Your browser doesn't support javascript.
loading
Mostrar: 20 | 50 | 100
Resultados 1 - 20 de 3.081
Filtrar
1.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 30(1): e016320, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33605387

RESUMO

This study aimed to identify the intestinal parasites of road-killed wild felines in the North Central and North, Paraná state, southern Brazil. The animals were monitored by sampling previously established transects. The places where the felines were run over were mapped, the animals were identified, and the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated. The feces were submitted to coproparasitological techniques of spontaneous sedimentation, floating in hypersaturated NaCl solution and centrifugal floating in zinc sulfate. All the parasitic structures detected were photomicrographed. In the coproparasitological analyses were identified oocysts of Cystoisospora spp., eggs of Ancylostomatidae, and Capillaria spp.; eggs of Aelurostrongylus spp., Toxocara spp., Physaloptera spp., Taenia spp., and Spirometra spp.; Aelurostrongylus abstrusus larvae; and eggs and adults of Ancylostoma cati and Taenia spp. One of the cats was parasitized by a flea of Ctenocephalides felis felis. Based on these results, the animals analyzed in this study supplied important samples for the evaluation of parasitic diversity of North of Paraná and suggested that this region may have conditions that allow the maintenance of these parasites life cycles in the environment and among wildlife.


Assuntos
Animais Selvagens , Doenças do Gato , Enteropatias Parasitárias , Parasitos , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais , Animais , Animais Selvagens/parasitologia , Biodiversidade , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Fezes/parasitologia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/epidemiologia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/parasitologia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/veterinária , Parasitos/isolamento & purificação , Parasitos/fisiologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/epidemiologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/parasitologia , Prevalência
2.
Arch Virol ; 166(2): 427-438, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33389172

RESUMO

The leopard cat (Prionailurus bengalensis) was listed as an endangered species under the Wildlife Conservation Act in Taiwan in 2009. However, no study has evaluated the possible direct or indirect effects of pathogens on the Taiwanese leopard cat population. Here, we targeted viral pathogens, including carnivore protoparvovirus 1 (genus Protoparvovirus), feline leukemia virus (FeLV), feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), coronaviruses (CoVs), and canine distemper virus (CDV), through molecular screening. The spatial and temporal dynamics of the target pathogens were evaluated. Through sequencing and phylogenetic analysis, we clarified the phylogenetic relationship of viral pathogens isolated from leopard cats and domestic carnivores. Samples from 23 live-trapped leopard cats and 29 that were found dead were collected from 2015 to 2019 in Miaoli County in northwestern Taiwan. Protoparvoviruses and CoVs were detected in leopard cats, and their prevalence (95% confidence interval) was 63.5% (50.4%-76.6%) and 8.8% (0%-18.4%), respectively. Most of the protoparvovirus sequences amplified from Taiwanese leopard cats and domestic carnivores were identical. All of the CoV sequences amplified from leopard cats were identified as feline CoV. No spatial or temporal aggregation of protoparvovirus infection in leopard cats was found in the sampling area, indicating a wide distribution of protoparvoviruses in the leopard cat habitat. We consider sympatric domestic carnivores to be the probable primary reservoir for the identified pathogens. We strongly recommend management of protoparvoviruses and feline CoV in the leopard cat habitat, particularly vaccination programs and population control measures for free-roaming dogs and cats.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Panthera/virologia , Infecções por Parvoviridae/epidemiologia , Infecções por Parvoviridae/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Coronavirus Felino/genética , Coronavirus Felino/isolamento & purificação , Vírus da Cinomose Canina/genética , Vírus da Cinomose Canina/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/virologia , Cães , Feminino , Vírus da Imunodeficiência Felina/genética , Vírus da Imunodeficiência Felina/isolamento & purificação , Vírus da Leucemia Felina/genética , Vírus da Leucemia Felina/isolamento & purificação , Masculino , Programas de Rastreamento , Parvovirinae/genética , Parvovirinae/isolamento & purificação , Taiwan/epidemiologia
3.
J Small Anim Pract ; 62(2): 97-106, 2021 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33325082

