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1.
J Dent Educ ; 83(8): 887-894, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31085685

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to analyze information about advanced education programs in prosthodontics (AEPPs) collected in American Dental Association (ADA) surveys on advanced dental education from 2006-07 to 2016-17. Data recorded included number of AEPPs and information on program directors, applicants, and enrollees in AEPPs. The results showed that, from 2006 to 2016, there was an increase in the number of AEPPs and enrollment of prosthodontic residents, and the number of applicants per program more than doubled. Despite these increases, steps are needed to increase the number of underrepresented minority residents in prosthodontics. Also, a periodic survey of prosthodontic residents to identify their goals, experiences during training, and career plans could benefit the specialty by providing more insight into the future prosthodontic workforce.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação em Odontologia , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde , Prostodontia/educação , Prostodontia/estatística & dados numéricos , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Odontólogos , Educação em Odontologia/economia , Educação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Saúde Bucal/educação , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde/economia , Avaliação de Programas e Projetos de Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Faculdades de Odontologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
2.
FEBS Open Bio ; 9(5): 830-839, 2019 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31034166

RESUMO

Although the historical bases for graduate training in the United Kingdom (UK) and Scandinavia both stem from the original concept developed by von Humboldt, and both award a 'PhD degree', their paths have diverged. There are thus significant differences in the manner in which graduate training is organised. To analyse these differences, two UK graduate programmes (School of Medicine, Cardiff University; Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool) and two Scandinavian graduate schools (Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Bergen; Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm) completed a Self-evaluation questionnaire developed by Organisation of PhD Education in Biomedicine and Health Sciences in the European System (ORPHEUS)). Analysis of the completed questionnaires shows differences concerning requirements for admission, the training content of PhD programmes, the format of the PhD thesis, how the thesis is assessed and the financial model. All programmes recognise that PhD training should prepare for employment both inside and outside of academia, with emphasis on transferable skills training. However, the analysis reveals some fundamental differences in the direction of graduate programmes in the UK and Scandinavia. In the UK, graduate programmes are directed primarily towards teaching PhD students to do research, with considerable focus on practical techniques. In Scandinavia, the focus is on managing projects and publishing papers. To some extent, the differences lead to a lack of full recognition of each other's theses as a basis for doing a postdoc. This paper describes the basis for these differences and compares the two approaches and points to areas in which there is, or might be, convergence.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Medicina/estatística & dados numéricos , Noruega , Suécia , Reino Unido , Universidades
3.
J Dent Educ ; 82(10): 1051-1058, 2018 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-30275139

RESUMO

The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to evaluate whether the noncognitive factors of the dental student application, including undergraduate major and interview score, predicted success in the predoctoral program and placement in postdoctoral programs. The study population consisted of 169 students in the Harvard School of Dental Medicine DMD graduating Classes of 2012 through 2016. Noncognitive factors in the dental application, including letters of recommendation, extracurricular activities, undergraduate major, and dental school admission interview performance, were collected for the study population. Groups were analyzed for differences among undergraduate majors and any association between postgraduate placement and dental school performance. Dental school performance measures were grades obtained in the third and fourth years in a combination of preclinical and clinical course assessments. The results showed that neither interview score nor undergraduate major was significantly associated with dental school performance or postdoctoral program placement. There was a non-significant association between interview score and performance in the course Treatment of Active Disease. These results suggest that noncognitive factors of the dental school application offered low yield to predicting predoctoral student performance and residency placements, with interview performance possibly outweighing undergraduate major in selection of successful predoctoral candidates.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia , Escolaridade , Critérios de Admissão Escolar , Estudantes de Odontologia , Adulto , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/normas , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos , Critérios de Admissão Escolar/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Estudantes de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto Jovem
4.
J Dent Res ; 97(5): 483-491, 2018 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-29328868

