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1.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1642, 2021 09 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34496810

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Epidemiological theory and many empirical studies support the hypothesis that there is a protective effect of male circumcision against some sexually transmitted infections (STIs). However, there is a paucity of randomized control trials (RCTs) to test this hypothesis in the South African population. Due to the infeasibility of conducting RCTs, estimating marginal or average treatment effects with observational data increases interest. Using targeted maximum likelihood estimation (TMLE), a doubly robust estimation technique, we aim to provide evidence of an association between medical male circumcision (MMC) and two STI outcomes. METHODS: HIV and HSV-2 status were the two primary outcomes for this study. We investigated the associations between MMC and these STI outcomes, using cross-sectional data from the HIV Incidence Provincial Surveillance System (HIPSS) study in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. HIV antibodies were tested from the blood samples collected in the study. For HSV-2, serum samples were tested for HSV-2 antibodies via an ELISA-based anti-HSV-2 IgG. We estimated marginal prevalence ratios (PR) using TMLE and compared estimates with those from propensity score full matching (PSFM) and inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW). RESULTS: From a total 2850 male participants included in the analytic sample, the overall weighted prevalence of HIV was 32.4% (n = 941) and HSV-2 was 53.2% (n = 1529). TMLE estimates suggest that MMC was associated with 31% lower HIV prevalence (PR: 0.690; 95% CI: 0.614, 0.777) and 21.1% lower HSV-2 prevalence (PR: 0.789; 95% CI: 0.734, 0.848). The propensity score analyses also provided evidence of association of MMC with lower prevalence of HIV and HSV-2. For PSFM: HIV (PR: 0.689; 95% CI: 0.537, 0.885), and HSV-2 (PR: 0.832; 95% CI: 0.709, 0.975). For IPTW: HIV (PR: 0.708; 95% CI: 0.572, 0.875), and HSV-2 (PR: 0.837; 95% CI: 0.738, 0.949). CONCLUSION: Using a TMLE approach, we present further evidence of a protective association of MMC against HIV and HSV-2 in this hyper-endemic South African setting. TMLE has the potential to enhance the evidence base for recommendations that embrace the effect of public health interventions on health or disease outcomes.


Assuntos
Circuncisão Masculina , Infecções por HIV , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Funções Verossimilhança , Masculino , Prevalência , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , África do Sul/epidemiologia
2.
J Infect Chemother ; 27(10): 1375-1383, 2021 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34344580

RESUMO

The best strategy for preventing the spread of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) is by educating the young. It is considered effective to provide such education by the age of 15-16 years (at the beginning of high school age), ideally before teenagers become sexually active. This guideline describes the framework and discusses the educational points for standard educational slides created by the Japanese Society for Sexually Transmitted Infections and the Japan Society of Adolescentology. A discussion of sexuality is also a discussion of human life, and the prevention of STIs is an important part of sex education. The Japanese Society for Sexually Transmitted Infections has a certification system for doctors and experts, and considers prevention education to be one of its key programs. In this revised version additional slides which are more easy to understand for junior high school students are shown.


Assuntos
Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Adolescente , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Instituições Acadêmicas , Educação Sexual , Comportamento Sexual , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Estudantes
3.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 87(5): 1111-1118, 2021 08 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34229327

