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2.
J Occup Health Psychol ; 26(4): 261-275, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34292019

RESUMO

The coronavirus pandemic resulted in national lockdown orders, followed by employment changes to reduce labor costs. We assess how health varied for hospitality workers due to the lockdown (i.e., comparing health a month before to a month after), employment change (i.e., comparing those with loss vs. no change), and employee response (i.e., more job threat vs. more personal recovery). Comparing pre- and post-lockdown surveys of 137 U.S. and U.K. hospitality employees, psychological health (i.e., negative and positive affect) worsened but physical health (i.e., symptoms and sleep) improved. We proposed those facing work loss (66% had reduced hours, furloughs, or layoffs) had more job threat but also more personal recovery (i.e., relaxation, mastery, exercise), resulting in opposing pathways to health. Results from a path analysis showed that work loss indirectly linked to higher psychological distress due to job threat, but to lower distress and fewer physical symptoms due to relaxation. Regardless of work loss, mastery (e.g., hobbies) was related to immediate changes in positive affect and sleep, while exercise did not have short-term health benefits. Further, recovery benefits from work loss were short-lived; only job threat carried the effect to psychological distress 2 months later. We offer quotes from the hospitality workers to contextualize the blessing and curse of work loss during the lockdown for these particularly vulnerable employees. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis , Nível de Saúde , Desemprego/psicologia , Adulto , Afeto , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estresse Ocupacional/epidemiologia , Estresse Ocupacional/etiologia , Sono , Reino Unido/epidemiologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
3.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255050, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34324522

RESUMO

AIMS: The present study aimed to investigate whether the psychological impact of the COVID-19 crisis varied with regards to young Swiss men's pre-crisis level of education and socioeconomic status and to changes in their work situation due to it. METHODS: A cohort of 2345 young Swiss men (from 21 out of 26 Swiss cantons; mean age = 29) completed survey-based assessments shortly before (April 2019 to February 2020) and early on during the COVID-19 crisis (May to June 2020). Outcomes measured were psychological outcomes before and during the COVID-19 crisis (depression, perceived stress and sleep quality), and the fear, isolation and psychological trauma induced by it. We investigated associations between these outcomes and their predictors: pre-crisis socioeconomic status (relative financial status, difficulty paying bills, level of education), changes in work situation during the crisis (job loss, partial unemployment, working from home, change in workload) and working in contact with potentially infected people, both inside and outside the healthcare sector. For outcomes measured before and during the crisis, the analyses were adjusted for their pre-crisis levels. RESULTS: About 21% of participants changed their employment status (job loss, partial unemployment or lost money if self-employed) and more than 40% worked predominantly from home during the COVID-19 crisis. Participants with a lower relative socioeconomic status already before the crisis experienced a higher psychological impact due to the COVID-19 crisis, compared to participants with an average socioeconomic status (major depression (b = 0.12 [0.03, 0.22]), perceived stress (b = 0.15 [0.05, 0.25]), psychological trauma (b = 0.15 [0.04, 0.26]), fear (b = 0.20 [0.10, 0.30]) and isolation (b = 0.19 [0.08, 0.29])). A higher impact was also felt by participants who lost their job due to the COVID-19 crisis, the partially unemployed, those with an increased workload or those who worked mainly from home (e.g. depression b = 0.25 [0.16, 0.34] for those working 90%+ at home, compared to those not working at home). CONCLUSIONS: Even in a country like Switzerland, with relatively high social security benefits and universal healthcare, the COVID-19 crisis had a considerable psychological impact, especially among those with a lower socioeconomic status and those who experienced deteriorations in their work situation due to the COVID-19 crisis. Supporting these populations during the crisis may help to prevent an amplification of inequalities in mental health and social status. Such support could help to lower the overall impact of the crisis on the mental well-being of Switzerland's population.


