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1.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 30(1): e025020, 2021.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33605389

RESUMO

Gurltia paralysans is the causal agent of gurltiosis in domestic cats in South America. Although the life cycle of G. paralysans is unknown, it is thought that gastropods could act as intermediate hosts (IHs), as is the case for several nematodes in the Angiostrongylidae family. The aim of this study was to search for G. paralysans larvae in terrestrial gastropods and determine their role in the life cycle of this nematode species. Terrestrial gastropod samples (n=835) were collected in Punucapa, Valdivia, southern Chile, where cases of gurltiosis had been reported before. The samples included species from the families Arionidae, Limacidae, Helicidae and Milacidae. All gastropods were subjected to enzymatic digestion to isolate G. paralysans larvae. Ten percent of the gastropod samples were analyzed using seminested PCR targeting the 28S rRNA gene, while 2.6% were analyzed by histopathological examination. The results indicated the absence of G. paralysans when using any of the three methods. In conclusion, further studies are needed to evaluate specific species of aquatic or native gastropods acting as possible IHs (in this geographic location).


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Gastrópodes , Metastrongyloidea , Infecções por Strongylida , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Chile , Gastrópodes/parasitologia , Especificidade de Hospedeiro , Estágios do Ciclo de Vida , Metastrongyloidea/fisiologia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/veterinária , Infecções por Strongylida/transmissão , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária
2.
Parasit Vectors ; 14(1): 13, 2021 Jan 06.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33407836

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Thelazia callipaeda is a zoonotic parasitic nematode of the family Thelaziidae, with Phortica okadai as its intermediate host and only confirmed vector in China. China has the largest number of human cases of thelaziosis in the world. It is generally believed that infected domestic animals (dogs and cats) are the most important reservoir hosts of T. callipaeda, and thus pose a direct threat to humans. At present, there is little research or attention focused on the role of wildlife in the transmission cycle of thelaziosis in nature reserves. METHODS: We selected locations in four national nature reserves across China to monitor P. okadai and wildlife. We used a fly-trap method to monitor P. okadai density. Morphological analysis of the parasites collected from the conjunctival sac of the infected wildlife was undertaken as the first step in species identification, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for species confirmation. RESULTS: In 2019, the density of P. okadai in Foping National Nature Reserve in China increased sharply, and infected P. okadai were newly found in the reserve. Giant panda, wild boar, leopard cat, and black bear were found to be newly infected with T. callipaeda (one individual of each species). A total of four worms were collected, one from each species of wildlife. The four worms were identified as T. callipaeda by their morphological characteristics; species identification was confirmed by PCR amplification. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of T. callipaeda infection in P. okadai as well as in a variety of wildlife, including giant panda, in nature reserves in China. These results indicate that there is a transmission cycle of T. callipaeda among wildlife in these nature reserves. The increasing number of case reports of thelaziosis in wildlife suggest a likely risk of T. callipaeda infection for the inhabitants of villages situated around nature reserves.


Assuntos
Animais Selvagens/parasitologia , Drosophilidae/parasitologia , Thelazioidea/isolamento & purificação , Animais , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , China/epidemiologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/veterinária , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Infecções Oculares Parasitárias/transmissão , Humanos , Insetos Vetores/parasitologia , Infecções por Nematoides/transmissão , Sus scrofa/parasitologia , Ursidae/parasitologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/transmissão , Zoonoses/parasitologia , Zoonoses/transmissão
4.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 2322-2332, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33028154