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: We assessed how the Dutch restrictions imposed on March 15, 2020, affected sexual behavior, preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP), and condom use among PrEP users in Amsterdam. METHODS: We used data on (1) PrEP use, (2) anal sex acts, and (3) condom use, per partner type [steady partners (SPs), known casual partners (KCPs), and unknown casual partners (UCPs)], collected daily through a mobile application used between December 1, 2019, and June 30, 2020. We compared the period before versus after March 15, 2020, regarding average proportion of days per week at which each end point was reported and average proportion of anal sex acts covered by PrEP and/or condoms. RESULTS: We included data from 136 men who have sex with men. After March 15, 2020, the proportion of days with anal sex increased with SPs [odds ratio (OR) = 1.26; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.10 to 1.44) and decreased with KCPs (OR = 0.73; 95% CI = 0.64 to 0.82) and UCPs (OR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.48 to 0.61). Shifts in partner types were most profound immediately after March 15, 2020, whereas returning to prerestriction levels mid-May 2020. The proportion of days with PrEP use decreased from 74% before to 58% after March 15, 2020 (P < 0.001). After March 15, 2020, PrEP use during sex decreased with UCPs (ß = -0.36; 95% CI = -0.72 to 0.00) but not with SPs and KCPs. Condom use during sex decreased with KCPs (ß = -0.36; 95% CI = -0.67 to 0.04) and UCPs (ß = -0.24; 95% CI = -0.46 to 0.03) but not with SPs. CONCLUSIONS: MSM decreased sex with casual partners and increased sex with SP, but changes were transient. Decreases in sex acts with casual partners paralleled decreases in PrEP use. However, condom use during sex with casual partners decreased, indicating the importance of continued sexual health services, including sexually transmitted infections screening and PrEP care, during COVID-19 restrictions.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina , Profilaxia Pré-Exposição , Comportamento Sexual , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Adulto , Preservativos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexo Seguro , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/tratamento farmacológico
6.
Emerg Med Clin North Am ; 39(3): 589-603, 2021 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34215404

RESUMO

Emergency medicine clinicians are mandated reporters, legally, which obligates clinicians to report any behavior suspicious for child maltreatment to local authorities. Pediatric patients often present to the emergency department with concern for physical injury and other pervasive complaints. In some cases, these injuries are nonaccidental. To appropriately advocate and protect children from further physical and emotional trauma, it is important for clinicians to recognize the signs and symptoms of child maltreatment and sexual abuse.


Assuntos
Maus-Tratos Infantis/diagnóstico , Cuidadores , Criança , Desenvolvimento Infantil , Serviços de Proteção Infantil , Diagnóstico Diferencial , Diagnóstico por Imagem , Medicina Legal , Humanos , Notificação de Abuso , Anamnese , Síndrome de Munchausen Causada por Terceiro/diagnóstico , Exame Físico , Profilaxia Pós-Exposição , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Tempo para o Tratamento
7.
Cien Saude Colet ; 26(7): 2683-2692, 2021 Jul.
Artigo em Português, Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34231681

RESUMO

This study aims to address the vulnerability of young university students to sexually transmitted infections and to identify and analyze the sexual behavior of university students and practices to prevent sexually transmitted infections. A descriptive and qualitative research study conducted in a private university in Rio de Janeiro in 2016, with 30 university students of both genders, aged 18-29 years old. The discursive data were collected by the Focal Group technique and analyzed using the content analysis technique, with the aid of the Nvivo 9.0 software, and anchored in John Gagnon's theory of sexual scripts. The findings denote that university students recognize themselves as a population vulnerable to infections transmitted by unprotected sex. The group has insufficient knowledge about infections and does not use condoms continuously. In the discourses of the university students, it was noticed that the type of affective relationship is determinant for the use (or not) of condoms. Young people believe in the group's invulnerability and therefore assume risky sexual behaviors.


Assuntos
Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Estudantes , Adolescente , Adulto , Brasil/epidemiologia , Preservativos , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Assunção de Riscos , Comportamento Sexual , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Adulto Jovem
8.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34283268

