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1.
Hum Resour Health ; 18(1): 81, 2020 10 28.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33115494

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Information and communication technology are playing a major role in ensuring continuity of healthcare services during the COVID-19 pandemic. The pandemic has also disrupted healthcare quality improvement (QI) training and education for healthcare professionals and there is a need to rethink the way QI training and education is delivered. The purpose of this rapid evidence review is to quickly, but comprehensively collate studies to identify what works and what does not in delivering QI training and education using distance learning modalities. METHODS: Three healthcare databases were searched along with grey literature sources for studies published between 2015 and 2020. Studies with QI training programmes or courses targeting healthcare professionals and students with at least one component of the programme being delivered online were included. RESULTS: A total of 19 studies were included in the review. Most studies had a mixed methods design and used blended learning methods, combining online and in-person delivery modes. Most of the included studies reported achieving desired outcomes, including improved QI knowledge, skills and attitudes of participants and improved clinical outcomes for patients. Some benefits of online QI training delivery include fewer required resources, reduced need for on-site instructors, increased programme reach, and more control and flexibility over learning time for participants. Some limitations of online delivery modes include limited learning and networking opportunities, functional and technical problems and long lead time for content adaptation and customisation. DISCUSSION: The review highlights that distance learning approaches to QI help in overcoming barriers to traditional QI training. Some important considerations for those looking to adapt traditional programmes to virtual environments include balancing virtual and non-virtual methods, using suitable technological solutions, customising coaching support, and using multiple criteria for programme evaluation. CONCLUSION: Virtual QI and training of healthcare professionals and students is a viable, efficient, and effective alternative to traditional QI education that will play a vital role in building their competence and confidence to improve the healthcare system in post-COVID environment.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Educação a Distância/organização & administração , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Melhoria de Qualidade , Humanos , Pandemias , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Ensaios Clínicos Controlados Aleatórios como Assunto
2.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 342, 2020 Oct 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33008374

RESUMO

Worldwide it is being discussed whether medical students might be of help during the present COVID-19 epidemic. Although this question is probably a legitimate one, one should however discuss this thoroughly before deciding whether medical students are to be included in this kind of medical care on a larger scale.Various arguments should be weighted, and potential tasks should be chosen carefully. This period could however be also an opportunity for medical students to learn things they would probably never learn about. Nevertheless, medical students have a deficit concerning knowledge about epidemics, and they are also not really well skilled in many hygiene measures. Furthermore, some of the known medical students' behaviour could be a risk factor for further spread of the virus as well. Then, young adults are at risk of getting infected themselves. Last but not least, medical students in general are under a great deal of pressure from their studies which could lead to the development of anxiety and other mental disorders. One could only speculate on the effects of this epidemic on their further mental well-being. Therefore, medical students participating in direct care of patients with COVID-19 should first be trained well, and then properly supervised at all times. Only then it might be a really useful and exceptional experience, for healthcare, medical schools as well as for society.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/terapia , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pneumonia Viral/terapia , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Humanos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia
4.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(11): 2399-2403, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33120627

RESUMO

Purpose: The aim of this study was to assess awareness about online classes and to assess if they can aid learning in the field of medicine amid lockdown. Methods: Online survey comprising a questionnaire related to the aspects of online teaching was undertaken. There were 16 questions, and responses were collected from undergraduates, postgraduates, and the teaching faculties. Results: Online classes were viewed favorably by the vast majority of respondents. Out of 412 respondents 79.9% actively attended the classes. While 42% felt the timings were inappropriate as they clashed with duty hours, a set of 35% had difficulty understanding the content and most of them were undergraduates. Poor internet connection was a main hindrance identified. In total, 69.2% respondents were happy with the feasibility of the classes and believed these classes had the advantage of being economical as they offered exposure to national and international faculty from the comfort of their homes. Conclusion: Conducting online classes on a national scale is a herculean task for a developing country because of poor internet connectivity and deficient access to high-speed broadband services. Nevertheless, their popularity among students during the current crisis shows that it is a very pragmatic and feasible teaching option and can definitely supplement traditional classroom teaching.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Instrução por Computador/métodos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Países em Desenvolvimento , Educação a Distância/organização & administração , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Quarentena/estatística & dados numéricos , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Índia/epidemiologia , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Pandemias , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
5.
J Postgrad Med ; 66(4): 200-205, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33037168

RESUMO

With the introduction of competency-based undergraduate curriculum in India, a paradigm shift in the assessment methods and tools will be the need of the hour. Competencies are complex combinations of various attributes, many of which being not assessable by objective methods. Assessment of affective and communication domains has always been neglected for want of objective methods. Areas like professionalism, ethics, altruism, and communication-so vital for being an Indian Medical Graduate, can be assessed longitudinally applying subjective means only. Though subjectivity has often been questioned as being biased, it has been proven time and again that a subjective assessment in expert hands gives comparable results as that of any objective assessment. By insisting on objectivity, we may compromise the validity of the assessment and deprive the students of enriched subjective feedback and judgement also. This review highlights the importance of subjective assessment in competency-based assessment and ways and means of improving the rigor of subjective assessment, with particular emphasis on the development and use of rubrics.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica/normas , Educação Baseada em Competências/organização & administração , Educação de Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Avaliação Educacional/métodos , Adulto , Currículo , Feminino , Humanos , Índia , Masculino , Profissionalismo , Estudantes de Medicina
10.
Scott Med J ; 65(4): 112-119, 2020 Nov.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32878575

