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1.
Recurso na Internet em Espanhol | LIS - Localizador de Informação em Saúde | ID: lis-LISBR1.1-46990

RESUMO

Los coronavirus son una familia de virus que causan enfermedades que van desde el resfriado común hasta enfermedades respiratorias más graves, circulan entre humanos y animales. A veces, los coronavirus que infectan a los animales pueden evolucionar, transmitirse a las personas y convertirse en una nueva cepa de coronavirus capaz de provocar enfermedades en los seres humanos, tal y como sucedió con el Síndrome Respiratorio Agudo Severo (SARS), en Asia en febrero de 2003 y, el Síndrome Respiratorio de Oriente Medio (MERS-CoV), que fue detectado por primera vez en Arabia Saudita en 2012.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/patogenicidade , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Controle Sanitário de Viajantes , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão
4.
N C Med J ; 81(1): 14-22, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31908326

RESUMO

BACKGROUND The Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic that began in 2015 presented a risk for ZIKV infection among persons who traveled to ZIKV-affected countries. Latinas in North Carolina and their sexual partners may be exposed to ZIKV when traveling to these regions.METHODS We administered a cross-sectional survey, measuring ZIKV risk and knowledge, to a convenience sample of 262 reproductive-age Latinas attending a Federally Qualified Health Center in rural North Carolina. We described ZIKV risk and knowledge in the sample, and compared responses between those who were pregnant or recently pregnant, and those who were not pregnant. We further identified factors associated with 1) awareness of ZIKV and 2) high knowledge of ZIKV sequelae and prevention among those who were aware of ZIKV, using log-binomial regression.RESULTS Two-thirds of participants had ever heard of ZIKV, which was positively associated with educational attainment. Most participants aware of ZIKV had moderate/high knowledge of ZIKV transmission (92.5%) and symptoms (73.2%), but knowledge of preventing sexual and congenital transmission was limited. Travel was infrequent among pregnant or recently pregnant participants (5.4%) and their partners (7.1%). Despite low risk for ZIKV infection, participants were willing to practice ZIKV prevention.LIMITATIONS Our study is limited by a lack of generalizability to Latinas in other regions of the country, self-reporting bias, and lack of survey validation as an indicator of English language proficiency.CONCLUSIONS Providers should identify patients likely to become pregnant and travel to high-risk areas, inquire about partner travel history, and offer culturally appropriate ZIKV risk counseling.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde/etnologia , Hispano-Americanos/psicologia , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Infecção por Zika virus/etnologia , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Hispano-Americanos/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , North Carolina , Gravidez , Fatores de Risco , Serviços de Saúde Rural
5.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31802155

RESUMO

Vaccinations are an integral part of pre-travel care. Gaps in routine vaccination should be closed. In particular, measles and influenza are important in the context of travel medicine. Vaccinations against yellow fever and meningococcal disease may be required for international travel. This article provides information on these and other travel vaccinations against hepatitis A, typhoid fever, rabies, Japanese encephalitis and cholera.Yellow fever endemic areas are located in Africa and in South America; there is no yellow fever in Asia. The meningococcal vaccine (A, C, W, Y) is required for pilgrims to Saudi Arabia. Additionally, it is recommended for travellers visiting the African "meningitis belt" during the dry season. A polio booster is required for countries with endemic wild-type polio virus (WPV) or circulating vaccine derived poliovirus (cVDPV).Hepatitis A is a common vaccine-preventable infection in travellers. The hepatitis A vaccination should therefore be recommended to all travellers going to endemic areas. South Asia is the most important region where travel-associated typhoid fever is acquired and where at the same time antimicrobial resistance is emerging. Two different vaccines against typhoid fever are available in Germany. The vaccine efficacy is 50-70% for both vaccines. Contacts with potentially rabid animals are a common travel-related problem. At the same time, vaccines for state of the art postexposure care are not provided in many countries. According to recent WHO recommendations, two vaccinations are sufficient for pre-travel priming against rabies. Japanese encephalitis is rare in travellers. Vaccination should be offered in case of travel to rural and peri-urban areas. Cholera is extremely rare in travellers going to endemic areas. Cholera vaccination is therefore usually not indicated in the context of travel medicine.


