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4.
Ann Agric Environ Med ; 26(4): 669-671, 2019 Dec 19.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31885244

RESUMO

Bartonellosis is a disease affecting a variety of animals. Many Bartonella infections are zoonotic, including cat scratch disease. Within the genus Bartonella are 45 species, of which more than 10 can infect cats and dogs. Companion animals serve as reservoirs for several zoonotic species of Bartonella, and may also serve as sentinels for zoonotic Bartonella species harbored by wildlife. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the occurrence of Bartonella spp. DNA in dogs from households where cats with clinical bartonellosis were kept. The presence of DNA with 99-100% compliance of the nucleotide sequence with the sequence of the Bartonella DNA isolated from cats was demonstrated in the body of 10% of tested dogs. The results indicate that cats serve as a Bartonella reservoir for dogs, and the dogs can play the same role with regard to humans.


Assuntos
Infecções por Bartonella/veterinária , Bartonella henselae/fisiologia , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Reservatórios de Doenças/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Animais , Infecções por Bartonella/microbiologia , Infecções por Bartonella/transmissão , Bartonella henselae/genética , Bartonella henselae/isolamento & purificação , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Zoonoses/microbiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão
5.
J Helminthol ; 94: e96, 2019 Nov 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31679534

RESUMO

Toxocariasis is an emerging zoonotic disease caused by Toxocara canis and T. cati. Toxocariasis and its etiological agents are of global public health importance, whose burden appears underestimated, especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The diversity in the transmission routes of these parasites contributes to disease prevalence and often hinders disease control measures. This study aimed to review the epidemiological distribution of Toxocara infections in SSA region. A systematic review and meta-analysis were performed using PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis). We identified 94 relevant, peer-reviewed articles, out of which, 75 articles were found eligible based on Toxocara infections in dogs, cats and humans. Overall, 27,102 samples were examined for T. canis in dogs, T. cati in cats and Toxocara serology in humans, out of which 6142 were positive for Toxocara infection: 3717 (13.7%) in dogs (faecal, 3487; necropsy, 180; hair, 50); 266 (1%) in cats (faecal, 101; necropsy, 165); and 2159 (8%) in humans (serology). Overall mean prevalences of 19% (95% confidence interval (CI): 14-23%), 9% (95% CI: 0-28%) and 36% (95% CI: 24-49%) were recorded in dogs, cats and humans, respectively. Substantial heterogeneity was observed between studies and subgroups (I2 = 99%, P < 0.01). Findings from the review showed that studies on the epidemiology of Toxocara infections in the SSA region are limited. We strongly recommend focused, collaborative and coordinated studies to determine Toxocara spp. prevalence in various hosts, including food animals and the environment, through a 'One Health' approach across SSA countries.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Toxocaríase/parasitologia , África ao Sul do Saara/epidemiologia , Animais , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Fezes/parasitologia , Humanos , Toxocara/classificação , Toxocara/genética , Toxocara/isolamento & purificação , Toxocara/fisiologia , Toxocaríase/epidemiologia , Toxocaríase/transmissão , Zoonoses/parasitologia
6.
Rev Bras Parasitol Vet ; 28(4): 632-643, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31596318

RESUMO

This study used serological and molecular methods to investigate the occurrence of vector-borne pathogens (VBP) with zoonotic potential in cats neutered at the University Veterinary Hospital in Canoinhas, Santa Catarina. The combined PCR and serological results revealed that 17 (56.6%) cats were positive for one or more pathogens. The sampled cats had antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. (7/30), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (3/30) and Leishmania infantum (2/30). The PCR assay detected DNA closely related to Ehrlichia canis in 6/30 cats, Mycoplasma haemofelis in 2/30 cats, A. phagocytophilum and Cytauxzoon sp. in one cat each. While Bartonella clarridgeiae and B. henselae were detected in two cats each, and B. koehlerae was detected in one cat.


