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1.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 30(1): e016320, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33605387

RESUMO

This study aimed to identify the intestinal parasites of road-killed wild felines in the North Central and North, Paraná state, southern Brazil. The animals were monitored by sampling previously established transects. The places where the felines were run over were mapped, the animals were identified, and the gastrointestinal tract was evaluated. The feces were submitted to coproparasitological techniques of spontaneous sedimentation, floating in hypersaturated NaCl solution and centrifugal floating in zinc sulfate. All the parasitic structures detected were photomicrographed. In the coproparasitological analyses were identified oocysts of Cystoisospora spp., eggs of Ancylostomatidae, and Capillaria spp.; eggs of Aelurostrongylus spp., Toxocara spp., Physaloptera spp., Taenia spp., and Spirometra spp.; Aelurostrongylus abstrusus larvae; and eggs and adults of Ancylostoma cati and Taenia spp. One of the cats was parasitized by a flea of Ctenocephalides felis felis. Based on these results, the animals analyzed in this study supplied important samples for the evaluation of parasitic diversity of North of Paraná and suggested that this region may have conditions that allow the maintenance of these parasites life cycles in the environment and among wildlife.


Assuntos
Animais Selvagens , Doenças do Gato , Enteropatias Parasitárias , Parasitos , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais , Animais , Animais Selvagens/parasitologia , Biodiversidade , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Fezes/parasitologia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/epidemiologia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/parasitologia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/veterinária , Parasitos/isolamento & purificação , Parasitos/fisiologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/epidemiologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/parasitologia , Prevalência
2.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 30(1): e025020, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33605389

RESUMO

Gurltia paralysans is the causal agent of gurltiosis in domestic cats in South America. Although the life cycle of G. paralysans is unknown, it is thought that gastropods could act as intermediate hosts (IHs), as is the case for several nematodes in the Angiostrongylidae family. The aim of this study was to search for G. paralysans larvae in terrestrial gastropods and determine their role in the life cycle of this nematode species. Terrestrial gastropod samples (n=835) were collected in Punucapa, Valdivia, southern Chile, where cases of gurltiosis had been reported before. The samples included species from the families Arionidae, Limacidae, Helicidae and Milacidae. All gastropods were subjected to enzymatic digestion to isolate G. paralysans larvae. Ten percent of the gastropod samples were analyzed using seminested PCR targeting the 28S rRNA gene, while 2.6% were analyzed by histopathological examination. The results indicated the absence of G. paralysans when using any of the three methods. In conclusion, further studies are needed to evaluate specific species of aquatic or native gastropods acting as possible IHs (in this geographic location).


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Gastrópodes , Metastrongyloidea , Infecções por Strongylida , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Chile , Gastrópodes/parasitologia , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Estágios do Ciclo de Vida , Metastrongyloidea/fisiologia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , Infecções por Strongylida/transmissão , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária
3.
J Parasitol ; 106(6): 835-842, 2020 11 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33378530

RESUMO

Numerous arthropod taxa are important in human and veterinary medicine. The salivary secretions and feces of arthropods can cause allergic reactions in host vertebrates or harbor pathogens. Also, bites can be a risk factor for secondary infections. Documenting the diversity of arthropods of medical and veterinary importance remains an important aspect of disease control and prevention. We provide new records of ectoparasitic arthropods from Mexico that are of potential medical or veterinary relevance. Scanning electron microscopy along with amplification and sequencing of a fragment of the mitochondrial gene (16S rRNA) was used to confirm some species identities. We report the cat louse Felicola subrostratus from cats and the chewing louse Heterodoxus spiniger from dogs, which are common ectoparasites but largely not reported in Mexico. The chigger Eutrombicula alfreddugesi is common on wild lizards (Squamata). For the first time, E. alfreddugesi is reported on Hemidactylus frenatus (common house gecko). This reptile has a close relationship with humans and its chiggers can cause dermatitis (i.e., trombiculiasis) or transmit pathogens. In addition, the common bed bug Cimex lectularius is reported for the first time in the state of Yucatan, an atypical area for its natural distribution. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that Cimex lectularius from Yucatan is closely related to genetic sequences of Cimex lectularius from China. Knowing the regional distribution of arthropods allows the design and implementation of prevention strategies for those that have potential roles as reservoirs or vectors.


