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1.
Fam Med ; 51(6): 509-515, 2019 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31184765

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Common Residency Program Requirements stipulate that each faculty member's performance be evaluated annually. Feedback is essential to this process, yet the culture of medicine poses challenges to developing effective feedback systems. The current study explores existing and ideal characteristics of faculty teaching evaluation systems from the perspectives of key stakeholders: faculty, residents, and residency program directors (PDs). METHODS: We utilized two qualitative approaches: (1) confidential semistructured telephone interviews with PDs from a convenience sample of eight family medicine residency programs, (2) qualitative responses from an anonymous online survey of faculty and residents in the same eight programs. We used inductive thematic analysis to analyze the interviews and survey responses. Data collection occurred in the fall of 2017. RESULTS: All eight (100%) of the PDs completed interviews. Survey response rates for faculty and residents were 79% (99/126) and 70% (152/216), respectively. Both PD and faculty responses identified a desire for actionable, real-time, frequent feedback used to foster continued professional development. Themes unique to faculty included easy accessibility and feedback from peers. Residents expressed an interest in in-person feedback and a process minimizing potential retribution. Residents indicated that feedback should be based on shared understanding of what skill(s) the faculty member is trying to address. CONCLUSIONS: PDs, faculty, and residents share a desire to provide faculty with meaningful, specific, and real-time feedback. Programs should strive to provide a culture in which feedback is an integral part of the learning process for both residents and faculty.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/normas , Internato e Residência , Ensino , Acreditação/normas , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Retroalimentação , Humanos , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal , Inquéritos e Questionários
2.
J Grad Med Educ ; 11(2): 132-142, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31024643

RESUMO

Background: Ambulatory training in internal medicine residency programs has historically been considered less robust than inpatient-focused training, which prompted a 2009 revision of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Program Requirements in Internal Medicine. This revision was intended to create a balance between inpatient and outpatient training standards and to spur innovation in the ambulatory setting. Objective: We explored innovations in ambulatory education in internal medicine residency programs since the 2009 revision of the ACGME Program Requirements in Internal Medicine. Methods: The authors conducted a scoping review of the literature from 2008 to 2017, searching PubMed, ERIC, and Scopus databases. Articles related to improving educational quality of ambulatory components of US-based internal medicine residency programs were eligible for inclusion. Articles were screened for relevance and theme categorization and then divided into 6 themes: clinic redesign, curriculum development, evaluating resident practice/performance, teaching methods, program evaluation, and faculty development. Once a theme was assigned, data extraction and quality assessment using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI) score were completed. Results: A total of 967 potentially relevant articles were discovered; of those, 182 were deemed relevant and underwent full review. Most articles fell into curriculum development and clinic redesign themes. The majority of included studies were from a single institution, used nonstandardized tools, and assessed outcomes at the satisfaction or knowledge/attitude/skills levels. Few studies showed behavioral changes or patient-level outcomes. Conclusions: While a rich diversity of educational innovations have occurred since the 2009 revision of the ACGME Program Requirements in Internal Medicine, there is a significant need for multi-institution studies and higher-level assessment.


Assuntos
Assistência Ambulatorial/métodos , Medicina Interna/educação , Internato e Residência/métodos , Currículo/normas , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Humanos , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde/métodos , Ensino/normas , Estados Unidos
3.
PLoS One ; 14(4): e0215067, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31022214

RESUMO

Reports of sexual harassment at medical faculties throughout the world, including the Radboud University, raised the question how prevalent this is at the Faculty of Science. We performed a survey among students to assess their experiences with harassment. This questionnaire consisted of questions from the EGERA survey, a questionnaire held among staff of multiple European Universities. We found that 9% of the respondents had observed or experienced harassment at the Faculty. Hardly any of these cases were reported to one of the institutional services. Moreover, most students did not now any of the provided services. We therefore suggest raising awareness on harassment and to make students more familiar with the trust person.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/normas , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Relações Interpessoais , Má Conduta Profissional/estatística & dados numéricos , Assédio Sexual/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes/psicologia , Universidades/normas , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Má Conduta Profissional/psicologia , Assédio Sexual/psicologia , Inquéritos e Questionários
4.
J Vasc Surg ; 69(5): 1559-1565, 2019 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31010519