RESUMO

For decades, dental schools in the United States have endured a significant faculty shortage. Studies have determined that the top 2 sources of dental faculty are advanced education programs and private practice. Those who have completed both DDS and PhD training are considered prime candidates for dental faculty positions. However, there is no national database to track those trainees and no evidence to indicate that they entered academia upon graduation. The objective of this study was to assess outcomes of dental school-affiliated oral sciences PhD program enrollment, graduates, and placement between 1994 and 2016. Using the American Dental Association annual survey of advanced dental education programs not accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation and data obtained from 22 oral sciences PhD programs, we assessed student demographics, enrollment, graduation, and placement. Based on the data provided by program directors, the average new enrollment was 33, and graduation was 26 per year. A total of 605 graduated; 39 did not complete; and 168 were still in training. Among those 605 graduates, 211 were faculty in U.S. academic institutions, and 77 were faculty in foreign institutions. Given that vacant budgeted full-time faculty positions averaged 257 per year during this period, graduates from those oral sciences PhD programs who entered academia in the United States would have filled 9 (3.6%) vacant faculty positions per year. Therefore, PhD programs have consistently generated only a small pipeline of dental school faculty. Better mentoring to retain talent in academia is necessary. Stronger support and creative funding plans are essential to sustain the PhD program. Furthermore, the oral sciences PhD program database should be established and maintained by dental professional organizations to allow assessments of training models, trends of enrollment, graduation, and placement outcomes.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Faculdades de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
5.
J Dent Educ ; 81(10): 1220-1226, 2017 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28966187

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to determine the number and size of postdoctoral teaching programs in geriatric dentistry in U.S. dental schools and other health professions educational institutions and those programs with Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) funding. In 2015, all 67 U.S. dental schools were contacted via email with a questionnaire to ask if they had a postdoctoral program in geriatric dentistry; if they did, they were asked to report the length and size of the program. Directors of all 16 HRSA-funded geriatric fellowships were also invited to participate in the survey. Fifty-six of the 67 (83.6%) dental schools and 15 of the 16 (93.8%) HRSA-funded programs completed the questionnaire. Postdoctoral geriatric dentistry programs were reported in 12 dental schools and six medical institutions, although only six programs were currently accepting fellows. The length of the programs was 12-36 months. The maximum number of residents in any program was ten. The oldest program was in Minnesota; it began in 1981. The newest program was beginning in 2017 at Boston University as a revised version of its previous HRSA-funded program. The loss of HRSA funding has had a major negative impact on the number of training programs. Future research is needed to determine how the loss of HRSA-funded programs has affected the availability of educators in geriatric dentistry for dental schools and the services provided to the geriatric community.


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Odontologia Geriátrica/educação , Faculdades de Odontologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos , United States Health Resources and Services Administration
6.
J Dent Educ ; 81(8): 1008-1014, 2017 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28765445

RESUMO

This executive summary for Section 1 of the "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century" project provides a composite picture of information from 12 background articles on the current state of dental education in the United States. The summary includes the following topics: the current status of the dental curriculum, the implications of student debt and dental school finances, the expansion of enrollment, student diversity, pre- and postdoctoral education, safety net status of dental school clinics, and trends in faculty.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia/tendências , Redução de Custos , Currículo , Educação em Odontologia/economia , Educação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Docentes de Odontologia/economia , Docentes de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Financiamento Pessoal , Humanos , Grupos Minoritários , Salários e Benefícios , Faculdades de Odontologia/economia , Faculdades de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Faculdades de Odontologia/tendências , Estudantes de Odontologia , Apoio ao Desenvolvimento de Recursos Humanos , Estados Unidos
7.
J Dent Educ ; 81(8): eS41-eS49, 2017 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28765454

RESUMO

Advanced dental education has evolved in the context of societal needs and economic trends to its current status. Graduate programs have positioned their role in the context of health systems and health science education trends in hospitals, interprofessional clinical care teams, and dental schools and oral health care systems. Graduate dental education has been a critical factor in developing teams in trauma care, craniofacial disorders, pediatric and adult medicine, and oncology. The misalignment of the mission of graduate dental programs and the demands of private practice has posed a challenge in the evolution of programs as educational programs have been directed towards tertiary and indigent care while the practice community focuses on largely healthy affluent patients for complex clinical interventions. Those seeking graduate dental education today are smaller in number and include more international dental graduates than in the past. Graduate dental education in general dentistry and in the nine recognized dental specialties now includes Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) recognition of training standards as part of its accreditation process and a CODA accreditation process for areas of clinical education not recognized as specialties by the American Dental Association. Current types of programs include fellowship training for students in recognized specialties. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."