Assuntos
Vetores Artrópodes/classificação , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Infestações por Piolhos/veterinária , Lagartos/parasitologia , Infestações por Ácaros/veterinária , Animais , Vetores Artrópodes/ultraestrutura , Percevejos-de-Cama/classificação , Gatos , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Iscnóceros/ultraestrutura , Infestações por Piolhos/parasitologia , Masculino , México , Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura , Infestações por Ácaros/parasitologia , Sifonápteros/ultraestrutura , Trombiculidae/ultraestrutura
4.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(3): e004920, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33027423

RESUMO

Soil samples collected near municipal schools (public/EMEI and private/EPEI schools), clubs (CLB), public squares (PS) and residential condominiums (CND) and samples of animal faeces from the Zoonosis Control Centre (CCZ) of the municipality of Votuporanga/SP were analysed using the Baermann method for the detection of zoonotic helminth larvae. The prevalence rates of the nematode genera identified were determined, and the results were compared using Fisher's exact and chi-square frequency tests. Information about cases of larvae migrans in the population were collected from the Family Health Units and the private health plans. All sites were positive for Ancylostoma spp. and, with the exception of EPEIs and dog faeces, for Strongyloides spp. The prevalence of Ancylostoma spp. was 87.5% for CND samples, 74.29% for EMIEs, 63.64% for CLB, 61.76% for PS and 64.29% for dog's and 42.86% for cats at CCZ. The prevalence of Strongyloides spp. ranged from 14.29% (cats/CCZ) to 41.18% (PS). Cases of cutaneous larva migrans were reported during interviews. Thus, from the public health perspective, the risk of individuals that frequent recreational areas in the municipality, especially children, to be infected by helminth larvae is noteworthy, indicating the need to develop policies aimed at controlling this important zoonosis.


Assuntos
Ancylostoma , Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Larva Migrans , Solo , Ancylostoma/fisiologia , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Cães , Fezes/parasitologia , Humanos , Larva Migrans/diagnóstico , Larva Migrans/epidemiologia , Solo/parasitologia
5.
Parasitol Res ; 119(11): 3649-3657, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32951143

RESUMO

Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite capable of infecting a large number of warm-blooded animals and causes serious health complications in immunocompromised patients. T. gondii infection of the feline small intestine is critical for the completion of the life cycle and transmission of T. gondii. Protein acetylation is an important posttranslational modification, which plays roles in the regulation of various cellular processes. Therefore, understanding of how T. gondii reprograms the protein acetylation status of feline definitive host can help to thwart the production and spread of T. gondii. Here, we used affinity enrichment and high-resolution liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to profile the alterations of the acetylome in cat small intestine 10 days after infection by T. gondii Prugniuad (Pru) strain. Our analysis showed that T. gondii induced significant changes in the acetylation of proteins in the cat intestine. We identified 2606 unique lysine acetylation sites in 1357 acetylated proteins. The levels of 334 acetylated peptides were downregulated, while the levels of 82 acetylated peptides were increased in the infected small intestine. The proteins with differentially acetylated peptides were particularly enriched in the bioenergetics-related processes, such as tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and oxidation-reduction. These results provide the first baseline of the global acetylome of feline small intestine following T. gondii infection and should facilitate further analysis of the role of acetylated protein in the pathogenesis of T. gondii infection in its definitive host.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Intestino Delgado/metabolismo , Toxoplasma , Toxoplasmose/metabolismo , Acetilação , Animais , Doenças do Gato/metabolismo , Gatos , Cromatografia Líquida de Alta Pressão/veterinária , Feminino , Intestino Delgado/parasitologia , Lisina/metabolismo , Masculino , Processamento de Proteína Pós-Traducional , Espectrometria de Massas em Tandem/veterinária , Toxoplasma/metabolismo
6.
Parasitol Res ; 119(9): 2877-2883, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32748040