Assuntos
COVID-19/psicologia , Homens/psicologia , Adulto , Estudos de Coortes , Depressão/psicologia , Emprego/psicologia , Medo/psicologia , Humanos , Masculino , Saúde Mental , Classe Social , Estresse Psicológico/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Suíça , Desemprego/psicologia
5.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 36(6): 641-647, 2021 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34114185

RESUMO

Previous studies have found an association between recessions and increased rates of suicide. In the present study we widened the focus to examine the association between economic uncertainty and suicides. We used monthly suicide data from the US at the State level from 2000 to 2017 and combined them with the monthly economic uncertainty index. We followed a panel data econometric approach to study the association between economic uncertainty and suicide, controlling for unemployment and other indicators. Economic uncertainty is positively associated with suicide when controlling for unemployment [coeff: 8.026; 95% CI: 3.692-12.360] or for a wider range of economic and demographic characteristics [coeff: 7.478; 95% CI: 3.333-11.623]. An increase in the uncertainty index by one percent is associated with an additional 11-24.4 additional monthly suicides in the US. Economic uncertainty is likely to act as a trigger, which underlines the impulsive nature of some suicides. This highlights the importance of providing access to suicide prevention interventions (e.g. hotlines) during periods of economic uncertainty.


Assuntos
Recessão Econômica/estatística & dados numéricos , Suicídio/economia , Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Incerteza , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Modelos Econométricos , Suicídio/psicologia , Desemprego/psicologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
Midwifery ; 99: 103013, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33957520

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of the mental health of pregnant women during the early and peak stages of the Covid-19 outbreak DESIGN: Online survey PARTICIPANTS: Pregnant women over the age of 18 years with no mental disorder during the pre-pregnancy period (N = 729). MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS: Mental disorders were assessed using the "Depression Anxiety Stress Scale" and social support was determined using the "Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale." Pregnant women had moderate levels of anxiety and depression and mild levels of stress. Anxiety, depression, and stress of moderate or high severity was reported in 62.2%, 44.6%, and 32.2% of the women, respectively. Pregnant women who lost their jobs during the pandemic period showed a 3-fold increase in the risk of anxiety, a 6-fold increase in the risk of depression, and a 4.8-fold increase in the risk of stress. An increase in the perception of social support has protective effects against all three mental disorders during pregnancy. In pregnant women with at least one obstetric risk, the risk of antenatal anxiety is 2 times higher than that in women with no risk. Similarly, women with a chronic physical illness before pregnancy have a higher risk of anxiety during pregnancy than healthy women. Financial strain has predictive value for anxiety and depression, and advanced age is a predictor for depression. KEY CONCLUSIONS: The incidence of mental disorders in pregnant women during the pandemic period was much higher than that during the pre-pandemic period. The high frequency of antenatal mental disorders can lead to an increase in the frequency of obstetric and maternal complications in the short and long term. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Early detection of inadequate social support and economic difficulties of pregnant women during the pandemic period is recommended for protecting their mental health. Pregnant women should have easy access to psychosocial support, and they should be provided obstetric counseling during the pandemic conditions.


Assuntos
Ansiedade , COVID-19 , Depressão , Complicações na Gravidez , Estresse Psicológico , Desemprego/psicologia , Adulto , Ansiedade/diagnóstico , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , Ansiedade/prevenção & controle , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/psicologia , Depressão/diagnóstico , Depressão/epidemiologia , Depressão/prevenção & controle , Feminino , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Saúde Materna , Saúde Mental/tendências , Gravidez , Complicações na Gravidez/diagnóstico , Complicações na Gravidez/epidemiologia , Complicações na Gravidez/prevenção & controle , Complicações na Gravidez/psicologia , Cuidado Pré-Natal/métodos , Cuidado Pré-Natal/estatística & dados numéricos , SARS-CoV-2 , Apoio Social , Estresse Psicológico/diagnóstico , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Estresse Psicológico/prevenção & controle , Turquia/epidemiologia
7.
J Appl Psychol ; 106(4): 518-529, 2021 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34014707