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Advancement in academic medicine is multifactorial. Our objectives were to characterize academic appointments in vascular surgery and to investigate what factors, particularly publications, influenced academic appointment. METHODS: Academic vascular surgeons at Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education vascular training programs or at primary sites of U.S. allopathic medical schools were included. Those with qualified titles, such as "adjunct" or a "clinical" prefix, were excluded. Sex, education, region, board certification, and affiliation details were recorded. Web of Science was queried for publication details and h-index. The h-index is a "personal impact factor" defined as "x" number of publications cited at least "x" number of times. After surgeons' information was deidentified, univariate and multivariable analyses were completed for academic appointment and appointment as division chief. RESULTS: There were 642 vascular surgeons who met criteria: 297 (46.3%) assistant professors, 150 (23.4%) associate professors, and 195 (30.4%) professors. There were 96 (15%) division chiefs and 10 (1.6%) chairs of surgery, and 83.2% were male. Surgeons worked in the Northeast (33.5%), Southern (32.6%), Central (20.1%), and Western (13.9%) United States. The mean (±standard deviation) number of publications was 13.7 ± 15.4 for assistant professors, 33.9 ± 28.8 for associate professors, and 86.8 ± 63.6 for professors (P < .001). Mean number of first or last author publications was 5.3 ± 6.4 for assistant professors, 12.2 ± 12.7 for associate professors, and 38.7 ± 35.3 for professors (P < .001). Mean h-index was 5.9 ± 5.4 for assistant professors, 12 ± 7.7 for associate professors, and 24.9 ± 12.6 for professors (P < .001). In multivariable analysis, vascular surgery board certification (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-32.2; P = .03), academic appointment at a public medical school (OR, 1.99; 95% CI, 1.18-3.37; P = .01), years since medical school graduation (OR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.09-1.18; P < .001, per year), and number of publications (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.03-1.06; P < .001, per publication) were independently associated with associate professor. Factors independently associated with professor were years since medical school graduation (OR, 1.18; 95% CI, 1.12-1.24; P < .001, per year) and number of first or last author publications (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.02-1.09; P = .003, per publication). Appointment as division chief was independently associated with h-index (OR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.01-1.08; P = .016, per point). CONCLUSIONS: Total number of publications was independently associated with associate professor, with number of first or last author publications particularly important for professor. The h-index was not independently associated with academic appointment, but it was for appointment as division chief. This study provides relevant data for promotional guidance in academic vascular surgery.


Assuntos
Docentes de Medicina/normas , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto/normas , Seleção de Pessoal/normas , Cirurgiões/normas , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Vasculares/normas , Autoria/normas , Bibliometria , Mobilidade Ocupacional , Comportamento de Escolha , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos , Estados Unidos
5.
Med Educ Online ; 24(1): 1596708, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30973089

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Filming teaching sessions were reported in the medical literature in the 1980s and 1990s but appear to have been an underreported and/or underutilized teaching tool since that time. National faculty development programs, such as the Harvard Macy Institute (HMI) Program for Educators in Health Professions and the Stanford Faculty Development Center for Medical Teachers program, have attempted to bridge this gap in formal instruction in teaching skills through microteaching sessions involving videos for self- and peer-assessment and feedback. OBJECTIVE: Current video-feedback faculty development initiatives are time intensive and impractical to implement broadly at an institutional level. Further, results of peer feedback have not been frequently reported in the literature at the institutional level. Our research aims to propose a convenient and effective process for incorporating video analysis into faculty devleopment programs. DESIGN: Our work describes a novel technique using video-recorded, simulated teaching exercises to compile multi-dimensional feedback as an aid in faculty development programs that promote teaching-skill development. This research evaluated the effectiveness of a focused teaching practicum designed for faculty in multiple specialty departments with large numbers of older patients into a geriatrics-based faculty development program. Effectiveness of the practicum is evaluated using quantitative scoring and qualitative analysis of self-reflection as well as peer and trainee input. RESULTS: VOTE sessions demonstrate an important exportable product which enable faculty to receive a detailed 360-degree assessment of their teaching. CONCLUSION: This intervention can be easily replicated and revised, as needed, to fit into the educational curriculum at other academic medical centers.