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The study aimed to estimate the incidence and prevalence of feline lymphoma in cats attending primary-care practices across the UK and to identify patient-based and environmental (radon and pesticide exposure) risk factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Case records from the VetCompass programme from primary-care veterinary practices in the UK were searched for a diagnosis of lymphoma in cats in 2016. Cases were required to have had an external laboratory confirmed diagnosis based on cytology and/or histopathology. A nested case-control study design was used to identify risk factors for lymphoma using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: From a cohort of 562,446 cats under veterinary care at VetCompass participating practices in 2016, a total of 271 lymphoma cases were identified (prevalence: 48/100,000, 95% confidence interval (CI) 44 to 56/100,000; incidence 32/100,000, 95% CI 26 to 35/100,000). There were 180 incident lymphoma cases and 803 controls, all aged 2 years and older. Male (odds ratio (OR) 1.7, 95% CI 1.2 to 2.4), insured (OR 3.6, 95% CI 2.3 to 5.6) and older cats (compared to cats 2 to <5 years, OR 5.0, 95% CI 2.8 to 8.8) were associated with increased odds of lymphoma diagnosis. Vaccinated cats were associated with decreased odds (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.0) compared to unvaccinated cats, although the type of vaccination received was not statistically significant. Breed and environmental factors studied were not associated with a diagnosis of lymphoma. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to estimate the frequency and report risk factors for lymphoma in cats attending UK primary-care practice.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Linfoma , Animais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/etiologia , Gatos , Incidência , Linfoma/epidemiologia , Linfoma/veterinária , Masculino , Fatores de Risco , Reino Unido/epidemiologia
4.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(3): e004920, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33027423

RESUMO

Soil samples collected near municipal schools (public/EMEI and private/EPEI schools), clubs (CLB), public squares (PS) and residential condominiums (CND) and samples of animal faeces from the Zoonosis Control Centre (CCZ) of the municipality of Votuporanga/SP were analysed using the Baermann method for the detection of zoonotic helminth larvae. The prevalence rates of the nematode genera identified were determined, and the results were compared using Fisher's exact and chi-square frequency tests. Information about cases of larvae migrans in the population were collected from the Family Health Units and the private health plans. All sites were positive for Ancylostoma spp. and, with the exception of EPEIs and dog faeces, for Strongyloides spp. The prevalence of Ancylostoma spp. was 87.5% for CND samples, 74.29% for EMIEs, 63.64% for CLB, 61.76% for PS and 64.29% for dog's and 42.86% for cats at CCZ. The prevalence of Strongyloides spp. ranged from 14.29% (cats/CCZ) to 41.18% (PS). Cases of cutaneous larva migrans were reported during interviews. Thus, from the public health perspective, the risk of individuals that frequent recreational areas in the municipality, especially children, to be infected by helminth larvae is noteworthy, indicating the need to develop policies aimed at controlling this important zoonosis.


Assuntos
Ancylostoma , Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Larva Migrans , Solo , Ancylostoma/fisiologia , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Cães , Fezes/parasitologia , Humanos , Larva Migrans/diagnóstico , Larva Migrans/epidemiologia , Solo/parasitologia
5.
J Vet Sci ; 21(5): e70, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33016017

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Oral neoplasia has been reported to account for 6-7% of all canine cancer and 3% of all feline cancers. To the authors' knowledge the last epidemiologic analysis of general oral cancer in dogs and cats was published in 1976. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this study was to report contemporary demographic information regarding oral tumors in dogs and cats. METHODS: Information was collected from cats or dogs diagnosed with oral neoplasia from the Veterinary Medical Data Base. Medical records representing cases that presented to one of 26 veterinary teaching hospitals from January 1, 1996 through December 31, 2017 were included. RESULTS: A total of 1,810 dogs and 443 cats were identified. A total of 962 cases (53.6%) of canine oral tumors were classified as malignant and 455 cases as benign (25.4%). The majority of feline oral tumors were classified as malignant (257 cases, 58.1%) and only a few benign (11 cases, 2.5%). The incidence of oral tumors was calculated to be 4.9 per 1,000 dogs (0.5%) and 4.9 per 1,000 cats (0.5%). CONCLUSIONS: This incidence of oral tumors is considerably higher than previously reported in both dogs and cats. These results provide valuable information for generation of hypotheses for future investigations of breed-based and pathology-based oral neoplastic studies.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/patologia , Cães , Feminino , Hospitais de Ensino , Incidência , Masculino , Neoplasias Bucais/epidemiologia , Neoplasias Bucais/patologia , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
6.
J Vet Sci ; 21(5): e71, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33016018

