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1.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 151-156, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043584

RESUMO

Early clinical exposure (ECE), defined as any interaction with patients prior to the portion of the curriculum when den- tal students spend most of their time at school as a primary provider, is a growing trend in curriculum reform across U.S. dental schools in the 21st century. The aims of this study were to characterize the types of ECE implementation in U.S. dental schools and determine if ECE correlated with earlier clinical competency assessments. In September 2018, the academic deans of all 66 U.S. dental schools were invited to respond to an eight-item electronic survey about ECE at their schools. Representatives of 40 schools submitted complete responses, for a response rate of 60.6%. Among the respondents, 85% reported their schools started their principal clinical experience (PCE), the portion of the curriculum when students spend most of their time as the primary provider for patients, during the last quarter of Year 2 or the first quarter of Year 3. Respondents at all 40 schools reported offering some form of ECE as part of the formal curriculum, with shadowing and performing dental prophylaxis the most commonly of- fered types. No statistically significant associations were found between specific types of ECE and related Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) clinical standards for both formative and summative assessments. Although U.S. dental schools have been incorporating more ECE into their curricula over the past decade, these findings suggest that it has not led to earlier clinical competency assessments.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Faculdades de Odontologia , Currículo , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Estados Unidos
2.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 143-150, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043586

RESUMO

In the U.S., the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) requires that dental schools use competency-based assessments and standardized levels of proficiency to ensure that students are prepared for patient care after graduation. No such comprehensive standardized preclinical testing is required in the CODA standards. The aim of this study was to determine the use of preclinical competency assessments for students transitioning from preclinical to clinical education in North American dental schools and respondents' perceptions of the need for standardization in preclinical testing. An electronic survey was sent to the academic deans of all 76 U.S. and Canadian dental schools in July 2018 asking if the school used competency exams to assess preclinical students prior to entering patient care and, if so, about the type of tests and disciplines tested, student remediation, and reasons for revisions. The survey also asked for the respondents' perspectives on potential preclinical assessment standardization. Respondents from 28 U.S. and two Canadian schools participated in the survey, for a 39.5% response rate. The majority (92.3%) of respondents said their school considered preclinical competency assessments to be good indicators of students' readiness for transitioning into patient care, yet 40.0% reported their schools had no comprehensive preclinical testing, and 13.8% had no preclinical testing in endodontics, periodontics, prosthetics, or restorative dentistry. Regarding type of comprehensive preclinical assessment used, 71.4% reported using typodont-based exams, 46.4% used written comprehensive exams, and 42.9% used objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs); respondents could select all that applied on this item. Of the respondents whose schools had preclinical competency assessments, 72.4% had a review mechanism in place to evaluate its effectiveness. Overall, this study found that 60% of the participating schools had some form of preclinical testing, but there were no agreed-upon competencies to determine preclinical dental students' readiness for safe patient care in their clinical education.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Faculdades de Odontologia , Canadá , Currículo , Humanos , Estudantes de Odontologia , Estados Unidos
3.
J Dent Educ ; 84(2): 135-142, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32043588

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a blended learning model with a flipped classroom approach in a clinical dental education setting based on student performance and perceptions. Comparisons were made between blended learning and traditional methods for all fourth-year dental students in two consecutive cohorts in a conservative dentistry course at a dental school in Jordan. The 2016-17 cohort (control group) consisted of 364 students taught with conventional methods. The 2017-18 cohort (study group) consisted of 253 students taught with blended learning using a flipped classroom method. Performance measures were two exams (online and written), two assignments, inclinic quizzes, and clinical assessment. The study also assessed the number of posts made by students in the study group on an online discussion forum. The results showed that the study group students had significantly better performance on all assessments than the control group students. The students' overall grades in the blended learning cohort were an average 7.25 points higher than in the control cohort. Students who participated in the online forum also had better performance in the course: one participation correlated with 0.697 standard deviations higher score. Overall, students' perceptions were positive and supported the adoption of a blended learning model in the course. These results showing improved student performance provide support for blended learning and use of an online discussion forum.


