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2.
Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J ; 16(3): 199-204, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33133355

RESUMO

Americans expect their doctors to have the competence to deliver high-quality care and expect safeguards to be in place that assure their doctors are competent. However, competence requires knowledge, and people have trouble assessing their own knowledge and level of competence. Because external assessment is required, several organizations have taken on the roles of defining and assuring medical competence. For example, professional organizations such as the American College of Cardiology (ACC) have developed consensus documents that define core competencies for cardiologists. External organizations such as the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) have defined training requirements for cardiologists, and the ABIM has developed a process to certify that physicians maintain their competence, although the process has generated considerable criticism from the profession. Recently, the ACC and ABIM have worked together to make the certification process less onerous and more meaningful. This paper provides a brief summary of the history and ongoing efforts to assure the competence of cardiologists.


Assuntos
Acreditação , Cardiologistas/educação , Cardiologia/educação , Certificação , Competência Clínica , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Acreditação/normas , Cardiologistas/normas , Cardiologia/normas , Certificação/normas , Competência Clínica/normas , Currículo , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/normas , Humanos
3.
Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J ; 16(3): 212-219, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33133357

RESUMO

The learning health system is a conceptual model for continuous learning and knowledge generation rooted in the daily practice of medicine. While companies such as Google and Amazon use dynamic learning systems that learn iteratively through every customer interaction, this efficiency has not materialized on a comparable scale in health systems. An ideal learning health system would learn from every patient interaction to benefit the care for the next patient. Notable advances include the greater use of data generated in the course of clinical care, Common Data Models, and advanced analytics. However, many remaining barriers limit the most effective use of large and growing health care data assets. In this review, we explore the accomplishments, opportunities, and barriers to realizing the learning health system.


Assuntos
Big Data , Cardiologistas/educação , Cardiologia/educação , Prestação Integrada de Cuidados de Saúde , Educação Médica Continuada , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Sistema de Aprendizagem em Saúde , Acesso à Informação , Confidencialidade , Humanos , Melhoria de Qualidade , Indicadores de Qualidade em Assistência à Saúde
6.
Clin Rheumatol ; 39(12): 3535-3541, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33067772

RESUMO

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has significantly impacted the field of rheumatology, in both the delivery of clinical care and didactic education for our trainees. These changes have generated significant strain for program directors and clinical educators who have had to leverage technology and develop new systems to ensure continued trainee education and assessment. We aim to outline the impacts on formal education programs presented by these unprecedented disruptions, describe the development and deployment of online teaching, reflect on the challenges and opportunities for technology-enabled learning and use of social media for education, and give some international perspectives on impacts on postgraduate rheumatology training outside the USA. With the rapid dissolution of barriers in place during the pre-COVID-19 era, we have the opportunity to assess the efficacy of new methods of care and further integrate technology into teaching and assessment. We propose that a hybrid in-person and technology-enabled learning approach, so-called blended learning, is likely to remain the most desirable future model for supporting trainee learning.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Educação a Distância/métodos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Reumatologia/educação , Currículo , Humanos , Disseminação de Informação , Pandemias , Mídias Sociais
11.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 20(6): e253-e254, 2020 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33067187

RESUMO

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the training of foundation doctors across the UK. A survey of foundation year 1 doctors across several district general hospitals in the East of England and East Midlands deaneries was carried out to investigate their perceptions of the impact on their training.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Hospitais de Distrito/organização & administração , Hospitais Gerais/organização & administração , Pandemias , Médicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Competência Clínica , Inglaterra , Humanos
12.
BMC Med Educ ; 20(1): 341, 2020 Oct 02.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33008392

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: As COVID-19 has been declared as a pandemic disease by the WHO on March 11th, 2020, the global incidence of COVID-19 disease increased dramatically. In response to the COVID-19 situation, Jordan announced the emergency state on the 19th of March, followed by the curfew on 21 March. All educational institutions have been closed as well as educational activities including clinical medical education have been suspended on the 15th of March. As a result, Distance E-learning emerged as a new method of teaching to maintain the continuity of medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic related closure of educational institutions. Distance E-Learning is defined as using computer technology to deliver training, including technology-supported learning either online, offline, or both. Before this period, distance learning was not considered in Jordanian universities as a modality for education. This study aims to explore the situation of distance E-learning among medical students during their clinical years and to identify possible challenges, limitations, satisfaction as well as perspectives for this approach to learning. METHODS: This cross-sectional study is based on a questionnaire that was designed and delivered to medical students in their clinical years. For this study, the estimated sample size (n = 588) is derived from the online Raosoft sample size calculator. RESULTS: A total of 652 students have completed the questionnaire, among them, 538 students (82.5%) have participated in distance learning in their medical schools amid COVID-19 pandemic. The overall satisfaction rate in medical distance learning was 26.8%, and it was significantly higher in students with previous experience in distance learning in their medical schools as well as when instructors were actively participating in learning sessions, using multimedia and devoting adequate time for their sessions. The delivery of educational material using synchronous live streaming sessions represented the major modality of teaching and Internet streaming quality and coverage was the main challenge that was reported by 69.1% of students. CONCLUSION: With advances in technologies and social media, distance learning is a new and rapidly growing approach for undergraduate, postgraduate, and health care providers. It may represent an optimal solution to maintain learning processes in exceptional and emergency situations such as COVID-19 pandemic. Technical and infrastructural resources reported as a major challenge for implementing distance learning, so understanding technological, financial, institutional, educators, and student barriers are essential for the successful implementation of distance learning in medical education.