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Feline calicivirus (FCV) is a major and highly infectious pathogen in cats worldwide. However, there have been limited studies about the status of FCV infections in Korea. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the current status of FCV infections in stray cats in Korea. METHODS: A novel reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was developed based on the conserved nucleotide sequences of reported FCV strains. Field swab samples were collected from 122 cats (2 hospital admitted cats and 120 stray cats) in 2016 and 2017. All the samples were tested by virus isolation and 2 different RT-PCRs, including the novel RT-PCR, for the detection of FCV. RESULTS: The novel RT-PCR assay showed no cross-reactivity to the nucleic acids of the other feline pathogens tested, and the limit of detection was calculated as 10° TCID50/mL based on an in vitro assessment. The novel RT-PCR assay detected 5 positive samples from the 122 field samples, which showed perfect agreement with the results of the virus isolation method. In contrast, another RT-PCR assay used in a previous study in Korea detected no positive samples. The prevalence of FCV infection in stray cats was 2.5% (3/120) based on the results of virus isolation and the novel RT-PCR assays. CONCLUSIONS: The current study is the first report of the detection and prevalence of FCV in stray cats in Korea. The novel RT-PCR assay developed in this study showed high sensitivity and specificity, which indicates a useful diagnostic assay to identify FCV infection in cats.


Assuntos
Infecções por Caliciviridae/veterinária , Calicivirus Felino/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase Via Transcriptase Reversa/veterinária , Animais , Infecções por Caliciviridae/epidemiologia , Infecções por Caliciviridae/virologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Prevalência , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase Via Transcriptase Reversa/métodos , Sensibilidade e Especificidade
7.
Viruses ; 12(9)2020 09 13.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32933150

RESUMO

Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses capable of causing respiratory, enteric, or systemic diseases in a variety of mammalian hosts that vary in clinical severity from subclinical to fatal. The host range and tissue tropism are largely determined by the coronaviral spike protein, which initiates cellular infection by promoting fusion of the viral and host cell membranes. Companion animal coronaviruses responsible for causing enteric infection include feline enteric coronavirus, ferret enteric coronavirus, canine enteric coronavirus, equine coronavirus, and alpaca enteric coronavirus, while canine respiratory coronavirus and alpaca respiratory coronavirus result in respiratory infection. Ferret systemic coronavirus and feline infectious peritonitis virus, a mutated feline enteric coronavirus, can lead to lethal immuno-inflammatory systemic disease. Recent human viral pandemics, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS), and most recently, COVID-19, all thought to originate from bat coronaviruses, demonstrate the zoonotic potential of coronaviruses and their potential to have devastating impacts. A better understanding of the coronaviruses of companion animals, their capacity for cross-species transmission, and the sharing of genetic information may facilitate improved prevention and control strategies for future emerging zoonotic coronaviruses. This article reviews the clinical, epidemiologic, virologic, and pathologic characteristics of nine important coronaviruses of companion animals.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Coronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Animais de Estimação/virologia , Animais , Camelídeos Americanos/virologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos/virologia , Quirópteros/virologia , Coronavirus/classificação , Coronavirus/genética , Coronavirus/fisiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/virologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/virologia , Cães/virologia , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/epidemiologia , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/virologia , Furões/virologia , Variação Genética , Doenças dos Cavalos/epidemiologia , Doenças dos Cavalos/virologia , Cavalos/virologia , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Humanos , RNA Viral/genética , Glicoproteína da Espícula de Coronavírus/fisiologia , Replicação Viral , Zoonoses
8.
Ann Agric Environ Med ; 27(3): 356-360, 2020 Sep 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32955214

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study is to evaluate the seroprevalence of antibodies of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato (Bbsl) and Leptospira interrogans sensu lato (Lisl) and their possible concurrence in domestic cats living in variable conditions in South Moravia in the district of Brno and its environs. Additional objectives were to discover possible differences in seroprevalence between groups of cats living in different living conditions, and to determine the spectrum of Leptospira serogroups in cats in the same places. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 360 blood sera from domestic cats of 3 different sets were collected during the period 2013-2015. All samples were examined using ELISA for the detection of IgM and IgG antibodies against Bbsl, and the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) for the detection of antibodies against 8 serogroups of Lisl. RESULTS: The ELISA method determined 15.8%, 4.8% and 10.3% IgM anti-Borrelia antibodies in the patient group, shelter cats and street cats, respectively. IgG anti-Borrelia antibodies were found in 6.2%, 9.5%, 5.2%, respectively. Antibodies specific for 5 Leptospira serogroups were detected by the use of MAT in 8.8%, 9.5% and 10.3% of cats from the investigated groups. The total positivity of all examined cats for anti-Borrelia antibodies was 18.0% and for anti-Leptospira - 9.2%. CONCLUSIONS: Cats can be infected with both Bbsl and Lisl. The obtained results are exclusive to the city of Brno and its environs, and are comparable to the limited previous studies. There is a need for further studies of clinical signs of both infections and the possible transmission of Leptospira by ticks.