RESUMO

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the cause of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) and responsible for the current pandemic. Recent SARS-CoV-2 susceptibility studies in cats show that the virus can replicate in these companion animals and transmit to other cats. Here, we present an in-depth study of SARS-CoV-2 infection, disease and transmission in domestic cats. Cats were challenged with SARS-CoV-2 via intranasal and oral routes. One day post challenge (DPC), two sentinel cats were introduced. Animals were monitored for clinical signs, clinicopathological abnormalities and viral shedding. Postmortem examinations were performed at 4, 7 and 21 DPC. Viral RNA was not detected in blood but transiently in nasal, oropharyngeal and rectal swabs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as various tissues. Tracheobronchoadenitis of submucosal glands with the presence of viral RNA and antigen was observed in airways of the infected cats. Serology showed that both, principals and sentinels, developed antibodies to SARS-CoV-2. All animals were clinically asymptomatic during the course of the study and capable of transmitting SARS-CoV-2 to sentinels. The results of this study are critical for understanding the clinical course of SARS-CoV-2 in a naturally susceptible host species, and for risk assessment.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Infecções por Coronavirus/veterinária , Suscetibilidade a Doenças , Pandemias/veterinária , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão , Pneumonia Viral/veterinária , Animais , Anticorpos Neutralizantes/sangue , Anticorpos Antivirais/sangue , Líquido da Lavagem Broncoalveolar/química , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Doenças do Gato/virologia , Gatos , Linhagem Celular , Chlorocebus aethiops , Infecções por Coronavirus/patologia , Masculino , Pneumonia Viral/patologia , RNA Viral/análise , RNA Viral/isolamento & purificação , Células Vero , Replicação Viral
5.
PLoS One ; 15(10): e0239991, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33091006

RESUMO

Shedding of DNA of pathogenic Leptospira spp. has been documented in naturally infected cats in several countries, but urinary shedding of infectious Leptospira spp. has only recently been proven. The climate in Southern Chile is temperate rainy with high annual precipitations which represents ideal preconditions for survival of Leptospira spp., especially during spring and summer. The aims of this study were to investigate shedding of pathogenic Leptospira spp. in outdoor cats in Southern Chile, to perform molecular characterization of isolates growing in culture, and to assess potential risk factors associated with shedding. Urine samples of 231 outdoor cats from rural and urban areas in southern Chile were collected. Urine samples were investigated for pathogenic Leptospira spp. by 4 techniques: qPCR targeting the lipL32 gene, immunomagnetic separation (IMS)-coupled qPCR (IMS-qPCR), direct culture and IMS-coupled culture. Positive urine cultures were additionally confirmed by PCR. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) was used to molecularly characterize isolates obtained from positive cultures. Overall, 36 urine samples (15.6%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 11.4-20.9) showed positive results. Eighteen (7.8%, 95% CI 4.9-12.1), 30 (13%, 95% CI 9.2-18), 3 (1.3%, 0.3-3.9) and 4 cats (1.7%; 95% CI 0.5-4.5) were positive in qPCR, IMS-qPCR, conventional culture, and IMS-coupled culture, respectively. MLST results of 7 culture-positive cats revealed sequences that could be assigned to sequence type 17 (6 cats) and sequence type 27 (1 cat) corresponding to L. interrogans (Pathogenic Leptospira Subgroup 1). Shedding of pathogenic Leptospira spp. by cats might be an underestimated source of infection for other species including humans. The present study is the first one reporting growth of leptospires from feline urine in culture in naturally infected cats in South-America and characterisation of culture-derived isolates. So far, very few cases of successful attempts to culture leptospires from naturally infected cats are described worldwide.


Assuntos
Derrame de Bactérias/fisiologia , Doenças do Gato/patologia , Leptospira/patogenicidade , Leptospirose/patologia , Animais , Proteínas da Membrana Bacteriana Externa/genética , Proteínas da Membrana Bacteriana Externa/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , DNA Bacteriano/metabolismo , Feminino , Leptospira/genética , Leptospira/isolamento & purificação , Leptospirose/microbiologia , Leptospirose/transmissão , Leptospirose/veterinária , Lipoproteínas/genética , Lipoproteínas/isolamento & purificação , Masculino , Tipagem de Sequências Multilocus , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real , Fatores de Risco , Urina/microbiologia
6.
Vet Parasitol ; 285: 109215, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32862125

