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1.
Public Health Res Pract ; 30(1)2020 Mar 10.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32152614

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Multilingual patient education materials (PEMs) in Australia are normally prepared initially in English (source text) and then translated into other languages. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the source texts for publicly available multilingual diabetes PEMs in Australia were written at the reading level recommended by health literacy guidelines (eighth-grade reading level). STUDY TYPE: Nonexperimental descriptive study. METHODS: All publicly accessible multilingual fact sheets on diabetes self-management from the Diabetes Australia and National Diabetes Services Scheme websites were collected. Readability was analysed using five different readability indices: Flesch Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), Gunning Fog Score (GFS), Coleman Liau Index (CLI), Simplified Measure of Gobbledygook Index (SMOG) and Automated Readability Index (ARI). The average number of syllables per word and the average number of words per sentence were also calculated. RESULTS: The average reading grade level of included PEMs was above Grade 10 (mean 10.4; standard deviation [SD] 0.9). The average number of syllables per word was 1.5 (SD 0.1), and the average number of words per sentence was 17 (SD 0.9). CONCLUSIONS: English-language source texts for national multilingual diabetes PEMs examined in this study were written at a readability level significantly higher than that recommended in health literacy guidelines. This was likely due to the use of polysyllabic words and complex medical terms, which are especially problematic when they are not defined. Improving readability of English-language source texts may help to ensure that the translated PEMs are more readable and accessible to their target readers. In conjunction with addressing other features that can make written materials easier to understand, this may help to better support diabetes self-management.


Assuntos
Compreensão , Diabetes Mellitus , Multilinguismo , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Austrália , Alfabetização em Saúde , Humanos , Linguagem , Leitura , Autocuidado
2.
CMAJ ; 192(4): E103-E104, 2020 Jan 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31988159
3.
Plast Reconstr Surg ; 145(2): 329e-336e, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31985630

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Videos on YouTube can be posted without regulation or content oversight. Unfortunately, many patients use YouTube as a resource on aesthetic surgery, leading to misinformation. Currently, there are no objective assessments of the quality of information on YouTube about aesthetic surgery. METHODS: YouTube was queried for videos about the 12 most common aesthetic surgical procedures, identified from the 2015 American Society of Plastic Surgeons procedural statistics between May and June of 2016. The top 25 results for each search term were scored using the modified Ensuring Quality Information for Patients criteria based on video structure, content, and author identification. Average Ensuring Quality Information for Patients score, view count, and video duration were compared between authorship groups. RESULTS: A total of 523 videos were graded after excluding duplicates. The mean modified Ensuring Quality Information for Patients score for all videos was 13.1 (SE, 0.18) of a possible 27. The videos under the search "nose reshaping" had the lowest mean score of 10.24 (SE, 0.74), whereas "breast augmentation" had the highest score of 15.96 (SE, 0.65). Physician authorship accounted for 59 percent of included videos and had a higher mean Ensuring Quality Information for Patients score than those by patients. Only three of the 21 search terms had a mean modified Ensuring Quality Information for Patients score meeting criteria for high-quality videos. CONCLUSIONS: The information contained in aesthetic surgery videos on YouTube is low quality. Patients should be aware that the information has the potential to be inaccurate. Plastic surgeons should be encouraged to develop high-quality videos to educate patients.


Assuntos
Disseminação de Informação/métodos , Internet , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Cirurgia Plástica/métodos , Gravação em Vídeo , Humanos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Estados Unidos , Gravação em Vídeo/normas
5.
J Clin Nurs ; 29(1-2): e1-e10, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31509311