RESUMO

The purpose of this article is to simultaneously advance theory and practice by understanding how the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic relates to new hire engagement. Prior research suggests starting a new job is an uncertain experience; we theorize that the COVID-19 pandemic creates additional environmental stressors that affect new hire engagement. First, we hypothesize that the occurrence of COVID-19 and unemployment rates relate negatively to engagement. Second, we theorize that the effects of the pandemic become more disruptive on new hire engagement as they gain tenure within the organization. Third, drawing from strategic management theory, we test whether States that introduce stronger COVID-19 policies help enhance the engagement of new hires. Examining a U.S. national sample of 12,577 newly hired (90 days or less) quick service restaurant employees across 9 months (January-September, 2020), we find support for these hypotheses. Subsequent model comparisons suggest there may be health stressors that shape engagement more strongly than purely economic stressors. These findings may be important because they highlight the experiences of workers more likely to be exposed to the pandemic and affected by COVID-related policies. Should the results generalize to other samples and jobs, this study offers potentially new research directions for understanding relationships between macro stressors and new hire perceptions and socialization. It also offers practical implications by helping organizations understand the importance of explicitly managing job insecurity, particularly in terms of COVID-19 policy. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Assuntos
COVID-19/psicologia , Pandemias/legislação & jurisprudência , Governo Estadual , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Engajamento no Trabalho , Local de Trabalho/legislação & jurisprudência , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Seleção de Pessoal/estatística & dados numéricos , SARS-CoV-2 , Fatores de Tempo , Desemprego/psicologia , Estados Unidos , Adulto Jovem
8.
New Solut ; 31(2): 107-112, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34000888

RESUMO

The global political economy is generating new forms and growing shares of informal, insecure, and precarious labor, adding to histories of insecure work and an externalization of social costs. The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the consequences of ignoring such signals in terms of the increased risk and vulnerability of insecure labor. This paper explores how such trends are generating intersecting adverse health outcomes for workers, communities, and environments and the implications for breaking siloes and building links between the paradigms, science, practice, and tools for occupational health, public health, and eco-health. Applying the principle of controlling hazards at the source is argued in this context to call for an understanding of the upstream production and socio-political factors that are jointly affecting the nature of work and employment and their impact on the health of workers, the public, and the planet.


Assuntos
Emprego , Saúde do Trabalhador/tendências , Adolescente , África Oriental , África Austral , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Emprego/psicologia , Emprego/normas , Emprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Política , Saúde Pública , Desemprego/psicologia , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Local de Trabalho/psicologia , Local de Trabalho/normas , Adulto Jovem
9.
Med J Aust ; 214(10): 462-468, 2021 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33899939

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To estimate initial levels of symptoms of depression and anxiety, and their changes during the early months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia; to identify trajectories of symptoms of depression and anxiety; to identify factors associated with these trajectories. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: Longitudinal cohort study; seven fortnightly online surveys of a representative sample of 1296 Australian adults from the beginning of COVID-19-related restrictions in late March 2020 to mid-June 2020. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Symptoms of depression and anxiety, measured with the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) depression and Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scales; trajectories of symptom change. RESULTS: Younger age, being female, greater COVID-19-related work and social impairment, COVID-19-related financial distress, having a neurological or mental illness diagnosis, and recent adversity were each significantly associated with higher baseline depression and anxiety scores. Growth mixture models identified three latent trajectories for depression symptoms (low throughout the study, 81% of participants; moderate throughout the study, 10%; initially severe then declining, 9%) and four for anxiety symptoms (low throughout the study, 77%; initially moderate then increasing, 10%; initially moderate then declining, 5%; initially mild then increasing before again declining, 8%). Factors statistically associated with not having a low symptom trajectory included mental disorder diagnoses, COVID-19-related financial distress and social and work impairment, and bushfire exposure. CONCLUSION: Our longitudinal data enabled identification of distinct symptom trajectories during the first three months of the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia. Early intervention to ensure that vulnerable people are clinically and socially supported during a pandemic should be a priority.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Adolescente , Adulto , Ansiedade/diagnóstico , Austrália/epidemiologia , Depressão/diagnóstico , Feminino , Estresse Financeiro/psicologia , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , SARS-CoV-2 , Isolamento Social/psicologia , Teletrabalho , Desemprego/psicologia , Adulto Jovem
10.
Adm Policy Ment Health ; 48(3): 388-392, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33791925