RESUMO

Feline lungworms such as Aerulostrongylus abstrusus and Troglostrongylus brevior are snail-borne pathogens causing respiratory disease in domestic cats. Paratenic hosts such as rodents and reptiles have also been implicated in the epidemiology of these parasites. Although A. abstrusus has been recognized for a long time as the most prevalent lungworm among cats worldwide, T. brevior is of major concern in kittens. Bearing in mind that disease due to T. brevior occurs mainly in pediatric patients younger than 6 months of age, the diagnosis of this parasite in two kittens presenting severe respiratory disease from the garden of one of the authors inspired us to investigate the potential routes of transmission for T. brevior in domestic cats. Of the three queens (A, B and C) that delivered kittens (n = 8), only cat A was positive for T. brevior, presenting her two kittens severe respiratory clinical signs, which lead to the exitus in one of them, 18 days of age. In addition, three kittens, the offspring of queen B, turned to be positive at the coprological examination after suckling from queen A, whereas those from queen C (that suckled only on their own mother) remained negative. A series of coprological, histological and molecular tests were conducted to confirm the presence of T. brevior in the patients as well as in the other cats cohabiting the same garden. Adult nematodes were retrieved from the trachea and bronchi of the dead kitten (kitten 1A), and larvae at the histology of the lung and liver parenchyma associated with bronco pneumonitis and lymphocytic pericholangitis, respectively. Cornu aspersum (n = 60), Eobania vermiculata (n = 30) snails (intermediate hosts) as well as lizards and rats (potential paratenic hosts) were collected from the same garden and processed through tissue digestion and molecular detection. Troglostrongylus brevior larvae were recovered through tissue digestion from two C. aspersum (3.33 %) and it was confirmed by PCR-sequencing approach, which also detected T. brevior DNA in the liver and lungs of one rat and in the coelomatic cavity of one gecko lizard. During the COVID-19 lockdown, when scientists spent more time at home, we grasp the opportunity to decipher T. brevior biology and ecology starting in a small ecological niche, such as the garden of our house. Data herein presented led us to suggest: i) the transmammary transmission of T. brevior in domestic cats; ii) the role of intermediate and paratenic hosts (including reptiles) in the epidemiology of the infection which they transmit; as well as iii) the importance of observational parasitology in studying any event that certainly occurs in small ecological niches, as it could be in our home gardens.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Transmissão Vertical de Doença Infecciosa/veterinária , Infecções Respiratórias/veterinária , Infecções por Strongylida/veterinária , Estrongilídios , Animais , Gatos , Feminino , Masculino , Infecções Respiratórias/parasitologia , Infecções Respiratórias/patologia , Infecções Respiratórias/transmissão , Infecções por Strongylida/parasitologia , Infecções por Strongylida/transmissão
9.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32471058

RESUMO

Over time the human-animal bond has been changed. For instance, the role of pets has changed from work animals (protecting houses, catching mice) to animals with a social function, giving companionship. Pets can be important for the physical and mental health of their owners but may also transmit zoonotic infections. The One Health initiative is a worldwide strategy for expanding collaborations in all aspects of health care for humans, animals, and the environment. However, in One Health communications the role of particularly dogs and cats is often underestimated. OBJECTIVE: Evaluation of positive and negative One Health issues of the human-companion animal relationship with a focus on zoonotic aspects of cats and dogs in industrialized countries. METHOD: Literature review. RESULTS: Pets undoubtedly have a positive effect on human health, while owners are increasing aware of pet's health and welfare. The changing attitude of humans with regard to pets and their environment can also lead to negative effects such as changes in feeding practices, extreme breeding, and behavioral problems, and anthropozoonoses. For the human, there may be a higher risk of the transmission of zoonotic infections due to trends such as sleeping with pets, allowing pets to lick the face or wounds, bite accidents, keeping exotic animals, the importation of rescue dogs, and soil contact. CONCLUSIONS: One Health issues need frequently re-evaluated as the close human-animal relationship with pet animals can totally differ compared to decennia ago. Because of the changed human-companion animal bond, recommendations regarding responsible pet-ownership, including normal hygienic practices, responsible breeding, feeding, housing, and mental and physical challenges conforming the biology of the animal are required. Education can be performed by vets and physicians as part of the One Health concept.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Saúde Única , Zoonoses , Animais , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Humanos , Animais de Estimação , Inquéritos e Questionários
14.
Vet Parasitol ; 280: 109058, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32200198