Assuntos
Babesiose/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Negativas/veterinária , Anaplasma/genética , Anaplasma/imunologia , Anaplasma/isolamento & purificação , Animais , Babesia/genética , Babesia/imunologia , Babesia/isolamento & purificação , Babesiose/transmissão , Bartonella/genética , Bartonella/imunologia , Bartonella/isolamento & purificação , Brasil , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Ehrlichia/genética , Ehrlichia/imunologia , Ehrlichia/isolamento & purificação , Feminino , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Negativas/diagnóstico , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Negativas/microbiologia , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Negativas/transmissão , Insetos Vetores , Masculino , Mycoplasma/genética , Mycoplasma/imunologia , Mycoplasma/isolamento & purificação
7.
Vet Parasitol ; 273: 112-121, 2019 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31476666

RESUMO

Toxoplasma gondii is the parasite responsible for toxoplasmosis, a highly prevalent zoonosis that affects humans and warm-blooded animals. Faeces of infected cats can contain millions of T. gondii oocysts, which remain infectious in the environment for months. Sites repeatedly used by cats for defecation ('latrines') are recognised as hotspots of T. gondii soil contamination, but this contamination varies from one latrine to another. To understand this spatial heterogeneity, camera traps were deployed in 39 cat latrines on three dairy farms with high-density cat populations and programmed to record visits during sixteen 10-day sessions, rotating between three farms over a period of a year. Generalized Linear Mixed Models were used to test the effects of cat sexual maturity, latrine location and season on the number of cat faeces deposited and on the number of cats defecating per latrine, as determined from the analysis of 41,282 video recordings. Sexually immature cats defecated 6.60-fold (95% CI = [2.87-15.25]) more often in latrines located close to a feeding site than in other latrines. This pattern was also observed for mature males (odds ratio [OR] = 9.42, 95% CI = [3.29-26.91]), especially during winter, but not for mature females (OR = 1.77, 95% CI = [0.80-3.94]). The number of defecating cats was also 2.67-fold (95% CI = [1.66-4.30], P < 0.001) higher in latrines located close to a feeding point than in those located far from it, regardless of cat category and season. Visits by intermediate T. gondii hosts (micromammals, birds and others) were also recorded. Out of the 39 latrines, 30 (76.92%) were visited by at least one intermediate host during the study period, and some latrines were highly frequented (up to 8.74 visits/day on average). These results provide evidence that the location of food resources in dairy farms influences the latrine use pattern by cats. Highly frequented latrines can be of high risk of T. gondii infection for definitive and intermediate hosts.


Assuntos
Comportamento Animal/fisiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Solo/parasitologia , Toxoplasmose Animal/transmissão , Animais , Gatos , Indústria de Laticínios , Feminino , Interações Hospedeiro-Parasita , Modelos Lineares , Densidade Demográfica
9.
Comp Immunol Microbiol Infect Dis ; 66: 101344, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31437677

RESUMO

Zoonotic Vector-Borne Diseases (VBDs) represent a relevant health issue for pets and humans. Italy is a major epidemiological hub for feline VBDs, because of suitable conditions for vector biology and disease transmission patterns. The present study investigated the exposure to major zoonotic arthropod-borne pathogens of cats in Italy, along with the evaluation of clinic-pathological features and a risk factor analysis. Out of 167 examined cats, 52 (31.1%) were seropositive for at least one vector-borne pathogen, being positivity for Bartonella henselae the most recorded (18%). Also, various cats seroreacted for Rickettsia felis (10.8%) and Rickettisa typhi (4.2%), Leishmania infantum (3%), Anaplasma phagocytophilum (2.4%) and Ehrlichia canis (2.4%). Forty-six cats were tested also for antibodies against D. immitis and two (4.3%) scored positive. The statistical analysis showed a positive association between flea infestation and seropositivity to B. henselae, other than an association between the administration of monthly ectoparasiticide treatments and seronegativity for Rickettsia spp.; seropositive cats were older than negative animals and the lifestyle (i.e. indoor vs outdoor) was not correlated with exposure to vector-borne pathogens. The majority of seropositive cats appeared clinically healthy or showed aspecific clinical signs. Around 80% of seropositive cats had one or more biochemical and/or complete blood count abnormalities. The present data confirm the endemicity of zoonotic feline VBDs in Italy and indicate that awareness on arthropod infections and transmitted pathogens should be kept high and possible implemented, towards the protection of animal and human health with adequate surveillance plans.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Vetores de Doenças , Animais de Estimação/parasitologia , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Bartonella/patogenicidade , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Gatos , Ehrlichia canis/patogenicidade , Infestações por Pulgas/transmissão , Itália/epidemiologia , Rickettsia/patogenicidade , Fatores de Risco , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/microbiologia
10.
Ann Agric Environ Med ; 26(2): 222-226, 2019 Jun 17.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31232049