Assuntos
Grupo Borrelia Burgdorferi/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Leptospira interrogans/isolamento & purificação , Leptospirose/veterinária , Doença de Lyme/veterinária , Animais , Anticorpos Antibacterianos/sangue , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Gatos , República Tcheca/epidemiologia , Leptospirose/epidemiologia , Leptospirose/microbiologia , Doença de Lyme/epidemiologia , Doença de Lyme/microbiologia , Prevalência , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos
9.
J Small Anim Pract ; 61(11): 696-703, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32974927

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To describe the clinicopathological findings and outcomes of cases of feline congenital hypothyroidism diagnosed in a single veterinary hospital in Santiago, Chile. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records were searched for cases of congenital hypothyroidism over an 18-month period. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of congenital hypothyroidism based on consistent historical and clinical findings, a low or low-normal serum total T4 and elevated serum canine TSH (cTSH). RESULTS: Six unrelated cats ranging in age from 4 to 19 months met the inclusion criteria. The most common historical signs were small stature and lethargy. All cats had disproportionate dwarfism, delayed tooth eruption, retained deciduous teeth, bilateral palpable goitres and low rectal temperatures. Other findings were bradycardia, obesity, poor hair coat and focal alopecia on the ventral aspects of the elbows and hocks. In all cases, cTSH was markedly elevated. Sequential changes noted after the initiation of therapy included normal T4 after 6 weeks, improved hair coat and increased physical activity by 8 weeks, normal cTSH by 10 weeks and normal physical appearance and dentition after 4 months. Goitres shrank markedly but remained palpable. Hypothyroidism was well managed clinically in all cases 2 years after diagnosis except for one cat that died of unrelated causes. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report to describe a cluster of congenital hypothyroidism cases in non-related cats that were presented over a short period of time. Growth defects resolve with treatment, even in cats diagnosed after puberty. Larger, prospective multi-centre studies are warranted to determine the incidence of congenital hypothyroidism in cats.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Hipotireoidismo Congênito , Hipertireoidismo , Animais , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Gatos , Hipotireoidismo Congênito/tratamento farmacológico , Hipotireoidismo Congênito/epidemiologia , Hipotireoidismo Congênito/veterinária , Hipertireoidismo/veterinária , Estudos Prospectivos , Tireotropina , Tiroxina
10.
Viruses ; 12(9)2020 09 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32911718

RESUMO

The aim of this prospective study was to determine prevalence and potential risk factors of feline coronavirus (FCoV) shedding. Four consecutive fecal samples of 179 cats from 37 German breeding catteries were analyzed for FCoV ribonucleic acid (RNA) by real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Prevalence of shedding was calculated using different numbers of fecal samples per cat (1-4) and different sampling intervals (5-28 days). Information on potential risk factors for FCoV shedding was obtained by a questionnaire. Risk factor analysis was performed using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). Most cats (137/179, 76.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 69.8-82.2) shed FCoV at least at once. None of the tested 37 catteries was free of FCoV. Prevalence calculated including all four (76.5%, 95% CI 69.8-82.2) or the last three (73.7%, 95% CI 66.8-79.7) samples per cat was significantly higher than the prevalence calculated with only the last sample (61.5%, 95% CI 54.2-68.3; p = 0.0029 and 0.0175, respectively). Young age was significantly associated with FCoV shedding while the other factors were not. For identification of FCoV shedders in multi-cat households, at least three fecal samples per cat should be analyzed. Young age is the most important risk factor for FCoV shedding.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/virologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Coronavirus Felino/isolamento & purificação , Fatores Etários , Criação de Animais Domésticos , Animais , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Gatos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/virologia , Fezes/virologia , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/epidemiologia , Peritonite Infecciosa Felina/virologia , Feminino , Alemanha , Abrigo para Animais , Modelos Lineares , Masculino , Prevalência , Estudos Prospectivos , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase Via Transcriptase Reversa , Fatores de Risco , Instalações de Eliminação de Resíduos
11.
J Vet Dent ; 37(2): 66-70, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32875972