Assuntos
Satisfação Pessoal , Estudantes de Odontologia , Currículo , Educação em Odontologia , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Faculdades de Odontologia
4.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 57-61, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977088

RESUMO

The aims of this study were to describe patient utilization of an urgent care clinic (UCC) in a dental school for one year and to assess dental students' perceptions of the benefits of training in this clinic. Aggregate clinic data from July 3, 2017, through July 6, 2018, were used to determine number of patients, number of new patients, number of new patients who elected to transfer their primary dental care to the university, number who were seen for a follow-up, and service/clinic to which each patient was referred. Student evaluations were used to determine the benefits students perceived in their training in the UCC. Results showed that 1,674 patients were seen in the UCC during the study period. Of these, 67% were new patients, and 53% of these new patients opted to transfer their primary dental care to the university. An average of 7.03 patients were treated per day, and 2.48 new patients per day were generated for the predoctoral student clinic. The most common referrals were to oral surgery (37%), endodontics (30%), and the predoctoral dental clinic (28%). Among these patients, 39% scheduled follow-up appointments, and the attendance rate was 69%. About 80% of eligible students (40/50) completed the questionnaire, and many provided optional comments. Over 80% of the responding students responded favorably regarding the learning experiences and assessments during the UCC rotation. This study found that establishment of the UCC increased the pool of patients and provided students the necessary experiences in triaging and treating dental emergencies.


Assuntos
Faculdades de Odontologia , Estudantes de Odontologia , Instituições de Assistência Ambulatorial , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Educação em Odontologia , Humanos
5.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 97-104, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977092

RESUMO

Assessment in competency-based dental education continues to be a recognized area for growth and development within dental programs around the world. At the joint American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) 2019 conference, Shaping the Future of Dental Education III, the workshop on assessment was designed to continue the discussion started in 2017 at the ADEA-ADEE Shaping the Future of Dental Education II.1 The focus of the 2019 conference involved examining the potential of entrustable professional activities (EPAs) and current thinking about workplace-based assessment (WBA) within competency-based education in the 21st century. Approximately 30 years ago, George Miller wrote about the assessment of competence in medical education and challenged faculty to reach for higher levels of assessment than knowledge or skill.2 Acknowledging that no one assessment method can result in a valid assessment of competence, Miller proposed a four-level framework for assessment. The lowest level involves measuring what students know ("knows"), followed by assessment of the skill with which knowledge is applied in relevant tasks or problems ("knows how"). Next is an assessment of task performance in standardized settings ("shows how"), and finally, the highest level assesses the student's performance in the unstandardized clinical workplace ("does"). The 2019 assessment workshop focused on advances in the assessment of learners in the unstandardized workplace-the highest level of Miller's assessment pyramid ("does"). Research has shown that dental education has struggled to implement assessment strategies that meet this level.3 The workshop brought together individuals from around the world, with an interest in assessment in dental education, to consider how assessment in the "does" level, specifically EPAs and WBA, factors into competence assessment in dentistry/dental education.


Assuntos
Educação Baseada em Competências , Educação em Odontologia , Competência Clínica , Europa (Continente) , Previsões , Humanos , Local de Trabalho
6.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 105-110, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977096