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused massive unemployment, exacerbated pre-existing behavioral health (mental health and substance use) disorders for many people, and created new disorders for others. Although policy changes have increased health care and unemployment benefits, most people want jobs and self-sufficiency rather than handouts. A robust evidence base shows that supported employment can enable unemployed people with behavioral health conditions to find competitive, integrated employment and behavioral health supports. Millions of U.S. citizens may need these services as the pandemic recedes and jobs become available. Government attention to supported employment is necessary now more than ever.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Readaptação ao Emprego/organização & administração , Saúde Mental , Desemprego/psicologia , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
11.
J Occup Rehabil ; 31(3): 455-462, 2021 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33656699

RESUMO

Purpose To determine if losing work during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with mental and physical health status. To determine if social interactions and financial resources moderate the relationship between work loss and health. Methods Participants were Australians aged 18 + years that were employed in paid work prior to the COVID-19 pandemic who responded to an online or telephone survey from 27th March to 12th June 2020 as part of a prospective longitudinal cohort study. Outcome measures include Kessler-6 score > 18 indicating high psychological distress, and Short Form 12 (SF-12) mental health or physical health component score < = 45 indicating poor mental or physical health. Results The cohort consisted of 2,603 respondents, including groups who had lost their job (N = 541), were not working but remained employed (N = 613), were working less (N = 660), and whose work was unaffected (N = 789). Three groups experiencing work loss had greater odds of high psychological distress (AOR = 2.22-3.66), poor mental (AOR = 1.78-2.27) and physical health (AOR = 2.10-2.12) than the unaffected work group. Poor mental health was more common than poor physical health. The odds of high psychological distress (AOR = 5.43-8.36), poor mental (AOR = 1.92-4.53) and physical health (AOR = 1.93-3.90) were increased in those reporting fewer social interactions or less financial resources. Conclusion Losing work during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with mental and physical health problems, and this relationship is moderated by social interactions and financial resources. Responses that increase financial security and enhance social connections may alleviate the health impacts of work loss. Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12620000857909.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Nível de Saúde , Saúde Mental , Pandemias , Desemprego/psicologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Austrália/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Prospectivos , Adulto Jovem
12.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249352, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33784339

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Existing literature on how employment loss affects depression has struggled to address potential endogeneity bias caused by reverse causality. The COVID-19 pandemic offers a unique natural experiment because the source of unemployment is very likely to be exogenous to the individual. This study assessed the effect of job loss and job furlough on the mental health of individuals in South Africa during the COVID-19 pandemic. DATA AND METHODS: The data for the study came from the first and second waves of the national survey, the National Income Dynamics-Coronavirus Rapid Mobile Survey (NIDS-CRAM), conducted during May-June and July-August 2020, respectively. The sample for NIDS-CRAM was drawn from an earlier national survey, conducted in 2017, which had collected data on mental health. Questions on depressive symptoms during the lockdown were asked in Wave 2 of NIDS-CRAM, using a 2-question version of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2). The PHQ-2 responses (0-6 on the discrete scale) were regrouped into four categories making the ordered logit regression model the most suited for assessing the impact of employment status on depressive symptoms. RESULTS: The study revealed that adults who retained paid employment during the COVID-19 lockdown had significantly lower depression scores than adults who lost employment. The benefits of employment also accumulated over time, underscoring the effect of unemployment duration on mental health. The analysis revealed no mental health benefits to being furloughed (on unpaid leave), but paid leave had a strong and significant positive effect on the mental health of adults. CONCLUSIONS: The economic fallout of the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in unprecedented job losses, which impaired mental wellbeing significantly. Health policy responses to the crisis therefore need to focus on both physical and mental health interventions.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/psicologia , Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Depressão/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , África do Sul/epidemiologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Desemprego/psicologia , Adulto Jovem
13.
Eur Psychiatry ; 64(1): e18, 2021 02 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33686933