RESUMO

Buccal bone expansion (BBE) refers to bulbous enlargement of the periodontium in domestic cats. The origin of BBE is unknown, and some of its epidemiological, clinical, and radiographic features have not been fully characterized. The purpose of this study was to determine whether specific demographic characteristics are associated with BBE in cats; and whether BBE is associated with other relevant radiographic findings. Pertinent data were collected from archived dental radiographs and electronic medical records of 97 client-owned cats. Results showed that BBE is common in cats presented for evaluation and treatment of dental disease; that breed, sex, and age are not associated with BBE; that BBE is not associated with a pattern of horizontal alveolar bone loss/extrusion or tooth resorption; that a pattern of vertical alveolar bone loss is a typical feature of BBE; and that BBE represents a common cause of canine tooth loss in cats.


Assuntos
Perda do Osso Alveolar , Doenças do Gato , Reabsorção de Dente , Perda do Osso Alveolar/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico por imagem , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Gatos , Estudos Transversais , Prevalência , Encaminhamento e Consulta , Reabsorção de Dente/diagnóstico por imagem , Reabsorção de Dente/epidemiologia , Reabsorção de Dente/veterinária
12.
Parasitol Res ; 119(10): 3443-3450, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32813040

RESUMO

Feline lungworms infect the respiratory tract of wild and domestic cats, causing infection often associated with clinical disease. Until recently, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus has been considered the most relevant species of lungworm, while Troglostrongylus brevior was considered of less significance. Fecal samples of feral cats from Jerusalem, Israel, collected over a year, were examined for first stage lungworm larvae (L1) using the Baermann method. Positive samples were morphologically identified, and their species identity was molecularly confirmed. Forty of 400 (10.0%) cats were lungworm-positive, of which 38/40 (95.0%) shed Troglostrongylus brevior and 6/40 (15.0%) shed Aelurostrongylus abstrusus. Four cats (10.0%) had mixed infections with both lungworm species. L1 shedding was associated with clinical respiratory signs in 11 (19.0%) T. brevior shedding cats of a total of 58 cats manifesting respiratory signs, while 23/342 (6.7%) cats without respiratory signs were L1-positive (p = 0.006). Non-respiratory clinical signs were also found to be more prevalent in L1 shedders (p = 0.012). A young kitten ≤ 4 weeks of age shed T. brevior L1 larvae. DNA sequences of both lungworm species using the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) locus were > 99% similar to other sequences deposited in GenBank, suggesting that T. brevior and A. abstrusus ITS2 sequences are both highly conserved. In conclusion, L1 shedding in feral cats from Jerusalem were mostly caused by T. brevior with only a small proportion involving A. abstrusus, different from many studies from other geographical regions.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Metastrongyloidea/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária , Animais , Animais Selvagens , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Gatos , Fezes/parasitologia , Israel/epidemiologia , Larva/classificação , Larva/genética , Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Metastrongyloidea/classificação , Metastrongyloidea/genética , Metastrongyloidea/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Prevalência , Infecções por Strongylida/epidemiologia , Infecções por Strongylida/parasitologia , Infecções por Strongylida/patologia
13.
J Small Anim Pract ; 61(11): 669-675, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32767372

RESUMO

To determine the period prevalence of hypocholesterolaemia and the associated mortality rates in dogs and cats at a university teaching hospital. The secondary aim was to identify disease processes associated with hypocholesterolaemia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records over a 5-year period were reviewed to determine the severity of hypocholesterolaemia and its associated mortality rate. Medical records of animals with moderate to severe hypocholesterolaemia (<2.59 mmol/L in dogs, <1.81 mmol/L in cats) were analysed further. Animals with hospital-acquired hypocholesterolaemia were identified. RESULTS: Among 16,977 dogs and 3,788 cats that had at least one cholesterol measurement, the period prevalence of hypocholesterolaemia was 7.0% in dogs and 4.7% in cats. The mortality rate of hypocholesteraemic dogs and cats was 12% in both species which was significantly higher than that of animals with normal serum cholesterol. The degree of hypocholesterolaemia was significantly associated with mortality. Dogs, but not cats, with hospital-acquired hypocholesterolaemia had a higher mortality rate than those presenting with hypocholesterolaemia. Disease of hepatic, gastrointestinal and lymphoreticular systems were most commonly associated with hypocholesterolaemia, and infectious and neoplastic disease were the most commonly associated pathophysiologic processes in both species. Lymphoma was over-represented in dogs with neoplasia. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Hypocholesterolaemia is not a frequent abnormality but was associated with mortality in this study and may be a negative prognostic indicator. It is not known if hypocholesterolaemia is simply a marker for disease severity, or if it is has active physiologic effects contributing to poor outcomes.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Animais , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Cães , Prevalência , Prognóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos
14.
Parasitol Res ; 119(9): 2877-2883, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32748040