RESUMO

Aelurostrongylus abstrusus (Nematoda, Metastrongyloidea) causes verminous pneumonia in cats worldwide. This study evaluated the seroprevalence of A. abstrusus antibodies in 220 stray and free-roaming cats from insular (Mykonos, Crete, Skopelos) and continental (Thessaloniki, Attica) Greece. The results were compared with morphological and biomolecular identification of first-stage larvae (L1) in faeces. Positive cats were observed in all 5 areas: 13/97 (13.4%), 1/32 (3.1%), 7/26 (26.9%), 3/18 (16.7%) and 5/47 (10.6%) cats tested positive for A. abstrusus L1 by Baermann examination, and 33/97 (34.0%), 7/32 (21.9%), 6/26 (23.1%), 3/18 (16.7%) and 11/47 (23.4%) were seropositive, in Mykonos, Crete, Skopelos, Thessaloniki and Attica, respectively. Troglostrongylus brevior L1 were found in 12/97 (12.4%), 3/26 (11.5%) and 2/47 (4.3%) cats from Mykonos, Skopelos and Attica respectively. Six of the 220 cats (2.7%), i.e. 4/97 (4.1%) from Mykonos and 2/26 (7.7%) from Skopelos, shed L1 of both A. abstrusus and T. brevior. Sixty samples were ELISA-positive (27.3%, 95% CI: 21.5-33.7%), of which 21 (35%) tested copromicroscopically positive (19 monospecific infections and 2 mixed with Troglostrongylus brevior), and 5 were positive for T. brevior L1 only. Among seronegative cats (n = 140), L1 of A. abstrusus were additionally detected in 8 (5.7% out of 140) cats (i.e. 4 monospecific infections and 4 mixed with T. brevior), and in 6 (4.3% out of 140) cats, L1 of T. brevior as monospecific infection were detected. This study confirms the presence of lungworms in Greece and suggests that the number of cats infected with/exposed to metastrongylids is higher than detected by faecal examinations.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Metastrongyloidea/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Strongylida/epidemiologia , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Fezes/parasitologia , Grécia/epidemiologia , Larva/classificação , Metastrongyloidea/anatomia & histologia , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Infecções por Strongylida/parasitologia
7.
Vet Parasitol ; 285: 109215, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32862125

RESUMO

Feline lungworms such as Aerulostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior are snail-borne pathogens causing respiratory disease in domestic cats. Paratenic hosts such as rodents and reptiles have also been implicated in the epidemiology of these parasites. Although A. abstrusus has been recognized for a long time as the most prevalent lungworm among cats worldwide, T. brevior is of major concern in kittens. Bearing in mind that disease due to T. brevior occurs mainly in pediatric patients younger than 6 months of age, the diagnosis of this parasite in two kittens presenting severe respiratory disease from the garden of one of the authors inspired us to investigate the potential routes of transmission for T. brevior in domestic cats. Of the three queens (A, B and C) that delivered kittens (n = 8), only cat A was positive for T. brevior, presenting her two kittens severe respiratory clinical signs, which lead to the exitus in one of them, 18 days of age. In addition, three kittens, the offspring of queen B, turned to be positive at the coprological examination after suckling from queen A, whereas those from queen C (that suckled only on their own mother) remained negative. A series of coprological, histological and molecular tests were conducted to confirm the presence of T. brevior in the patients as well as in the other cats cohabiting the same garden. Adult nematodes were retrieved from the trachea and bronchi of the dead kitten (kitten 1A), and larvae at the histology of the lung and liver parenchyma associated with bronco pneumonitis and lymphocytic pericholangitis, respectively. Cornu aspersum (n = 60), Eobania vermiculata (n = 30) snails (intermediate hosts) as well as lizards and rats (potential paratenic hosts) were collected from the same garden and processed through tissue digestion and molecular detection. Troglostrongylus brevior larvae were recovered through tissue digestion from two C. aspersum (3.33 %) and it was confirmed by PCR-sequencing approach, which also detected T. brevior DNA in the liver and lungs of one rat and in the coelomatic cavity of one gecko lizard. During the COVID-19 lockdown, when scientists spent more time at home, we grasp the opportunity to decipher T. brevior biology and ecology starting in a small ecological niche, such as the garden of our house. Data herein presented led us to suggest: i) the transmammary transmission of T. brevior in domestic cats; ii) the role of intermediate and paratenic hosts (including reptiles) in the epidemiology of the infection which they transmit; as well as iii) the importance of observational parasitology in studying any event that certainly occurs in small ecological niches, as it could be in our home gardens.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Transmissão Vertical de Doença Infecciosa/veterinária , Infecções Respiratórias/veterinária , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária , Estrongilídios , Animais , Gatos , Feminino , Masculino , Infecções Respiratórias/parasitologia , Infecções Respiratórias/patologia , Infecções Respiratórias/transmissão , Infecções por Strongylida/parasitologia , Infecções por Strongylida/transmissão
8.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(3): e008420, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32785525

