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1.
Viruses ; 13(2)2021 01 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33499363

RESUMO

Felid herpesvirus-1 (FeHV-1) is an important respiratory and ocular pathogen of cats and current vaccines are limited in duration and efficacy because they do not prevent infection, viral nasal shedding and latency. To address these shortcomings, we have constructed FeHV-1 gE-TK- and FeHV-1 PK- deletion mutants (gE-TK- and PK-) using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mutagenesis and shown safety and immunogenicity in vitro. Here, we compare the safety and efficacy of a prime boost FeHV-1 gE-TK- and FeHV-1 PK- vaccination regimen with commercial vaccination in cats. Cats in the vaccination groups were vaccinated at 3-week intervals and all cats were challenge infected 3 weeks after the last vaccination. Evaluations included clinical signs, nasal shedding, virus neutralizing antibodies (VN), cytokine mRNA gene expression, post-mortem histology and detection of latency establishment. Vaccination with gE-TK- and PK- mutants was safe and resulted in significantly reduced clinical disease scores, pathological changes, viral nasal shedding, and viral DNA in the trigeminal ganglia (the site of latency) following infection. Both mutants induced VN antibodies and interferons after immunization. In addition, after challenge infection, we observed a reduction of IL-1ß expression, and modulation of TNFα, TGFß and IL10 expression. In conclusion, this study shows the merits of using FeHV-1 deletion mutants for prevention of FeHV-1 infection in cats.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Herpesviridae/veterinária , Imunidade Inata , Varicellovirus/genética , Vacinas Virais/imunologia , Animais , Anticorpos Neutralizantes/sangue , Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Linhagem Celular , Citocinas/genética , Citocinas/imunologia , Deleção de Genes , Infecções por Herpesviridae/prevenção & controle , Imunização Secundária/veterinária , Masculino , Varicellovirus/fisiologia , Proteínas do Envelope Viral/genética , Proteínas do Envelope Viral/imunologia , Vacinas Virais/genética , Virulência/genética , Replicação Viral , Eliminação de Partículas Virais
5.
J Small Anim Pract ; 61(6): E1-E35, 2020 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32227347

RESUMO

The World Small Animal Veterinary Association Vaccination Guidelines Group has produced global guidelines for small companion animal practitioners on best practice in canine and feline vaccination. Recognising that there are unique aspects of veterinary practice in certain geographical regions of the world, the Vaccination Guidelines Group undertook a regional project in Latin America between 2016 and 2019, culminating in the present document. The Vaccination Guidelines Group gathered scientific and demographic data during visits to Argentina, Brazil and Mexico, by discussion with national key opinion leaders, visiting veterinary practices and review of the scientific literature. A questionnaire survey was completed by 1390 veterinarians in five Latin American countries and the Vaccination Guidelines Group delivered continuing education at seven events attended by over 3500 veterinarians. The Vaccination Guidelines Group recognised numerous challenges in Latin America, for example: (1) lack of national oversight of the veterinary profession, (2) extraordinary growth in private veterinary schools of undetermined quality, (3) socioeconomic constraints on client engagement with preventive health care, (4) high regional prevalence of some key infectious diseases (e.g. feline leukaemia virus infection, canine visceral leishmaniosis), (5) almost complete lack of minimal antigen vaccine products as available in other markets, (6) relative lack of vaccine products with extended duration of immunity as available in other markets, (7) availability of vaccine products withdrawn from other markets (e.g. Giardia vaccine) or unique to Latin America (e.g. some Leishmania vaccines), (8) accessibility of vaccines directly by pet owners or breeders such that vaccination is not delivered under veterinary supervision, (9) limited availability of continuing education in veterinary vaccinology and lack of compulsion for continuing professional development and (10) limited peer-reviewed published scientific data on small companion animal infectious diseases (with the exception of leishmaniosis) and lack of support for such academic research. In this document, the Vaccination Guidelines Group summarises the findings of this project and assesses in evidence-based fashion the scientific literature pertaining to companion animal vaccine-preventable diseases in Latin America. The Vaccination Guidelines Group makes some recommendations on undergraduate and postgraduate education and academic research. Recognising that current product availability in Latin America does not permit veterinarians in these countries to vaccinate according to the global World Small Animal Veterinary Association guidelines, the Vaccination Guidelines Group makes a series of "pragmatic" recommendations as to what might be currently achievable, and a series of "aspirational" recommendations as to what might be desirable for the future. The concept of "vaccine husbandry" is addressed via some simple guidelines for the management of vaccine products in the practice. Finally, the Vaccination Guidelines Group emphasises the global trend towards delivery of vaccination as one part of an "annual health check" or "health care plan" that reviews holistically the preventive health care needs of the individual pet animal. Latin American practitioners should transition towards these important new practices that are now well embedded in more developed veterinary markets. The document also includes 70 frequently asked questions and their answers; these were posed to the Vaccination Guidelines Group during our continuing education events and small group discussions and should address many of the issues surrounding delivery of vaccination in the Latin American countries. Spanish and Portuguese translations of this document will be made freely available from the on-line resource pages of the Vaccination Guidelines Group.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Vacinação/veterinária , Médicos Veterinários , Animais , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Cães , Humanos , América Latina
6.
Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd ; 162(3): 141-151, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32146434