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Holistic sexual healthcare factors in diversity of social habitat and aims to improvise client outreach for prevention, testing, counseling, and treatment of STIs. Towards this goal, the immunology outpatient clinic, the public health department of Bochum, the AIDS Service Organization Bochum e. v., and other community-driven NGOs mutually cooperate under the umbrella of WIR - Walk In Ruhr, Centre for Sexual Health and Medicine. OBJECTIVES: WIR is an innovative concept for multi-professional in-house ambulatory healthcare with cross-sectoral and cross-legal reach. It has successfully improved accessibility, testing and treatment rates, and HIV/STI self-assessment. We present the results achieved at WIR. METHODS: A mixed-method design of qualitative and quantitative surveys. RESULTS: The WIR reaches more women (27.7%) and heterosexuals (56.4%) than other counseling/test centers. The rate of positive test results at the WIR increased from 9.3% in 2017 to 12.6% in 2018 and progress from prevention to medical care is a significant aspect of WIR. The Federal Ministry of Health has externally evaluated WIR for over three years. DISCUSSION: The integrative care model of WIR allows for early outreach and treatment of individuals with HIV/ST infections. Health advisors remain an important instrument facilitating outreach and psychosocial/psychotherapeutic counseling is administered frequently. Such a multi-layered approach in prevention, testing, and consultation, leads to improvement in both medical outcomes and the self-responsible attitude of patients towards their sexual health. Hence, expansion of integrative care models like WIR on a wider scale could arguably contribute to better health service and sexual health.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Saúde Sexual , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Comportamento Sexual , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/diagnóstico , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle
9.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1439, 2021 07 21.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34289834

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A common risk behavior in adolescence is the early initiation of unprotected sex that exposes adolescents to an unplanned pregnancy or sexually transmitted infections. Schools are an ideal place to strengthen adolescents' sexual knowledge and modify their behavior, guiding them to exercise responsible sexuality. The purpose of this article was to evaluate the knowledge of public secondary school teachers who received training in comprehensive education in sexuality (CES) and estimate the counseling's effect on students' sexual behavior. METHODS: Seventy-five public school teachers were trained in participatory and innovative techniques for CES. The change in teacher knowledge (n = 75) was assessed before and after the training using t-tests, Wilcoxon ranks tests and a Generalized Estimate Equation model. The students' sexual and reproductive behavior was evaluated in intervention (n = 650) and comparison schools (n = 555). We fit a logistic regression model using the students' sexual debut as a dependent variable. RESULTS: Teachers increased their knowledge of sexuality after training from 5.3 to 6.1 (p < 0.01). 83.3% of students in the intervention school reported using a contraceptive method in their last sexual relation, while 58.3% did so in the comparison schools. The students in comparison schools were 4.7 (p < 0.01) times more likely to start sexual initiation than students in the intervention schools. CONCLUSION: Training in CES improved teachers' knowledge about sexual and reproductive health. Students who received counseling from teachers who were trained in participatory and innovative techniques for CES used more contraceptive protection and delayed sexual debut.


Assuntos
Educação Sexual , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Adolescente , Feminino , Humanos , Gravidez , Instituições Acadêmicas , Comportamento Sexual , Sexualidade , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle
12.
AIDS ; 35(9): 1461-1477, 2021 07 15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34185713

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Given stark health inequities among precarious and criminalized workers, we aimed to apply a structural determinants framework to systematically review evidence on HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevalence, access to HIV/STI/SRH services, and condom use among im/migrant sex workers (ISWs) globally. METHODS: Systematic search of peer-reviewed studies published in English (2009-2019). Eligible studies reported HIV/STI, access to HIV/STI/SRH services, and/or condom use outcomes and/or lived experiences among ISWs. Quantitative and qualitative data were synthesized using a structural determinants framework. RESULTS: Of 425 studies screened, 29 studies from 15 countries were included. HIV prevalence ranged from 0.3 to 13.6% and varied across settings, with highest prevalence among undocumented ISWs in a high-income country (Portugal). Precarious immigration status was a structural factor associated with poorer HIV/STI outcomes, whereas qualitative narratives showed ISWs' lived experiences as strongly shaped by policing and stigma. Despite disparities, in some settings, HIV and STI prevalence were lower and odds of condom use with clients were higher among ISWs relative to non-im/migrant sex workers. This review identified a paucity of research on SRH and male and gender-diverse ISWs. Across legislative settings, criminalization of SW and im/migrant status, policing, and migration-related marginalization were prominent structural barriers to ISWs' HIV/STI/SRH access. CONCLUSION: This review identified important inequities and variation in HIV/STI prevalence among ISWs globally. Our findings highlight impacts of the intersections of migration and criminalization, and suggest a need to reform criminalized sex work laws; address punitive policing and immigration enforcement; enable safer indoor work environments; and expand community-based interventions towards promoting HIV/STI/SRH access and health equity among ISWs.