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Chlamydia (C.) felis can cause infection which may be associated with conjunctivitis and/or respiratory tract disease, particularly in kittens, but could also be the cause of the disease in adult cats. Infection is more common in multi-cat environments. The zoonotic potential of C. felis appears low, but exposure to this microorganism is possible by handling the affected cats, by contact with their aerosol, and also via fomites. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the study, 140 cats of various breeds from Kosice region in Slovakia were studied. Conjunctival samples were obtained from 71 clinically healthy cats (50.7%) and 69 cats with clinical signs of conjunctivitis and upper respiratory tract impairment (49.3%). Cats were divided into 4 groups according to breed and type of environment in which they lived. In the 1st group were cats kept inside only (n=33), in the 2nd group, free-roaming cats (n=50), the 3rd group comprised stray cats, taken from the streets (n=28), and the 4th group included cats kept in shelters or deposit devices (n=29). Molecular method PCR and DNA sequencing was used as the diagnostic method. RESULTS: Overall positivity was 17.1%. Of the 24 positive cats, the highest positivity was detected in the population of stray cats (35.7%) and shelter cats (31%). In the group of free-roaming cats, 10% had positivity. No positive animals were detected in the group of cats kept inside only. It was also found that the risk of C. felis in cats with clinical signs of disease was more than 7-fold higher than in cats without clinical signs of conjunctivitis and respiratory tract. CONCLUSIONS: The obtained results show that cats, especially stray and shelter cats, can be important sources of feline chlamydiosis, and due to their close contact with people they can present a risk for transmission.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Infecções por Chlamydia/transmissão , Infecções por Chlamydia/veterinária , Chlamydia/fisiologia , Zoonoses/transmissão , Animais , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Gatos , Chlamydia/classificação , Chlamydia/genética , Chlamydia/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Chlamydia/microbiologia , Meio Ambiente , Humanos , Filogenia , Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase em Tempo Real , Zoonoses/microbiologia
11.
PLoS One ; 14(6): e0217989, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31188858

RESUMO

Toxoplasma gondii is a single-celled intracellular apicomplexan parasite that causes toxoplasmosis. It is capable of infecting humans and nearly all warm-blooded animals including pigs, but cats are the only known definitive host. This ubiquitous zoonotic pathogen can cause abortion, stillbirth and fetal abnormalities, and has been associated with mental and behavioral changes in humans. Acute infection is potentially fatal in immunocompromised individuals. The present study aimed to assess the Toxoplasma seroprevalence in pigs, humans and cats after its initial reported detection in pigs about three decades ago in Cebu, Philippines. A total of 924 humans, 104 cats and 514 slaughter pigs were tested for antibodies against T. gondii using a commercial latex agglutination test. The results revealed positive detection rates of 26.3% (244/924) for humans, 42.3% (44/104) for cats and 13.4% (69/514) for slaughter pigs. Statistical analyses revealed that the area (P = 0.004), cat ownership (P = 0.020), the frequency of contact with cats (P < 0.0001) and consumption of street foods (P = 0.043) were significantly associated with seropositivity for T. gondii in humans. Meanwhile, the use of litter trays (P = 0.001) and contact with other animals (P = 0.007) were significantly associated with seropositivity in cats. The odds ratio for selected significant factors revealed that living in suburban areas (OR 1.66, 95% CI: 1.20-2.31), owning a cat (OR 1.482, 95% CI: 1.07-2.07) and eating street foods (OR 1.585, 95% CI: 1.01-2.48) were associated with an increased risk of T. gondii exposure in humans. In cats, the use of a litter tray (OR 4.5, 95% CI: 1.73-11.71) was associated with an increased risk of exposure. None of the profile parameters were found to be significantly associated with seropositivity in slaughter pigs (P > 0.05). This study is the first report of the serological detection of T. gondii in humans and cats in Cebu, Philippines, and the first assessment of the prevalence of the parasite in pigs in the area since its initial detection in 1982. This is also the first report documenting the seropositivity of T. gondii in pregnant women in the country. The confirmed seropositivity of T. gondii in Cebu, Philippines, in the present study implies the endemicity of toxoplasmosis in this area and highlights the need for routine testing and increased public awareness.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças Endêmicas , Doenças dos Suínos/epidemiologia , Toxoplasma/patogenicidade , Toxoplasmose Animal/epidemiologia , Toxoplasmose Cerebral/epidemiologia , Matadouros , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Animais , Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/sangue , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Filipinas/epidemiologia , Gravidez , Fatores de Risco , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Suínos , Doenças dos Suínos/parasitologia , Doenças dos Suínos/transmissão , Toxoplasma/fisiologia , Toxoplasmose Animal/parasitologia , Toxoplasmose Animal/transmissão , Toxoplasmose Cerebral/parasitologia , Toxoplasmose Cerebral/transmissão
12.
Med Mycol J ; 60(2): 39-44, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31155570