Assuntos
Educação Médica/organização & administração , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Feedback Formativo , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal/organização & administração , Ensino/organização & administração , Currículo , Educação Médica/normas , Humanos , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Ensino/normas , Gravação em Vídeo
7.
Acad Med ; 94(5): 626-629, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30920444

RESUMO

Criticism, scathing comments, and harassment are becoming more common elements of social media discourse. Recent coordinated public attacks directed at higher education faculty illustrate these troubling trends. In several cases, these attacks have been politically motivated by participants who disagree with a faculty member's statements regarding sensitive subjects. Whereas most high-profile cases have included faculty teaching at the undergraduate level who use social media to promote scholarly discussion, medical school faculty may also be at risk, especially if their scholarly pursuits pertain to politically charged issues (e.g., race and diversity, firearms, vaccinations, the health of transgender populations). In today's digital environment of cellphone recordings, forwarded e-mails, and open-access manuscripts, any faculty member who discusses or engages in scholarship of politically sensitive issues on- or offline may be at risk. In this Invited Commentary, the authors discuss the multifaceted problem of cyberbullying of medical school faculty and provide recommendations to faculty and administrators about how to mitigate and manage these situations.


Assuntos
Cyberbullying/prevenção & controle , Docentes de Medicina/psicologia , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Guias como Assunto , Faculdades de Medicina/normas , Mídias Sociais/normas , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Adulto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Adulto Jovem
8.
Am J Hosp Palliat Care ; 36(8): 675-681, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30845811

RESUMO

Interest and appreciation for palliative care (PC) has resulted in increased demand for both PC services and education. The PC rotation has been shown to improve PC knowledge in medical students (MS) and internal medicine (IM) residents, and PC specialists stand poised to direct the primary PC education of learners at different levels of training. To concurrently teach learners of different levels of training on a busy PC service, we created an educational system that emphasizes management of learner schedules, organization of teaching activities, faculty development to improve teaching skills, and learner self-evaluation. Both MS and IM residents showed an improvement in self-assessed competence as well as increased comfort level with seriously ill patients after PC rotation. Careful adjustment of learner schedules has accommodated an increasing number of learners, while maintaining a low learner to faculty ratio. The PC educators face an exciting and daunting challenge as the number of patients with PC needs and the number of learners requesting PC experience grow. We continue to improve milestone-based PC assessment tools, to invest in faculty development, and to explore innovative ways to support PC educators as they strive to provide consistent PC education that is both useful for learners and can be incorporated into busy PC clinical practice.


Assuntos
Educação Médica/organização & administração , Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Cuidados Paliativos/organização & administração , Ensino/organização & administração , Planejamento Antecipado de Cuidados/organização & administração , Comunicação , Currículo , Educação Médica/normas , Docentes de Medicina/educação , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Internato e Residência/organização & administração , Manejo da Dor/métodos , Competência Profissional , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal/organização & administração , Ensino/educação , Ensino/normas
9.
Acad Psychiatry ; 43(4): 407-410, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30843151

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: With a growing geriatric population and limited geriatric psychiatrists in Canada, it is crucial to provide sufficient training in geriatric psychiatry during medical school. The authors examined how geriatric psychiatry education is delivered in Canadian medical schools during clerkship. Factors that could be associated with increased geriatric psychiatry teaching in medical schools were examined. The authors were also interested in comparing Canadian to US findings. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was distributed to the psychiatry medical education representatives attending the Canadian Organization of Undergraduate Psychiatry Educators (COUPE) semi-annual meeting in September 2017. RESULTS: All 17 (100%) medical schools completed the survey. Fifteen of the 17 schools (88%) have geriatric psychiatry-specific learning objectives. Five schools (29%) offer a clinical component in geriatric psychiatry. One school has an award for clerks (6%), and no awards exist for faculty. The number of lecture hours in geriatric psychiatry is moderately correlated with the presence of a geriatric component to psychiatry clerkship (Spearman's rho = 0.67, p = 0.003) and the length of the geriatric portion of clerkship (Spearman's rho = 0.64, p value = 0.006). Lecture hours are also moderately correlated with the presence of a geriatric fellowship (Spearman's rho = 0.68, p value = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Geriatric psychiatry clerkship education is inconsistent in Canada. There is virtually no recognition of excellence in teaching or undergraduate performance in this area in clerkship. Geriatric psychiatry may receive more frequent attention in Canadian medical schools than in US medical schools.