RESUMO

Cats are less susceptible to Dirofilaria immitis infection than dogs. Although rare, the feline disease can be fatal even with low parasitic loads. The infection is often asymptomatic or has non-specific symptoms that are mainly associated with the death of immature worms. Microfilaremia is rare and transient. Normally, microfilaremia, when present, lasts for not more than 33 days. This study describes a feline case presenting with non-specific clinical signs and prolonged microfilaremia. Case: a random bred cat infected by feline leukemia virus (FeLV) that was found to be microfilaremic by chance. The infection was detected by the presence of microfilariae in a blood smear and was confirmed by antigen test (SNAP Feline Triple Test, Idexx®) and echocardiogram.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Dirofilaria immitis , Dirofilariose , Infecções por Retroviridae , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Dirofilariose/sangue , Dirofilariose/complicações , Dirofilariose/diagnóstico , Dirofilariose/parasitologia , Vírus da Leucemia Felina , Infecções por Retroviridae/complicações , Infecções por Retroviridae/veterinária
9.
Parasitol Res ; 119(10): 3443-3450, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32813040

RESUMO

Feline lungworms infect the respiratory tract of wild and domestic cats, causing infection often associated with clinical disease. Until recently, Aelurostrongylus abstrusus has been considered the most relevant species of lungworm, while Troglostrongylus brevior was considered of less significance. Fecal samples of feral cats from Jerusalem, Israel, collected over a year, were examined for first stage lungworm larvae (L1) using the Baermann method. Positive samples were morphologically identified, and their species identity was molecularly confirmed. Forty of 400 (10.0%) cats were lungworm-positive, of which 38/40 (95.0%) shed Troglostrongylus brevior and 6/40 (15.0%) shed Aelurostrongylus abstrusus. Four cats (10.0%) had mixed infections with both lungworm species. L1 shedding was associated with clinical respiratory signs in 11 (19.0%) T. brevior shedding cats of a total of 58 cats manifesting respiratory signs, while 23/342 (6.7%) cats without respiratory signs were L1-positive (p = 0.006). Non-respiratory clinical signs were also found to be more prevalent in L1 shedders (p = 0.012). A young kitten ≤ 4 weeks of age shed T. brevior L1 larvae. DNA sequences of both lungworm species using the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) locus were > 99% similar to other sequences deposited in GenBank, suggesting that T. brevior and A. abstrusus ITS2 sequences are both highly conserved. In conclusion, L1 shedding in feral cats from Jerusalem were mostly caused by T. brevior with only a small proportion involving A. abstrusus, different from many studies from other geographical regions.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Metastrongyloidea/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária , Animais , Animais Selvagens , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Gatos , Fezes/parasitologia , Israel/epidemiologia , Larva/classificação , Larva/genética , Larva/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Metastrongyloidea/classificação , Metastrongyloidea/genética , Metastrongyloidea/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Prevalência , Infecções por Strongylida/epidemiologia , Infecções por Strongylida/parasitologia , Infecções por Strongylida/patologia
10.
Parasitol Res ; 119(9): 3099-3104, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32627079

RESUMO

The first case of feline ocular Thelazia callipaeda infection and two new canine imported infections in West Germany are here described. The three animals had a history of recent travel to/from other countries. The young adult cat imported from Spain presented an intermittent unilateral ocular discharge. During in-depth ophthalmic examination, a single alive nematode was removed from the conjunctival compartment of the affected eye. Referring to the canine cases, an adult female dog originated from Kenya presented epiphora and mucous whitish-grey discharge of the right eye. During flushing of the nasolacrimal duct two small, thin and long nematodes were removed. Furthermore, a male Borzoi racing dog with regular visit to racing tracks in different countries presented ocular mucous discharge. At ophthalmologic examination, two transparent-whitish vital nematodes were removed. All nematode specimens of the three cases were morphologically identified as adult T. callipaeda parasites. The animals were treated orally with milbemycin oxime (2.0 mg/kg; cat) or milbemycin oxime/praziquantel (0.5 mg/kg and 5.0 mg/kg; dogs) twice with 1-week interval resulting in complete resolution of symptoms. The repeated introduction of patent T. callipaeda-infected animals, especially from southern and eastern endemic countries, will ease the establishment of ophthalmic thelaziosis in Northern Europe. The male fruit fly, Phortica variegata, an intermediate host of T. callipaeda, is endemic within European countries. Considering the clinical and zoonotic relevance of ophthalmic thelaziosis, enhanced disease awareness of European medical and veterinarian doctors and in-depth eye examination for proper detection of T. callipaeda are crucial for appropriate anthelmintic treatments and to limit spreading of the infection.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Infecções Oculares Parasitárias/parasitologia , Infecções por Spirurida/veterinária , Thelazioidea/isolamento & purificação , Animais , Anti-Helmínticos/administração & dosagem , Doenças do Gato/tratamento farmacológico , Gatos , Cães , Infecções Oculares Parasitárias/tratamento farmacológico , Feminino , Alemanha , Macrolídeos/administração & dosagem , Masculino , Infecções por Spirurida/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Spirurida/parasitologia , Thelazioidea/genética , Thelazioidea/fisiologia
11.
Korean J Parasitol ; 58(3): 257-265, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32615739

