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1.
Mol Cell Probes ; 54: 101669, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33203619

RESUMO

Feline coronavirus (FCoV) is classified into two pathotypes: the avirulent feline enteric coronavirus (FECV), and the virulent feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). Rapid pathogen detection, which is efficient and convenient, is the best approach for early confirmatory diagnosis. In this study, we first developed and evaluated a rapid recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) detection method for FCoV that can detect FCoV within 15 min at 39 °C. The detection limit of that assay was 233 copies/µL DNA molecules per reaction. The specificity was high: it did not cross-react with canine distemper virus (CDV), canine coronavirus (CCoV), canine adenovirus (CAV), feline calicivirus (FCV), feline herpesvirus (FHV), or feline parvovirus (FPV). This assay was evaluated using 42 clinical samples (30 diarrhea samples and 12 ascites samples). The coincidence rate between FCoV-RPA and RT-qPCR for detection in clinical samples was 95.2%. In summary, FCoV-RPA analysis provides an efficient, rapid, and sensitive detection method for FCoV.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Coronavirus Felino/genética , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/diagnóstico , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular/veterinária , Técnicas de Amplificação de Ácido Nucleico/métodos , RNA Viral/genética , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Coronavirus Felino/isolamento & purificação , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular/métodos , Técnicas de Amplificação de Ácido Nucleico/veterinária , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real/métodos , Sensibilidade e Especificidade
2.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(4): 482-487, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33151116

RESUMO

Pain recognition and treatment in companion animals are important aspects of veterinary medicine, yet the teaching of these concepts may not be adequate at all academic institutions. This study was designed to evaluate veterinary students' ability to recall signs of pain and specific analgesic drugs in dogs and cats. We hypothesized that students in the fourth, or final, year of their veterinary curriculum would have a better understanding of pain recognition and be able to recall more analgesic options. A brief, voluntary, and anonymous open question survey was made available to all veterinary students, years 1 to 4, at our institution. The questions included, "How does a cat/dog show signs of pain?" and "What pain medications are used in cats/dogs?" Survey responses were collated according to the students' year in the curriculum, and the most common responses for signs of pain and analgesic medications recalled by the students in both the cat and dog were compared for significant differences. Results showed that students in the class of 2017 (seniors) had no superior recall of analgesic medications or recognition of pain in cats or dogs compared to the other classes. Vocalization was the most common sign of pain recalled with at least 50% responses from all classes. Carprofen was the most commonly recalled analgesic for dogs (the difference between classes, p = .04). Meloxicam was the most commonly recalled analgesic for cats (the difference among classes, p < .001). Based on these results, areas of improvement were identified for our analgesic curriculum.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Educação em Veterinária , Analgésicos/uso terapêutico , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/tratamento farmacológico , Gatos , Cães , Humanos , Dor/diagnóstico , Dor/tratamento farmacológico , Dor/veterinária , Estudantes
3.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(4): e014220, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33111845

RESUMO

Spotted fever group rickettsioses are emerging diseases. In some of these diseases, domestic dogs act as sentinels. Canine serological studies have demonstrated that rickettsial dispersion is concentrated in rural areas, seroprevalence being higher where human rickettsioses are endemic. In Rio de Janeiro, the Atlantic forest vegetation has been devastated by urbanization. In this context, we aimed to detect Rickettsia spp. in urban areas of the West Zone of Rio de Janeiro. Sera from 130 dogs were tested by Indirect Immunofluorescence Assay, and ticks collected from these dogs were tested by polymerase chain reaction. We found the rate of serological reactions against R. rickettsii and R. parkeri in our study area to exceed those of rural and non-endemic areas, highlighting the importance of dogs as urban sentinels. The possibility of contact with opossums and capybaras increased the chances of exposure to Rickettsia spp., reinforcing the hypothetical link between the landscape and the rickettsial wild cycle. Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato was the tick most frequently observed. PCR-positive samples showed similarity with R. rickettsii and R. felis, an emerging pathogen rarely reported from ticks. We observed that rickettsiae circulate in urban places and ticks from indoor environments, which may be involved in bacterial epidemiology.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Rhipicephalus sanguineus , Infecções por Rickettsia , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Cães , Humanos , Rickettsia , Infecções por Rickettsia/diagnóstico , Infecções por Rickettsia/epidemiologia , Infecções por Rickettsia/veterinária , Febre Maculosa das Montanhas Rochosas/epidemiologia , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Carrapatos/microbiologia
4.
J Virol Methods ; 286: 113979, 2020 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32979406