Assuntos
Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/tendências , Especialidades Odontológicas/tendências , Acreditação , Currículo/tendências , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/economia , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Bolsas de Estudo , Humanos , Internato e Residência , Faculdades de Odontologia/tendências , Especialidades Odontológicas/economia , Especialidades Odontológicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
8.
J Dent Educ ; 81(3): 278-286, 2017 Mar.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-28250033

RESUMO

The Dental Residency Match (DRM) program provides an ethical and unbiased selection process for applicants to postdoctoral dental programs, based on mutual interests of applicants and programs. The aims of this study were to conduct a descriptive analysis of DRM metrics for the years 2008 to 2015 and to test the hypothesis that there was a difference in number of ranks submitted between programs that filled all their offered positions and those that did not. DRM metrics data from years 2008 to 2015 were obtained from the National Matching Service. Trend analyses and panel data assessments were made. Six types of postdoctoral dental programs (GPR, AEGD, oral and maxillofacial surgery, pediatric dentistry, orthodontics, and dental anesthesiology) participate in the DRM program. The results showed that the number of programs participating and number of residency positions offered increased over the study period. The programs that filled all their positions ranked more applicants than the programs that did not fill their positions (p<0.05). The number of acceptable applicants increased over the study period for all programs except those in dental anesthesiology. These results suggest that participation in DRM is increasing, most programs are able to fill their positions with acceptable applicants, and programs seeking to fill all their positions need to submit a large number of ranks.


Assuntos
Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Critérios de Admissão Escolar/estatística & dados numéricos , Estudos Transversais , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Estados Unidos
9.
BMC Med Educ ; 15: 219, 2015 Dec 11.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-26655045

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: This is the first study of its kind to provide data regarding the self-reported career choice motivation and intentions after graduation of dental and dental hygiene students in Nepal. The findings of this study can be used to inform future oral health workforce planning in Nepal. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of dentistry and dental hygiene students attending a large accredited dental college in Kathmandu, Nepal. Quantitative data were analysed using IBM® SPSS® 22. The respondents were given the opportunity to provide clarifying comments to some of the questions. RESULTS: Two hundred questionnaires were distributed, and 171 students completed the anonymous survey (response rate 86 %). Working in health care and serving the community were the most important initial motives for career choice, with significantly more dentistry students selecting their degree course because of the possibility to work flexible working hours (p < .001) compared to dental hygiene students. A majority of the students expressed concern about finding a suitable job (58 %) after graduation. Almost a quarter (23 %) reported intent to seek a job immediately after graduation, while 46 % plan further studies. Dentistry students were more likely to report planning further studies (p = .007) compared to the dental hygiene students. Dental hygiene students express a higher interest in going abroad (p = .011) following graduation. Only 10 % of all students plan to live or work in rural areas after study. Most common preferred locations to live after graduation are urban (33 %) or abroad (38 %). Data suggest a preference to combine working in a hospital with working in their own practice (44 %) while interest in solely working in their own practice is low (<2 %). CONCLUSION: Many students, though enthusiastic about their profession and expressing the ambition to serve the community, fear unemployment or envision better chances abroad. Most of the students in this study expressed a preference to live in an urban area after graduation. Findings indicate that strong measures are required to incentivise students to consider rural work.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Emigração e Imigração/tendências , Motivação , Área de Atuação Profissional , Estudantes de Odontologia , Adulto , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Humanos , Satisfação no Emprego , Masculino , Nepal/epidemiologia , População Rural , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Estudantes de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , População Urbana
10.
J Dent Educ ; 79(5): 493-8, 2015 May.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25941142