RESUMO

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore adult general surgical patients' perceptions of, and satisfaction with, discharge education provided by healthcare providers. BACKGROUND: Discharge education is essential for general surgical patients as it equips them with the required knowledge and skills to engage in their care after discharge. Insufficient knowledge to self-manage or assess their symptoms can result in postdischarge complications, unplanned hospital readmission and overall dissatisfaction with the hospital experience. DESIGN: A constructivist-interpretivist paradigm using qualitative interviews. METHODS: Telephone interviews were conducted with 13 patients between August 2018 and November 2018 and analysed using inductive content analysis. COREQ guidelines were adopted for the conduct and reporting of the study. RESULTS: Four themes were uncovered: (a) The quality of discharge information influences patients' postdischarge experience; (b) The negative impact of contextual influences on delivery of discharge education; (c) Patients actively participating in their surgical journey; (d) Patients' preferences with the delivery of discharge education. CONCLUSION: Inadequate discharge education leads to patients' inability to self-manage their recovery process. Information sharing with patients fosters shared understanding towards goals and expectations. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Understanding patients' view may inform the design of patient-centred discharge education interventions for patients to self-manage their recovery postdischarge.


Assuntos
Alta do Paciente/normas , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Satisfação do Paciente , Adulto , Idoso , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/métodos , Período Pós-Operatório , Pesquisa Qualitativa
6.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1171: 105-126, 2019.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31823243

RESUMO

The use of augmented reality (AR) has a rich history and is used in a number of fields. Its application in healthcare and anatomy education is developing considerable interest. However, although its popularity is on the rise, its use as an educational and practical tool has not been sufficiently evaluated, especially with children. Therefore, this study presents the design, development and evaluation of an educational tablet-based application with AR functionality for children. A distal radius fracture was chosen, as it is one of the more common fractures in the younger age group. Following a standardized software engineering methodology, we identified functional and non-functional requirements, creating a child-friendly tablet based AR application. This used industry standard software and incorporated three-dimensional models of a buckle fracture, object and image target marker recognition, interactivity and educational elements. In addition, we surveyed children at the Glasgow Science Centre on its usability, design and educational effectiveness. Seventy-one children completed a questionnaire (25 also underwent a short structured interview). Overall, the feedback was positive relating to entertainment value, graphic design, usability and educational scope of the application. Notably, it was shown to increase user understanding of radiology across all age groups following a trial of the application. This study shows the great potential of using digital technologies, and more particularly augmented information, in engaging future generations in science from a young age. Creation of educational materials using digital technologies, and evaluating its effectiveness, highlights the great scope novel technology could have in anatomical education and training.


Assuntos
Realidade Aumentada , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Interface Usuário-Computador , Criança , Humanos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Assistência Centrada no Paciente , Escócia , Software/normas , Inquéritos e Questionários
7.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 19(1): 892, 2019 Nov 27.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31771571

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Drug information leaflets (DILs) are written for patients and health care providers to show how to use the medications safely and effectively, in order to reach the required therapeutics outcomes. This comparative study was conducted to evaluate various DILs of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) that are produced in Palestine, along with their imported equivalents. METHODS: Thirty-five DILs of NSAIDs were analyzed and evaluated in a cross-sectional comparative study. Thirty-one statements were obtained from literature and used; evaluation was performed on basis of both any presence or absence of these statements in the leaflets. 23 of the 31 statements that were available in both local and imported DILs were also evaluated in terms of total word-counts: the median (interquartile range) word-count for each statement was determined separately for the two groups and then compared. For the remaining 8 statements, this was not performed,either because they were not present in any leaflet, or because counting the number of words would not be meaningful. RESULTS: A total of 35 DILs for nine different active ingredients of NSAIDs were analyzed. In 97% of leaflets, "Instructions to convert medication into liquid forms" were missing and 94% did not provide any information about "Pharmacokinetics". 83% of DILs provided no information about "Mechanism of action" and 74% did not mention any reliable references. 66% of the analyzed inserts did not include any instruction about the possibility of a tablet splitting. And in 63%, the "Date of last revision" was missing. Further, "Duration of using" and "Inactive ingredients" were not found in 51% of leaflets. In terms of word-count, the related sections of the 23 selected criteria were expressed with more words by imported leaflets compared with the local ones, significant differences were found in 12 categories, the highest significance of > 42.4-fold difference was found in "Geriatric considerations" category whereas 1.4-fold difference was found in "Shelf life," being the lowest one. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that local products provide less information than imported products, so we recommend that appropriate measurements be taken by both Palestinian authorities and manufacturers to improve both quantity and quality of local DILs.