RESUMO

Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) causes verminous pneumonia in cats worldwide. This study evaluated the seroprevalence of A. abstrusus antibodies in 220 stray and free-roaming cats from insular (Mykonos, Crete, Skopelos) and continental (Thessaloniki, Attica) Greece. The results were compared with morphological and biomolecular identification of first-stage larvae (L1) in faeces. Positive cats were observed in all 5 areas: 13/97 (13.4%), 1/32 (3.1%), 7/26 (26.9%), 3/18 (16.7%) and 5/47 (10.6%) cats tested positive for A. abstrusus L1 by Baermann examination, and 33/97 (34.0%), 7/32 (21.9%), 6/26 (23.1%), 3/18 (16.7%) and 11/47 (23.4%) were seropositive, in Mykonos, Crete, Skopelos, Thessaloniki and Attica, respectively. Troglostrongylus brevior L1 were found in 12/97 (12.4%), 3/26 (11.5%) and 2/47 (4.3%) cats from Mykonos, Skopelos and Attica respectively. Six of the 220 cats (2.7%), i.e. 4/97 (4.1%) from Mykonos and 2/26 (7.7%) from Skopelos, shed L1 of both A. abstrusus and T. brevior. Sixty samples were ELISA-positive (27.3%, 95% CI: 21.5-33.7%), of which 21 (35%) tested copromicroscopically positive (19 monospecific infections and 2 mixed with Troglostrongylus brevior), and 5 were positive for T. brevior L1 only. Among seronegative cats (n = 140), L1 of A. abstrusus were additionally detected in 8 (5.7% out of 140) cats (i.e. 4 monospecific infections and 4 mixed with T. brevior), and in 6 (4.3% out of 140) cats, L1 of T. brevior as monospecific infection were detected. This study confirms the presence of lungworms in Greece and suggests that the number of cats infected with/exposed to metastrongylids is higher than detected by faecal examinations.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Metastrongyloidea/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Strongylida/epidemiologia , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Fezes/parasitologia , Grécia/epidemiologia , Larva/classificação , Metastrongyloidea/anatomia & histologia , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Infecções por Strongylida/parasitologia
15.
J Small Anim Pract ; 61(9): 554-560, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32734615

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: To describe infection in companion animals with the zoonotic pathogen Corynebacterium ulcerans and to determine its prevalence in clinically-affected and healthy animals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The clinical presentation and treatment of three cases of C. ulcerans infection is described. Two studies to determine C. ulcerans prevalence rates were undertaken: (a) a prospective study of nasal samples from healthy animals, 479 dogs and 72 cats; (b) a retrospective analysis of records of nasal samples collected over a 10-year period from 189 dogs and 64 cats affected by respiratory signs. RESULTS: Toxigenic C. ulcerans was isolated from four cats with nasal discharge while concurrent C. ulcerans and mecC methicillin-resistant S. aureus infection was detected in a dog suffering from chronic nasal discharge. Clinical features were not distinctive and all cases recovered following antimicrobial treatment. Multilocus sequence typing supported a common source for isolates from the shelter cats. Carriage rates of C. ulcerans in healthy animals were 0.42% (2/479) in dogs and 0.00% (0/72) in cats whereas in animals with signs of upper respiratory tract infection prevalence rates were 0.53% (1/189) in dogs and 6.25% (4/64) in cats. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Clinicians should be aware that dogs and cats can be infected with (or carriers of) toxigenic C. ulcerans Considering the potential zoonotic risk, assistance from medical and public health colleagues should be sought in confirmed cases.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Infecções por Corynebacterium , Doenças do Cão , Staphylococcus aureus Resistente à Meticilina , Infecções Respiratórias , Animais , Doenças do Gato/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Gatos , Corynebacterium , Infecções por Corynebacterium/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Corynebacterium/epidemiologia , Infecções por Corynebacterium/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Cães , Estudos Prospectivos , Infecções Respiratórias/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções Respiratórias/epidemiologia , Infecções Respiratórias/veterinária , Estudos Retrospectivos
16.
J Vet Diagn Invest ; 32(4): 549-555, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32687010