RESUMO

Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) are members of the alphacoronavirus genus that are further characterized by serotype (types I and II) based on the antigenicity of the spike (S) protein and by pathotype based on the associated clinical conditions. Feline enteric coronaviruses (FECV) are associated with the vast majority of infections and are typically asymptomatic. Within individual animals, FECV can mutate and cause a severe and usually fatal disease called feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), the leading infectious cause of death in domestic cat populations. There are no approved antiviral drugs or recommended vaccines to treat or prevent FCoV infection. The plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) traditionally employed to assess immune responses and to screen therapeutic and vaccine candidates is time-consuming, low-throughput, and typically requires 2-3 days for the formation and manual counting of cytolytic plaques. Host cells are capable of carrying heavy viral burden in the absence of visible cytolytic effects, thereby reducing the sensitivity of the assay. In addition, operator-to-operator variation can generate uncertainty in the results and digital records are not automatically created. To address these challenges we developed a novel high-throughput viral microneutralization assay, with quantification of virus-infected cells performed in a plate-based image cytometer. Host cell seeding density, microplate surface coating, virus concentration and incubation time, wash buffer and fluorescent labeling were optimized. Subsequently, this FCoV viral neutralization assay was used to explore immune correlates of protection using plasma from naturally FECV-infected cats. We demonstrate that the high-throughput viral neutralization assay using the Celigo Image Cytometer provides a robust and efficient method for the rapid screening of therapeutic antibodies, antiviral compounds, and vaccines. This method can be applied to various viral infectious diseases to accelerate vaccine and antiviral drug discovery and development.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Coronavirus Felino/isolamento & purificação , Ensaios de Triagem em Larga Escala/veterinária , Citometria por Imagem/métodos , Testes de Neutralização/métodos , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Linhagem Celular , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/diagnóstico , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/virologia , Ensaios de Triagem em Larga Escala/métodos , Citometria por Imagem/veterinária , Testes de Neutralização/veterinária , Carga Viral
5.
J Feline Med Surg ; 22(9): 831-846, 2020 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32845225

RESUMO

PRACTICAL RELEVANCE: Feline leukaemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus of domestic cats worldwide. Cats lacking strong FeLV-specific immunity and undergoing progressive infection commonly develop fatal FeLV-associated disease. Many aspects of FeLV infection pathogenesis have been elucidated, some during more recent years using molecular techniques. It is recommended that the FeLV status of every cat is known, since FeLV infection can influence the prognosis and clinical management of every sick cat. Moreover, knowledge of a cat's FeLV status is of epidemiological importance to prevent further spread of the infection. CLINICAL CHALLENGES: Diagnosing FeLV infection remains challenging due to different outcomes of infection, which can vary over time depending on the balance between the virus and the host's immune system. Furthermore, testing for FeLV infection has become more refined over the years and now includes diagnostic assays for different viral and immunological parameters. Knowledge of FeLV infection pathogenesis, as well as the particulars of FeLV detection methods, is an important prerequisite for correct interpretation of any test results and accurate determination of a cat's FeLV status. AIMS: The current review presents recent knowledge on FeLV pathogenesis, key features to be determined in FeLV infection, and frequently used FeLV detection methods, and their characteristics and interpretation. An algorithm for the diagnosis of FeLV infection in a single cat, developed by the European Advisory Board on Cat Diseases, is included, and FeLV testing in specific situations is addressed. As well as increasing awareness of this deadly infection in domestic cats, the aim is to contribute diagnostic expertise to allow veterinarians in practice to improve their recognition, and further reduce the prevalence, of FeLV infection.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Vírus da Leucemia Felina , Infecções por Retroviridae , Infecções Tumorais por Vírus , Animais , Gatos , Infecções por Retroviridae/diagnóstico , Infecções por Retroviridae/veterinária , Infecções Tumorais por Vírus/diagnóstico , Infecções Tumorais por Vírus/veterinária
6.
J Small Anim Pract ; 61(9): 541-546, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32692434