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are of increasing importance in human and veterinary medicine. Also, small animal clinics and practices are facing patients carrying antibiotic-resistant bacteria. What risk do these animals pose for animal owners? How can the risk of transmission to humans be reduced? A working group of human and veterinary medicine experts developed a guide for dog or cat owners with pets carrying antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The guide contains background information on the most important antibiotic-resistant bacteria in dogs and cats, namely methicillin-resistant staphylococci and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Measures are listed to reduce the risk of transmission to humans. This review explains the pathophysiology, occurrence and risk factors of these bacteria in dogs, cats and humans. Recommended measures are outlined.


Assuntos
Infecções Bacterianas/veterinária , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana , Animais de Estimação/microbiologia , Animais , Infecções Bacterianas/microbiologia , Infecções Bacterianas/prevenção & controle , Infecções Bacterianas/transmissão , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Humanos
7.
Int J Infect Dis ; 95: 352-360, 2020 Jun.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32205283

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Hoping to improve health-related effectiveness, a two-phase vaccination against rabies was designed and executed in northern Tanzania in 2018, which included geo-epidemiological and economic perspectives. METHODS: Considering the local bio-geography and attempting to rapidly establish a protective ring around a city at risk, the first phase intervened on sites surrounding that city, where the population density was lower than in the city at risk. The second phase vaccinated a rural area. RESULTS: No rabies-related case has been reported in the vaccinated areas for over a year post-immunisation; hence, the campaign is viewed as highly cost-effective. Other metrics included: rapid implementation (concluded in half the time spent on other campaigns) and the estimated cost per protected life, which was 3.28 times lower than in similar vaccinations. CONCLUSIONS: The adopted design emphasised local bio-geographical dynamics: it prevented the occurrence of an epidemic in a city with a higher demographic density than its surrounding area and it also achieved greater effectiveness than average interventions. These interdisciplinary, policy-oriented experiences have broad and immediate applications in settings of limited and/or time-sensitive (expertise, personnel, and time available to intervene) resources and conditions.


Assuntos
Programas de Imunização , Vacinas Antirrábicas/administração & dosagem , Raiva/prevenção & controle , Animais , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Gatos , Análise Custo-Benefício , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Programas de Imunização/economia , Raiva/economia , Raiva/transmissão , Vacinas Antirrábicas/economia , Tanzânia
8.
Parasit Vectors ; 13(1): 65, 2020 Feb 12.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32051008

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: In three randomized, controlled laboratory efficacy studies, the efficacy in the prevention of patent infections of a topical combination of imidacloprid 10%/moxidectin 1% (Advocate® spot-on formulation for cats, Bayer Animal Health GmbH) against larval stages and immature adults of Aelurostrongylus abstrusus, as well as the treatment efficacy of a single or three monthly treatments against adult A. abstrusus, were evaluated. METHODS: Cats were experimentally inoculated with 300-800 third-stage larvae (L3). Each group comprised 8 animals and the treatment dose was 10 mg/kg bodyweight (bw) imidacloprid and 1 mg/kg bw moxidectin in each study. Prevention of the establishment of patent infections was evaluated by two treatments at a monthly interval at three different time points before and after challenge infection. Curative efficacy was tested by one or three treatments after the onset of patency. Worm counts at necropsy were used for efficacy calculations. RESULTS: In Study 1, the control group had a geometric mean (GM) of 28.8 adult nematodes and the single treatment group had a GM of 3.4 (efficacy 88.3%). In Study 2, the control group had a GM of 14.3, the prevention group had a GM of 0 (efficacy 100%), while the treatment group had a GM of 0.1 (efficacy 99.4%). In Study 3, the GM worm burden in the control group was 32.6 compared to 0 in all three prevention groups (efficacy 100% for all of those groups). CONCLUSIONS: The monthly administration of Advocate® reliably eliminated early larval stages and thereby prevented lung damage from and patent infections with A. abstrusus in cats. Regarding treatment, a single application of Advocate® reduced the worm burden, but it did not sufficiently clear the infection. In contrast, three monthly treatments were safe and highly efficacious against A. abstrusus.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Macrolídeos/administração & dosagem , Metastrongyloidea/efeitos dos fármacos , Neonicotinoides/administração & dosagem , Nitrocompostos/administração & dosagem , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária , Administração Tópica , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Esquema de Medicação , Composição de Medicamentos , Feminino , Larva/efeitos dos fármacos , Estágios do Ciclo de Vida/efeitos dos fármacos , Pulmão/efeitos dos fármacos , Pulmão/parasitologia , Masculino , Infecções por Strongylida/tratamento farmacológico , Infecções por Strongylida/prevenção & controle , Resultado do Tratamento
9.
Parasit Vectors ; 13(1): 101, 2020 Feb 26.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32102683