RESUMO

The outbreak of human toxoplasmosis can be attributed to ingestion of food contaminated with Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasmosis recently increased in domestic and stray dogs and cats. It prompted studies on the zoonotic infectious diseases transmitted via these animals. Sero- and antigen prevalences of T. gondii in dogs and cats were surveyed using ELISA and PCR, and B1 gene phylogeny was analyzed in this study. Toxoplasmosis antibodies were measured on sera of 403 stray cats, 947 stray dogs, 909 domestic cats, and 2,412 domestic dogs collected at nationwide regions, Korea from 2017 to 2019. In addition, whole blood, feces, and tissue samples were also collected from stray cats (1,392), stray dogs (686), domestic cats (3,040), and domestic dogs (1,974), and T. gondii-specific B1 gene PCR was performed. Antibody prevalence of stray cats, stray dogs, domestic cats, and domestic dogs were 14.1%, 5.6%, 2.3%, and 0.04%, respectively. Antigen prevalence of these animals was 0.5%, 0.2%, 0.1%, and 0.4%, respectively. Stray cats revealed the highest infection rate of toxoplasmosis, followed by stray dogs, domestic cats, and domestic dogs. B1 gene positives were 5 of stray cats, and identified to high/moderate pathogenic Type I/III group. These findings enforce that preventive hygienic measure should be strengthened at One Health level in dogs and cats, domestic and stray, to minimize human toxoplasmosis infections.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Cães/parasitologia , Genes de Protozoários/genética , Toxoplasma/genética , Toxoplasmose Animal/parasitologia , Animais , Filogenia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase , República da Coreia/epidemiologia , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Toxoplasmose/parasitologia , Toxoplasmose/prevenção & controle
12.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(2): e022719, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609246

RESUMO

We evaluated the prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in the serum samples collected from domestic cats in Belém, Pará, Brazil. We also correlated the presence of T. gondii antibodies with environmental variables and cat-owner habits. Four-hundred and forty-seven serum samples from domestic cats were analyzed. The sera were tested using an indirect immunofluorescence assay. Among the animals analyzed, 21.92% (98/447) were seropositive. A statistically significant association was found in relation to age and serology among the animals over 1 year old (p<0.01): in the group up to 1 year old, 12.82% (20/156) of the animals were positive, and in the group over 1 year old, 26.80% (78/291) were positive. Our results show that the cats in Belém, Pará region have anti-T. gondii antibodies, and their owners are not aware of toxoplasmosis or how to prevent its transmission.


Assuntos
Anticorpos Antiprotozoários , Doenças do Gato , Toxoplasma , Toxoplasmose Animal , Animais , Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/sangue , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Prevalência , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Toxoplasmose Animal/epidemiologia
13.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(2): e023519, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32609248

RESUMO

An adult male puma (Puma concolor), hit by a car in an urban area, died three days later despite the therapeutic support provided. At necropsy, multiple firm nodules were identified in the gastric mucosa. The nodules were coated by an intact mucosa with a central opening from which reddish and cylindrical nematodes protruded into the lumen. Twenty-seven nematodes were retrieved for morphological and morphometric evaluations. During histopathological examination of the gastric tissue, the adult nematodes appear in longitudinal and transverse sections, surrounded by thick bands of collagen, interspersed with mixed inflammatory infiltrates. The nematodes had an eosinophilic cuticle with caudal serrated projections (bulbar type), coelomyarian musculature, pseudocoelom, and females with uterus containing numerous larvated eggs, characteristics consistent with the Cylicospirura genus. Morphologically, female nematodes had six large tricuspid teeth in the oral cavity and the vulva had an opening anterior to the esophagus-intestinal junction. Male nematodes had five pairs of small papillae near the tip of the tail. These findings were consistent with Cylicospirura felineus. This parasite should be included in the differential diagnosis of nodular gastric wall lesions in wild felids.