Assuntos
Estágio Clínico/organização & administração , Docentes de Medicina/organização & administração , Psiquiatria Geriátrica/educação , Canadá , Estudos Transversais , Currículo/normas , Educação de Graduação em Medicina , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
10.
Acad Med ; 94(6): 763-767, 2019 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30893063

RESUMO

There is an increasing need for academic health centers (AHCs) to engage communities across their clinical, research, and educational missions. Although AHCs have a long-standing history of community service, a more comprehensive approach to working with communities is required to respond to shifts toward a population health paradigm, funder requirements for community engagement in research, and demands that medical education focus more on social and environmental determinants of health. Community engagement has been employed at many AHCs, though often in limited ways or relying heavily on students and faculty interested in serving communities. This limited involvement has been due, in part, to lack of infrastructure to support engagement, resource constraints, and the lack of a clear value proposition for long-term investments in community partnerships. However, there are compelling reasons for AHCs to take an enterprise-wide approach to working with communities. An enterprise-wide approach to community engagement will require reconsideration of communities, moving from viewing them as people or groups in need of service to seeing them as assets who can help AHCs better understand and address social determinants of health, enhance students' and trainees' ability to provide care, and increase the relevance and potential impact of research discoveries. To accomplish this, AHCs will need to establish the necessary infrastructure to support long-term community partnerships, adapt policies to support and reward engaged scholarship and teaching, and consider new ways of integrating community members in roles as advisors and collaborators across the AHC.


Assuntos
Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/organização & administração , Integração Comunitária/tendências , Educação Médica/métodos , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/tendências , Cultura , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Bolsas de Estudo , Recursos em Saúde , Humanos , Qualidade da Assistência à Saúde , Seguridade Social
12.
South Med J ; 112(2): 70-75, 2019 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30708368

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: At our institution, learner communication skills during an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) are measured by standardized patients (SPs) using the New Mexico Clinical Communication Scale (NM-CCS). Faculty physicians also conduct a direct observation of a clinical encounter (DOCE) to observe students' interactions with real hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to determine whether students have similar communication skills scores with real patients as compared with SPs. METHODS: The NM-CCS was modified to fit a hospital encounter (mNM-CCS). Student NM-CCS scores for an OSCE were compared with their matched mNM-CCS scores obtained during their DOCE. RESULTS: Matched scores were compared for 83 students. The mean total percentage scores on the DOCE and OSCE were both 60%. There was no correlation between individual student communication scores. The difference between mean total scores mNM-CCS scores for the faculty preceptors was not statistically significant (P = 0.1985). CONCLUSIONS: We found no correlation between student communication scores measured by faculty during the DOCE compared with communication skills measured by SPs during an OSCE. The discordant results of some students on the OSCE compared with the DOCE suggests that the OSCE may not identify students who may benefit from additional communication skills training.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Comunicação , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Relações Médico-Paciente , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
13.
BMC Med Educ ; 19(1): 49, 2019 Feb 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30732603

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Clinical teaching plays a crucial role in the transition of medical students into the world of professional practice. Faculty development initiatives contribute to strengthening clinicians' approach to teaching. In order to inform the design of such initiatives, we thought that it would be useful to discover how senior medical students' experience of clinical teaching may impact on how learning during clinical training might be strengthened. METHODS: This qualitative study was conducted using convenience sampling of medical students in the final two months of study before qualifying. Three semi-structured focus group discussions were held with a total of 23 students. Transcripts were analysed from an interpretivist stance, looking for underlying meanings. The resultant themes revealed a tension between the students' expectations and experience of clinical teaching. We returned to our data looking for how students had responded to these tensions. RESULTS: Students saw clinical rotations as having the potential for them to apply their knowledge and test their procedural abilities in the environment where their professional practice and identity will develop. They expected engagement in the clinical workplace. However, their descriptions were of tensions between prior expectations and actual experiences in the environment. They appreciated that learning required them to move out of their "comfort zone", but seemed to persist in the idea of being recipients of teaching rather than becoming directors of their own learning. Students seem to need help in participating in the clinical setting, understanding how this participation will construct the knowledge and skills required as they join the workplace. Students did not have a strong sense of agency to negotiate participation in the clinical workplace. CONCLUSIONS: There is the potential for clinicians to assist students in adapting their way of learning from the largely structured classroom based learning of theoretical knowledge, to the more experiential informal workplace-based learning of practice. This suggests that faculty developers could broaden their menu of offerings to clinicians by intentionally incorporating ways not only of offering students affordances in the clinical learning environment, but also of attending to the development of students' agentic capability to engage with those affordances offered.