RESUMO

The World Health Organization has indicated that Interprofessional Education (IPE) occurs when "students from two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other".1 These IPE experiences are widely thought to provide students with the opportunity to learn and practice the knowledge, skills, behaviors and attitudes that will ultimately translate into the provision of safer, higher quality, team-based patient care when they become health care practitioners in collaborative care environments. At the joint American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) 2019 Shaping the Future of Dental Education III conference in Brescia, Italy, delegates explored the concept of transprofessional learning, where students learn skills across a wider range of professions than health professions alone. The workshop continued the dialogue that began during the 2017 ADEA-ADEE Shaping the Future of Dental Education II conference in London, England as previously reported by Davis et al.,2 and explored the use of transprofessional learning through the lenses of dental education, applied linguistics education and law education focusing on the use of reflective practices. The workshop brought together educators from around the globe in a highly interactive setting where they had the opportunity to discuss and develop tools and practices for teaching reflective practice by using a transprofessional learning approach.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Relações Interprofissionais , Odontologia , Inglaterra , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Linguística , Londres
7.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 44-50, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977097

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of live-video and video demonstration methods in training dental students in orthodontic emergency applications. A total of 105 fifth-year dental students at a dental school in Turkey participated in the study in 2018. A pretest was given to the students to evaluate their level of knowledge about band cementing and re-bonding of brackets. Subsequently, two clinical applications were demonstrated with either live-video or video demonstration. During the live-video demonstration, the lecturer gave information about the steps of the procedure while performing the clinical application on the patient using a camera attached to the loupes. The students were able to see the process on the screens. During the video demonstration, previously recorded videos of those clinical applications were shown, and information was given to students in a classroom. On the next day, posttests were given to the students. The posttest also asked students to give their opinions about both methods. The results showed that the mean posttest scores on the video demonstration were significantly higher than on the live-video demonstration. However, no significant difference between the demonstration methods was found with regard to increase of scores from pre- to posttest. Most students preferred use of the two demonstrations together for education in the clinical orthodontics lecture. This study found that the two demonstration methods had comparable effects on increasing students' level of knowledge. However, from the students' perspective, the two should be used together to achieve the highest effect.


Assuntos
Ortodontia , Educação em Odontologia , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Estudantes de Odontologia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Gravação em Vídeo
8.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 111-116, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977098

RESUMO

The central purpose of scientific research and emerging dental health technologies is to improve care for patients and achieve health equity. The Impact of Scientific Technologies and Discoveries on Oral Health Globally workshop conducted joint American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) 2019 conference, Shaping the Future of Dental Education III, highlighted innovative technologies and scientific discoveries to support personalized dental care in an academic and clinical setting. The 2019 workshop built upon the new ideas and way forward identified in the 2017 ADEE-ADEA joint American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and the Association for Dental Education in Europe (ADEE) 2019 conference, Shaping the Future of Dental Education II held in London. During the most recent workshop the approach was to explore the "Teaching Clinic of the Future". Participants applied ideas proposed by keynote speakers, Dr. Walji and Dr. Vervoorn to educational models (Logic Model) in an ideal dental education setting. It is only through this continuous improvement of our use of scientific and technological advances that dental education will be able to convey to students the cognitive skills required to continually adapt to the changes that will affect them and consequently their patients throughout their career. This workshop was a valuable experience for highlighting opportunities and challenges for all stakeholders when aiming to incorporate new technologies to facilitate patient care and students' education.


Assuntos
Currículo , Saúde Bucal , Educação em Odontologia , Europa (Continente) , Humanos , Londres , Estados Unidos
9.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 34-43, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977101

RESUMO

The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of dental students' faculty group leader in clinic, intended postgraduate training, and clinic schedule on their clinical performance. This retrospective study used de-identified transcript data from the Columbia University College of Dental Medicine Classes of 2013, 2014, and 2015, a total of 238 students. The impact factors analyzed were the assigned faculty member who served as clinical group leader and mentor; area of students' intended postgraduate training; and variations in timing of students' summer clinic assignments and vacations. Clinical performance, consistent with the school's graduation criteria, was measured with summative assessments (completion of competencies); completion of care for patients assigned (case completions); and overall patient encounter rate. The results showed that group leader assignment correlated with significant differences among students in completion of cases (p=0.001), competencies completed (p<0.001), and patient encounter rate (p=0.018). Students who intended to pursue general practice residencies and prosthodontics specialty training completed fewer cases than students pursuing other types of postgraduate training (p<0.001). Students who had full-time clinic in June and vacation later in the summer of their third- to fourth-year transition completed more cases (p<0.001), completed more competencies (p=0.008), and had more patient visits (p=0.012) than those who had full-time clinic later in the summer. There were significant correlations among case completions, completion of competencies, and patient encounter rate. Overall, this study found that the students' intended postgraduate training, clinic schedules, and faculty mentors influenced their progress in clinical training and should be taken into consideration in student evaluation and patient care.