Assuntos
Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Viagem , Vacinação , Animais , Alemanha , Febre Amarela
7.
Rev Med Chil ; 147(5): 650-657, 2019 May.
Artigo em Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31859898

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: There is always a risk of importing infectious diseases when travelling abroad. AIM: To estimate the effective risk of a Chilean of acquiring measles during a travel by countries where measles outbreaks have been reported, considering the present level of immunity in the country. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Previously established mathematical models using differential equations were applied to calculate the risk of acquiring measles of people traveling to endemic areas. RESULTS: The probability of acquiring measles of a voyager is 8.11 x 10-8. CONCLUSIONS: These estimations help decision making about preventive measures for travelers to endemic measles areas.


Assuntos
Sarampo/transmissão , Modelos Teóricos , Medição de Risco/métodos , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Chile/epidemiologia , Surtos de Doenças , Humanos , Sarampo/epidemiologia , Sarampo/prevenção & controle , Vacina contra Sarampo , Probabilidade , Fatores de Risco , Fatores de Tempo , Vacinação
8.
Mayo Clin Proc ; 94(11): 2314-2339, 2019 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31685156

RESUMO

The pretravel management of the international traveler should be based on risk management principles. Prevention strategies and medical interventions should be based on the itinerary, preexisting health factors, and behaviors that are unique to the traveler. A structured approach to the patient interaction provides a general framework for an efficient consultation. Vaccine-preventable diseases play an important role in travel-related illnesses, and their impact is not restricted to exotic diseases in developing countries. Therefore, an immunization encounter before travel is an ideal time to update all age-appropriate immunizations as well as providing protection against diseases that pose additional risk to travelers that may be delineated by their destinations or activities. This review focuses on indications for each travel-related vaccine together with a structured synthesis and graphics that show the geographic distribution of major travel-related diseases and highlight particularly high-risk destinations and behaviors. Dosing, route of administration, need for boosters, and possible accelerated regimens for vaccines administered prior to travel are presented. Different underlying illnesses and medications produce different levels of immunocompromise, and there is much unknown in this discipline. Recommendations regarding vaccination of immunocompromised travelers have less of an evidence base than for other categories of travelers. The review presents a structured synthesis of issues pertinent to considerations for 5 special populations of traveler: child traveler, pregnant traveler, severely immunocompromised traveler, HIV-infected traveler, and traveler with other chronic underlying disease including asplenia, diabetes, and chronic liver disease.


Assuntos
Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Viagem , Vacinação/estatística & dados numéricos , Vacinas/uso terapêutico , Adulto , Criança , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Medicina de Viagem/métodos
9.
Wilderness Environ Med ; 30(4S): S100-S120, 2019 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31668519

RESUMO

To provide guidance to clinicians, the Wilderness Medical Society convened experts to develop evidence-based guidelines for water disinfection in situations where the potability of available water is not ensured, including wilderness and international travel, areas affected by disaster, and other areas without adequate sanitation. The guidelines present the available methods for reducing or eliminating microbiologic contamination of water for individuals, groups, or households; evaluation of their effectiveness; and practical considerations. The evidence evaluation includes both laboratory and clinical publications. The panel graded the recommendations based on the quality of supporting evidence and the balance between benefits and risks or burdens, according to the criteria published by the American College of Chest Physicians.