Assuntos
Folhetos , Anti-Inflamatórios não Esteroides/uso terapêutico , Estudos Transversais , Humanos , Oriente Médio , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Embalagem de Produtos , Publicações/normas
8.
BMC Infect Dis ; 19(1): 774, 2019 Sep 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31488064

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: HCV (Hepatitis C virus) is a prevalent chronic disease with potentially deadly consequences, especially for drug users. However, there are no special HCV or HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-related intervention programs that are tailored for drug users in China; to fill this gap, the purpose of this study was to explore HCV and HIV-related knowledge among drug users in MMT (methadone maintenance treatment) sites of China and to investigate the effectiveness of HCV and HIV-related education for improving the knowledge of IDUs (injection drug users) and their awareness of infection. METHODS: The study was a randomized cluster controlled trial that compared a usual care group to a usual care plus HCV/HIV-REP (HCV/HIV-Reduction Education Program) group with a 24-week follow-up. The self-designed questionnaires, the HCV- and HIV-related knowledge questionnaire and the HIV/HCV infection awareness questionnaire, were used to collect the data. Four MMT clinics were selected for this project; two MMT clinics were randomly assigned to the research group, with subjects receiving their usual care plus HCV/HIV-REP, and the remaining two MMT clinics were the control group, with subjects receiving their usual care over 12 weeks. Sixty patients were recruited from each MMT clinic. A total of 240 patients were recruited. Follow-up studies were conducted at the end of the 12th week and the 24th week after the intervention. RESULTS: At baseline, the mean score (out of 20 possible correct answers) for HCV knowledge among the patients in the group receiving the intervention was 6.51 (SD = 3.5), and it was 20.57 (SD = 6.54) for HIV knowledge (out of 45 correct answers) and 8.35 (SD = 2.8) for HIV/HCV infection awareness (out of 20 correct answers). At the 12-week and 24-week follow-up assessments, the research group showed a greater increase in HCV-/HIV-related knowledge (group × time effect, F = 37.444/11.281, P < 0.05) but no difference in their HIV/HCV infection awareness (group × time effect, F = 2.056, P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: An MMT-based HCV/HIV intervention program could be used to improve patient knowledge of HCV and HIV prevention, but more effort should be devoted to HIV/HCV infection awareness. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Protocols for this study were approved by institution review board (IRB) of Shanghai Mental Health Center (IRB:2009036), and registered in U.S national institutes of health (http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01647191 ). Registered 23 July 2012.


Assuntos
Usuários de Drogas/educação , Infecções por HIV/prevenção & controle , Hepatite C/prevenção & controle , Metadona/uso terapêutico , Tratamento de Substituição de Opiáceos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto , Adulto , Conscientização , China/epidemiologia , Análise por Conglomerados , Usuários de Drogas/psicologia , Usuários de Drogas/estatística & dados numéricos , Eficiência Organizacional , Feminino , HIV/fisiologia , Infecções por HIV/epidemiologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Hepacivirus/fisiologia , Hepatite C/epidemiologia , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Tratamento de Substituição de Opiáceos/métodos , Tratamento de Substituição de Opiáceos/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/organização & administração , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Prevalência , Inquéritos e Questionários , Resultado do Tratamento
9.
BMC Ophthalmol ; 19(1): 174, 2019 Aug 08.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31395040

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: A patient's health literacy is fundamental for navigating the health system and managing disease. This study aimed to compare the health literacy levels of patients with chronic retinal disease in Denmark. METHODS: This cross-sectional questionnaire study used the validated HLS-EU-Q16 questionnaire to determine the health literacy of 225 patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), diabetic macular edema (DME) or retinal vein occlusion (RVO), receiving intravitreal treatment at the retinal clinic, Zealand University Hospital, Denmark. Patients were consecutively included as participants for the study. All patients had the option of having the survey read aloud to them. RESULTS: Health literacy levels between the patient groups did not differ significantly, however, the proportion of patients with poor health literacy was high-65% of AMD patients, 73% of DME patients, and 63% of patients with RVO. CONCLUSIONS: Low health literacy of patients with retinal disease signify a need for more health literacy research in the field of retinal diseases, to secure that patients have the timely and appropriate knowledge and competencies to manage their condition.