Assuntos
Gastrite , Nematoides , Puma , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Gatos , Feminino , Gastrite/parasitologia , Gastrite/veterinária , Masculino , Nematoides/fisiologia , Infecções por Nematoides/parasitologia , Infecções por Nematoides/patologia , Infecções por Nematoides/veterinária , Puma/parasitologia
14.
Parasitol Res ; 119(9): 3005-3011, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32677003

RESUMO

Cytauxzoonosis is described as an emerging tick-borne disease of domestic and wild felids caused by protozoans of the genus Cytauxzoon. While in the Americas the condition is described as a fatal disease, in Europe, reports on the clinical expression of the infection are scarce. This study describes the first case of Cytauxzoon sp. infection in Germany, in a domestic cat. A 6-year-old male domestic cat living in Saarlouis (Saarland) was presented with anorexia, lethargy and weight loss. The cat had an outdoor lifestyle and had not travelled abroad. Serum clinical chemistry analysis revealed azotaemia with markedly increased symmetric dimethylarginine, hypercreatinemia, hyperphosphatemia and hypoalbuminemia. Moreover, a mild non-regenerative anaemia was present. Approximately 1 year prior to these findings, the domestic cat was diagnosed with a feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection. These results pointed toward a decreased glomerular filtration rate, presumably as a result of kidney dysfunction. Round to oval signet ring-shaped intraerythrocytic organisms, morphologically suggestive for a piroplasm, were revealed during blood smear evaluation with a degree of parasitaemia of 33.0%. PCR analyses and sequencing of a region of the 18S rRNA gene confirmed the presence of a Cytauxzoon sp. infection, with 99-100% nucleotide sequence identity with previously published Cytauxzoon sp. isolates. As this is the first molecularly confirmed Cytauxzoon sp. infection in a domestic cat in Germany, these findings suggest that cytauxzoonosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of anaemia in outdoor domestic cats, particularly in areas where wild felid populations are present.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Piroplasmida/isolamento & purificação , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/parasitologia , Animais , Gatos , Alemanha , Masculino , Piroplasmida/classificação , Piroplasmida/genética , Piroplasmida/crescimento & desenvolvimento , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/parasitologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/veterinária
15.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(2): e003520, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32520088

RESUMO

Blood samples and swabs from ocular conjunctiva and mouth were obtained from 64 cats. Of 64 serum samples, 19 were positive for Leishmania antibodies by ELISA (29.80%). Eight cats were positive by PCR (12.5%) in swab samples from mouth and/or ocular mucosa. Poor kappa agreement between serological and molecular results (k = 0.16) was obtained. From five positive PCR samples one was L. braziliensis and four were L. infantum. Phylogenetic analysis performed with the five isolates of Leishmania, showed that samples of L. infantum isolated from the cats were phylogenetically close to those isolated from domestic dogs in Brazil, while the L. braziliensis is very similar to the one described in humans in Venezuela. The study demonstrated that, despite high seropositivity for Leishmania in cats living in the study region, poor agreement between serological and molecular results indicate that positive serology is not indicative of Leishmania infection in cats. Parasite DNA can be detected in ocular conjunctiva and oral swabs from cats, indicating that such samples could be used for diagnosis. Results of phylogenetic analyzes show that L. infantum circulating in Brazil is capable of infecting different hosts, demonstrating the parasite's ability to overcome the interspecies barrier.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Leishmania braziliensis/isolamento & purificação , Leishmania infantum/isolamento & purificação , Leishmaniose/parasitologia , Animais , Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/sangue , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Gatos , DNA de Protozoário/análise , Ensaio de Imunoadsorção Enzimática/veterinária , Leishmania braziliensis/genética , Leishmania braziliensis/imunologia , Leishmania infantum/genética , Leishmania infantum/imunologia , Leishmaniose/diagnóstico , Filogenia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária
16.
J Parasitol ; 106(3): 395-399, 2020 06 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32556163

RESUMO

The objective of the present study was to determine the characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in cats, rats, and chickens in the border areas of Yunnan Province. A total of 259 samples was collected from 10 border areas in Yunnan Province including 94 cats, 58 rats, and 107 chickens. Samples were screened by a nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay and the positive products were analyzed by multilocus PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) to determine the genotypes. Toxoplasma gondii deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected from 15.96% of 94 cats, 15.52% of 58 rats, and 6.54% of 107 chickens, respectively, and the average infection rate is 11.97%. Using the multilocus PCR-RFLP, we found that the genotype of T. gondii in cats and rats was ToxoDB#9. Because of low DNA concentration, no genotype was determined from chickens. These results fill the gaps of knowledge in the prevalence and genotype of T. gondii in the border areas of Yunnan Province and have implications for the better control of T. gondii infection in humans and animals.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Galinhas/parasitologia , Doenças das Aves Domésticas/epidemiologia , Ratos/parasitologia , Doenças dos Roedores/epidemiologia , Toxoplasmose Animal/epidemiologia , Animais , Encéfalo/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , China/epidemiologia , DNA de Protozoário/química , DNA de Protozoário/isolamento & purificação , Marcadores Genéticos , Técnicas de Genotipagem/veterinária , Tipagem de Sequências Multilocus/veterinária , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , Polimorfismo de Fragmento de Restrição , Doenças das Aves Domésticas/parasitologia , Prevalência , Doenças dos Roedores/parasitologia , Toxoplasma/classificação , Toxoplasma/genética , Toxoplasmose Animal/parasitologia
17.
Parasitol Res ; 119(6): 1903-1913, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32385710