Assuntos
Padrões de Prática Médica , Purificação da Água/métodos , Medicina Selvagem/normas , Desastres , Desinfecção/métodos , Humanos , Sociedades Médicas , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Microbiologia da Água , Medicina Selvagem/métodos
11.
Rev Med Suisse ; 15(665): 1737-1739, 2019 Oct 02.
Artigo em Francês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31580016

RESUMO

The Mal de Débarquement Syndrome (MdDS) is characterized by a persistent (> 1 month) sensation of self-motion, most of the time initially motion-triggered (i.e. boat, car, airplane travel). The symptoms are markedly diminished during a new exposure to passive motion. Female are more often affected. The vestibular functional assessment and cerebral imaging are normal. Chronic fatigue, headache, hypersensitivity to visual stimuli are other classical features of MdDS. The impact of MdDS on quality of life is significant. Maladaptation of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, abnormal functional connectivity as well as gonadal hormones imbalance are possible causes of the MdDS. Exposure to optokinetic stimulations, and transcranial magnetic stimulations open therapeutic perspectives.


Assuntos
Enjoo devido ao Movimento/fisiopatologia , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Feminino , Humanos , Enjoo devido ao Movimento/etiologia , Enjoo devido ao Movimento/terapia , Qualidade de Vida , Estimulação Magnética Transcraniana , Viagem
12.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 139(13)2019 Sep 24.
Artigo em Inglês, Norueguês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31556531

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Febrile illness is a common clinical problem and frequently caused by bacterial and viral infections. When blood cultures are negative and symptoms persist despite empirical antibiotic treatment, clinicians must consider other differential diagnoses including malignancy, rheumatologic disease and parasitic infections. CASE PRESENTATION: A Norwegian male in his eighties experienced febrile illness during a stay in Southern Spain. Upon return to Norway, he was hospitalized with fever, weight-loss, enlarged spleen, pancytopenia and hypergammaglobulinemia. After failing to respond to broad-spectrum antibiotics and antifungals, he was diagnosed with visceral leishmaniasis and Leishmania infantum was confirmed by PCR and sequencing of spleen biopsy and blood. INTERPRETATION: With increasing migration and tourism, doctors in non-endemic countries should be familiar with visceral leishmaniasis.


Assuntos
Leishmaniose Visceral/diagnóstico , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Anfotericina B/administração & dosagem , Anfotericina B/uso terapêutico , Antiprotozoários/administração & dosagem , Antiprotozoários/uso terapêutico , Artrite/parasitologia , Febre/parasitologia , Humanos , Leishmania infantum/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Leishmania infantum/isolamento & purificação , Leishmaniose Visceral/complicações , Leishmaniose Visceral/tratamento farmacológico , Masculino , Pancitopenia/parasitologia , Espanha , Esplenomegalia/diagnóstico por imagem , Esplenomegalia/parasitologia , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Doença Relacionada a Viagens
13.
MMWR Recomm Rep ; 68(2): 1-33, 2019 07 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31518342

RESUMO

This report updates the 2010 recommendations from the CDC Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding prevention of Japanese encephalitis (JE) among U.S. travelers and laboratory workers (Fischer M, Lindsey N, Staples JE, Hills S. Japanese encephalitis vaccines: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP). MMWR Recomm Rep 2010;59[No. RR-1]). The report summarizes the epidemiology of JE, describes the JE vaccine that is licensed and available in the United States, and provides recommendations for its use among travelers and laboratory workers.JE virus, a mosquitoborne flavivirus, is the most common vaccine-preventable cause of encephalitis in Asia. JE occurs throughout most of Asia and parts of the western Pacific. Approximately 20%-30% of patients die, and 30%-50% of survivors have neurologic, cognitive, or behavioral sequelae. No antiviral treatment is available.Inactivated Vero cell culture-derived JE vaccine (Ixiaro [JE-VC]) is the only JE vaccine that is licensed and available in the United States. In 2009, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensed JE-VC for use in persons aged ≥17 years; in 2013, licensure was extended to include children aged ≥2 months.Most travelers to countries where the disease is endemic are at very low risk for JE. However, some travelers are at increased risk for infection on the basis of their travel plans. Factors that increase the risk for JE virus exposure include 1) traveling for a longer period; 2) travel during the JE virus transmission season; 3) spending time in rural areas; 4) participating in extensive outdoor activities; and 5) staying in accommodations without air conditioning, screens, or bed nets. All travelers to countries where JE is endemic should be advised to take precautions to avoid mosquito bites to reduce the risk for JE and other vectorborne diseases. For some persons who might be at increased risk for JE, the vaccine can further reduce the risk for infection. The decision about whether to vaccinate should be individualized and consider the 1) risks related to the specific travel itinerary, 2) likelihood of future travel to countries where JE is endemic, 3) high morbidity and mortality of JE, 4) availability of an effective vaccine, 5) possibility (but low probability) of serious adverse events after vaccination, and 6) the traveler's personal perception and tolerance of risk.JE vaccine is recommended for persons moving to a JE-endemic country to take up residence, longer-term (e.g., ≥1 month) travelers to JE-endemic areas, and frequent travelers to JE-endemic areas. JE vaccine also should be considered for shorter-term (e.g., <1 month) travelers with an increased risk for JE on the basis of planned travel duration, season, location, activities, and accommodations and for travelers to JE-endemic areas who are uncertain about their specific travel duration, destinations, or activities. JE vaccine is not recommended for travelers with very low-risk itineraries, such as shorter-term travel limited to urban areas or outside of a well-defined JE virus transmission season.