Assuntos
Emigrantes e Imigrantes , Infecções por HIV , Profissionais do Sexo , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Preservativos , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Masculino , Portugal , Prevalência , Saúde Reprodutiva , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle
13.
Soc Sci Med ; 282: 113997, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34183195

RESUMO

Faith-based organisations constitute the second largest healthcare providers in Sub-Saharan Africa but their religious values might be in conflict with providing some sexual and reproductive health services. We undertake regression analysis on data detailing client-provider interactions from a facility census in Malawi and examine whether religious ownership of facilities is associated with the degree of adherence to family planning guidelines. We find that faith-based organisations offer fewer services related to the investigation and prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and the promotion of condom use. The estimates are robust to several sensitivity checks on the impact of client selection. Given the prevalence of faith-based facilities in Sub-Saharan Africa, our results suggest that populations across the region may be at risk from inadequate sexual and reproductive healthcare provision which could exacerbate the incidence of STIs, such as HIV/AIDS, and unplanned pregnancies.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Atenção à Saúde , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Malaui , Gravidez , Comportamento Sexual , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle
14.
Curr HIV/AIDS Rep ; 18(4): 261-270, 2021 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34105091

RESUMO

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review highlights the intersection of the COVID-19, HIV, and STI pandemics and examines how harm reduction strategies can be applied broadly to controlling a pandemic. RECENT FINDINGS: Since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, remarkable advances in the understanding of COVID-19 prevention, diagnosis, and treatment have been made at a much faster pace than prior pandemics, yet much more still remains to be discovered. Many of the strategies to control the COVID-19 pandemic mirror those employed to stem the HIV pandemic. Harm reduction principles used in the HIV pandemic can be applied to reduce the morbidity and mortality of the COVID-19 pandemic through effective prevention, detection, and treatment strategies.


Assuntos
COVID-19/prevenção & controle , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Redução do Dano , SARS-CoV-2 , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , COVID-19/diagnóstico , COVID-19/epidemiologia , COVID-19/terapia , Quimioprevenção , Infecções por HIV/diagnóstico , Infecções por HIV/terapia , Humanos , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/diagnóstico , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/terapia , Vacinação
15.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34073683

RESUMO

Adolescent sexual behavior is shaped by individual, social, and structural factors that can increase HIV-risk, unwanted pregnancy, and sexually transmitted disease. To inform the development of a comprehensive sexuality education program, 239 secondary school adolescents ages 14-19 in Maun, Botswana, completed a survey of sexual and reproductive health knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors in February-March 2020. Bivariate and multivariate analyses examined factors associated with sexual experience and perceived ability to insist on condoms. Approximately 21% of respondents reported having had sexual intercourse. More than half felt able to insist on condoms. Sources of information about human reproduction, alcohol use, attitudes about when sex is acceptable, and perceived sexual activity by one's peers were predictive of sexual experience. Age, confidence in correct condom use, perceived acceptability of adolescent sex with condoms, and endorsement of prevailing gender norms were significantly associated with perceived ability to insist on condom use.