RESUMO

The unparalleled epidemic of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), during early December 2019 in Wuhan, China, has rapidly evolved into a global pandemic, became a matter of grave concern. The pandemic presented a unique challenge to government agencies worldwide. The paucity of resources and lack of knowledges to manage the pandemic, coupled with the fear of future consequences has established the need for adoption of emerging and future technologies to address the upcoming challenges. With introduction of measures to control the pandemic, trainees will see a dramatic decline in their in-person exposure to all aspects of their education, with no clear endpoint. This presents an extreme challenge for educators and, given the rapidly evolving situation, there have not yet been training authorities recommendations. We propose several innovative solutions to deliver medical education while maintaining the safety of residents and educators.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Tecnologia Educacional , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Controle de Doenças Transmissíveis , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Infecções por Coronavirus/transmissão , Humanos , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle , Pneumonia Viral/transmissão
13.
Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi ; 41(7): 1155-1159, 2020 Jul 10.
Artigo em Chinês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32741187

RESUMO

Objective: To understand the provision of preventive medicine curriculum system in the training programs of clinical medicine in the era of Healthy China. Methods: A total of 36 training programs of clinical medicine were selected from different areas of China for a statistical analysis on their basic information, involvement of concept of preventive medicine in program objectives, and provision of preventive medicine curriculum system. Results: Of all the 36 training programs of clinical medicine, 22(61%) have no mentions of prevention medicine in their program objectives; only one university's training program states preventive medicine together with basic medicine and clinical medicine as one of the three main disciplines. The total class hours for the core courses of preventive medicine (hygiene, medical statistics, epidemiology, evidence-based medicine, and social medicine) range from 80 to 252, with an average of (156.7±43.2) hours. The average percentage of class hours for preventive medicine courses among the total class hours is 4.3%±1.1% (range: 2.5%-7.5%), and obvious differences exist among universities. Conclusions: In current training programs of clinical medicine, the proportion of prevention medicine curriculum is insufficient, the percentage of hours for preventive medicine course is very low, and the differences among various universities are obvious. It is urgently needed to strengthen preventive medicine curriculum in training programs for clinical medical students in new era. It is suggested to further promote the concept of putting prevention first, improve the curriculum system of clinical medicine, intensify the integrated development preventive medicine and clinical medicine and pay attention to clinical research ability enhancement for the further improvement of training program of clinical medicine.


Assuntos
Currículo , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Medicina Preventiva/educação , China , Humanos
14.
South Med J ; 113(8): 368-371, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32747962

RESUMO

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) rapidly led to global human devastation, including multiple deaths, sicknesses, and financial reverberations across many individuals and communities. As COVID-19 gained its foothold in the United States, medical school administrators, faculty, and students had to undergo rapid change to mitigate the disease spread, putting all parties in dubious situations. Medical school administrators had to make swift and judicious decisions that would best serve the student body and the diverse patient population at clinical sites. Medical schools with students practicing in rural, remote regions with a dearth of healthcare resources have even more complicated decisions to make in these unprecedented times. We provide an overview of rapid decision-making processes that can be used by curriculum leaders and medical school administrators to continue to meet accreditation requirements while attempting to keep medical students safe and prepared for graduation in response to the COVID-19 health crisis.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Currículo , Técnicas de Apoio para a Decisão , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Faculdades de Medicina/organização & administração , Acreditação , Betacoronavirus , Educação Médica/normas , Humanos , Saúde da População Rural , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia
15.
Med Teach ; 42(10): 1123-1127, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32776858

RESUMO

The current global crises, including climate, COVID-19, and environmental change, requires global collective action at all scales. These broad socio-ecological challenges require the engagement of diverse perspectives and ways of knowing and the meaningful engagement of all generations and stages of personal and professional development. The combination of systems thinking, change management, quality improvement approaches and models, appreciative/strength-based approaches, narratives, storytelling and the strengths of Indigenous knowledges, offer synergies and potential that can set the stage for transformative, strengths-based education for sustainable healthcare (ESH). The need for strong leadership to enact a vision for ESH is outlined here with the intent to enable and nurture the conditions for change, ultimately improving health and well-being across generations.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Assistência à Saúde/organização & administração , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Betacoronavirus , Humanos , Relações Interprofissionais , Modelos Organizacionais , Pandemias , Integração de Sistemas
16.
Med Teach ; 42(11): 1202-1215, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32847456