Assuntos
Encefalite Japonesa/prevenção & controle , Vacinas contra Encefalite Japonesa/administração & dosagem , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Adolescente , Adulto , Comitês Consultivos , Idoso , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Encefalite Japonesa/epidemiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Esquemas de Imunização , Lactente , Vacinas contra Encefalite Japonesa/efeitos adversos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Gravidez , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Adulto Jovem
14.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 13(9): e0007620, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31513580

RESUMO

Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is the causative agent of typhoid fever, a systemic human infection with a burden exceeding 20 million cases each year that occurs disproportionately among children in low and middle income countries. Antimicrobial therapy is the mainstay for treatment, but resistance to multiple agents is common. Here we report genotypes and antimicrobial resistance (AMR) determinants detected from routine whole-genome sequencing (WGS) of 533 S. Typhi isolates referred to Public Health England between April 2014 and March 2017, 488 (92%) of which had accompanying patient travel information obtained via an enhanced surveillance questionnaire. The majority of cases involved S. Typhi 4.3.1 (H58) linked with travel to South Asia (59%). Travel to East and West Africa were associated with genotypes 4.3.1 and 3.3.1, respectively. Point mutations in the quinolone resistance determining region (QRDR), associated with reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones, were very common (85% of all cases) but the frequency varied significantly by region of travel: 95% in South Asia, 43% in East Africa, 27% in West Africa. QRDR triple mutants, resistant to ciprofloxacin, were restricted to 4.3.1 lineage II and associated with travel to India, accounting for 23% of cases reporting travel to the country. Overall 24% of isolates were MDR, however the frequency varied significantly by region and country of travel: 27% in West Africa, 52% in East Africa, 55% in Pakistan, 24% in Bangladesh, 3% in India. MDR determinants were plasmid-borne (IncHI1 PST2 plasmids) in S. Typhi 3.1.1 linked to West Africa, but in all other regions MDR was chromosomally integrated in 4.3.1 lineage I. We propose that routine WGS data from travel-associated cases in industrialised countries could serve as informal sentinel AMR genomic surveillance data for countries where WGS is not available or routinely performed.


Assuntos
Farmacorresistência Bacteriana/genética , Salmonella typhi/genética , Febre Tifoide/epidemiologia , Genótipo , Humanos , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Quinolonas/farmacologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Febre Tifoide/microbiologia , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma
15.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 139(12)2019 09 10.
Artigo em Norueguês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31502778

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This case report presents one of the first documented incidents of chronic Q-fever (C. burnetii) in Norway. A comprehensive workup resulted in an unexpected finding. CASE PRESENTATION: A Norwegian woman in her eighties presented to a district general hospital with lower back pain, decreased general condition and weight loss. Computer tomography (CT) revealed a large thoracic aortic aneurysm presumed to be of mycotic origin, and later magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans revealed osteomyelitis in the surrounding vertebrae. Conventional diagnostic workup did not identify the causative agent. After more than 6 months of different examinations, surgery, exhausting invasive procedures and antimicrobial treatment, we were ultimately successful in determining the microbial cause of chronic mycotic aneurism and osteomyelitis to be C. Burnetii (Q-fever) through serological and PCR analysis. INTERPRETATION: An increasing proportion of the population in all age groups travel abroad, and clinicians should be aware of the increasing incidence of imported infectious diseases. Obtaining a thorough medical history is still an important tool in the diagnostic process.