Assuntos
Estágio Clínico/normas , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/normas , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Estudantes de Medicina , Ensino/normas , Grupos Focais , Humanos , Relações Interpessoais , Entrevistas como Assunto , Motivação , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia
14.
Rev. medica electron ; 41(1): 34-44, ene.-feb. 2019. tab
Artigo em Espanhol | LILACS, CUMED | ID: biblio-991323

RESUMO

RESUMEN Introducción: el comienzo la Docencia Médica Superior en Matanzas en el mes de enero de 1969 con un grupo de 32 alumnos en el sexto año de la carrera de medicina promueve un intenso trabajo para lograr la formación total de los médicos en la propia provincia, para lo que era necesario comenzar la enseñanza de las Ciencias Básicas Biomédicas y dentro de éstas, las disciplinas morfológicas (Anatomía, Histología y Embriología) y con ello propiciar la creación del Departamento de Ciencias Morfológicas. Objetivo: caracterizar al departamento de Ciencias Morfológicas y la calidad de su claustro hasta el año 2015. Materiales y métodos: se emplean en esta investigación métodos cualitativos del nivel teórico y del empírico, de este último las entrevistas, revisión de documentos y análisis porcentual. Resultados: fue un departamento creado en mayo de 1981 que alcanza importantes resultados en la calidad del claustro en 2011 donde el 84% del claustro tiene categoría docente principal de titular o auxiliar, el 90,9% es especialista de segundo grado y el 88 % ostentaba la categoría de Máster o Doctor en Ciencias. Conclusiones: se consideró un departamento de relevancia en la Universidad y que en 2015 es fusionado con el departamento de Ciencias Fisiológicas, pasando a formar parte de un departamento denominado Ciencias Básicas Biomédicas a lo que los autores de la investigación no le encuentran justificación, ni científica, ni didáctica.


ABSTRACT Introduction: the beginning of the high medical education in Matanzas on January 1969, with a group of 32 sixth-year student of the Medicine curriculum promoted an intense work to achieve the total training of the doctors in the province; therefore, it was necessary to begin teaching the Biomedical Basic Sciences, among them, the morphologic disciplines (Anatomy, Histology and Embryology), what lead to the creation of the Department of Morphological Sciences. Objective: to characterize the Department of Morphological Sciences and its staff quality up to 2015. Material and methods: there are used qualitative research methods of the theoretical and empiric levels like interviews, documental review and percentage analysis. Results: the department was created on May 1981; the quality of the staff reached important results in 2011, when 84 % of the staff accomplished the main teaching category of titular or auxiliary professor; 90.9 % of them are second grade specialists, and 88 % has the scientific category of Master or Doctor in Sciences. Conclusions: the Department was considered a relevant department in the University; in 2015 it was merged with the Department of Physiologic Sciences, in a department named Biomedical Basic Sciences. The authors consider that fact has neither scientific nor didactical justification.


Assuntos
Humanos , Faculdades de Medicina , Docentes de Medicina/normas
15.
J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth ; 33(4): 1037-1043, 2019 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30638919