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Pets may be carriers of infectious agents including parasites. As part of a larger-scale study covering the whole of Europe, this study examines deworming measures reported by Spanish pet owners and identifies risk factors. METHODS: An online questionnaire was administered to cat and dog owners in Spain. The replies provided were used to obtain information about the pets' living conditions and to accordingly classify each pet into one of the four ESCCAP infection risk categories (A, B, C or D) for which different deworming frequencies are recommended. Questions were also asked about pet care and owners' attitude toward their pets. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used to correlate risk groups with deworming frequencies. RESULTS: Completed questionnaires were returned by 500 cat owners and 501 dog owners. According to responses, 96.21% of dogs were assigned to risk category D (maximum risk), and only 1.2%, 2.2% and 0.4% to A, B and C, respectively. Almost all cats were assigned to the minimum risk category A (indoor cats, 62%) or maximum risk category D (outdoor cats, 32.8%); only 3.4% and 1.8% of cats were classified as risk B and C respectively. More dogs were allocated to the higher risk group compared to cats, which were more frequently kept indoors. Cats were reportedly dewormed less frequently than dogs (2.56 and 3.13 times per year respectively), consistent with their different infestation risk. Thus, pets in the lower risk group A were either adequately dewormed or treated more often than necessary. Only a small proportion of cats were not dewormed at all (n = 14). Alarmingly, almost all pets in risk groups B, C or D (representing 95% of dogs and 39% of cats) were dewormed less often than recommended. CONCLUSIONS: More effective health education is required for the management of zoonotic endoparasite diseases under the umbrella of One Health targeted at owners, veterinarians, general practitioners, and health authorities. To align deworming frequency with infection risk, pet owners should be provided with clear, compelling instructions.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/prevenção & controle , Animais de Estimação/parasitologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Idoso de 80 Anos ou mais , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Parasitos/fisiologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/parasitologia , Fatores de Risco , Espanha , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem , Zoonoses/parasitologia , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle
10.
J Feline Med Surg ; 22(2): 199-202, 2020 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31986978

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate safety and seroconversion when an inactivated H3N2 canine influenza virus (CIV) vaccine was administered to cats. METHODS: Twenty 7-8-week-old seronegative cats were randomly assigned to two groups of 10 animals each. Cats in treatment group T01 were subcutaneously administered two doses of an adjuvanted placebo 3 weeks apart to serve as non-immunized controls. Cats in treatment group T02 were subcutaneously administered with two doses of H3N2 CIV vaccine at 3 weeks apart. All animals were actively monitored for 5 days after each injection for local and systemic reactions. Tympanic temperatures were recorded the day before and 5 days after each vaccination. Blood samples for serology were collected prior to each vaccination (days -1 and 20), and 7 and 14 days post-second vaccination. RESULTS: Minor vocalization was observed in both control and vaccinated animals after the first and second dose administration. The only injection site reaction observed was mild swelling in one control cat, which resolved within 24 h. Transient fevers (39.5-39.7°C) that resolved within 24 h post-injection were observed in both treatment groups (T01 = 3/10 and T02 = 5/10). All vaccinated, but no control, animals successfully seroconverted within 14 days of second vaccination, with H3N2 CIV-specific hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titers ranging from 32 to 128. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Cats vaccinated subcutaneously with an inactivated H3N2 CIV vaccine had similar rates of adverse events post-vaccination as the control group. Increased HAI titers provided evidence of post-vaccination seroconversion with the H3N2 CIV-vaccinated group.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Vacinas contra Influenza , Infecções por Orthomyxoviridae , Vacinação , Animais , Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue , Anticorpos Antivirais/imunologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão , Cães , Vírus da Influenza A Subtipo H3N2 , Vacinas contra Influenza/administração & dosagem , Vacinas contra Influenza/efeitos adversos , Vacinas contra Influenza/imunologia , Infecções por Orthomyxoviridae/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Orthomyxoviridae/veterinária , Soroconversão , Vacinação/efeitos adversos , Vacinação/veterinária
11.
J Zoo Wildl Med ; 50(4): 798-802, 2020 Jan 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31926509