RESUMO

Oral and maxillofacial radiology is the newest specialty to be recognized by the American Dental Association, so knowledge about the parameters of this profession is in the early stages of development. The aim of this study was to understand the current distribution of oral and maxillofacial radiologists (OMFRs) in academia and private practice, the nature of their practice, and trends in their board certification status. An email describing the study's purpose with a link to a survey was sent to "OradList," a listserv that has a majority of OMFRs in the United States and Canada as members. Of the 205 respondents, 46% were female; the age distribution ranged from 25 to over 70 years; and 80% were working full-time. Among the respondents, 66% practiced in an academic setting, 20% in private practice, 8% in both private and academic settings, and 3% in the military. Only 37% of the respondents were board-certified. For OMFRs trained from 1965 to 2009, there was an increasing trend towards becoming board-certified, but a significant decrease occurred after 2009, dropping from 65% to 35% of those trained in those years.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Odontólogos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia , Radiologia/educação , Conselhos de Especialidade Profissional , Centros Médicos Acadêmicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Idoso , Odontólogos/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Satisfação no Emprego , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Odontologia Militar/estatística & dados numéricos , Prática Privada/estatística & dados numéricos , Prática Profissional/estatística & dados numéricos , Radiologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores de Tempo
11.
Oral Maxillofac Surg ; 19(3): 259-65, 2015 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25707775

RESUMO

PURPOSE: To identify factors associated with scientific productivity (SP) of German oral-maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) training centers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective cohort study was composed of a set of data from German OMFS training centers. A total of eight predictor variables were grouped into demographic, structural, and personal categories. The outcome variables were average publications in 2013 per senior staff, and percentage of OMFS trainees with >1 publications. Descriptive and univariate statistics were computed using P < 0.05. RESULTS: The sample included outputs from 62 OMFS departments (34 [54.8 %] university-based; 46 [74.2 %] in large cities). Average publications were 2.4 ± 3 per senior staff (range, 0-27), and 160 trainees (31.7 %) published >1 papers. The number of publications and productive trainees was not linked to department name and number of female senior staffs, but publication count was significantly increased when the hospital was in a metropolis (P = 0.018) or university-based (P < 0.0001), the OMFS' chairperson and >3 staffs within the department had a postdoctoral degree (German "Habilitation") (P = 0.013 and <0.0001), and the chairperson had h-index >10 or the first/last authorship in 2013 (P < 0.0001). Female senior surgeons were less scientifically productive than the male ones (P = 0.01). CONCLUSION: SP of German OMFS training centers is greatly different across the country and influenced by city size, university base, educational backgrounds, and research activities of chairpersons and senior staffs. This helps students, trainees, and young surgeons to reach the career choice that is personally appropriate. The involved organizations may need to encourage research output of less productive surgeons/centers. Increasing postdoctoral-qualified staffs will increase SP of the department.


Assuntos
Pesquisa em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação , Eficiência Organizacional , Procedimentos Cirúrgicos Bucais/educação , Publicações/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Autoria , Estudos de Coortes , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Alemanha , Humanos , Masculino , Estudos Retrospectivos
12.
BMC Oral Health ; 15: 11, 2015 Jan 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25608862