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Comprehensive educational initiatives in ultrasound for practicing physicians are lacking. We developed a perioperative ultrasound training program for faculty to offer a broad orientation to the principles and clinical applications of ultrasound. DESIGN AND SETTING: The program consisted of two phases. Phase one, which introduced ultrasound via didactic and hands-on components, had six live sessions. At the end of each, participants completed a knowledge quiz. During the sixth session, faculty participated in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE). For phase two, faculty attended two to three sessions (8-10 hours each) of in-depth individualized training and demonstrated supervised performance of ultrasound-related procedures of their choice. PARTICIPANTS: Participants included Anesthesia faculty at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: On average 30 faculty members attended each live session for phase one; 12 completed phase two. There was a significant difference in quiz scores across the six sessions (p < 0.001) with scores for Session 6 being significantly higher than for Session 1 (p < 0.001). The average mean and median scores on the three OSCE stations were 95.63% and 98.33%, respectively. For phase two, the 8 participants who received training in regional anesthesia each performed > 10 blocks on patients over two days; 5 of the 7 participants who received training in transthoracic echocardiography each completed more than 15 examinations on simulators and 10 examinations on patients. CONCLUSION: It is possible to implement a departmental educational program for ultrasound to improve ultrasound knowledge and skills in practicing anesthesiologists.


Assuntos
Anestesiologia/educação , Anestesiologia/normas , Competência Clínica/normas , Avaliação Educacional/normas , Docentes de Medicina/educação , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/métodos , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/normas , Anestesiologia/métodos , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Humanos , Internato e Residência/métodos , Internato e Residência/normas
16.
West J Emerg Med ; 20(1): 50-57, 2019 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30643601

RESUMO

Introduction: Formative evaluations of clinical teaching for emergency medicine (EM) faculty are limited. The goal of this study was to develop a behaviorally-based tool for evaluating and providing feedback to EM faculty based on their clinical teaching skills during a shift. Methods: We used a three-phase structured development process. Phase 1 used the nominal group technique with a group of faculty first and then with residents to generate potential evaluation items. Phase 2 included separate focus groups and used a modified Delphi technique with faculty and residents, as well as a group of experts to evaluate the items generated in Phase 1. Following this, residents classified the items into novice, intermediate, and advanced educator skills. Once items were determined for inclusion and subsequently ranked they were built into the tool by the investigators (Phase 3). Results: The final instrument, the "Faculty Shift Card," is a behaviorally-anchored evaluation and feedback tool used to facilitate feedback to EM faculty about their teaching skills during a shift. The tool has four domains: teaching clinical decision-making; teaching interpersonal skills; teaching procedural skills; and general teaching strategies. Each domain contains novice, intermediate, and advanced sections with 2-5 concrete examples for each level of performance. Conclusion: This structured process resulted in a well-grounded and systematically developed evaluation tool for EM faculty that can provide real-time actionable feedback to faculty and support improved clinical teaching.


Assuntos
Desempenho Acadêmico/normas , Competência Clínica/normas , Medicina de Emergência/educação , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Ensino/normas , Técnica Delfos , Retroalimentação , Humanos , Internato e Residência
17.
Int J Med Educ ; 10: 9-15, 2019 Jan 25.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30685751

RESUMO

Objectives: The study sought to evaluate near-peer tutors' teaching of critical appraisal skills to medical students as an aspect of Evidence-based Medicine. Methods: In a randomized crossover trial, 241 students completing a Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-based Medicine (CE-EBM) module in the Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia (FMUI) were randomly assigned to intervention or control groups. During tutorial sessions, intervention group participants were assigned to near-peer tutors, who were newly graduated doctors, and those in the control groups were assigned to staff tutors. After two tutorial sessions, intervention and control groups exchanged tutors for the next two sessions. Outcomes were measured using written knowledge and skills multiple choice questions (MCQ) test, the Evidence-based Practice Confidence Scale (EPIC) and a student attitude questionnaire, along with student evaluation of tutors to evaluate the process. Results: On completion of the module, the written test scores of intervention group students were similar to those of the control group (t(239) = 1.553, p=0.122), as well as overall Evidence-based Practice Confidence Scale scores (F(2/170) = 0.179, p = 0.673) and attitude scores (t(219) =-0.676, p = 0.085). In the tutor evaluations, the students rated their near-peer tutored sessions as better than those tutored by staff in most respects. Conclusions: Near-peer tutors were as effective as and more readily accepted than staff tutors in teaching critical appraisal skills. These findings support the broader implementation of peer-teaching in other areas of medical education.


