , Pandemias , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Doenças Cardiovasculares/mortalidade , Feminino , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde , Humanos , Incidência , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Nova Zelândia/epidemiologia
6.
J Appl Psychol ; 105(12): 1397-1407, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33271028

RESUMO

In order to combat the spread of the novel coronavirus, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed a list of recommended preventative health behaviors for Americans to enact, including social distancing, frequent handwashing, and limiting nonessential trips from home. Drawing upon scarcity theory, the purpose of this study was to examine whether the economic stressors of perceived job insecurity and perceived financial insecurity are related to employee self-reports of enacting such behaviors. Moreover, we tested propositions regarding the impact of two state-level contextual variables that may moderate those relationships: the generosity of unemployment insurance benefits and extensiveness of statewide COVID-19-related restrictions. Using a multilevel data set of N = 745 currently employed U.S. workers nested within 43 states, we found that both job insecurity and financial insecurity were negatively related to the enactment of the CDC-recommended guidelines. However, the state-level variables acted as cross-level moderators, such that the negative relationship between job insecurity and compliance with the CDC guidelines was attenuated within states that have a more robust unemployment system. However, working in a state with more extensive COVID-19 restrictions seemed to primarily benefit more financially secure workers. When statewide policies were more restrictive, employees reporting more financial security were more likely to enact the CDC-recommended guidelines compared to their financially insecure counterparts. We discuss these findings in light of the continuing need to develop policies to address the public health crisis while also protecting employees facing economic stressors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
/economia , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S./legislação & jurisprudência , Serviços Preventivos de Saúde/legislação & jurisprudência , Governo Estadual , Adulto , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S./economia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pandemias , Serviços Preventivos de Saúde/economia , Serviços Preventivos de Saúde/métodos , Desemprego/psicologia , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
7.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 131, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33193946

RESUMO

Introduction: Nigeria is the most populous country in the African continent. The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors for COVID-19 prevalence and deaths in all 6 geopolitical regions and 37 States in Nigeria. Methods: we analyzed the data retrieved from various sources, including Nigeria CDC, Nigeria National Bureau of Statistics, Unicef-Nigeria multiple indicator cluster survey and the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington. We examined 4 clinical risk factors (prevalence of TB, HIV, smoking and BCG vaccination coverage) and 5 sociodemographic factors (age ≥65, population density, literacy rate, unemployment and GDP per capita). Multivariate modeling was conducted using generalized linear model. Results: our analysis showed that the incidence of confirmed COVID-19 cases differed widely across the 37 States, from 0.09 per 100,000 in Kogi to 83.7 in Lagos. However, more than 70% of confirmed cases were concentrated in just 7 States: Lagos, Abuja, Oyo, Kano, Edo, Rivers and Delta. Case mortality rate (CMR) also varied considerably, with Lagos, Abuja and Edo having CMR above 9 per million population. On bivariate analysis, higher CMR correlated positively with GDP (r=0.53) and to a lesser extent with TB (r=0.36) and population density (r=0.38). On multivariate analysis, which is more definitive, States with higher HIV prevalence and BCG coverage had lower CMR, while high GDP States had a greater CMR. Conclusion: this study indicates that COVID-19 has disproportionately affected certain States in Nigeria. Population susceptibility factors include higher economic development but not literacy or unemployment. Death rates were mildly lower in States with higher HIV prevalence and BCG vaccination coverage.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Vacina BCG , Feminino , Geografia Médica , Produto Interno Bruto/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Humanos , Alfabetização/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Nigéria/epidemiologia , Densidade Demográfica , Prevalência , Utilização de Procedimentos e Técnicas , Fatores de Risco , Fumar/epidemiologia , Determinantes Sociais da Saúde , Tuberculose/epidemiologia , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Vacinação/estatística & dados numéricos
8.
PLoS One ; 15(11): e0240683, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33232365