Assuntos
Aneurisma da Aorta Torácica/microbiologia , Osteomielite/microbiologia , Febre Q , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Antibacterianos/administração & dosagem , Antibacterianos/uso terapêutico , Aneurisma da Aorta Torácica/diagnóstico por imagem , Coxiella burnetii/isolamento & purificação , Feminino , Humanos , Dor Lombar/microbiologia , Vértebras Lombares/diagnóstico por imagem , Vértebras Lombares/microbiologia , Imagem por Ressonância Magnética , Anamnese , Noruega , Osteomielite/diagnóstico por imagem , Febre Q/complicações , Febre Q/diagnóstico , Febre Q/tratamento farmacológico , Vértebras Torácicas/diagnóstico por imagem , Vértebras Torácicas/microbiologia , Tomografia Computadorizada por Raios X , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Perda de Peso
17.
Isr Med Assoc J ; 21(8): 538-541, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31474016

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Travelers' diarrhea (TD) is frequently encountered in people traveling from high-income to low-income countries; however, its epidemiology in those traveling between high-income countries is not known. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the incidence of diarrhea in North American students relocating to Israel. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study involving medical students from the United States and Canada relocating to Israel was conducted. Students who relocated to Israel during 2010-2016 were contacted by email to participate in an anonymous survey. Data included demographic information as well as occurrence, timing, duration, and outcome of diarrhea after relocation. RESULTS: Ninety-seven students participated in the survey. Most (93.7%) students relocated from the United States or Canada. The period-prevalence of diarrhea was 69.1%. The incidence of diarrhea declined from 34.8 cases per 100 student-months during the first month after relocation to 1.3 cases per 100 student-months after 1 year. The duration of diarrhea was up to 1 week in 72.7%. Students who reported diarrhea were younger than students who did not (mean age 24.0 ± 2.2 and 28.4 ± 1.8 years, respectively, P < 0.001). No other demographic parameter was significantly associated with a higher likelihood of diarrhea. CONCLUSIONS: A high proportion of North American medical students relocating to Israel reported diarrhea with clinical and epidemiological features similar to classic TD. Further studies are needed to elucidate the causative agents of TD in Israel.


Assuntos
Diarreia/epidemiologia , Inquéritos Epidemiológicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes/estatística & dados numéricos , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Doença Aguda , Adulto , Canadá/etnologia , Estudos de Coortes , Diarreia/etnologia , Feminino , Humanos , Incidência , Israel/epidemiologia , Masculino , Projetos Piloto , Estudos Retrospectivos , Viagem , Estados Unidos/etnologia , Adulto Jovem
18.
Med. clín (Ed. impr.) ; 153(5): 205-212, sept. 2019. tab
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-183997

RESUMO

El incremento de los viajes internacionales, la creciente presencia de vectores transmisores de arbovirus en nuestro país, las alertas de fiebres hemorrágicas, como el actual brote de ébola en la R. D. del Congo y los casos autóctonos de fiebre hemorrágica de Crimea-Congo en nuestro país, ponen de nuevo en primer plano las enfermedades tropicales. El aislamiento de los casos sospechosos de enfermedades de alta transmisibilidad y letalidad ha de ser una prioridad (fiebres hemorrágicas, MERS-CoV). Al valorar al paciente, una cuidadosa historia clínica basada en los aspectos epidemiológicos de la zona de procedencia, las actividades realizadas, el tiempo de estancia en el mismo y el inicio de los síntomas nos ayudarán finalmente, si no al diagnóstico definitivo, sí al menos a descartar las enfermedades que signifiquen una amenaza para él. Por su frecuencia y gravedad la malaria debe ser descartada, sin olvidar las otras causas habituales de fiebre con las que el médico de urgencias debe estar familiarizado también