Assuntos
Comportamento do Adolescente , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Adolescente , Adulto , Botsuana , Preservativos , Feminino , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Humanos , Intenção , Gravidez , Comportamento Sexual , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Adulto Jovem
16.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1090, 2021 06 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34098916

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Social networks, norms, and discussions about sexual health may inform sexual practices, influencing risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or sexually transmitted infection (STI) acquisition. To better understand social networks of Peruvian men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women (trans women), we examined key social network members (SNMs), participant perceptions of these network members' opinions toward sexual health behaviors, and associations between network member characteristics and condomless anal intercourse (CAI). METHODS: In a 2017 cross-sectional study, a convenience sample of 565 MSM and trans women with HIV-negative or unknown serostatus was asked to identify three close SNMs; describe discussions about HIV and STI prevention with each; and report perceived opinions of condom use, HIV/STI testing, and partner notification of STIs. Generalized estimating equations evaluated relationships between SNM characteristics, opinions, and discussions and participant-reported CAI. RESULTS: Among participants who identified as MSM, 42.3% of key SNMs were perceived to identify as gay. MSM "never" discussed HIV and STI prevention concerns with 42.4% of heterosexual SNMs, but discussed them "at least once weekly" with 16.9 and 16.6% of gay- and bisexual- identifying SNMs, respectively. Among participants who identified as trans women, 28.2% of key SNMs were perceived as heterosexual; 25.9%, as bisexual; 24.7%, as transgender; and 21.2%, as gay. Trans women discussed HIV/STI prevention least with cis-gender heterosexual network members (40.2% "never") and most with transgender network members (27.1% "at least once weekly"). Participants perceived most of their close social network to be completely in favor of condom use (71.2% MSM SNMs, 61.5% trans women SNMs) and HIV/STI testing (73.1% MSM SNMs, 75.6% trans women SNMs), but described less support for partner STI notification (33.4% MSM SNMs, 37.4% trans women SNMs). Most participants reported CAI with at least one of their past three sexual partners (77.5% MSM, 62.8% trans women). SNM characteristics were not significantly associated with participant-reported frequency of CAI. CONCLUSIONS: Findings compare social support, perceived social norms, and discussion patterns of Peruvian MSM and trans women, offering insight into social contexts and sexual behaviors. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The parent study from which this analysis was derived was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier: NCT03010020 ) on January 4, 2017.


Assuntos
Infecções por HIV , Saúde Sexual , Minorias Sexuais e de Gênero , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Pessoas Transgênero , Comunicação , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Homossexualidade Masculina , Humanos , Masculino , Peru/epidemiologia , Comportamento Sexual , Parceiros Sexuais , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Rede Social
17.
Nursing (Säo Paulo) ; 24(277): 5857-5864, jun.2021.
Artigo em Português | LILACS, BDENF - Enfermagem | ID: biblio-1253862

RESUMO

Objetivo: Este trabalho objetiva relatar a experiência de graduandas de enfermagem durante encontros com pessoas que vivem com o HIV e participam de um movimento social organizado. Método: A ideia de integrar os encontros promovidos pelo grupo surgiu da necessidade de se aproximar de pessoas que atuam no cenário baiano propondo discussões sobre prevenção, diagnóstico e enfrentamento da epidemia do HIV, objetos do projeto de extensão Bonde Universitário: participação jovem na prevenção de Infecções Sexualmente Transmissíveis, do qual as estudantes fazem parte. Resultado: Os encontros desencadearam rodas de conversas mensais com temas sugeridos pelos participantes: preconceito, perspectiva de futuro e liderança. A ação promoveu a integração entre os participantes e conferiu às graduandas uma prática rica de atenção à saúde. Conclusão: A participação proporcionou a organização de atividades educativas e um aprendizado mútuo, com elaboração de ações inovadoras que tenham potencial para produzir efeitos sobre as práticas sexuais dos sujeitos.(AU)


Objective: This work aims to report the experience of undergraduate nursing students during meetings with people living with HIV and participating in an organized social movement. Method: The idea of integrating the meetings promoted by the group arose from the need to approach people who work in the Bahian scenario, proposing discussions about prevention, diagnosis and coping with the HIV epidemic, objects of the Bonde Universitário extension project: young participation in the prevention of Sexually Transmitted Infections, of which the students are a part. Result: The meetings triggered rounds of monthly conversations with themes suggested by the participants: prejudice, perspective of the future and leadership. The action promoted the integration among the participants and gave the undergraduate students a rich practice of health care. Conclusion: Participation provided the organization of educational activities and mutual learning, with the development of innovative actions that have the potential to produce effects on the sexual practices of the subjects.(AU)