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Lead is a common environmental hazard because of its past use as an additive to gasoline and household paint. Some evidence suggests that children with histories of child abuse and neglect are at elevated risk for residence in communities and households with less desirable characteristics and high levels of exposure to environmental hazards and toxins. OBJECTIVES: To understand whether childhood maltreatment leads to higher levels of household dust lead and blood lead in adulthood and the extent to which characteristics of a person's physical environment or individual level socio-economic status (SES) (based on unemployment, poverty, and receipt of public assistance) contribute to understanding the relationship. METHODS: A large prospective cohort design study in which abused and neglected children (ages 0-11) were matched with non-maltreated children and assessed in adulthood. Objective and subjective neighborhood characteristics were assessed at approximate age 40 and household dust lead (cleaned and less often cleaned) and blood lead levels were measured at age 41. Blood was collected through venipuncture by a registered nurse as part of a medical status exam. RESULTS: Childhood maltreatment predicted higher levels of dust lead in less often cleaned household places, residence in worse neighborhoods defined by objective (census tract data) and subjective (reports of physical disorder and lack of social cohesion and control), and higher levels of poverty, receiving public assistance, and unemployment. Only objective neighborhood characteristics mediated the relationship between childhood maltreatment and dust lead level in adulthood. There were also significant paths from objective neighborhood disadvantage and individual level SES to higher levels of blood lead. DISCUSSION: Thirty years after their childhood experiences, individuals with documented histories of childhood maltreatment are at higher risk for living in environments as adults with elevated lead levels that may impact other aspects of their lives and compromise their health.


Assuntos
Sobreviventes Adultos de Maus-Tratos Infantis/estatística & dados numéricos , Chumbo/sangue , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Sobreviventes Adultos de Maus-Tratos Infantis/psicologia , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Chumbo/toxicidade , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Características de Residência , Fatores de Risco
9.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0240065, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33017439

RESUMO

Ever since the grey system theory was proposed about 40 years ago, its characteristics such as small samples, few data, and uncertainty have been used for study in the literature with increasingly wider scope. Recent studies on grey relation analysis have included static data analyses, and most of them have adopted initial values with only a relational order. Under the same study conditions, if different data preprocessing methods are used, then the relational order will be ranked differently. This study took Taiwan as the object to explore seven economic indices (birth rate (%), Taiwan's total population (thousand people), unemployment rate (%), income per capita (USD), weighted average interest rate on deposits (%), Consumer Price Index (CPI), and national income (NI)) and how they affect the economic growth rate. The traditional static grey relational analysis treated the collected data with taking consideration of time effect which is irrational under some circumstance. An innovative dynamic grey relational analysis was carried out by shifting the raw data due to the time leading or lagging effect which is a mean to improve the capability of traditional grey relational analysis. The differences in analyses between static grey relational analysis and dynamic grey relational analysis via different data preprocessing methods were further discussed, finding that different data preprocessing methods generated a new set of relational orders through the latter. Finally, the prosperity index was used to identify the effects of all factors on economic growth (leading, synchronization, and lagging indices).


Assuntos
Desenvolvimento Econômico/estatística & dados numéricos , Coeficiente de Natalidade/tendências , Modelos Econômicos , Projetos de Pesquisa , Taiwan , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos
11.
Cien Saude Colet ; 25(suppl 2): 4169-4176, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Português, Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33027353

RESUMO

The objective of this study is to show the impact of the early death of the elderly, especially those who are financially responsible for families, on the income of other family members. It is considered to be premature, because death occurs at an age where life expectancy is positive and different from zero. The concern arises from the finding that 74.7% of the deaths recorded by Covid-19 until 8/13/2020 occurred in individuals aged 60 years or older, of which 56.4% were men. For example, at age 60 a male individual could still expect to live another 18.1 years, given the health conditions prevailing in 2018.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/mortalidade , Características da Família , Renda , Mortalidade Prematura , Pneumonia Viral/mortalidade , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Brasil/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
14.
Pediatrics ; 146(4)2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32943535