Assuntos
Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Alfabetização em Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Doenças Retinianas/psicologia , Acuidade Visual , Idoso , Doença Crônica , Estudos Transversais , Feminino , Seguimentos , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Doenças Retinianas/diagnóstico , Estudos Retrospectivos , Fatores Socioeconômicos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Fatores de Tempo , Tomografia de Coerência Óptica
10.
Can J Diabetes ; 43(6): 445-452, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31375180

RESUMO

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common chronic diseases worldwide and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality. A high prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been noted among the South Asian population, in general, and migrant South Asians. Self-management is considered a proponent to the management of diabetes. Although empirical evidence supports such interventions, little is known regarding the cultural congruency of such interventions for diverse cultural and ethnic groups, particularly South Asians. Our purpose was to determine the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education (DSME) and diabetes self-management support (DSMS), interventions on migrant South Asian's glycated hemoglobin (A1C) levels and whether DSME and DSMS interventions are culturally tailored to the migrant South Asian population. In this study, a systematic review, with narrative synthesis, was conducted. Data were extracted on the study, participant, and intervention characteristics and the cultural congruity using Leininger's sunrise model. Four studies meeting the inclusion criteria were included. Overall, most (75%) of the DSME and DSMS interventions were not effective in reducing A1C levels. Specific to cultural congruity of the interventions, all studies delivered the intervention based on the participant's preferred language and incorporated culturally sensitive dietary information primarily by persons of the same cultural and ethnic background. However, little information was presented on the provision and integration of culturally congruent care. Findings highlight the importance of rethinking the way in which South Asians are labelled as a homogenous group and accounting for such differences when adapting and designing culturally tailored DSME and or DSMS interventions in clinical practice.


Assuntos
Grupo com Ancestrais do Continente Asiático/estatística & dados numéricos , Assistência à Saúde Culturalmente Competente/normas , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/etnologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Qualidade de Vida , Autogestão/educação , Características Culturais , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/psicologia , Humanos
11.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 27: e3164, 2019 Aug 19.
Artigo em Português, Inglês, Espanhol | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31432918

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Behavior Change Protocol for educational practices in Diabetes Mellitus. METHOD: methodological study aimed at cross-cultural adaptation, comprising the steps of translation, back-translation, assessment by an expert committee and pre-testing of the instrument on a sample of 30 healthcare service users with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. RESULTS: the instrument was assessed based on criteria pertaining semantic, idiomatic, conceptual and cultural equivalence between the original instrument and the translated version, its mean Content Validity Index being 0.85. CONCLUSION: results showed content validity indicating the instrument's successful cross-cultural adaptation to the Brazilian culture for use in educational practices targeting self-care in type 2 DM.


Assuntos
Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Autocuidado/normas , Inquéritos e Questionários/normas , Tradução , Brasil , Comparação Transcultural , Características Culturais , Feminino , Serviços de Saúde , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Variações Dependentes do Observador , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Valores de Referência , Reprodutibilidade dos Testes , Autocuidado/métodos
12.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 72(4): 896-902, 2019 Aug 19.
Artigo em Inglês, Português | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31432944

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To design and validate the content and format of a guidebook for chronic renal failure patients about the care with venous access for hemodialysis at home. METHOD: Methodological study, in which the steps for the guidebook design were: project planning, literature search, material content, and qualification selection. RESULTS: After analysis of the articles, the content to be included in the guidebook was selected. The first draft of the guidebook was submitted for content and format validation, with the participation of 12 specialists. The necessary adjustments for the design of the final version were made with the help of an illustrator. CONCLUSION: The designed guidebook, "Hemodialysis: Care of Venous Accesses and Intercurrences at Home," consists of educational material to help hemodialysis patients with daily care with central venous catheter and arteriovenous fistula practices in case of intercurrences.