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To assess the utility of urine dipstick strips for detection of feline proteinuria when used in combination with urine-specific gravity, compared with urine protein-to-creatinine ratio as the gold standard. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective analysis of clinical records of comprehensive urine examination obtained from cats presented to a referral hospital. Diagnostic agreement and test accuracy were calculated for the dipstick test alone and in combination with the urine-specific gravity, using different cut-off values for proteinuria. Receiver-operating characteristic curves were also calculated. RESULTS: A total of 121 urine samples were included. The diagnostic agreement between dipstick and urine protein-creatinine ratio was poor. A dipstick result of equal or greater than "Trace" (0.1-0.3 g/L) had a sensitivity of 81% and a specificity of 31% to detect proteinuria. Grouping the samples by urine-specific gravity did not increase dipstick agreement with the urine protein-creatinine ratio and only resulted in a slight improvement in the accuracy of detecting proteinuria. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The dipstick test was not accurate for detecting proteinuria when combined with urine-specific gravity in cats. Clinicians should not rely on this test and, regardless of the urine concentration, other appropriate quantitative methods such as urine protein-creatinine ratio should always be performed to detect proteinuria in cats.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Fitas Reagentes , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Gatos , Creatinina , Proteinúria/diagnóstico , Proteinúria/veterinária , Estudos Retrospectivos , Sensibilidade e Especificidade , Gravidade Específica , Urinálise/veterinária
7.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(23): 710-713, 2020 Jun 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-590108

RESUMO

On April 22, CDC and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported cases of two domestic cats with confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). These are the first reported companion animals (including pets and service animals) with SARS-CoV-2 infection in the United States, and among the first findings of SARS-CoV-2 symptomatic companion animals reported worldwide. These feline cases originated from separate households and were epidemiologically linked to suspected or confirmed human COVID-19 cases in their respective households. Notification of presumptive positive animal test results triggered a One Health* investigation by state and federal partners, who determined that no further transmission events to other animals or persons had occurred. Both cats fully recovered. Although there is currently no evidence that animals play a substantial role in spreading COVID-19, CDC advises persons with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to restrict contact with animals during their illness and to monitor any animals with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and separate them from other persons and animals at home (1).


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Pandemias/veterinária , Animais de Estimação/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Animais , Gatos , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , New York , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Zoonoses
8.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(23): 710-713, 2020 Jun 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32525853

RESUMO

On April 22, CDC and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) reported cases of two domestic cats with confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). These are the first reported companion animals (including pets and service animals) with SARS-CoV-2 infection in the United States, and among the first findings of SARS-CoV-2 symptomatic companion animals reported worldwide. These feline cases originated from separate households and were epidemiologically linked to suspected or confirmed human COVID-19 cases in their respective households. Notification of presumptive positive animal test results triggered a One Health* investigation by state and federal partners, who determined that no further transmission events to other animals or persons had occurred. Both cats fully recovered. Although there is currently no evidence that animals play a substantial role in spreading COVID-19, CDC advises persons with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 to restrict contact with animals during their illness and to monitor any animals with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and separate them from other persons and animals at home (1).


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/diagnóstico , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Pandemias/veterinária , Animais de Estimação/virologia , Pneumonia Viral/diagnóstico , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Animais , Gatos , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , New York , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Zoonoses
9.
J Vet Emerg Crit Care (San Antonio) ; 30(4): 376-383, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32579274