RESUMO

Potential long-lasting adverse effects of child maltreatment have been widely reported, although little is known about the distinctive long-term impact of differing types of maltreatment. Our objective for this special article is to integrate findings from the Mater-University of Queensland Study of Pregnancy, a longitudinal prenatal cohort study spanning 2 decades. We compare and contrast the associations of specific types of maltreatment with long-term cognitive, psychological, addiction, sexual health, and physical health outcomes assessed in up to 5200 offspring at 14 and/or 21 years of age. Overall, psychological maltreatment (emotional abuse and/or neglect) was associated with the greatest number of adverse outcomes in almost all areas of assessment. Sexual abuse was associated with early sexual debut and youth pregnancy, attention problems, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, and depression, although associations were not specific for sexual abuse. Physical abuse was associated with externalizing behavior problems, delinquency, and drug abuse. Neglect, but not emotional abuse, was associated with having multiple sexual partners, cannabis abuse and/or dependence, and experiencing visual hallucinations. Emotional abuse, but not neglect, revealed increased odds for psychosis, injecting-drug use, experiencing harassment later in life, pregnancy miscarriage, and reporting asthma symptoms. Significant cognitive delays and educational failure were seen for both abuse and neglect during adolescence and adulthood. In conclusion, child maltreatment, particularly emotional abuse and neglect, is associated with a wide range of long-term adverse health and developmental outcomes. A renewed focus on prevention and early intervention strategies, especially related to psychological maltreatment, will be required to address these challenges in the future.


Assuntos
Maus-Tratos Infantis/psicologia , Maus-Tratos Infantis/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Comportamento do Adolescente , Asma/epidemiologia , Transtornos de Deficit da Atenção e do Comportamento Disruptivo/epidemiologia , Austrália/epidemiologia , Estatura , Criança , Cognição , Estudos de Coortes , Gorduras na Dieta/administração & dosagem , Escolaridade , Feminino , Humanos , Inteligência , Estudos Longitudinais , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Gravidez , Gravidez na Adolescência/estatística & dados numéricos , Qualidade de Vida , Comportamento Sexual , Transtornos do Sono-Vigília/epidemiologia , Evasão Escolar/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
15.
PLoS One ; 15(9): e0238348, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32936820

RESUMO

We examined family isolation, economic hardship, and long-distance migration as potential patterns of an extreme outcome of a lonely death: bodily remains that remain unclaimed and are left to the state. This paper combines a unique dataset-Los Angeles County's records of unclaimed deaths-with the Vital Statistics' Mortality data and the Annual Social and Economic Survey (ASEC) to examine 1) whose remains are more likely to become unclaimed after death and, 2) whether population-level differences and trends in family isolation, economic hardship, and long-distance migration explain the differences in the rates of unclaimed deaths. We employ multivariate Poisson models to estimate relative rates of unclaimed deaths by social and demographic characteristics. We find that increases in never married, divorced/separated, and living without family were positively associated with rates of unclaimed deaths. Unemployment among men and poverty among women was associated with higher unclaimed deaths. Long-distance migration was not associated with more unclaimed bodies.


Assuntos
Causas de Morte , Solidão/psicologia , Estado Civil/estatística & dados numéricos , Pobreza , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
16.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(9): e2015470, 2020 09 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32876682