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Objectives were to: (1) determine whether and how often general dentists (GDs) provide specific dental procedures; and (2) test the hypothesis that provision is associated with key dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. METHODS: GDs (n = 2,367) in the United States National Dental Practice-Based Research Network completed an Enrollment Questionnaire that included: (1) dentist; (2) practice; and (3) patient characteristics, and how commonly they provide each of 10 dental procedures. We determined how commonly procedures were provided and tested the hypothesis that provision was substantively related to the three sets of characteristics. RESULTS: Two procedure categories were classified as "uncommon" (orthodontics, periodontal surgery), three were "common" (molar endodontics; implants; non-surgical periodontics), and five were "very common" (restorative; esthetic procedures; extractions; removable prosthetics; non-molar endodontics). Dentist, practice, and patient characteristics were substantively related to procedure provision; several characteristics seemed to have pervasive effects, such as dentist gender, training after dental school, full-time/part-time status, private practice vs. institutional practice, presence of a specialist in the same practice, and insurance status of patients. CONCLUSIONS: As a group, GDs provide a comprehensive range of procedures. However, provision by individual dentists is substantively related to certain dentist, practice, and patient characteristics. A large number and broad range of factors seem to influence which procedures GDs provide. This may have implications for how GDs respond to the ever-changing landscape of dental care utilization, patient population demography, scope of practice, delivery models and GDs' evolving role in primary care.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Participativa Baseada na Comunidade , Assistência Odontológica/estatística & dados numéricos , Odontologia Geral , Padrões de Prática Odontológica/estatística & dados numéricos , Implantes Dentários/estatística & dados numéricos , Restauração Dentária Permanente/estatística & dados numéricos , Prótese Total/estatística & dados numéricos , Prótese Parcial Removível/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Estética Dentária , Feminino , Pesquisa sobre Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Seguro Odontológico/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Dente Molar/patologia , Ortodontia Corretiva/estatística & dados numéricos , Desbridamento Periodontal/estatística & dados numéricos , Doenças Periodontais/cirurgia , Prática Privada/estatística & dados numéricos , Prática Profissional/estatística & dados numéricos , Tratamento do Canal Radicular/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Sexuais , Especialidades Odontológicas/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Extração Dentária/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
13.
J Dent Educ ; 79(1): 64-71, 2015 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-25576554

RESUMO

The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to survey the backgrounds and perspectives of U.S. periodontal residents in 2012. A 64-item web-based survey was distributed to all periodontal residents in the United States (544 residents enrolled in 54 graduate programs) via email in March 2012. Data on the residents' demographics, experiences during graduate periodontal training, and goals were collected and analyzed, and percentages were calculated. The survey had a 19.1% response rate. Most of the respondents (74%) had graduated from international dental schools, and 81.7% were in combined programs (clinical training combined with a Master's degree, PhD, or other doctoral degree). Almost one-fourth of the responding residents (24%) reported a total debt of more than $300,000 after graduation. More than 60% of the respondents planned to practice in a private setting as an associate, partner, or solo practice owner. The responding residents reported having chosen their graduate programs based mainly on the programs' clinical education and reputation (72% and 48%, respectively). Future studies will determine educational trends and outcomes for periodontal residents in the longer term.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia , Internato e Residência , Periodontia/educação , Adulto , Fatores Etários , Estudos Transversais , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/economia , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Escolaridade , Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Europeu/estatística & dados numéricos , Docentes de Odontologia , Características da Família , Feminino , Objetivos , Humanos , Intercâmbio Educacional Internacional/estatística & dados numéricos , Internet , Internato e Residência/economia , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Licenciamento em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Masculino , Estado Civil , Prática Odontológica Associada/estatística & dados numéricos , Periodontia/economia , Prática Privada/estatística & dados numéricos , Fatores Sexuais , Inquéritos e Questionários , Apoio ao Desenvolvimento de Recursos Humanos , Estados Unidos
14.
Bull Tokyo Dent Coll ; 55(2): 103-9, 2014.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24965955