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To assess the accuracy of focused cardiac ultrasound (FOCUS) and point-of-care N-terminal proBNP assay in the emergency setting for differentiation of cardiac from noncardiac causes of respiratory distress in cats. DESIGN: Prospective diagnostic accuracy study between 2014 and 2016. SETTING: Emergency room at an urban university teaching hospital. ANIMALS: Forty-one client-owned cats presenting for evaluation of respiratory distress. INTERVENTIONS: Emergency clinicians made an initial diagnosis of noncardiac or cardiac cause of respiratory distress based on physical examination (PE) findings and history. The diagnoses were updated after performing FOCUS and point-of-care N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide (POC-BNP). Reference standard diagnosis was determined by agreement of a board-certified cardiologist and critical care specialist with access to subsequent radiographs and echocardiograms. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Forty-one cats were enrolled. Three cats with incomplete data and 1 cat with an uncertain reference standard diagnosis were excluded. The remaining 37 cats were used for analysis: 21 cardiac and 16 noncardiac cases. The ratio of left atrial to aortic root diameter (LA:Ao) measured by FOCUS was significantly correlated with LA:Ao measured by echocardiography (R = 0.646, P < 0.0001). Emergency clinicians correctly diagnosed 27 of 37 (73.0%), yielding a PE positive percent agreement = 76.2% (95% CI, 52.8-91.8%) and negative percent agreement = 68.8% (95% CI, 41.3-89.0%). Five noncardiac and 5 cardiac cats were misdiagnosed. Post FOCUS, overall percent agreement improved to 34 of 37 (91.9%), with positive percent agreement = 95.2% (95% CI, 76.2-99.9%) and negative percent agreement = 87.5% (95% CI, 61.7-98.5%). The POC-BNP yielded an overall percent agreement = 32/34 (94.1%), positive percent agreement = 100% (95% CI, 82.4-100.0%), and negative percent agreement = 86.7% (95% CI, 59.5-98.3%) in differentiating cardiac versus noncardiac cases. CONCLUSIONS: FOCUS evaluation of basic cardiac structure and LA:Ao by trained emergency clinicians improved accuracy of diagnosis compared to PE in cats with respiratory distress. FOCUS and POC-BNP are useful diagnostics in the emergent setting.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Dispneia/veterinária , Ecocardiografia/veterinária , Cardiopatias/veterinária , Peptídeo Natriurético Encefálico/sangue , Sistemas Automatizados de Assistência Junto ao Leito , Animais , Doenças do Gato/sangue , Gatos , Dispneia/sangue , Dispneia/diagnóstico , Feminino , Hospitais Veterinários , Masculino , Estudos Prospectivos , Radiografia
10.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(2): e003520, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32520088

RESUMO

Blood samples and swabs from ocular conjunctiva and mouth were obtained from 64 cats. Of 64 serum samples, 19 were positive for Leishmania antibodies by ELISA (29.80%). Eight cats were positive by PCR (12.5%) in swab samples from mouth and/or ocular mucosa. Poor kappa agreement between serological and molecular results (k = 0.16) was obtained. From five positive PCR samples one was L. braziliensis and four were L. infantum. Phylogenetic analysis performed with the five isolates of Leishmania, showed that samples of L. infantum isolated from the cats were phylogenetically close to those isolated from domestic dogs in Brazil, while the L. braziliensis is very similar to the one described in humans in Venezuela. The study demonstrated that, despite high seropositivity for Leishmania in cats living in the study region, poor agreement between serological and molecular results indicate that positive serology is not indicative of Leishmania infection in cats. Parasite DNA can be detected in ocular conjunctiva and oral swabs from cats, indicating that such samples could be used for diagnosis. Results of phylogenetic analyzes show that L. infantum circulating in Brazil is capable of infecting different hosts, demonstrating the parasite's ability to overcome the interspecies barrier.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Leishmania braziliensis/isolamento & purificação , Leishmania infantum/isolamento & purificação , Leishmaniose/parasitologia , Animais , Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/sangue , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Gatos , DNA de Protozoário/análise , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática/veterinária , Leishmania braziliensis/genética , Leishmania braziliensis/imunologia , Leishmania infantum/genética , Leishmania infantum/imunologia , Leishmaniose/diagnóstico , Filogenia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária
11.
J Mycol Med ; 30(3): 101005, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32522404