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a major threat to the public. However, the comprehensive profile of suicidal ideation among the general population has not been systematically investigated in a large sample in the age of COVID-19. METHODS: A national online cross-sectional survey was conducted between February 28, 2020 and March 11, 2020 in a representative sample of Chinese adults aged 18 years and older. Suicidal ideation was assessed using item 9 of the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The prevalence of suicidal ideation and its risk factors was evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 56,679 participants (27,149 males and 29,530 females) were included. The overall prevalence of suicidal ideation was 16.4%, including 10.9% seldom, 4.1% often, and 1.4% always suicidal ideation. The prevalence of suicidal ideation was higher in males (19.1%) and individuals aged 18-24 years (24.7%) than in females (14.0%) and those aged 45 years and older (11.9%). Suicidal ideation was more prevalent in individuals with suspected or confirmed infection (63.0%), frontline workers (19.2%), and people with pre-existing mental disorders (41.6%). Experience of quarantine, unemployed, and increased psychological stress during the pandemic were associated with an increased risk of suicidal ideation and its severity. However, paying more attention to and gaining a better understanding of COVID-19-related knowledge, especially information about psychological interventions, could reduce the risk. CONCLUSIONS: The estimated prevalence of suicidal ideation among the general population in China during COVID-19 was significant. The findings will be important for improving suicide prevention strategies during COVID-19.


Assuntos
COVID-19/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Ideação Suicida , Adolescente , Adulto , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Prevalência , Quarentena/psicologia , Quarentena/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Risco , SARS-CoV-2 , Estresse Psicológico/epidemiologia , Suicídio/prevenção & controle , Suicídio/psicologia , Suicídio/estatística & dados numéricos , Desemprego/psicologia , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
14.
Infez Med ; 29(1): 54-64, 2021 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33664173

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to explore the psychological impact of the initial stage of the 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on people living with HIV (PLWH), a population at increased risk of psychological distress. PLWH participated in an online survey exploring demographic and clinical data, physical symptoms, contact history, knowledge and concerns, precautionary measures and additional information about COVID-19 during the first phase of the pandemic in Italy. The Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) (identifying the COVID-19 pandemic as a specific traumatic life event) and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) also formed part of the survey. Out of 98 participants, 45% revealed from mild to severe psychological impact from COVID-19 according to IES-R. A lower percentage, instead, complained of significant levels of depression (14%), anxiety (11%) or stress (6%) according to DASS-21. Higher education, being unemployed, number of perceived COVID-19 physical symptoms, concerns about risk of contracting COVID-19 and the pandemic situation in Italy, and needing additional information to prevent COVID-19 infection were positively associated to a higher risk of negative psychological impact. Moreover, among the participants, female gender, age, fewer years from HIV diagnosis and not being aware of their own viremia were associated to a higher risk of negative psychological outcomes. Almost half of our PLWH sample experienced significant levels of distress related to the COVID-19 pandemic. Women, elderly patients and those with recent HIV diagnosis appear to be the more psychologically fragile subgroups. Our findings could help identify patients most in need of psychological interventions to improve the wellbeing of PLWH.