RESUMO

Microsporidia is a group of spore-forming microorganisms with zoonotic potential. This study aimed to compare intestinal microsporidia infections in cat owners and non-pet owners. In total, 210 fecal samples were collected from indoor cats, cat owners, and non-pet owners. DNA extraction was performed and the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene was amplified. To characterize the genotypes, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) fragment was amplified and sequenced. The phylogenetic trees were drawn to evaluate the relationship among Enterocytozoon bieneusi isolates. Two (2.9%) and one (1.4%) fecal samples from cat owners and one (1.4%) and two (2.9%) fecal samples from non-pet owners were positive for E. bieneusi and Encephalitozoon intestinalis, respectively. E. bieneusi was detected in two cat samples (2.9%). Same infection was not seen between infected cats and their owners. There was no significant difference between the prevalence rate of microsporidia among the cat owners and non-pet owners. Indeed, the genotypes L and type IV were seen in cats, while the genotype D was only detected in human. In this study, E. bieneusi and E. intestinalis were more prevalent among the cat owners and non-pet owners, respectively. Indeed, the higher prevalence of E. bieneusi in cats and their owners might be resulted from the worldwide distribution of this species.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Enteropatias Parasitárias/parasitologia , Microsporídios , Microsporidiose/diagnóstico , Adulto , Animais , Estudos de Casos e Controles , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Gatos , Encephalitozoon/isolamento & purificação , Enterocytozoon/isolamento & purificação , Fezes/parasitologia , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Enteropatias Parasitárias/veterinária , Irã (Geográfico)/epidemiologia , Masculino , Microsporídios/classificação , Microsporídios/genética , Microsporídios/isolamento & purificação , Microsporidiose/epidemiologia , Microsporidiose/veterinária , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Animais de Estimação/parasitologia , Filogenia , Prevalência , Zoonoses/epidemiologia
18.
Parasitol Res ; 119(7): 2275-2286, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32451716

RESUMO

Giardia and Cryptosporidium infections are common in cats, but knowledge is limited about their clinical importance, risk factors, and the role of cats as a reservoir for human infections. Here, we collected faeces and questionnaire data from 284 cats from shelters and veterinary clinics in the Copenhagen Metropolitan Region (= study population). Additionally, 33 samples were analysed separately from catteries with gastrointestinal clinical signs (= cases). (Oo-)cysts were quantified by immunofluorescence microscopy. All Giardia (n = 34) and Cryptosporidium (n = 29) positive samples were analysed by sequencing of the 18S rRNA, gdh and hsp70 loci, and co-infections were detected by McMaster/inverted microscopy. In the study population, 7.0% and 6.7% were positive for Giardia and Cryptosporidium respectively; 48.5% and 36.4% of the breeder cats (cases) were infected. Increased odds of diarrhoea were demonstrated in Giardia (p = 0.0008) and Cryptosporidium (p = 0.034) positive cats. For Giardia, the odds were positively correlated with infection intensity. Co-infection with Cryptosporidium (OR 12.79; p < 0.001), parasitic co-infections other than Cryptosporidium (OR 5.22; p = 0.009), no deworming (OR 4.67; p = 0.035), and male sex (OR 3.63; p = 0.025) were risk factors for Giardia. For Cryptosporidium, co-infection with Giardia was the only risk factor (OR 11.93; p < 0.0001). Genotyping revealed G. duodenalis assemblages A and F, and C. felis, all of them previously detected in humans. In conclusion, excretion of Giardia and Cryptosporidium was associated with clinical disease. Although a public health risk is likely, studies including larger sample sizes, more discriminatory markers and samples from other animals and humans are needed to reveal the full zoonotic potential.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Criptosporidiose/epidemiologia , Giardíase/epidemiologia , Giardíase/veterinária , Animais , Gatos , Criptosporidiose/parasitologia , Cryptosporidium/genética , Dinamarca/epidemiologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/parasitologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/veterinária , Fezes/parasitologia , Feminino , Giardia/genética , Giardíase/parasitologia , Proteínas de Choque Térmico HSP70/genética , Humanos , Masculino , RNA Ribossômico 18S/genética , Fatores de Risco , Desidrogenase do Álcool de Açúcar/genética
19.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 29(1): e012819, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32294719