Assuntos
Cateteres Venosos Centrais/normas , Folhetos , Diálise Renal/instrumentação , Diálise Renal/métodos , Adulto , Cateteres Venosos Centrais/efeitos adversos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Diálise Renal/normas , Fatores de Tempo
13.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 55(7)2019 Jul 07.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31284666

RESUMO

Background and objectives: Lumbar spine surgery may be considered if pharmacologic, rehabilitation and interventional approaches cannot provide sufficient recovery from low back-related pain. Postoperative physiotherapy treatment in England is often accompanied by patient information leaflets, which contain important rehabilitation advice. However, in order to be an effective instrument for patients, the information provided in these leaflets must be up to date and based on the best available evidence and clinical practice. This study aims to critically analyse the current postoperative aspects of rehabilitation (exercise prescription and return to normal activity) that are provided in patient information leaflets in England as part of an evaluation of current practice following lumbar spine surgery. Materials and Methods: Patient information leaflets from English National Health Service (NHS) hospitals performing lumbar spine surgery were sourced online. A content analysis was conducted to collect data on postoperative exercise prescription and return to normal activities. Results: Thirty-two patient information leaflets on lumbar surgery were sourced (fusion, n = 11; decompression, n = 15; all lumbar procedures, n = 6). Many of the exercises prescribed within the leaflets were not based on evidence of clinical best practice and lacked a relationship to functional activity. Return to normal activity advice was also wide ranging, with considerable variation in the recommendations and definitions provided. Conclusions: This study highlights a clear variation in the recommendations of exercise prescription, dosage and returning to normal activities following lumbar spine surgery. Future work should focus on providing a consistent and patient-centred approach to recovery.


Assuntos
Terapia por Exercício/estatística & dados numéricos , Vértebras Lombares/cirurgia , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/normas , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Volta ao Esporte/estatística & dados numéricos , Inglaterra , Exercício/fisiologia , Terapia por Exercício/métodos , Humanos , Dor Lombar/complicações , Dor Lombar/cirurgia , Vértebras Lombares/lesões , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/métodos , Procedimentos Ortopédicos/estatística & dados numéricos , Folhetos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Período Pós-Operatório , Pesquisa Qualitativa , Medicina Estatal/organização & administração , Medicina Estatal/estatística & dados numéricos
14.
World Neurosurg ; 130: e588-e597, 2019 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31260846

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Most Americans consult the Internet to address their health concerns. Limited health literacy among the public highlights the need for patient education Web sites to deliver understandable health information. We assessed the understandability and actionability of online neurosurgical patient education materials (PEMs) provided by the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS) and MedlinePlus. METHODS: Articles on neurosurgical conditions and treatments listed on both the AANS site and MedlinePlus were analyzed. Two reviewers scored articles using 2 validated health literacy tools, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Clear Communication Index (CCI) and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT). These tools evaluate the quality of written health information and assess for content, organization, and actionability of PEMs. RESULTS: One hundred and thirty-eight articles were evaluated from the AANS (n = 61) and MedlinePlus (n = 77). The median CCI score for MedlinePlus and AANS articles was 68.9 (interquartile range [IQR], 62.5-81.3) and 56.3 [IQR, 46.7-73.7], respectively (P < 0.001). Only 1 article scored ≥90%, which is the CCI threshold for PEMs to be considered easy to read. Although the AANS and Medline performed similarly on the understandability component of the PEMAT (66.7 [IQR, 53.8-69.2] vs. 69.2 [IQR, 66.7-83.3], respectively; P < 0.001), significant differences were observed for the actionability section of the PEMAT (Medline 60 [IQR, 60-60] vs. AANS 0 [IQR, 0-60]; P < 0.001). Less than 13% of articles provided summaries, visual aids, and tangible tools to aid patient action. CONCLUSIONS: Neurosurgical online PEMs may be difficult to understand and potentially act as barriers for patients' engagement with health systems. There is a need to deliver patient-centered health information that effectively informs patients, aiding in meaningful health decision making.