RESUMO

In a 2012-2014 epidemiological study of feline and canine dermatophytoses in Japan, we investigated the prevalence of fungi among 296 cats and 170 dogs treated at a veterinary clinic and 51 cats and dogs at an animal shelter at Fukui City in Japan. Microsporum canis was isolated from only one cat out of the 517 animals. Also, from 2012 to 2017, we analyzed isolates from 76 cats and 15 dogs with dermatophytoses at 14 veterinary clinics across 10 prefectures in Honshu and Shikoku. M. canis was the cause for 85 of the cases and Microsporum gypseum for the other six. M. canis infection routes in cats are thought to include stray cats as well as breeding facilities and pet shops, whereas for dogs, only breeding facilities and pet shops. Tinea was found in 18.7% (14/75) of the owners of these animals. We showed that microsatellite genotyping is useful for molecular epidemiological investigations such as determination of infection routes of M. canis.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Tinha/epidemiologia , Tinha/veterinária , Animais , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Reservatórios de Doenças , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Técnicas de Genotipagem/métodos , Humanos , Japão/epidemiologia , Microsporum/genética , Microsporum/isolamento & purificação , Prevalência , Fatores de Tempo , Tinha/microbiologia , Tinha/transmissão
13.
Parasit Vectors ; 12(1): 230, 2019 May 14.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31088533

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Peritoneal larval cestodiasis induced by Mesocestoides Vaillant, 1863 (Cyclophyllidea: Mesocestoididae) is a common cause of severe infections in domestic dogs and cats, reported also from other mammals and less frequently from birds. However, there is a limited knowledge on the taxonomy of causative agents of this disease. RESULTS: In the present study, we investigated a massive, likely lethal, infection of a song thrush Turdus philomelos (Passeriformes: Turdidae) by Mesocestoides sp. tetrathyridia. We performed combined morphological and phylogenetic analysis of the tetrathyridia and compared them with the materials obtained previously from other birds and mammals. The metrical data fitted within the wide range reported by previous authors but confirmed the limited value of morphological data for species identification of tetrathyridia of Mesocestoides spp. The molecular analyses suggested that the isolates represented an unidentified Mesocestoides sp. that was previously repeatedly isolated and sequenced in larval and adult forms from domestic dogs and cats in Europe, the Middle East and North Africa. In contrast to the present study, which found encysted tetrathyridia, four of the five previous studies that identified the same species described infections by acephalic metacestodes only. CONCLUSIONS: The tetrathyridia of the examined Mesocestoides sp. are described in the present study for the first time. However, the possible match with the species that were previously reported to infect birds remains uncertain. The phylogenetic analyses also suggested the rejection of two cases that were previously identified as Mesocestoides corti as they were likely caused by the same species as in the presently reported infection case. The newly provided DNA sequences should allow the assignment to species in the future, when adults of the genus Mesocestoides are more thoroughly sequenced.