Assuntos
COVID-19/psicologia , Infecções por HIV/psicologia , Pandemias , Angústia Psicológica , SARS-CoV-2 , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Idoso , Ansiedade/epidemiologia , COVID-19/complicações , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Estudos Transversais , Depressão/epidemiologia , Escolaridade , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos , Humanos , Itália/epidemiologia , Acontecimentos que Mudam a Vida , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores Sexuais , Desemprego/psicologia
16.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 607, 2021 03 29.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33781232

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To explore the association between food insecurity and mental health outcomes among low-income Americans during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a survey of 2714 low-income respondents nationwide from June 29, 2020 to July 21, 2020. A proportional odds logit model was employed to estimate the associations between food insecurity and anxiety and between food insecurity and depression. RESULTS: Food insecurity is associated with a 257% higher risk of anxiety and a 253% higher risk of depression. Losing a job during the pandemic is associated with a 32% increase in risk for anxiety and a 27% increase in risk for depression. CONCLUSIONS: Food insecurity caused by the pandemic was associated with increased risk of mental illness. The relative risk of mental illness from being food insecure is almost three-fold that of losing a job during the pandemic. Public health measures should focus on getting direct subsidies of food purchases to poor families, especially families with children. They should also reduce the stigma and shame that is associated with accepting charitable foods.


Assuntos
Depressão/epidemiologia , Insegurança Alimentar , Abastecimento de Alimentos/estatística & dados numéricos , Saúde Mental , Pandemias , Desemprego/psicologia , Adulto , COVID-19/epidemiologia , Criança , Depressão/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Quarentena , SARS-CoV-2 , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
17.
Front Public Health ; 9: 630620, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33692982

RESUMO

The outbreak of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) ineluctably caused social distancing and unemployment, which may bring additional health risks for patients with cancer. To investigate the association of the pandemic-related impacts with the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with melanoma during the COVID-19 pandemic, we conducted a cross-sectional study among Chinese patients with melanoma. A self-administered online questionnaire was distributed to melanoma patients through social media. Demographic and clinical data, and pandemic-related impacts (unemployment and income loss) were collected. HRQoL was determined by the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) and its disease-specific module (the melanoma subscale, MS). A total of 135 patients with melanoma completed the study. The mean age of the patients was 55.8 ± 14.2 years, 48.1% (65/135) were male, and 17.04% (34/135) were unemployed since the epidemic. Unemployment of the patients and their family members and income loss were significantly associated with a lower FACT-G score, while the MS score was associated with the unemployment of the patients' family members. Our findings suggested that unemployment is associated with impaired HRQoL in melanoma patients during the COVID-19 epidemic.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/psicologia , COVID-19/economia , COVID-19/psicologia , Melanoma/economia , Melanoma/psicologia , Qualidade de Vida/psicologia , Desemprego/psicologia , Adulto , Idoso , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/estatística & dados numéricos , COVID-19/epidemiologia , China/epidemiologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Melanoma/epidemiologia , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos
18.
J Ment Health Policy Econ ; 24(1): 31-41, 2021 Mar 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33739934

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Unemployment is associated with a high risk of experiencing mental illness. This can lead to stigmatisation, reduced quality of life, and long-term costs like increased healthcare expenditure and productivity losses for society as a whole. Previous research indicates evidence for an association between unemployment and higher mental health service costs, but there is insufficient information available for the German healthcare system. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study aims to identify costs and cost drivers for health and social service use among unemployed people with mental health problems in Germany. METHODS: A sample of 270 persons participated at baseline and six-month-follow-up. Healthcare and social service use was assessed using the Client Socio-Demographic and Service Receipt Inventory. Descriptive cost analysis was performed. Associations between costs and potential cost drivers were tested using structural equation modelling. RESULTS: Direct mean costs for 12 months range from EUR 1265.13 (somatic costs) to EUR 2206.38 (psychiatric costs) to EUR 3020.70 (total costs) per person. Path coefficients indicate direct positive effects from the latent variable mental health burden (MHB) on stigma stress, somatic symptoms, and sick leave. DISCUSSION: The hypothesis that unemployed people with mental health problems seek help for somatic symptoms rather than psychiatric symptoms was not supported. Associations between MHB and costs strongly mediated by sick leave indicate a central function of healthcare provision as being confirmation of the inability to work. IMPLICATIONS FOR HEALTH POLICIES: Targeted interventions to ensure early help-seeking and reduce stigma remain of key importance in reducing long-term societal costs. IMPLICATIONS FOR FURTHER RESEARCH: Future research should explore attitudes regarding effective treatment for the target group.