RESUMO

Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is one of the most common hereditary diseases in cats, with high prevalence in Persian and Persian-related cats. PKD is caused mainly by an inherited autosomal dominant (AD) mutation, and animals may be asymptomatic for years. We screened 16 cats from various breeds exhibiting a renal abnormality by ultrasound examination and genotyped them for the c.10063C>A transversion on exon 29 of the polycystin-1 (PKD1) gene, by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Among these cats, a Siamese nuclear family of 4 cats with ancestral hereditary renal failure were screened by whole-genome sequencing (WGS) to determine novel variations in genes associated with both AD and autosomal recessive PKD in humans. During the study period, one cat died as a result of renal failure and was forwarded for autopsy. Additionally, we screened 294 cats asymptomatic for renal disease (Angora, Van, Persian, Siamese, Scottish Fold, Exotic Shorthair, British Shorthair, and mixed breeds) to determine the prevalence of the mutation in cats in Turkey. Ten of the symptomatic and 2 of the asymptomatic cats carried the heterozygous C → A transversion, indicating a prevalence of 62.5% and 0.68%, respectively. In the WGS analysis of 4 cats in the Siamese nuclear family, novel variations were determined in the fibrocystin gene (PKHD1), which was not compatible with dominant inheritance of PKD.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Mutação , Doenças Renais Policísticas/veterinária , Canais de Cátion TRPP/genética , Animais , Doenças do Gato/etiologia , Doenças do Gato/genética , Gatos , Doenças Renais Policísticas/epidemiologia , Doenças Renais Policísticas/etiologia , Doenças Renais Policísticas/genética , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , Polimorfismo de Fragmento de Restrição , Prevalência , Insuficiência Renal/epidemiologia , Insuficiência Renal/etiologia , Insuficiência Renal/genética , Insuficiência Renal/veterinária , Canais de Cátion TRPP/metabolismo , Turquia/epidemiologia , Sequenciamento Completo do Genoma/veterinária
17.
Korean J Parasitol ; 58(3): 257-265, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32615739

RESUMO

The outbreak of human toxoplasmosis can be attributed to ingestion of food contaminated with Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasmosis recently increased in domestic and stray dogs and cats. It prompted studies on the zoonotic infectious diseases transmitted via these animals. Sero- and antigen prevalences of T. gondii in dogs and cats were surveyed using ELISA and PCR, and B1 gene phylogeny was analyzed in this study. Toxoplasmosis antibodies were measured on sera of 403 stray cats, 947 stray dogs, 909 domestic cats, and 2,412 domestic dogs collected at nationwide regions, Korea from 2017 to 2019. In addition, whole blood, feces, and tissue samples were also collected from stray cats (1,392), stray dogs (686), domestic cats (3,040), and domestic dogs (1,974), and T. gondii-specific B1 gene PCR was performed. Antibody prevalence of stray cats, stray dogs, domestic cats, and domestic dogs were 14.1%, 5.6%, 2.3%, and 0.04%, respectively. Antigen prevalence of these animals was 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.1%, and 0.4%, respectively. Stray cats revealed the highest infection rate of toxoplasmosis, followed by stray dogs, domestic cats, and domestic dogs. B1 gene positives were 5 of stray cats, and identified to high/moderate pathogenic Type I/III group. These findings enforce that preventive hygienic measure should be strengthened at One Health level in dogs and cats, domestic and stray, to minimize human toxoplasmosis infections.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Cães/parasitologia , Genes de Protozoários/genética , Toxoplasma/genética , Toxoplasmose Animal/parasitologia , Animais , Filogenia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Toxoplasmose/parasitologia , Toxoplasmose/prevenção & controle
18.
Arch Virol ; 165(9): 2079-2082, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32627058