Assuntos
Compreensão , Internet , Procedimentos Neurocirúrgicos/educação , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Materiais de Ensino/normas , Alfabetização em Saúde/normas , Humanos
15.
Gynecol Oncol ; 154(3): 616-621, 2019 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31324452

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: Patients are increasingly using online materials to learn about gynecologic cancer. Providers can refer patients to online educational materials produced by a number of different major medical organizations and pharmacology companies. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the American Medical Association (AMA) recommend that patient educational materials (PEMs) are written between a sixth and eighth grade reading level. In this study, we assess the readability of online PEMs published by major medical organizations and industry partners. METHODS: Websites from twelve websites providing educational materials for gynecologic oncology patients were surveyed. Online PEMs were identified and analyzed using seven validated readability indices. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) post-hoc analysis were performed to detect differences in readability between publishers. RESULTS: Two-hundred and sixty PEMs were included in this analysis. Overall, PEMs were written at a mean 11th±0.6 grade reading level. Only 6.5% of articles were written at the AMA/NIH recommended reading grade level of 6th to 8th grade or below. ANOVA demonstrated a significant difference in readability between publishing associations (p<0.01). PEMs from the Centers for Disease Control had a mean 9th±1.2 grade reading level and were significantly lower than all other organizations. PEMs from The Foundation for Women's Cancer had a mean 13th±1.8 grade reading level and were significantly higher than most other organizations. PEMs from pharmaceutical companies (mean readability=10.1±1.1, N=30) required the lowest reading grade level and were significantly more readable than those from governmental organizations (11.1±1.7, p<0.05) and nonprofit medical associations (12.4±1.7, p<0.01) in ANOVA and Tukey-Kramer post hoc analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Gynecologic oncology PEMs available from twelve major organization websites are written well above the recommended sixth to eighth grade reading difficulty level.


Assuntos
Neoplasias dos Genitais Femininos , Internet/normas , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Leitura , Compreensão , Indústria Farmacêutica , Feminino , Órgãos Governamentais , Alfabetização em Saúde , Humanos , Organizações sem Fins Lucrativos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos
16.
Continuum (Minneap Minn) ; 25(4): 1141-1144, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31356297

RESUMO

This medicolegal article examines a physician's liability when he or she has knowledge of adverse effects associated with a prescription medication and suggests ways to mitigate that liability risk. The article also discusses the circumstances under which pharmaceutical companies face liability for side effects such as tardive dyskinesia.


Assuntos
Responsabilidade Legal , Imperícia , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Médicos/normas , Antagonistas dos Receptores de Dopamina D2/efeitos adversos , Efeitos Colaterais e Reações Adversas Relacionados a Medicamentos/prevenção & controle , Humanos , Metoclopramida/efeitos adversos , Discinesia Tardia/induzido quimicamente , Discinesia Tardia/prevenção & controle
17.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 72(3): 780-787, 2019 Jun 27.
Artigo em Inglês, Português | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31269146

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: to describe the validation of the booklet on self-care with the feet of people with diabetes. METHOD: methodological study, focusing on the validation of a printed booklet. The content and appearance of the booklet was validated by 23 judges divided into three groups: 11 content and appearance, seven technicians and five of the area of design and marketing. The appearance was validated by 30 people with type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. RESULTS: the judges in the nursing area allowed the validation of material with a Content Validity Index (CVI) of 0.99, judges in the area of design and marketing with Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) of 99.2% and the target audience with concordance index of 99.4%. CONCLUSION: the educational booklet proved to be valid and reliable educational material to be used in order to promote compliance with self-care with the feet of people with Diabetes Mellitus.


Assuntos
Pé Diabético/terapia , Folhetos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Autocuidado/instrumentação , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/complicações , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/psicologia , Diabetes Mellitus Tipo 2/terapia , Pé Diabético/psicologia , Humanos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Autocuidado/métodos , Autocuidado/normas , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estudos de Validação como Assunto
18.
Nurs Womens Health ; 23(4): 309-315, 2019 Aug.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31271730