Assuntos
Faculdades de Odontologia , Estudantes de Odontologia , Competência Clínica , Educação em Odontologia , Docentes de Odontologia , Humanos , Estudos Retrospectivos
10.
J Dent Educ ; 84(1): 117-122, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31977102

RESUMO

Global networking has been identified as an important method of enhancing health care education and services in the field of dentistry.1 The ability to share expertise, resources, knowledge, and experience to benefit all is highly desired among students, educators, health care professionals, and communities globally. Both our student and patient populations are dynamic societies that are becoming increasingly complex and facing growing needs and expectations, which is a constant challenge for educators and health care professionals to satisfy.2 The key question, stemming from the Global Networking (GN) workshop of the 2017 ADEE-ADEA Shaping the Future of Dental Education II meeting, was identified as, "How can dental educators around the world network to share ideas, experience, expertise, and resources to improve our curricula and teaching and learning environments for our educators, students, and communities that they serve?" The action plan devised by the GN workshop from the 2017meeting indicated two key steps in these early stages of setting up a global network: 1) "…grassroots participation for input and consumption of meaningful and needed content," and 2) "…advisors/consultants for organizational top-down guidance to define and maintain the global networking philosophy and platform…".1 The GN workshop of 2019 SFDE meeting aimed to deliver guidance and discussion with those experienced in engaging local communities from both a grassroots and an organizational approach.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Saúde Bucal , Currículo , Odontologia , Previsões , Humanos
11.
J Oral Sci ; 62(1): 119-121, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31996514

RESUMO

The aim of the present study was to analyze the parameters recorded by the Simodont dental trainer and methacrylate block grades during preclinical practicums to validate whether manual skills can be assessed by both methodologies, over a period of two years and to obtain a preclinical evaluation methodology for all the parameters that measure Simodont performance in each of the prepared figures. To this end, the methacrylate block practice's criteria and evaluation scale were used as predictors. A total of 82 students who completed the first year of dentistry were followed for 2 years. Their performance on the same task (i.e., cavity preparation of three figures in the Simodont and methacrylate blocks) was then reevaluated in the third year. Manual skill improvement was detected in all the students. The parameters measured by the Simodont were used as predictors of the methacrylate block evaluation's results, performed by a professor. Multiple linear regression models for each of the figures and years evaluated in the study were proposed. The present study demonstrates that both methodologies can detect manual skill improvement in dental students. Additionally, the Simodont practice can be reliably evaluated.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Estudantes de Odontologia , Competência Clínica , Preparo da Cavidade Dentária , Humanos
12.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(1): e18470, 2020 Jan.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31895779

RESUMO

The appropriate approach to dental patients, developed during the course of dentists' training, is a prerequisite for the holistic treatment of patients. Empathy is an important component of such an approach. This study aimed to determine the levels of empathy among students of dentistry at different stages in their training.The Jefferson Scale of Empathy - Health Profession Students Version was used to conduct the research, and 100 dental students (66 female and 34 male) ranging from first to fifth year participated in the survey. The scale contained 20 questions, with a possible score interval between 20 and 140. A higher score indicates increased ability to express empathy.The level of empathy among dentistry students increased from the first and second to fourth years, where it reached its maximum. During the fifth year, a decrease in levels of empathy was observed.The increase in empathy during the dental course may be correlated with the growth of clinical practice during the subsequent years of study. A slight decrease in empathy in the fifth-year students may be due to the curricular focus on performing procedures, with students having to meet a set target in order to finish the course.