RESUMO

Endoparasitic infections are associated with morbidity in cats. This study aimed to investigate the occurrence of endoparasites among cats of different life stages in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The samples were analyzed individually by macroscopic exploration for proglottids and centrifugal-flotation. Stool samples were obtained from household cats (n = 57) and shelter cats (n = 336). Endoparasites were detected in 50.64% of the samples. Among household and shelter cats, 21.05% and 55.66% were infected with endoparasites, respectively. In household cats, the most prevalent endoparasites were Ancylostoma spp. (in 25.0%) and Strongyloides spp. (in 25.0%), followed by Toxocara spp. (in 16.67%), Dipylidium caninum (in 16.67%), Cystoisospora spp. (in 8.33%), and Uncinaria spp. + Ancylostoma spp. (in 8.33%). In shelter cats, the most prevalent endoparasite was Ancylostoma spp. (in 29.41%), followed by Cystoisospora spp. (in 26.20%) and Toxocara spp. (in 16.58%), as well as Cystoisospora spp. + Toxocara spp. (in 8.02%); Ancylostoma spp. + Toxocara spp. (in 11.76%); Cystoisospora spp. + Ancylostoma spp. (in 3.74%); Cystoisospora spp. + Toxocara spp. + Ancylostoma spp. (in 3.21%); and Dipylidium caninum + Ancylostoma spp. (in 0.53%). Endoparasitic infections in cats underscore the need for preventive veterinary care and routine coproparasitologic tests.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Helmintíase Animal/epidemiologia , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/epidemiologia , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Fezes/parasitologia , Helmintíase Animal/diagnóstico , Helmintíase Animal/parasitologia , Prevalência , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/diagnóstico , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/parasitologia
20.
Vet Parasitol ; 280: 108995, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32155518

RESUMO

Dirofilaria immitis and D. repens are endemic throughout Europe and southern eastern regions of Asia and reported with increasing frequency in Africa. Nevertheless, the increased awareness of veterinary practitioners, even in countries where the prevalence is low, has led to a decrease D. immitis prevalence in dogs, especially in previously endemic/hyper-endemic areas. Prevalence has significantly increased, however, in areas where heartworm has apparently spread more recently, such as Central and North Eastern Europe. Furthermore, autochthonous cases have been observed in Siberia. Low seroprevalence has been reported in Croatia, while in Romania it has reached 14%. In Greece, the prevalence ranges between 0.7% and 25% whilst in Turkey is 0-18%. Data for canine dirofilariosis in Africa is scarce, and most are case reports. Overall, the dominant species is Achanthocheilonema dracunculoides, although both D. immitis and D. repens have been reported from some countries. In the Far East, the prevalence ranges from 2% to 15% in northeastern of China. In Hong Kong a novel species has been found in dogs and humans (Candidatus Dirofilaria hongkongensis). In India, the prevalence ranges from 4.7%-29.5% in Northeastern states. The main factors that have influenced the spreading of Dirofilaria infections are the climate changes and the introduction of new, invasive, competent mosquito species such as Aedes albopictus and Ae. koreicus. Other factors include relocation and insufficient prevention in dogs, manly in the new areas of colonization. Feline heartworm infection has been diagnosed in every European country when diagnosed either by the Knott test or by serology for circulating antibodies and antigens of the parasite. However, prevalence is much lower than in dogs. In spite of the continuing spreading of heartworm infection, D. repens is the main concern in Europe, mostly for physicians, while the infection is nearly always asymptomatic in dogs. The infection is spreading from Portugal to the Southeastern regions of Finland and Siberia, and in some areas its prevalence overlaps that of D. immitis. Many reasons make more difficult the control of D. repens than D. immitis: the frequent lack of clinical symptoms of suspicion, the specific diagnosis being possible only by blood examination and the inefficacy of some macrocyclic lactones.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Dirofilaria immitis/fisiologia , Dirofilaria repens/fisiologia , Dirofilariose/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , África/epidemiologia , Animais , Ásia/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Dirofilariose/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Cães , Europa (Continente)/epidemiologia , Prevalência
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