RESUMO

The epidemiological, clinical and anatomopathological aspects of pythiosis in cats in northeastern Brazil are described. From January 2000 to December 2018 the Laboratory of Animal Pathology of the Federal University of Campina Grande received 1928 tissue samples of cats, three of which were diagnosed as pythiosis. Grossly, the cats showed a multinodular mass in the oral cavity associated with facial deformity (case 1), a large multinodular mass thickening the jejunum wall (case 2), and an ulcerated nodule in the skin at the base of the tail (case 3). Histologically, pyogranulomatous inflammation and necrosis, with intralesional predominantly negatively stained hyphae, were observed in all cases. Immunohistochemistry for Pythium insidiosum revealed strong immunolabelling of the hyphae. The diagnosis of pythiosis was based on the epidemiological, clinical and anatomopathological findings, and was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Although uncommon in cats, pythiosis should be readily considered as a differential diagnosis of chronic pyogranulomatous infections of the gastrointestinal tract and skin, especially in endemic areas, where the disease is often diagnosed in other animal species.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Pitiose/diagnóstico , Animais , Brasil , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Gatos , Assimetria Facial/microbiologia , Assimetria Facial/patologia , Assimetria Facial/veterinária , Feminino , Inflamação/microbiologia , Inflamação/patologia , Inflamação/veterinária , Masculino , Pitiose/microbiologia , Pythium/isolamento & purificação , Pythium/patogenicidade , Estudos Retrospectivos
12.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 50(4): 823-882, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32387302

RESUMO

Facial dermatitis in cats can be caused by a broad range of infectious, allergic, immune-mediated and neoplastic disorders with very different treatments and prognoses. Baseline dermatologic diagnostics (skin scrapings for mites, cytology for infection and to characterize inflammatory infiltrate, and dermatophyte culture) are required, as well as possible further diagnostics, including therapeutic trials for parasites and feeding a hypoallergenic diet, bacterial culture, and skin biopsies for histopathology in order to achieve a diagnosis. Clinical presentations of diseases affecting different parts of the feline face are presented and discussed.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Dermatite/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Gatos , Dermatite/diagnóstico , Orelha , Face , Nariz
13.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 50(4): 811-822, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32389353

RESUMO

Many older cats often suffer concurrently from multiple conditions. By focusing on the common concerns, rather than conflicting requirements, a management program can be devised. Optimize hydration, nutrition, and ensure comfort though providing analgesia and a low-stress environment in which the patient's feline-specific nature is respected both in the clinic and at home. Additional requirements, such as hyperphosphatemia or hypokalemia, can be met using treatments outside of diet, if necessary.


Assuntos
Envelhecimento , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Animais , Doenças do Gato/terapia , Gatos , Comorbidade , Hiperfosfatemia/terapia , Hiperfosfatemia/veterinária , Hipopotassemia/terapia , Hipopotassemia/veterinária
14.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 50(4): 883-898, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32360014

RESUMO

The focus of this article is on how interpretations of laboratory data can utilize both population and individual reference intervals, while making the most of routine testing procedures coupled with some of the newer laboratory tests, which can complement the existing tests in diagnosing disease.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Testes Diagnósticos de Rotina/veterinária , Animais , Gatos , Medicina Veterinária/tendências
16.
BMC Vet Res ; 16(1): 158, 2020 May 24.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32448251

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: At this time, elimination diets followed by oral food challenges (OFCs) represent the "gold standard" for diagnosing skin-manifesting food allergies (FA) in dogs and cats. Regrettably, there is no clear consensus on how long one should wait for clinical signs to flare after an OFC before diagnosing or ruling-out a FA in a dog or a cat. RESULTS: We searched two databases on October 23, 2019 to look for specific information on the time for a flare of clinical signs to occur during OFCs after elimination diets in dogs and cats with skin-manifesting FAs. Altogether, we reviewed the study results of nine papers that included 234 dogs and four articles containing data from 83 cats. As multiple OFCs could be done in the same patient and not all animals included were subjected to an OFC, we were able to compile 315 and 72 times to flare (TTF) after an OFC in dogs and cats, respectively. When regrouping all cases together, about 9% of dogs and 27% of cats exhibited a flare of clinical signs in the first day after an OFC; 21% of dogs and 29% of cats had such relapse by the end of the second day. The time needed for 50 and 90% of dogs to exhibit a deterioration of clinical signs (TTF50 and TTF90) was 5 and 14, respectively; in cats, these times were 4 and 7 days, respectively. By 14 days after an OFC, nearly all food-allergic patients from both species had had a relapse of clinical signs. These results are limited by the likely under-reporting of flares that occur on the first day immediately following an OFC, the time in which IgE-mediated acute allergic reactions typically develop. CONCLUSION: Veterinary clinicians performing an OFC need to wait for 14 and 7 days for more than 90% of dogs and cats with a skin-manifesting FA to have a flare of clinical signs, respectively.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Hipersensibilidade Alimentar/veterinária , Administração Oral , Animais , Doenças do Gato/imunologia , Gatos , Dermatite/diagnóstico , Dermatite/imunologia , Dermatite/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/imunologia , Cães , Hipersensibilidade Alimentar/diagnóstico , Fatores de Tempo
18.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(1): e012819, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32294719