Assuntos
Educação Médica/métodos , Epidemiologia/educação , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/educação , Docentes de Medicina , Grupo Associado , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Pensamento/fisiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Atitude , Competência Clínica , Estudos Cross-Over , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Docentes de Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Ensino , Adulto Jovem
18.
Simul Healthc ; 14(2): 113-120, 2019 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30601468

RESUMO

STATEMENT: Simulation is relatively new in many low-income countries. We describe the challenges encountered, solutions deployed, and the costs incurred while establishing two simulation centers in Uganda. The challenges we experienced included equipment costs, difficulty in procurement, lack of context-appropriate curricula, unreliable power, limited local teaching capacity, and lack of coordination among user groups. Solutions we deployed included improvisation of equipment, customization of low-cost simulation software, creation of context-specific curricula, local administrative support, and creation of a simulation fellowship opportunity for local instructors. Total costs for simulation setups ranged from US $165 to $17,000. For centers in low-income countries trying to establish simulation programs, our experience suggests that careful selection of context-appropriate equipment and curricula, engagement with local and international collaborators, and early emphasis to increase local teaching capacity are essential. Further studies are needed to identify the most cost-effective levels of technological complexity for simulation in similar resource-constrained settings.


Assuntos
Educação Médica/métodos , Treinamento por Simulação/estatística & dados numéricos , Custos e Análise de Custo , Países em Desenvolvimento , Equipamentos Médicos Duráveis/economia , Equipamentos Médicos Duráveis/provisão & distribução , Educação Médica/economia , Fontes de Energia Elétrica/normas , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Humanos , Projetos Piloto , Treinamento por Simulação/economia , Uganda
19.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 69(1): 34-43, 2019 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30623909

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To establish the construct validity of Assessment of Medical Educational Environment by the Teachers inventory. METHODS: The cross-sectional analytical study was conducted from January to May 2017 and comprised doctors working as faculty in Rawalpindi Medical College, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, and its 3 teaching hospitals. Non-probability (purposive) sampling was used to meet the criteria of 5 participants per item of the Assessment of Medical Educational Environment by the Teachers inventory. Exploratory factor analysis was done using SPSS 20 and confirmatory factor analysis was done with version 16 of the Analysis of Moment Structures software. RESULTS: Of the 250 subjects, 126(50.4%) were males and 124(49.6%) were females. Exploratory factor analysis ended with extraction of 11 components. It showed sufficiency of sample size and no multi-collinearity. Three (50%) of the six domains were finalised on the whole and 10(20%) of the 50 items were debarred from the inventory. All three domains had high reliability. Root mean square residual and chi square / degree of freedom were within acceptable limit. However, comparative fit index, goodness of fit index, normed fit index and root mean square error of approximation portrayed not only poor model fit after re-running confirmatory factor analysis, but also led to omission of further 16(32%) items with poor loadings from the inventory. Thus, there was exclusion of total 26(52%) items from the tool and the finalised Assessment of Medical Educational Environment by the Teachers inventory comprised 24(48%) items. CONCLUSIONS: Construct validity of Assessment of Medical Educational Environment by the Teachers inventory could not be established, but the tool was found to be reliable.


Assuntos
Educação Médica , Docentes de Medicina , Meio Social , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Ensino , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Educação Médica/normas , Psicologia Ambiental/métodos , Docentes de Medicina/psicologia , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Feminino , Hospitais de Ensino , Humanos , Relações Interpessoais , Masculino , Paquistão , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Inquéritos e Questionários , Ensino/psicologia , Ensino/normas
20.
Med Teach ; 41(1): 107-108, 2019 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29475380

RESUMO

Faculty development (FD) activities aim to improve teaching competencies. Success of these activities is conditioned with the ability of participants to transfer the learned competencies into their teaching practices. Unfortunately, evaluation of the effectiveness of FD rely mostly upon self-reported or verbal feedback, without valid evaluation of their progress in teaching performance. This shortcoming may be attributed to the unavailability of a systematic assessment system to evaluate participants' performance in the workplace. In this article, we advocate how the concept and principles of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) can be used in assessment of teaching competencies and ensuring the transfer of training to the workplace.


Assuntos
Educação Baseada em Competências/normas , Docentes de Medicina/normas , Competência Profissional/normas , Currículo/normas , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Desenvolvimento de Programas/normas , Ensino/normas
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