RESUMO

Importance: Home health care is one of the fastest growing postacute services in the US and is increasingly important in the era of coronavirus disease 2019 and payment reform, yet it is unknown whether patients who need home health care are receiving it. Objective: To examine how often patients referred to home health care at hospital discharge receive it and whether there is evidence of disparities. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cross-sectional study used Medicare data regarding the postacute home health care setting from October 1, 2015, through September 30, 2016. The participants were Medicare fee-for-service and Medicare Advantage beneficiaries who were discharged alive from a hospital with a referral to home health care (2 379 506 discharges). Statistical analysis was performed from July 2019 to June 2020. Exposures: Hospital referral to home health care. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes included whether discharges received their first home health care visit within 14 days of hospital discharge and the number of days between hospital discharge and the first home health visit. Differences in the likelihood of receiving home health care across patient, zip code, and hospital characteristics were also examined. Results: Among 2 379 506 discharges from the hospital with a home health care referral, 1 358 697 patients (57.1%) were female, 468 762 (19.7%) were non-White, and 466 383 (19.6%) were dually enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid; patients had a mean (SD) age of 73.9 (11.9) years and 4.1 (2.1) Elixhauser comorbidities. Only 1 284 300 patients (54.0%) discharged from the hospital with a home health referral received home health care services within 14 days of discharge. Of the remaining 1 095 206 patients (46.0%) discharged, 37.7% (896 660 discharges) never received any home health care, while 8.3% (198 546 discharges) were institutionalized or died within 14 days without a preceding home health care visit. Patients who were Black or Hispanic received home health at lower rates than did patients who were White (48.0% [95% CI, 47.8%-48.1%] of Black and 46.1% [95% CI, 45.7%-46.5%] of Hispanic discharges received home health within 14 days compared with 55.3% [95% CI, 55.2%-55.4%] of White discharges). In addition, disadvantaged patients waited longer for their first home health care visit. For example, patients living in high-unemployment zip codes waited a mean of 2.0 days (95% CI, 2.0-2.0 days), whereas those living in low-unemployment zip codes waited 1.8 days (95% CI, 1.8-1.8 days). Conclusions and Relevance: Disparities in the use of home health care remain an issue in the US. As home health care is increasingly presented as a safer alternative to institutional postacute care during coronavirus disease 2019, and payment reforms continue to pressure hospitals to discharge patients home, ensuring the availability of safe and equitable care will be crucial to maintaining high-quality care.


Assuntos
Assistência ao Convalescente/estatística & dados numéricos , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/etnologia , Serviços de Assistência Domiciliar/estatística & dados numéricos , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Estudos Transversais , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Planos de Pagamento por Serviço Prestado , Feminino , Disparidades em Assistência à Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Masculino , Medicaid/estatística & dados numéricos , Medicare , Medicare Part C , Alta do Paciente , Pobreza/estatística & dados numéricos , Características de Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
17.
J Affect Disord ; 277: 540-548, 2020 12 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32889378

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health and emotional support among the general population are unclear. We therefore assessed if the prevalence of high Anxiety and Depression Symptoms (ADS) levels and lack of Emotional Support (ES) increased, and if risk factors of ADS and ES changed. METHODS: Data was extracted from surveys conducted with the Dutch longitudinal population-based LISS panel (N = 3,983). ADS and ES were assessed in March 2019 and 2020. Risk factors for ADS and ES were extracted from surveys in November 2018 and 2019. These were: ADS, gender, education, domestic situation, employment, age, ethnicity, lung and heart problems, and diabetes. RESULTS: The prevalence of high ADS levels and lack of ES did not increase compared to the pre-outbreak prevalence. ADS, non-native ethnic background, (partial) work disabilities and lung problems were predictive of both ADS and lack of ES in March 2019 and 2020. Job seekers, students and those who take care of housekeeping were more at risk for ADS in March 2020, but not in 2019. While 35-49 years old respondents were less at risk for ADS in March 2019, they were more at risk in 2020. Parents with child(ren) at home and those who take care of housekeeping more often lacked ES in March 2020, but not in 2019. LIMITATIONS: No other mental health problems were assessed. CONCLUSIONS: No increase in the prevalence of ADS and lack of ES was found. Some risk factors remained significant after the outbreak, while others changed notably.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus , Depressão/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Apoio Social , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Ansiedade/psicologia , Betacoronavirus , Depressão/psicologia , Feminino , Serviço de Limpeza , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Países Baixos/epidemiologia , Pais , Prevalência , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Estudantes/psicologia , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
20.
J Pastoral Care Counsel ; 74(3): 196-202, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32967549

RESUMO

Profanity, derived from the Latin for "not sacred," has long been seen as antithetical to spirituality. Social norms around organized religion, respectability, race, gender, etc. compound this perception. In this article, I examine how the use of profanity in Clinical Pastoral Education can help students experience personal, social, and physical freedom. Association of Clinical Pastoral Education outcomes, demographic data, and a student experience provide support for this assertion.


Assuntos
Idioma , Assistência Religiosa/educação , Afro-Americanos/psicologia , Afro-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/psicologia , Homicídio/psicologia , Homicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/psicologia , Racismo/psicologia , Racismo/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/psicologia , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
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