Assuntos
Cisticercose/veterinária , Mamíferos/parasitologia , Mesocestoides/genética , Animais de Estimação/parasitologia , Aves Canoras/parasitologia , Animais , Sequência de Bases , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Cisticercose/transmissão , Doenças do Cão/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Cães , Evolução Fatal , Feminino , Mesocestoides/patogenicidade , Filogenia
15.
Cad Saude Publica ; 35(4): e00109218, 2019 05 02.
Artigo em Português | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31066776

RESUMO

Sporotrichosis is a subcutaneous mycosis with global distribution, and patients generally receive outpatient treatment. Since 1998 there has been an increase in cases in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, mainly via zoonotic transmission involving cats. Patients coinfected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) often require hospitalization and evolve to death. This study analyzes and describes data from 1992 to 2015 obtained from the database of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS). There were 782 hospitalizations and 65 deaths in Brazil. Six percent of the hospitalizations and 40% of the deaths involved coinfection with HIV. There were 250 hospitalizations and 36 deaths in Rio de Janeiro, with a progressive increase over the course of the period. The states of São Paulo and Goiás also showed high numbers. Men, non-whites, and individuals with low schooling evolved more frequently to death. In conclusion, sporotrichosis is associated with hospitalizations and deaths throughout Brazil, especially in the state of Rio de Janeiro.


Assuntos
Hospitalização/estatística & dados numéricos , Esporotricose/mortalidade , Adolescente , Adulto , Animais , Brasil/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Criança , Pré-Escolar , Surtos de Doenças , Feminino , Sistemas de Informação Hospitalar , Humanos , Lactente , Recém-Nascido , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Características de Residência , Esporotricose/transmissão , Adulto Jovem , Zoonoses/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/mortalidade
16.
BMC Res Notes ; 12(1): 279, 2019 May 16.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31097016

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: Toxoplasma gondii is an opportunistic parasite that causes a clinical manifestation known as toxoplasmosis. We investigated the prevalence and potential risk factors of T. gondii infection among women in Khartoum, Sudan. A sero-parasitological cross-sectional study included 100 women aging between 15 and 50 years old was conducted between January and November 2018. Serum samples were collected and investigated for the presence of anti-T. gondii immunoglobulins. RESULTS: Mean age of the women population included was 26.75 ± 8.25 with a range between 15 and 50 years. Sero-prevalence of T. gondii antibodies was 27% (27/100) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 18.6-36.8%. Among seropositive population 81% (22/27), 15% (4/27) and 4% (1/27) were seropositive for IgG antibodies, IgM antibodies and both antibodies respectively. Age group 21-30 years old had the highest frequency of detected IgG (10/45) and IgM (3/45). Married women had the highest frequency of detected IgG or IgM, 18/79 and 3/79, respectively. Risk factors analysis showed a total of 37/100 participants were having direct contact with cats and 66/100 have a frequent raw meat consumption, neither direct cats contact nor raw meat consumption had a statistically significant association with seropositivity to T. gondii (P value = 0.052 and 0.565, respectively).


Assuntos
Anticorpos Antiprotozoários/sangue , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Imunoglobulina G/sangue , Imunoglobulina M/sangue , Toxoplasma/imunologia , Toxoplasmose/epidemiologia , Adolescente , Adulto , Animais , Doenças do Gato/imunologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Imunocompetência , Estado Civil , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Fatores de Risco , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Sudão/epidemiologia , Toxoplasmose/imunologia , Toxoplasmose/parasitologia , Toxoplasmose/transmissão
17.
Vet Clin North Am Small Anim Pract ; 49(4): 687-702, 2019 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30961995

RESUMO

"In North America, with the exceptions of Bartonella henselae and Cytauxzoon felis, feline vector-borne diseases (FVBDs) have been minimally studied in domestic cats. Cats can be infected with many of the same vector-borne pathogens that infect dogs. Nonspecific clinical signs linked to FVBDs and low prevalence of certain vector-borne pathogens contribute to a limited awareness of FVBDs in sick cats. As clinicians become informed about FVBDs and as vector-borne disease diagnostics are routinely applied to evaluate sick cats, we will gain a stronger understanding of vector-borne pathogens in cats. This article focuses on recent findings related to FVBDs."