Assuntos
Custos de Cuidados de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Transtornos Mentais/economia , Transtornos Mentais/terapia , Serviços de Saúde Mental/economia , Licença Médica/economia , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Feminino , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Transtornos Mentais/epidemiologia , Saúde Mental , Serviços de Saúde Mental/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Qualidade de Vida , Estigma Social , Desemprego/psicologia , Adulto Jovem
19.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(5): e283-e293, 2021 05 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33625073

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether patterns of work during COVID-19 pandemic altered by effort to contain the outbreak affected anxiety and depression. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 911 residents of Philadelphia, inquiring about their working lives during early months of the epidemic, symptoms of anxiety and depression, plus demographics, perceived sources of support, and general health. RESULTS: Occupational contact with suspected COVID-19 cases was associated with anxiety. Concerns about return to work, childcare, lack of sick leave, and loss/reduction in work correlated with anxiety and depression, even when there was no evidence of occupational contact with infected persons; patterns differed by sex. CONCLUSIONS: Heightened anxiety and depression during COVID-19 pandemic can be due to widespread disruption of working lives, especially in "non-essential" low-income industries, on par with experience in healthcare.


Assuntos
Ansiedade/epidemiologia , COVID-19/psicologia , Depressão/epidemiologia , Emprego/classificação , Emprego/psicologia , Adulto , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis/métodos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Philadelphia/epidemiologia , SARS-CoV-2 , Inquéritos e Questionários , Teletrabalho , Desemprego/psicologia
20.
Gynecol Oncol ; 161(2): 477-482, 2021 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33546868

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To study associations among employment, insurance status, and distress in gynecologic oncology patients; and to evaluate the impact of being unemployed or having no/Medicaid insurance on different distress problem areas. METHODS: In this single institution, cross-sectional analysis of gynecologic oncology patients, we screened for distress and problem areas using the National Comprehensive Cancer Network distress thermometer and problem list at outpatient appointments between 6/2017-9/2017. Primary outcome was self-reported high distress (score ≥ 5). The distress problem list included 5 categories-practical, family, emotional, physical, and other. Employment status included employed, unemployed, homemaker, and retired. Logistic regression was used to predict high distress from employment and insurance statuses, adjusting for relevant covariates. RESULTS: Of 885 women, 101 (11.4%) were unemployed, and 53 (6.0%) uninsured or had Medicaid coverage. One in five patients (n = 191, 21.6%) indicated high distress. Unemployed patients were more likely than employed to endorse high distress [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) = 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.2-5.7, p < 0.001]. Compared to employed patients, a greater proportion of unemployed patients endorsed distress related to practical (p < 0.05), emotional (p < 0.001), physical (p < 0.01), and other (p < 0.05) problems. Uninsured/Medicaid patients were more likely to endorse high distress (aOR = 2.8, 95% CI 1.5-5.1, p < 0.001) and report family (p < 0.001), emotional (p < 0.001), and other (p < 0.01) problems than patients who had Medicare/commercial insurance. CONCLUSIONS: Gynecologic oncology patients who are unemployed or have no/Medicaid insurance face high distress that appears to arise from issues beyond practical problems, including financial and/or insurance insecurities.


Assuntos
Emprego/psicologia , Emprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Neoplasias dos Genitais Femininos/economia , Neoplasias dos Genitais Femininos/psicologia , Cobertura do Seguro/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Seguro Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Modelos Logísticos , Medicaid/estatística & dados numéricos , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Angústia Psicológica , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Desemprego/psicologia , Desemprego/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
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