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) was declared a pandemic in March 2020. This rapid systematic review synthesised published reports of medical educational developments in response to the pandemic, considering descriptions of interventions, evaluation data and lessons learned. METHODS: The authors systematically searched four online databases and hand searched MedEdPublish up to 24 May 2020. Two authors independently screened titles, abstracts and full texts, performed data extraction and assessed risk of bias for included articles. Discrepancies were resolved by a third author. A descriptive synthesis and outcomes were reported. RESULTS: Forty-nine articles were included. The majority were from North America, Asia and Europe. Sixteen studies described Kirkpatrick's outcomes, with one study describing levels 1-3. A few papers were of exceptional quality, though the risk of bias framework generally revealed capricious reporting of underpinning theory, resources, setting, educational methods, and content. Key developments were pivoting educational delivery from classroom-based learning to virtual spaces, replacing clinical placement based learning with alternate approaches, and supporting direct patient contact with mitigated risk. Training for treating patients with COVID-19, service reconfiguration, assessment, well-being, faculty development, and admissions were all addressed, with the latter categories receiving the least attention. CONCLUSIONS: This review highlights several areas of educational response in the immediate aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic and identifies a few articles of exceptional quality that can serve as models for future developments and educational reporting. There was often a lack of practical detail to support the educational community in enactment of novel interventions, as well as limited evaluation data. However, the range of options deployed offers much guidance for the medical education community moving forward and there was an indication that outcome data and greater detail will be reported in the future.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Medicina Baseada em Evidências/educação , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Desenvolvimento de Pessoal/organização & administração , Ásia , Betacoronavirus , Gerenciamento de Dados , Avaliação Educacional , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , América do Norte
19.
Educ. med. (Ed. impr.) ; 21(4): 261-264, jul.-ago. 2020.
Artigo em Espanhol | IBECS | ID: ibc-192656

RESUMO

El virus, además de provocar una pandemia, con centenares de miles de enfermos y con decenas de miles de fallecidos, ha tenido la capacidad («el poder») de romper las prácticas educativas estándar. Esto ha tenido, o puede tener, un beneficio: reconsiderar lo que es realmente importante y lo que no lo es tanto. Y eso tiene un gran valor para el docente y para el discente. Y también ha servido para reconocer y encontrar formas alternativas con las que se puede transmitir el saber. En definitiva, el profesor ha tenido la oportunidad de contribuir a crear un modelo educativo capaz de impulsar el desarrollo de nuevas formas y métodos de aprendizaje. Ciertas técnicas y recursos educativos han podido ser reconocidos como «presentes» o «ausentes» de nuestro sistema educativo. Esto implica que ciertos recursos han de estar presentes, o que es preciso optimizar los que ya están disponibles para enseñar, para aprender, o para evaluar. La tecnología permite facilitar el contacto «directo» entre profesor y alumno, entre profesores, y entre alumnos. Pero sobra decir que la tecnología ha de estar disponible


The virus, besides causing a pandemic, with hundreds of thousands ill, and with tens of thousands dead, has had the ability (‘the power’) to break standard education practices. This has had, or may have, one benefit: to reconsider that which is really important and that which is not so important. And this is of great value for the teacher and for the student. And it has also served to recognise and find alternative ways to transmit the knowledge. All things considered, the teacher has had the opportunity to contribute in creating an education model capable of boosting the development of new ways and methods of learning. Certain educational techniques and resources have been able to be recognised as 'present' or 'absent' in our education system. This implies that certain recourses have to be present, or that is required to optimise those that are available in order to teach, to learn, or to evaluate. Technology helps to provide 'direct' contact between teacher and student, between teachers and between students. But it goes without saying that the technology has to be available


Assuntos
Humanos , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pandemias , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Telemedicina/métodos , Ensino/organização & administração
20.
Obstet Gynecol ; 136(4): 830-834, 2020 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32826520

RESUMO

As hospitals and medical schools confronted coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), medical students were essentially restricted from all clinical work in an effort to prioritize their safety and the safety of others. One downstream effect of this decision was that students were designated as nonessential, in contrast to other members of health care teams. As we acclimate to our new clinical environment and medical students return to the frontlines of health care, we advocate for medical students to be reconsidered as physicians-in-training who bring valuable skills to patient care and to maintain their status as valued team members despite surges in COVID-19 or future pandemics. In addition to the contributions students provide to medical teams, they also serve to benefit from the formative experiences of caring for patients during a pandemic rather than being relegated to the sidelines. In this commentary, we discuss factors that led to students' being excluded from this pandemic despite being required at the bedside during prior U.S. public health crises this past century, and we review educational principles that support maintaining students in clinical environments during this and future pandemics.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Educação Médica , Controle de Infecções/métodos , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas/métodos , Segurança , Estudantes de Medicina/psicologia , Betacoronavirus , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Infecções por Coronavirus/prevenção & controle , Educação Médica/organização & administração , Educação Médica/tendências , Humanos , Modelos Educacionais , Inovação Organizacional , Pandemias/prevenção & controle , Equipe de Assistência ao Paciente , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Pneumonia Viral/prevenção & controle
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