RESUMO

We evaluated the seroprevalence of Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) and West Nile virus (WNV) in dogs and cats in Córdoba, Argentina. Monotypic and heterotypic serological patterns were differentiated by means of a neutralization test. The SLEV seroprevalence in dogs was 14.6% (44/302; 100% monotypic). Two out of 94 (2.1%, 100% monotypic) cats were positive for WNV only. Four dogs (1.3%) exhibited neutralizing antibody titers against SLEV and WNV. During the study, three dogs seroconverted to SLEV. Our study demonstrates that pets were useful for detecting viral activity and could be considered as sentinels in the local surveillance of SLEV and WNV.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue , Doenças do Gato/sangue , Doenças do Cão/sangue , Vírus da Encefalite de St. Louis/imunologia , Encefalite de St. Louis/veterinária , Animais de Estimação/sangue , Febre do Nilo Ocidental/veterinária , Vírus do Nilo Ocidental/imunologia , Animais , Argentina , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/virologia , Cães , Vírus da Encefalite de St. Louis/isolamento & purificação , Encefalite de St. Louis/sangue , Encefalite de St. Louis/epidemiologia , Encefalite de St. Louis/virologia , Animais de Estimação/virologia , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Febre do Nilo Ocidental/sangue , Febre do Nilo Ocidental/epidemiologia , Febre do Nilo Ocidental/virologia , Vírus do Nilo Ocidental/isolamento & purificação
19.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(2): e022719, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609246

RESUMO

We evaluated the prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in the serum samples collected from domestic cats in Belém, Pará, Brazil. We also correlated the presence of T. gondii antibodies with environmental variables and cat-owner habits. Four-hundred and forty-seven serum samples from domestic cats were analyzed. The sera were tested using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Among the animals analyzed, 21.92% (98/447) were seropositive. A statistically significant association was found in relation to age and serology among the animals over 1 year old (p<0.01): in the group up to 1 year old, 12.82% (20/156) of the animals were positive, and in the group over 1 year old, 26.80% (78/291) were positive. Our results show that the cats in Belém, Pará region have anti-T. gondii antibodies, and their owners are not aware of toxoplasmosis or how to prevent its transmission.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Antiprotozoários , Doenças do Gato , Toxoplasma , Toxoplasmose Animal , Animais , Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/sangue , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Prevalência , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Toxoplasmose Animal/epidemiologia
20.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis ; 14(7): e0008330, 2020 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609739

RESUMO

Sporotrichosis is a chronic subcutaneous mycosis caused by Sporothrix species, of which the main aetiological agents are S. brasiliensis, S. schenckii, and S. globosa. Infection occurs after a traumatic inoculation of Sporothrix propagules in mammals' skin and can follow either a classic route through traumatic inoculation by plant debris (e.g., S. schenckii and S. globosa) or an alternative route through zoonotic transmission from animals (e.g., S. brasiliensis). Epizootics followed by a zoonotic route occur in Brazil, with Rio de Janeiro as the epicenter of a recent cat-transmitted epidemic. DNA-based markers are needed to explore the epidemiology of these Sporothrix expansions using molecular methods. This paper reports the use of amplified-fragment-length polymorphisms (AFLP) to assess the degree of intraspecific variability among Sporothrix species. We used whole-genome sequences from Sporothrix species to generate 2,304 virtual AFLP fingerprints. In silico screening highlighted 6 primer pair combinations to be tested in vitro. The protocol was used to genotype 27 medically relevant Sporothrix. Based on the overall scored AFLP markers (97-137 fragments), the values of polymorphism information content (PIC = 0.2552-0.3113), marker index (MI = 0.002-0.0039), effective multiplex ratio (E = 17.8519-35.2222), resolving power (Rp = 33.6296-63.1852), discriminating power (D = 0.9291-0.9662), expected heterozygosity (H = 0.3003-0.3857), and mean heterozygosity (Havp = 0.0001) demonstrated the utility of these primer combinations for discriminating Sporothrix. AFLP markers revealed cryptic diversity in species previously thought to be the most prevalent clonal type, such as S. brasiliensis, responsible for cat-transmitted sporotrichosis, and S. globosa responsible for large sapronosis outbreaks in Asia. Three combinations (#3 EcoRI-FAM-GA/MseI-TT, #5 EcoRI-FAM-GA/MseI-AG, and #6 EcoRI-FAM-TA/MseI-AA) provide the best diversity indices and lowest error rates. These methods make it easier to track routes of disease transmission during epizooties and zoonosis, and our DNA fingerprint assay can be further transferred between laboratories to give insights into the ecology and evolution of pathogenic Sporothrix species and to inform management and mitigation strategies to tackle the advance of sporotrichosis.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Mapeamento Cromossômico , Sporothrix/classificação , Esporotricose/epidemiologia , Esporotricose/veterinária , Análise do Polimorfismo de Comprimento de Fragmentos Amplificados , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Gatos , Surtos de Doenças , Genótipo , Epidemiologia Molecular , Sporothrix/isolamento & purificação , Esporotricose/microbiologia
SELEÇÃO DE REFERÊNCIAS
DETALHE DA PESQUISA
...