RESUMO

The clinical manifestations most frequently observed in cats with leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania infantum are cutaneous alterations, which suggest a high parasitic load in the skin and the possibility of infecting a vector. This study evaluated the infectiousness of to phlebotomine sand flies cats infected with L. infantum. A total of 12 cats with infection by L. infantum from the city of Teresina, Piauí, Brazil, were included in the study. Cats were diagnosed by direct visualization of the parasite. Laboratory-bred insects, free from infection by Leishmania spp. were offered a blood meal for 60 min on cats infected with L. infantum. On the fifth and sixth day after the blood meal, flies were dissected to assess promastigote forms of the parasite in the digestive system. Eight cats (67 %) were able to infect the vectors. The frequency of infected insects per cat ranged 0.0-94.4%. The mean frequency of insects feeding on cats was 95.2 %. Large numbers of the parasite were observed per insect, but were not quantified. The result confirm that cats are able to infect L. longipalpis, indicating that cats are part of the epidemiological chain of VL, acting as reservoir of the disease.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Insetos Vetores/parasitologia , Leishmania infantum/fisiologia , Leishmaniose Visceral/veterinária , Psychodidae/parasitologia , Animais , Brasil , Gatos , Feminino , Leishmaniose Visceral/transmissão , Masculino
15.
Schweiz Arch Tierheilkd ; 162(3): 141-151, 2020 Mar.
Artigo em Alemão | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32146434

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are of increasing importance in human and veterinary medicine. Also, small animal clinics and practices are facing patients carrying antibiotic-resistant bacteria. What risk do these animals pose for animal owners? How can the risk of transmission to humans be reduced? A working group of human and veterinary medicine experts developed a guide for dog or cat owners with pets carrying antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The guide contains background information on the most important antibiotic-resistant bacteria in dogs and cats, namely methicillin-resistant staphylococci and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Measures are listed to reduce the risk of transmission to humans. This review explains the pathophysiology, occurrence and risk factors of these bacteria in dogs, cats and humans. Recommended measures are outlined.


Assuntos
Infecções Bacterianas/veterinária , Doenças do Gato/prevenção & controle , Doenças do Cão/prevenção & controle , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana , Animais de Estimação/microbiologia , Animais , Infecções Bacterianas/microbiologia , Infecções Bacterianas/prevenção & controle , Infecções Bacterianas/transmissão , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Humanos
16.
J Feline Med Surg ; 22(1): 31-39, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31916873

RESUMO

PRACTICAL RELEVANCE: There has been increasing identification of vector-borne pathogens in cats presented to veterinary clinics around the world for evaluation of fever and the associated secondary effects, such as signs of depression and loss of appetite. AIM: The aim of this article is to summarize the clinically relevant information concerning fever in cats that is associated with pathogens known or suspected to be vectored by fleas, with an emphasis on presenting clinical abnormalities and optimal diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. Fever in cats that is associated with pathogens vectored by ticks or sandflies is discussed in Part 2 of this article series.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Febre , Insetos Vetores , Sifonápteros , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/terapia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Febre/etiologia , Febre/veterinária , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/diagnóstico , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/terapia , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/transmissão , Doenças Transmitidas por Vetores/veterinária
17.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 20(2): 188-198, 2020 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31784369