RESUMO

Endoparasitic infections are associated with morbidity in cats. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of endoparasites among cats of different life stages in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The samples were analyzed individually by macroscopic exploration for proglottids and centrifugal-flotation. Stool samples were obtained from household cats (n = 57) and shelter cats (n = 336). Endoparasites were detected in 50.64% of the samples. Among household and shelter cats, 21.05% and 55.66% were infected with endoparasites, respectively. In household cats, the most prevalent endoparasites were Ancylostoma spp. (in 25.0%) and Strongyloides spp. (in 25.0%), followed by Toxocara spp. (in 16.67%), Dipylidium caninum (in 16.67%), Cystoisospora spp. (in 8.33%), and Uncinaria spp. + Ancylostoma spp. (in 8.33%). In shelter cats, the most prevalent endoparasite was Ancylostoma spp. (in 29.41%), followed by Cystoisospora spp. (in 26.20%) and Toxocara spp. (in 16.58%), as well as Cystoisospora spp. + Toxocara spp. (in 8.02%); Ancylostoma spp. + Toxocara spp. (in 11.76%); Cystoisospora spp. + Ancylostoma spp. (in 3.74%); Cystoisospora spp. + Toxocara spp. + Ancylostoma spp. (in 3.21%); and Dipylidium caninum + Ancylostoma spp. (in 0.53%). Endoparasitic infections in cats underscore the need for preventive veterinary care and routine coproparasitologic tests.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Helmintíase Animal/epidemiologia , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/epidemiologia , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Fezes/parasitologia , Helmintíase Animal/diagnóstico , Helmintíase Animal/parasitologia , Prevalência , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/diagnóstico , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/parasitologia
19.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 50(4): 695-706, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32334908

RESUMO

When an owner notices a behavior change in their cat that concerns them enough to present the cat to the vet, there are 3 possibilities: the behavior change reflects a change in behavioral health (a change in psychological state), a change in medical health (a change in physical state), or a combination (comorbid medical and behavioral pathologies). Because many behavioral pathologies are diagnoses of exclusion, it is important that the veterinarian rule out all of the likely medical differentials for the changed behavior. This article is a behavior-by-behavior guide to the more common differentials for the most common problem behaviors.


Assuntos
Comportamento Animal , Gatos/fisiologia , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico
20.
Can J Vet Res ; 84(2): 138-145, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32255909

RESUMO

Although hepatobiliary disease is common in cats, little is known about the bile composition in either these diseased states or in healthy cats. The objectives of this study were to evaluate several analytes from the bile of healthy cats and to investigate the usefulness of measuring these variables to predict bacterial cholangitis. Cats were prospectively enrolled and divided into 3 groups: 21 healthy cats (group 1) and 14 cats with suspected hepatobiliary disease: 9 without bacterial biliary infection (group 2) and 5 with bacterial biliary infection (group 3). Percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis was conducted on each cat. Bile cytology and culture were carried out and bile was analyzed for pH, lactate, and glucose levels using several point-of-care (POC) devices. Reference values for several bile analytes in healthy cats were calculated and are presented in this study. Neither the pH (P = 0.88) nor the lactate concentration (P = 0.85) was significantly different among the 3 groups. Sodium concentration was significantly higher in group 3 than in group 2 (P < 0.05). Bile pH, lactate, and glucose levels were unable to predict the presence of a bacterial infection in the bile.


Assuntos
Bile/química , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Sistema Digestório/veterinária , Sistemas Automatizados de Assistência Junto ao Leito , Animais , Gatos , Doenças do Sistema Digestório/diagnóstico , Estudos Prospectivos
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