RESUMO

Two methods for delivering a canarypox-vectored canine distemper vaccine to tigers (Panthera tigris) and domestic cats (Felis catus) were investigated. Eight tigers were divided randomly into two vaccination groups: subcutaneous injection or topical tonsillar application. Each tiger received 2 ml of canine distemper virus (CDV) vaccine (Merial Ferret Distemper Vaccine). Blood was collected from tigers on days 0, 21, 35 or 37, and 112 post-initial vaccination (PIV). Domestic cats were divided randomly into four treatment groups: saline injection (negative controls), low- and high-dose oral, and subcutaneous vaccinates. Blood was collected from domestic cats on days 0, 7, 21, and 28 and 165 or 208 PIV. Sera were tested for CDV antibodies by virus neutralization. All individuals were seronegative at the beginning of the study. One tiger vaccinated subcutaneously developed a titer of 32 by day 35, which reduced to 16 by day 112. Another tiger vaccinated by tonsillar application developed a titer of 8 on day 112. All other tigers remained seronegative. Cats that received saline injection or oral vaccination remained seronegative at each sampling time. Domestic cats vaccinated subcutaneously developed titers ranging from 4 to >128 by day 28, and those re-bled at day 166 had titers of 16 or 64. The disparity in response between domestic cats and tigers may be due to species differences or it may represent a dose-dependent effect. Subcutaneous vaccination with canarypox-vectored Purevax Ferret Distemper® is safe and elicits persistent antibody titers in domestic cats vaccinated parenterally.


Assuntos
Vírus da Varíola dos Canários , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Vírus da Cinomose Canina/imunologia , Cinomose/prevenção & controle , Tigres/imunologia , Vacinas Virais/imunologia , Administração Oral , Animais , Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue , Doenças do Gato/imunologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Feminino , Masculino , Vacinas Sintéticas
12.
J Feline Med Surg ; 22(1): 41-48, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31916874

RESUMO

PRACTICAL RELEVANCE: There has been increasing identification of vector-borne pathogens in cats presented to veterinary clinics around the world for evaluation of fever and the associated secondary effects, such as signs of depression and loss of appetite. AIM: The aim of this article is to summarize the clinically relevant information concerning fever in cats that is associated with pathogens vectored by ticks or sandflies, with an emphasis on presenting clinical abnormalities and optimal diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. Fever in cats associated with pathogens known or suspected to be vectored by fleas was discussed within Part 1 of this two-part article series.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Febre , Psychodidae , Carrapatos , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Doenças do Gato/terapia , Gatos , Febre/etiologia , Febre/veterinária , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/diagnóstico , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/prevenção & controle , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/terapia , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/veterinária
14.
Vet Surg ; 49(2): 256-264, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31617950

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To determine perioperative inadvertent hypothermia (PIH) incidence, risk factors, prevention methods, and effect of PIH prevention on anesthesia recovery times. STUDY DESIGN: Nonrandomized controlled before-and-after trial. ANIMALS: Dogs (n = 277) and cats (n = 20) undergoing open surgery. METHODS: Incidence and risk factors for PIH (core temperature <96.8°F), existing thermal care practices, and recovery times were documented at baseline. For group 1, a thermal care bundle consisting of protocol-driven active warming combined with raised environmental temperatures (75°F) in induction rooms (IR) and operating rooms (OR) was implemented. Perioperative inadvertent hypothermia incidence and recovery times were recorded. For group 2, baseline active warming practices were resumed while environmental temperatures remained elevated. RESULTS: Perioperative inadvertent hypothermia was associated with preoperative imaging (P = .039) and percentage clip area (P = .037). Perioperative inadvertent hypothermia decreased in group 1 (13.5%, n = 96, P < .001) and group 2 (13.0%, n = 100, P < .001) compared with baseline (35.6%, n = 101). Median time from anesthesia withdrawal to extubation decreased in group 1 (5 minutes, P = .028) and group 2 (5 minutes, P = .018) compared with baseline (7 minutes). Median time from anesthesia recovery to spontaneous food intake decreased in group 1 (6 hours, n = 92, P = .016) but not in group 2 (6.0 hours, n = 88, P = .060) compared with baseline (n = 94, 6.7 hours). No group differences in PIH risk factors were identified. CONCLUSION: Perioperative inadvertent hypothermia incidence was high but reducible by raising environmental temperatures alone or in combination with increased focus on active warming. Reductions in PIH shortened recovery times. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Maintaining IR and OR temperatures at the standard-of-care for human pediatric surgery reduces PIH and may improve outcomes.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Hipotermia/veterinária , Complicações Intraoperatórias/veterinária , Temperatura , Anestesia , Animais , Temperatura Corporal , Doenças do Gato/etiologia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/etiologia , Cães , Feminino , Humanos , Hipotermia/etiologia , Hipotermia/prevenção & controle , Incidência , Complicações Intraoperatórias/epidemiologia , Monitorização Intraoperatória , Assistência Perioperatória , Fatores de Risco
16.
Vet Rec ; 185(23): 735, 2019 12 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31831706