The increase in international travel, the growing presence of arbovirus vectors in our country, and notifications of haemorrhagic fever such as the current outbreak of Ebola in D.R. Congo and the cases of Crimea-Congo haemorrhagic fever in our country have again cast the spotlight on tropical diseases Isolating suspected cases of highly contagious and lethal diseases must be a priority (Haemorrhagic fever, MERS-CoV). Assessing the patient, taking a careful medical history based on epidemiological aspects of the area of origin, activities they have carried out, their length of stay in the area and the onset of symptoms, will eventually help us, if not to make a definitive diagnosis, at least to exclude diseases that pose a threat to these patients. Malaria should be ruled out because of its frequency, without forgetting other common causes of fever familiar to emergency doctors


Assuntos
Humanos , Controle Sanitário de Viajantes , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Isolamento de Pacientes/tendências , Saúde do Viajante , Doenças Transmissíveis Importadas/epidemiologia , Febres Hemorrágicas Virais/epidemiologia , Infecções por Arbovirus/epidemiologia , Arbovirus/isolamento & purificação , Meningite/epidemiologia , Febre Tifoide/epidemiologia , Rickettsia/isolamento & purificação , Coronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Esquistossomose/epidemiologia
19.
Mikrobiyol Bul ; 53(3): 348-353, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Turco | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31414637

RESUMO

The frequency of travel-related infections in the world has increased due to the easily and widespread use of travel facilities in the 21st century. Vector-borne diseases are an important part of infectious diseases. Dengue fever is one of the travel-related infections that has been reported increasingly in recent years through the development of diagnostic methods. The aim of this report was to present two Dengue fever cases originating from travel. There was a story of mosquito bite during a trip to Sri Lanka travel in our first case. The patient was 30 years old and maculopapular rash appeared on the fifth day of contact. Three days after the onset of the rash, she has admitted to our clinic, complaining with fever and chills. Increased leukopenia and muscle enzymes were detected in the laboratory analysis. Real-time reverse transcriptase polimerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was positive in the serum sample. The patient was followed up with supportive care and discharged by improvement. The second case, a 24-year-old male, had a story of mosquito bite during his trip to Malaysia. After the patient complained of fever, chills, fever, nausea, vomiting and muscle pain, the Dengue virus (DENV) NS1 antigen test performed in this country was found to be positive. In the second case, there was no maculopapular rash and laboratory analysis showed an increase in leukopenia, thrombocytopenia and muscle enzymes. RT-PCR positivity was detected in the serum sample. The patient was followed up with supportive treatment and discharged with cure. DENV infections are caused by DENV which is common in the tropical areas of the world. There are four DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4 serotypes. DENV infections can present different clinical manifestations such as asymptomatic disease, viral syndrome, Dengue haemorrhagic fever, and Dengue shock syndrome. Dengue fever is often accompanied by arthritis, maculopapular rash and high fever. Our cases were defined as Dengue fever according to this definition. In the diagnosis of the disease, it is necessary first to be suspicious of the disease and the travel history must be questioned. In the definitive diagnosis, virus isolation, antigen, nucleic acid detection and serological tests are used. The virus can be isolated from blood, serum, urine and tissues. In the first five days after beginning of the symptoms associated with DENV infections, serum RT-PCR and Dengue NS1 antigen test may be positive.


Assuntos
Vírus da Dengue , Dengue , Doença Relacionada a Viagens , Adulto , Dengue/complicações , Dengue/diagnóstico , Dengue/patologia , Dengue/virologia , Vírus da Dengue/classificação , Exantema/etiologia , Feminino , Humanos , Malásia , Masculino , Sri Lanka , Resultado do Tratamento , Adulto Jovem
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