RESUMO

Career paths and aspirations were investigated among postgraduate dental trainees on completion of clinical training at Tokyo Dental College between 2006, when clinical residency became mandatory, and 2011. Overall, those finding employment with independent general dental practitioners accounted for the majority (34%), followed by those entering postgraduate courses at the Chiba Hospital (20%), those embarking on a postgraduate clinical specialty course at the Chiba Hospital (16%), and those going on to other universities (7%). At the Chiba Hospital, the number selecting postgraduate courses, residency training (including further residency training or a postgraduate clinical specialty course), or employment with a general dental practitioner was almost the same; however, the number selecting postgraduate courses at the Suidobashi Hospital was low, showing a strong tendency toward becoming a general or clinical practitioner. At the Ichikawa General Hospital, most of the trainees decided to remain at the same school or hospital as postgraduate students or residents, showing an aspiration toward further specialization. The results of the Fisher's exact test showed a significant difference in career paths between the Chiba, Suidobashi, and Ichikawa General Hospitals. Trends among postgraduate dental trainees from this and other schools completing the clinical residency program here and subsequently entering postgraduate courses, further residency training, or a postgraduate clinical specialty course at this school were investigated. No major difference was observed in the percentage of trainees remaining at the same school or entering postgraduate courses between those from this and those from other schools; however, more trainees from other schools selected further residency training, while fewer selected a postgraduate clinical specialty course.


Assuntos
Escolha da Profissão , Odontólogos/psicologia , Internato e Residência , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Odontólogos/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Emprego , Odontologia Geral/estatística & dados numéricos , Hospitais de Ensino , Humanos , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Prática Privada/estatística & dados numéricos , Especialidades Odontológicas/educação , Tóquio
16.
J Dent Educ ; 77(10): 1270-85, 2013 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-24098031

RESUMO

The number of adults above sixty-five years of age in the United States will expand considerably over the next thirty years. However, many dentists believe that their dental education did not adequately prepare them to treat an older adult population. Consequently, it is important to review dental curricula to determine where these gaps in education may occur and what can be done to address them in order to improve access to care. In this study, information was gathered from the websites of sixty-two U.S. dental schools in order to understand the types of geriatric courses offered. This review revealed that while most schools (89 percent) provide their predoctoral students with some education in geriatrics, only fourteen (22.6 percent) offer clinical training specifically for older adult care. In addition, forty-three schools (69 percent) include a geriatric component in either their General Practice Residency or Advanced Education in General Dentistry programs or have a certificate program in geriatric dentistry. Only about 23 percent of the schools offer a continuing education course in geriatrics at any one time. Previous studies have shown that clinical training is the most effective method of increasing students' confidence in treating older patients. Consequently, dental schools should work to incorporate clinical experience into geriatric education to prevent widening an existing gap in older adult oral health care.


Assuntos
Assistência Odontológica para Idosos , Educação em Odontologia , Odontologia Geriátrica/educação , Faculdades de Odontologia , Idoso , Currículo , Educação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação Continuada em Odontologia , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Odontologia Geriátrica/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Faculdades de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
17.
Rural Remote Health ; 13(2): 2366, 2013.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23767792

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Southwest Virginia is a rural, low-income region with a relatively small dentist workforce and poor oral health outcomes. The opening of a dental school in the region has been proposed by policy-makers as one approach to improving the size of the dentist workforce and oral health outcomes. METHODS: A policy simulation was conducted to assess how a hypothetical dental school in rural Southwest Virginia would affect the availability of dentists and utilization levels of dental services. The simulation focuses on two channels through which the dental school would most likely affect the region. First, the number of graduates who are expected to remain in the region was varied, based on the extensiveness of the education pipeline used to attract local students. Second, the number of patients treated in the dental school clinic under different dental school clinical models, including the traditional model, a patient-centered clinic model and a community-based clinic model, was varied in the simulation to obtain a range of additional dentists and utilization rates under differing dental school models. RESULTS: Under a set of plausible assumptions, the low yield scenario (ie private school with a traditional clinic) would result in three additional dentists residing in the region and a total of 8090 additional underserved patients receiving care. Under the high yield scenario (ie dental pipeline program with community based clinics) nine new dentists would reside in the region and as many as 18 054 underserved patients would receive care. Even with the high yield scenario and the strong assumption that these patients would not otherwise access care, the utilization rate increases to 68.9% from its current 60.1%. CONCLUSIONS: While the new dental school in Southwest Virginia would increase the dentist workforce and utilization rates, the high cost combined with the continued low rate of dental utilization suggests that there may be more effective alternatives to improving oral health in rural areas. Alternative policies that have shown considerable promise in expanding access to disadvantaged populations include virtual dental homes, enhanced Medicaid reimbursement programs, and school-based dental care systems.