Assuntos
Vetores Artrópodes/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Animais , Vetores Artrópodes/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Gatos , América do Norte/epidemiologia
19.
Parasit Vectors ; 12(1): 11, 2019 Jan 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30616666

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne diseases remain a major health-threat for humans and animals worldwide. To estimate the distribution of pathogenic agents and especially Bartonella spp., we conducted tick microbiome analysis and determination of the infection status of wild animals, pets and pet owners in the state of Hesse, Germany. RESULTS: In total, 189 engorged ticks collected from 163 animals were tested. Selected ticks were analyzed by next generation sequencing (NGS) and confirmatory PCRs, blood specimens of 48 wild animals were analyzed by PCR to confirm pathogen presence and sera of 54 dogs, one cat and 11 dog owners were analyzed by serology. Bartonella spp. were detected in 9.5% of all ticks and in the blood of 17 roe deer. Further data reveal the presence of the human and animal pathogenic species of genera in the family Spirochaetaceae (including Borrelia miyamotoi and Borrelia garinii), Bartonella spp. (mainly Bartonella schoenbuchensis), Rickettsia helvetica, Francisella tularensis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in ticks. Co-infections with species of several genera were detected in nine ticks. One dog and five dog owners were seropositive for anti-Bartonella henselae-antibodies and one dog had antibodies against Rickettsia conorii. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a snapshot of pathogens circulating in ticks in central Germany. A broad range of tick-borne pathogens are present in ticks, and especially in wild animals, with possible implications for animal and human health. However, a low incidence of Bartonella spp., especially Bartonella henselae, was detected. The high number of various detected pathogens suggests that ticks might serve as an excellent sentinel to detect and monitor zoonotic human pathogens.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Cervos/microbiologia , Doenças do Cão/transmissão , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Negativas/transmissão , Microbiota , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/transmissão , Carrapatos/microbiologia , Animais , Doenças do Gato/epidemiologia , Doenças do Gato/microbiologia , Gatos , Cervos/parasitologia , Doenças do Cão/epidemiologia , Doenças do Cão/microbiologia , Cães , Feminino , Alemanha/epidemiologia , Bactérias Gram-Negativas/imunologia , Bactérias Gram-Negativas/isolamento & purificação , Infecções por Bactérias Gram-Negativas/microbiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Animais de Estimação , Risco , Alinhamento de Sequência/veterinária , Estudos Soroepidemiológicos , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/epidemiologia , Doenças Transmitidas por Carrapatos/microbiologia
20.
Parasit Vectors ; 12(1): 28, 2019 Jan 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30634999

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Successful Cytauxzoon felis transmission studies have occurred using Amblyomma americanum adults acquisition-fed as nymphs on an experimentally infected domestic cat or Dermacentor variabilis adults fed as nymphs on a splenectomized bobcat. Here, we evaluated A. americanum and D. variabilis nymphs acquisition-fed as larvae on a C. felis-infected carrier domestic cat for competence to transmit the protozoan parasite as nymphs to naïve, healthy domestic cats. METHODS: Amblyomma americanum and D. variabilis larvae were applied to a chronically infected, parasitemic C. felis donor cat (Felis catus) and allowed to feed to repletion. Engorged larvae were collected and held through ecdysis. Three cats were each infested with 66 A. americanum or 66 D. variabilis emerged nymphs. Cytauxzoon felis infections in principal cats were determined by clinical signs and detection of circulating parasite by blood smear and PCR evaluation. RESULTS: Clinical signs of cytauxzoonosis were observed in cats infested with A. americanum nymphs beginning 12-15 days post-infestation (dpi). The same cats were PCR positive on 12-14 dpi; piroplasms were evident in blood smears at 16 dpi, and macrophage schizonts were observed in stained spleen impression smears in two animals at necropsy. Cats infested with acquisition-fed D. variabilis nymphs remained clinically normal and did not develop detectable parasitemia over the course of the study as determined by blood smear and PCR. CONCLUSIONS: Cytauxzoon felis was successfully transmitted to domestic cats by A. americanum nymphs acquisition-fed as larvae on the donor cat. However, we were not able to transmit C. felis to healthy domestic cats with D. variabilis nymphs that were simultaneously acquisition-fed on the same donor cat. Results from this study suggest that larval and nymphal A. americanum likely play important roles in natural transmission cycles of C. felis.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato/parasitologia , Ixodidae/parasitologia , Piroplasmida/fisiologia , Animais , Vetores Aracnídeos/parasitologia , Doenças do Gato/transmissão , Gatos , Ninfa/parasitologia , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/parasitologia , Infecções Protozoárias em Animais/transmissão
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