Objetivo: Este trabajo tiene como objetivo reportar la experiencia de estudiantes de enfermería durante encuentros con personas que viven con el VIH y que participan en un movimiento social organizado. Método: La idea de integrar los encuentros promovidos por el grupo surgió de la necesidad de acercarse a las personas que trabajan en el escenario bahiano, proponiendo discusiones sobre prevención, diagnóstico y afrontamiento de la epidemia de VIH, objetos del proyecto de extensión Bonde Universitário: jóvenes participación en la prevención de Infecciones de Transmisión Sexual, de la cual los estudiantes son parte. Resultado: Los encuentros desencadenaron rondas de conversaciones mensuales con temas propuestos por los participantes: prejuicio, perspectiva de futuro y liderazgo. La acción promovió la integración entre los participantes y brindó a los estudiantes de pregrado una rica práctica del cuidado de la salud. Conclusión: La participación proporcionó la organización de actividades educativas y de aprendizaje mutuo, con el desarrollo de acciones innovadoras que tienen el potencial de producir efectos en las prácticas sexuales de los sujetos.(AU)


Assuntos
Humanos , Masculino , Feminino , Estudantes de Enfermagem , Infecções por HIV , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle , Promoção da Saúde
18.
Sex Transm Dis ; 48(8S): S58-S65, 2021 08 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33938515

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: Chlamydia and gonorrhea are 2 of the most common bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) worldwide. Rising chlamydia and gonorrhea rates along with increased closing of STI clinics has led many to seek STI testing in clinical settings such as urgent cares and walk-in clinics. However, with competing priorities, providing effective and efficient STI care can be difficult in these settings. This has left a growing need for the implementation of novel STI screening programs in other clinical settings. This review summarizes previous studies that have evaluated the clinical implementation of chlamydia and gonorrhea screening programs in these settings. Literature from January 2015 to February 2020 regarding the implementation or evaluation of STI screening programs in clinical settings was reviewed. Constructs from the Capability, Opportunity, Motivation, and Behavior model were used to organize results, as this model can aid in identifying specific strategies for behavior/process change interventions. We found that multiple STI screening programs have been implemented and evaluated in 5 different countries and multiple health care facilities including sexual health clinics, urgent cares, walk-in clinics, and university health clinics. When implementing new STI screening programs, sample-first, test-and-go services and molecular point-of-care (POC) testing approaches were found to be effective in increasing screening and reducing costs and time to treatment. At the health care systems level, these programs can help reduce STI screening costs and generate additional revenue for clinics. At the provider level, clear communication and guidance can help clinical and administrative staff in adopting new screening programs. Finally, at the patient level, new programs can reduce time to treatment and travel costs in visiting clinics multiple times for testing and treatment services.


Assuntos
Infecções por Chlamydia , Gonorreia , Infecções por HIV , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Infecções por Chlamydia/diagnóstico , Gonorreia/diagnóstico , Humanos , Ciência da Implementação , Programas de Rastreamento , Motivação , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/diagnóstico , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle
19.
Sex Transm Dis ; 48(8S): S50-S53, 2021 08 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33938516

RESUMO

ABSTRACT: The National Sexually Transmitted Diseases Curriculum is an e-learning platform. New registrations and learning group creations in March to April 2020 were compared with previous 12-month data. Substantial increases in registrations and learning groups demonstrate that the National Sexually Transmitted Diseases Curriculum was successfully leveraged to meet rapidly shifting training needs due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


Assuntos
COVID-19 , Instrução por Computador , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis , Currículo , Humanos , Pandemias , SARS-CoV-2 , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/epidemiologia , Doenças Sexualmente Transmissíveis/prevenção & controle
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