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Devising effective, targeted approaches to prevent recurrent meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin and soft tissue infection requires an understanding of factors driving MRSA acquisition. We comprehensively defined household longitudinal, strain-level S aureus transmission dynamics in households of children with community-associated MRSA skin and soft tissue infection. METHODS: From 2012-15, otherwise healthy paediatric patients with culture-confirmed, community-onset MRSA infections were recruited for the Household Observation of MRSA in the Environment (HOME) prospective cohort study from hospitals and community practices in metropolitan St Louis (MO, USA). Children with health-care-related risk factors were excluded, as determined by evidence of recent hospital admission, an invasive medical device, or residence in a long-term care facility. Household contacts (individuals sleeping in the home ≥four nights per week) and indoor dogs and cats were also enrolled. A baseline visit took place at the index patient's primary home, followed by four quarterly visits over 12 months. At each visit, interviews were done and serial cultures were collected, to detect S aureus from three anatomic sites of household members, two anatomic sites on dogs and cats, and 21 environmental surfaces. Molecular typing was done by repetitive-sequence PCR to define distinct S aureus strains within each household. Longitudinal, multivariable generalised mixed-effects logistic regression models identified factors associated with S aureus acquisition. FINDINGS: Across household members, pets, and environmental surfaces, 1267 strain acquisition events were observed. Acquisitions were driven equally by 510 introductions of novel strains into households and 602 transmissions within households, each associated with distinct factors. Frequent handwashing decreased the likelihood of novel strain introduction into the household (odds ratio [OR] 0·86, credible interval [CrI] 0·74-1·01). Transmission recipients were less likely to own their homes (OR 0·77, CrI 0·63-0·94) and were more likely to share bedrooms with strain-colonised individuals (OR 1·33, CrI 1·12-1·58), live in homes with higher environmental S aureus contamination burden (OR 3·97, CrI 1·96-8·20), and report interval skin and soft tissue infection (OR 1·32, CrI 1·07-1·64). Transmission sources were more likely to share bath towels (OR 1·25, CrI 1·01-1·57). Pets were often transmission recipients, but rarely the sole transmission source. INTERPRETATION: The household environment plays a key role in transmission, a factor associated with skin and soft tissue infection. Future interventions should inclusively target household members and the environment, focusing on straightforward changes in hand hygiene and household sharing behaviours. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Children's Discovery Institute, Burroughs Wellcome Foundation, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.


Assuntos
Staphylococcus aureus Resistente à Meticilina/patogenicidade , Pele/microbiologia , Infecções dos Tecidos Moles/transmissão , Infecções Estafilocócicas/transmissão , Infecções Cutâneas Estafilocócicas/transmissão , Animais , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Infecções Comunitárias Adquiridas/microbiologia , Infecções Comunitárias Adquiridas/transmissão , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Características da Família , Desinfecção das Mãos/métodos , Humanos , Estudos Longitudinais , Meticilina/uso terapêutico , Estudos Prospectivos , Fatores de Risco , Infecções dos Tecidos Moles/microbiologia , Infecções Estafilocócicas/microbiologia , Infecções Cutâneas Estafilocócicas/microbiologia
18.
Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis ; 68: 101390, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31760363

RESUMO

Macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes is an emerging problem with a great public health concern throughout the world. The current study was carried out in order to investigate the possible role of pet animals in the epidemiology of such pathogen. For this purpose, nasal or oral swabs were collected from 115 pets (40 dogs and 75 cats) with respiratory illness. The collected swabs were cultured for isolation and identification of S. pyogenes. Macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes strains were initially identified after antibiotic susceptibility testing of the all obtained S. pyogenes isolates, then the phenotypic and molecular identification were done using the double-disk test and the detection of macrolide resistance genes, respectively. Of the 115 examined pet animals, S. pyogenes was recovered from 11 (9.6 %), from which, the isolation rates among dogs and cats were 15 % and 6.7 %, respectively. Macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes was isolated from dogs and cats in the following rates 10 % and 5.3 %, respectively. All macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes strains were assigned to cMLS resistance phenotype while all of them carried ermB gene only, except one strain from a cat possessed both ermB and ermTR genes. The phylogenetic analysis of 4 ermB gene sequences showed high genetic relatedness with those carried by bacteria isolated from human cases to underline the public health impact of such strains. Seriously, all macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes strains were resistant to penicillin. The emergence of penicillin-macrolide resistant S. pyogenes among pet animals underscores not only an emerging veterinary pathogen, but also an ongoing public health threat.