Assuntos
Betacoronavirus , Medicina Clínica/educação , Infecções por Coronavirus/epidemiologia , Educação a Distância/organização & administração , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/organização & administração , Pneumonia Viral/epidemiologia , Adulto , Instrução por Computador , Estudos Transversais , Currículo , Feminino , Humanos , Jordânia , Masculino , Pandemias , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
16.
Vasc Health Risk Manag ; 16: 429-435, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33116553

RESUMO

Background: Cardiology fellows, in particular, are in a unique position to mold the new cardiovascular workforce, especially in terms of risk prevention. There is a growing need for the cardiovascular workforce. In the United States, one person dies every forty-two seconds due to a cardiovascular adverse event. Methods: A PRISMA systematic review included comprehensive search of the MED-LINE database (PubMed) from 1927 to 2020 - the oldest to newest available literature on the subject available through PubMed. Results: Fifty-seven cardiology fellows together interpreted a total of 1719 EKGs with a correct rate of 52%. Sixty-four fellows completed a total of 1363 echocardiography interpretations with an accuracy rate of nearly 75%. Conclusion: Based on the studies discussed, it is evident that a cardiology fellow, particularly in their early years of training, may be limited due to a lack of experience. With continued EKG and echocardiogram interpretation, as well as other clinical skills practice, fellows can improve their diagnostic accuracy and procedural efficiency.


Assuntos
Cardiologistas/educação , Cardiologia/educação , Competência Clínica , Ecocardiografia , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Eletrocardiografia , Cardiopatias/diagnóstico , Cardiologistas/psicologia , Humanos , Variações Dependentes do Observador , Valor Preditivo dos Testes , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes
18.
Pain Physician ; 23(4S): S367-S380, 2020 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32942794

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: The unexpected COVID-19 crisis has disrupted medical education and patient care in unprecedented ways. Despite the challenges, the health-care system and patients have been both creative and resilient in finding robust "temporary" solutions to these challenges. It is not clear if some of these COVID-era transitional steps will be preserved in the future of medical education and telemedicine. OBJECTIVES: The goal of this commentary is to address the sometimes substantial changes in medical education, continuing medical education (CME) activities, residency and fellowship programs, specialty society meetings, and telemedicine, and to consider the value of some of these profound shifts to "business as usual" in the health-care sector. METHODS: This is a commentary is based on the limited available literature, online information, and the front-line experiences of the authors. RESULTS: COVID-19 has clearly changed residency and fellowship programs by limiting the amount of hands-on time physicians could spend with patients. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medicine Education has endorsed certain policy changes to promote greater flexibility in programs but still rigorously upholds specific standards. Technological interventions such as telemedicine visits with patients, virtual meetings with colleagues, and online interviews have been introduced, and many trainees are "techno-omnivores" who are comfortable using a variety of technology platforms and techniques. Webinars and e-learning are gaining traction now, and their use, practicality, and cost-effectiveness may make them important in the post-COVID era. CME activities have migrated increasingly to virtual events and online programs, a trend that may also continue due to its practicality and cost-effectiveness. While many medical meetings of specialty societies have been postponed or cancelled altogether, technology allows for virtual meetings that may offer versatility and time-saving opportunities for busy clinicians. It may be that future medical meetings embrace a hybrid approach of blending digital with face-to-face experience. Telemedicine was already in place prior to the COVID-19 crisis but barriers are rapidly coming down to its widespread use and patients seem to embrace this, even as health-care systems navigate the complicated issues of cybersecurity and patient privacy. Regulatory guidance may be needed to develop safe, secure, and patient-friendly telehealth applications. Telemedicine has affected the prescribing of controlled substances in which online counseling, informed consent, and follow-up must be done in a virtual setting. For example, pill counts can be done in a video call and patients can still get questions answered about their pain therapy, although it is likely that after the crisis, prescribing controlled substances may revert to face-to-face visits. LIMITATIONS: The health-care system finds itself in a very fluid situation at the time this was written and changes are still occurring and being assessed. CONCLUSIONS: Many of the technological changes imposed so abruptly on the health-care system by the COVID-19 pandemic may be positive and it may be beneficial that some of these transitions be preserved or modified as we move forward. Clinicians must be objective in assessing these changes and retaining those changes that clearly improve health-care education and patient care as we enter the COVID era.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Assistência à Saúde/tendências , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/tendências , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Telemedicina/tendências , Adulto , Betacoronavirus , Assistência à Saúde/métodos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/métodos , Bolsas de Estudo/métodos , Bolsas de Estudo/tendências , Humanos , Internato e Residência/métodos , Internato e Residência/tendências , Masculino , Telemedicina/métodos
19.
Neurol Sci ; 41(12): 3377-3379, 2020 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32970238

RESUMO

The worldwide SARS-CoV-2 pandemic is dramatically affecting health systems with consequences also for neurological residency training. Here we report early experiences and challenges that European neurologists and residents faced. The breadth of the pandemic and the social restrictions induced substantial modifications in both inpatient and outpatient clinical care and academic activities as well, adversely affecting our residency training. On the other hand we see also opportunities, such as gaining more clinical and professional skills. All these drastic and sudden changes lead us to reconsider some educational aspects of our training program that need to be improved in order to better prepare the neurologists of the future to manage unexpected and large emergency situations like the one we are living in these days. A reconsideration of the neurological training program could be beneficial to guarantee high standard level of the residency training in this period and beyond.


Assuntos
Infecções por Coronavirus , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Internato e Residência , Neurologistas/educação , Neurologia/educação , Pandemias , Pneumonia Viral , Betacoronavirus , Europa (Continente) , Humanos
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