RESUMO

OBJECTIVE: To measure the relationship between exclusive breastfeeding and 24-hour rooming-in for low-risk primiparous women with uncomplicated vaginal births at term. DESIGN: Descriptive correlational design with a qualitative component. SETTING: The Labor & Delivery and Mother/Baby units of a community hospital with more than 2,300 births annually. PARTICIPANTS: A convenience sample of 89 women. INTERVENTION/MEASUREMENTS: Participants completed a demographic questionnaire, the Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale, which measures attitudes toward breastfeeding, and a four-item questionnaire at 2, 6, and 12 weeks postpartum to assess breastfeeding status. RESULTS: Iowa Infant Feeding Attitude Scale scores suggest that most of the sample had positive attitudes toward breastfeeding. The average separation time for women and newborns was 3 hours 40 minutes. No statistically significant differences were found regarding maternal attitudes toward breastfeeding or mother-newborn separation during the postpartum period between newborns who were exclusively breastfeeding or formula-feeding at 12 weeks. CONCLUSION: Success with exclusive breastfeeding in the immediate postpartum period is not necessarily dependent on 24-hour rooming in, and it is important for women to have the ability to make informed choices regarding newborn separation in the hospital.


Assuntos
Aleitamento Materno/psicologia , Comportamento de Escolha , Mães/psicologia , Alojamento Conjunto/normas , Adulto , Aleitamento Materno/estatística & dados numéricos , Feminino , Humanos , Mães/estatística & dados numéricos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/métodos , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Gravidez , Alojamento Conjunto/métodos , Alojamento Conjunto/psicologia
20.
BMC Med ; 17(1): 105, 2019 06 04.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31159786

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: News stories represent an important source of information. We aimed to evaluate the impact of "spin" (i.e., misrepresentation of study results) in health news stories reporting studies of pharmacologic treatments on patients'/caregivers' interpretation of treatment benefit. METHODS: We conducted three two-arm, parallel-group, Internet-based randomized trials (RCTs) comparing the interpretation of news stories reported with or without spin. Each RCT considered news stories reporting a different type of study: (1) pre-clinical study, (2) phase I/II non-RCT, and (3) phase III/IV RCT. For each type of study, we identified news stories reported with spin that had earned mention in the press. Two versions of the news stories were used: the version with spin and a version rewritten without spin. Participants were patients/caregivers involved in Inspire, a large online community of more than one million patients/caregivers. The primary outcome was participants' interpretation assessed by one specific question "What do you think is the probability that 'treatment X' would be beneficial to patients?" (scale, 0 [very unlikely] to 10 [very likely]). RESULTS: For each RCT, 300 participants were randomly assigned to assess a news story with spin (n = 150) or without spin (n = 150), and 900 participants assessed a news story. Participants were more likely to consider that the treatment would be beneficial to patients when the news story was reported with spin. The mean (SD) score for the primary outcome for abstracts reported with and without spin for pre-clinical studies was 7.5 (2.2) versus 5.8 (2.8) (mean difference [95% CI] 1.7 [1.0-2.3], p < 0.001); for phase I/II non-randomized trials, 7.6 (2.2) versus 5.8 (2.7) (mean difference 1.8 [1.0-2.5], p < 0.001); and for phase III/IV RCTs, 7.2 (2.3) versus 4.9 (2.8) (mean difference 2.3 [1.4-3.2], p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Spin in health news stories reporting studies of pharmacologic treatments affects patients'/caregivers' interpretation. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT03094078 , NCT03094104 , NCT03095586.


Assuntos
Cuidadores/psicologia , Comunicação , Confiabilidade dos Dados , Tratamento Farmacológico/psicologia , Pacientes/psicologia , Percepção , Adolescente , Adulto , Idoso , Atitude Frente a Saúde , Cuidadores/educação , Ensaios Clínicos Fase I como Assunto/psicologia , Ensaios Clínicos Fase II como Assunto/psicologia , Ensaios Clínicos Fase III como Assunto/psicologia , Ensaios Clínicos Fase IV como Assunto/psicologia , Avaliação Pré-Clínica de Medicamentos/psicologia , Feminino , Humanos , Internet/normas , Masculino , Pessoa de Meia-Idade , Educação de Pacientes como Assunto/normas , Projetos de Pesquisa/normas , Medição de Risco , Adulto Jovem
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