Assuntos
Antibacterianos/farmacologia , Farmacorresistência Bacteriana Múltipla , Macrolídeos/farmacologia , Penicilinas/farmacologia , Infecções Estreptocócicas/veterinária , Streptococcus pyogenes/efeitos dos fármacos , Animais , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Genótipo , Humanos , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Boca/microbiologia , Nariz/microbiologia , Animais de Estimação/microbiologia , Fenótipo , Saúde Pública , Infecções Estreptocócicas/transmissão , Streptococcus pyogenes/classificação
19.
J Mycol Med ; 30(1): 100908, 2020 Apr.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31732417

RESUMO

Sporotrichosis is considered a neglected disease of humans and animals in many regions of the world and is the most frequent implantation mycosis in Latin America. OBJECTIVES: To illustrate the zoonotic importance of the disease, describing a case involving a veterinarian and an infant that acquired the disease from a domestic cat and to describe, genotype and characterize these new isolates. METHODS: Direct examination of tissue samples from the two patients and feline lesions revealed the presence of Sporothrix yeast-like organisms. Fungal cultures and molecular identification of the strains were performed. Since antifungal susceptibility data of animal-borne isolates are scarce, the in vitro susceptibility testing by a microdilution reference method was determined against azoles, amphotericin B and terbinafine. RESULTS: Fungal culture and sequence analysis of the ITS region of rDNA and calmodulin and ß-tubulin genes confirmed the diagnosis and the causative agent as Sporothrix brasiliensis. In all cases, terbinafine was the most active drug, followed by posaconazole, itraconazole and voriconazole; the least active drugs were amphotericine B and fluconazole. Lack of clinical response in the veterinarian and in the infant to itraconazole and potassium iodide, respectively was observed. CONCLUSIONS: This study contributed to the molecular epidemiology of Sporothrix species in Argentina and the characterization of the in vitro susceptibility pattern of S. brasiliensis isolates recovered from a cat and two humans involved in this case of zoonotic sporotrichosis. Bearing in mind the "One Health" concept, the experience described in the present study highlights the need for future strategies for sporotrichosis treatment, control and prevention.


Assuntos
Antifúngicos/uso terapêutico , Doenças do Gato , Esporotricose/diagnóstico , Esporotricose/tratamento farmacológico , Zoonoses/diagnóstico , Zoonoses/tratamento farmacológico , Adulto , Animais , Antifúngicos/farmacologia , Argentina , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/tratamento farmacológico , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Pré-Escolar , Feminino , Genótipo , Humanos , Testes de Sensibilidade Microbiana , Técnicas de Diagnóstico Molecular , Técnicas de Tipagem Micológica/métodos , Núcleo Familiar , Filogenia , Sporothrix/classificação , Sporothrix/efeitos dos fármacos , Sporothrix/genética , Sporothrix/isolamento & purificação , Esporotricose/microbiologia , Médicos Veterinários
20.
Med Mycol ; 58(1): 141-143, 2020 Jan 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31220310

RESUMO

Since 1998, there has been an increase in the number of cat-transmitted cases of human sporotrichosis in Rio de Janeiro state, and severe forms are observed especially when associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). A retrospective search of the INI/ Fiocruz database was conducted to identify sporotrichosis cases, hospitalized and deceased patients, between 1999 and 2015. There were 3917 adult patients diagnosed, 75 of them hospitalized, and 11 died. We conclude there is still a progression toward hyperendemic levels and greater severity has been demonstrated mainly in a socially excluded population.


Assuntos
Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Esporotricose/epidemiologia , Esporotricose/mortalidade , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Surtos de Doenças , Feminino , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Infecções por HIV/microbiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Estudos Retrospectivos
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