Assuntos
Serviços de Saúde Bucal/estatística & dados numéricos , Acesso aos Serviços de Saúde , Pobreza , Regionalização/métodos , Saúde da População Rural , Faculdades de Odontologia , Serviços de Saúde Comunitária , Delegação Vertical de Responsabilidades Profissionais , Serviços de Saúde Bucal/organização & administração , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Política de Saúde , Necessidades e Demandas de Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Medicaid , Assistência Centrada no Paciente , Desenvolvimento de Programas , Regionalização/normas , Faculdades de Odontologia/economia , Faculdades de Odontologia/organização & administração , Faculdades de Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Integração de Sistemas , Estados Unidos , Virginia , Recursos Humanos
18.
J Dent Educ ; 77(1): 72-8, 2013 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23314469

RESUMO

China is a developing country with the largest population of any country in the world. The 2010 sixth national census found that China's population was 1,339,724,852, accounting for about 19 percent of the world's total population. However, higher education in the Chinese dental field started late and developed slowly. In order to acquaint more dental educators worldwide about China's current higher dental education system, this article provides a brief introduction to the present education system, degrees conferred, curriculum setting, training mode, teaching materials, courses, and academic journals.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Certificação , China , Currículo , Educação em Odontologia/métodos , Educação em Odontologia/normas , Educação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Publicações Periódicas como Assunto , Obras de Referência , Faculdades de Odontologia , Ensino/métodos , Materiais de Ensino , Livros de Texto como Assunto
19.
J Dent Educ ; 76(12): 1623-8, 2012 Dec.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-23225681

RESUMO

There has been limited research into the impact of predoctoral experiences and postdoctoral general dentistry residencies on the practice patterns of dentists in the care of patients with special or complex needs. This study was undertaken to determine if educational experiences with special populations had a relationship to practice patterns after graduation or residency. University of the Pacific alumni who graduated between 1997 and 2007 were surveyed regarding their pre- and postdoctoral dental education and their practice patterns for the care of patients categorized as medically compromised, frail elders, and developmentally disabled. Definitions for each patient category were provided. Alumni were asked about their practice setting and postdoctoral education. Thirty-one percent (n=526) of those surveyed responded. Regression analyses showed respondents not in private practice were more likely to have completed a postdoctoral general dentistry program (Advanced Education in General Dentistry or General Practice Residency) after dental school compared to respondents in private practice (p<0.001). Across all age groups, respondents not in private practice treated significantly more patients with developmental disabilities than those in private practice (p<0.001). Respondents not in private practice treated more medically compromised patients younger than age sixty-five compared to respondents in private practice (p<0.01). Interestingly, those in private practice treated significantly more patients over sixty-five who were also classified as medically compromised (p<0.05). Pacific alumni who completed postdoctoral training in general dentistry were found to practice more often in non-private practice settings. Alumni in non-private practice settings reported treating a higher percentage of medically compromised patients below age sixty-five than their counterparts in a typical private practice. The pre- and postdoctoral experiences of treating special needs populations appear to have a relationship to graduates' practice setting and patient population.


Assuntos
Assistência Odontológica/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pós-Graduação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação em Odontologia/estatística & dados numéricos , Odontologia Geral/educação , Internato e Residência/estatística & dados numéricos , Padrões de Prática Odontológica/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência Odontológica/classificação , Assistência Odontológica para Idosos , Assistência Odontológica para Doentes Crônicos , Assistência Odontológica para Pessoas com Deficiências , Deficiências do Desenvolvimento , Odontologia Geral/estatística & dados numéricos , Humanos , Prática Privada/estatística & dados numéricos , Estados Unidos
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