RESUMO

Alexander German, Ian Ramsey and Philip Lhermette address some of the concerns raised over calling pet obesity a disease and argue that this classification can bring many management opportunities.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/classificação , Doenças do Cão/classificação , Obesidade/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/diagnóstico , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Cães , Obesidade/diagnóstico , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Animais de Estimação
17.
Vet Rec ; 185(Suppl 1): 1-3, 2019 11 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31727730

RESUMO

Pet obesity is on the rise, bringing with it increased risks of ill health and poor quality of life for companion animals. The profession is, rightly, concerned. But is it clear on the complex, interconnected causes for this change and well equipped to confront them? Some argue a greater degree of understanding is required. Claire Read reports.


Assuntos
Dieta/veterinária , Obesidade/veterinária , Ração Animal , Animais , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Doenças do Gato/terapia , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Doenças do Cão/terapia , Cães , Humanos , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Obesidade/terapia , Animais de Estimação
18.
Vet Rec ; 185(Suppl 1): 7, 2019 11 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31727733

RESUMO

Human and animal behaviour often combine into a perfect storm of obesity-causing actions.


Assuntos
Obesidade/veterinária , Condicionamento Físico Animal , Animais , Comportamento Apetitivo , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Gatos/fisiologia , Humanos , Obesidade/prevenção & controle , Animais de Estimação
20.
Parasit Vectors ; 12(1): 480, 2019 Oct 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31610795

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Endoparasites in dogs and cats are a concern related to pet health and zoonotic risks. Several determinants may affect the endoparasite transmission and infection of dogs and cats such as pet's lifestyle or regional parasite distribution. Although different zoonotic endoparasites, such as Toxocara spp. and Echinococcus spp., have been identified in France, little information exists about the deworming behaviors of owners or the frequency of occurrence of risk factors associated with endoparasite infection or transmission. Deworming guidelines, such as those created by the European Scientific Counsel Companion Animal Parasites (ESCCAP), recommend a deworming frequency according to the risk of infection of every pet and the potential risk for zoonotic transmission. The objectives of this study were to explore how lifestyles of dogs and cats from France were related to a particular risk of endoparasites and assess whether deworming frequencies complied with ESCCAP recommendations. METHODS: French data were extracted from a database created during a recent European pet owner survey regarding endoparasitic infection risk. Dogs and cats were grouped into risk categories based upon the ESCCAP guidelines. The compliance between the actual and recommended deworming frequencies were explored among the regions surveyed. RESULTS: The majority of dogs and cats were older than 6 months, had outdoor access, had contact with children or elderly people, and lived in rural and town areas. Most of the dogs were in contact with other dogs, snails or prey (83%), and ate slugs, snails, grass or dug in the garden (68%). Likewise, most of the cats hunted outside (57%) and caught prey animals (52%). Consequently, most of the dogs (89%) and cats (53%) were considered to be in the highest-risk category (D). However, independent of the region, the average deworming compliance for dogs was poor (6%). While deworming compliance for cats in category A (low-risk) was excellent (94%), for cats in category D it was poor (6%). CONCLUSIONS: Deworming compliance is needed to enhance pet health and reduce zoonotic risks. Future studies are warranted to thoroughly investigate the compliance and effectiveness of deworming protocols, and the risk factors associated with endoparasites in France.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/parasitologia , Animais de Estimação/parasitologia , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Cães , França/epidemiologia , Humanos , Estilo de Vida , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/epidemiologia , Doenças Parasitárias em Animais/prevenção & controle , Prevalência , Fatores de Risco , Inquéritos e Questionários , Zoonoses/parasitologia , Zoonoses/prevenção & controle
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