Assuntos
Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Empatia , Estudantes de Odontologia/psicologia , Adulto , Educação em Odontologia , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Assistência Centrada no Paciente/métodos , Polônia , Distribuição por Sexo , Inquéritos e Questionários
13.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 24(1): 163-168, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31698535

RESUMO

AIMS: To evaluate the self-perceived preparedness of final-year dental undergraduate students in dental public universities in Malaysia. METHODS: Final-year dental undergraduate students from six dental public universities in Malaysia were invited to participate in an online study using a validated Dental Undergraduates Preparedness Assessment Scale DU-PAS. RESULTS: In total, about 245 students responded to the online questionnaire yielding a response rate of 83.05%. The age range of the respondents was 23-29 years with a mean age of 24.36 (SD 0.797). The total score obtained by the respondents was ranged from 48 to 100 with a mean score of 79.56 (SD 13.495). Weaknesses were reported in several clinical skills, cognitive and behavioural attributes. CONCLUSIONS: The preparedness of undergraduate students at six dental institutions in Malaysia was comparable to students from developed countries. The dental undergraduate preparedness assessment scale is a useful tool, and dental institutions may be used for self-assessment as well as to obtain feedback from the supervisors.


Assuntos
Estudantes de Odontologia , Universidades , Adulto , Competência Clínica , Educação em Odontologia , Humanos , Malásia , Inquéritos e Questionários , Adulto Jovem
14.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 24(1): 26-35, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31518467

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Electives have been shown to contribute to both the professional and personal development of students in specific areas of interest outside the standard curriculum. The School of Oral Health Sciences at the University of the Witwatersrand introduced electives as a pedagogy in the Bachelor of Dental Sciences (BDS) and Bachelor of Oral Health Sciences (BOHSc) curricula in 2010 and 2014, respectively. However, since its introduction, the relevance of these electives in the BDS and BOHSc curricula has not been investigated. METHODS: This research was designed as an evaluation study that used a questionnaire survey administered to 76 dental and oral hygiene graduates (BDS and BOHSc). RESULTS: Of the initial 76 questionnaires that were distributed, 55 (BDS = 38, BOHSc = 17) were returned, giving a response rate of 72.4%. Almost all the participants (92.7%) agreed that the electives enabled them to develop better interpersonal skills; 80.0% and 82.7% agreed that their clinical skills, and knowledge of key concepts in dental practice, respectively, had improved upon completion of the elective. In appraising the elective programme, 87.0% of the graduates agreed that the content and outcome of the elective programme should be reviewed and changed. CONCLUSION: Obtaining empirical data on the impact of electives on clinical knowledge, skill and behaviour of dental graduates will enhance the relevance of electives in dental education. Findings by this study reveal that the actual impact of the electives on dental graduates was desirable and corresponded with the intended impact. The problematic areas that were identified will inform future planning.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Higiene Bucal , Competência Clínica , Currículo , Humanos , Inquéritos e Questionários
15.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 24(1): 53-62, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31518475

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: In the United Kingdom, the General Dental Council requires newly graduated dentists to be competent in managing orthodontic emergencies. Undergraduate students typically receive limited exposure to orthodontics, with teaching primarily delivered via conventional lectures. Flipped teaching involves knowledge being acquired in students' own time, with class time focussing on construction of meaning. METHODS: A total of 61 undergraduate dental students were randomised into either a flipped or a conventional group. The conventional group (n = 30) attended a lecture describing the management of six common emergencies. The flipped group (n = 31) were given access to six videos via a virtual learning environment and later completed practical tasks related to the material. Both groups completed a single best answer assessment. Perceptions of flipped classroom teaching were explored via focus groups. RESULTS: For questions on orthodontic emergencies, the conventional group had a mean examination result of 70.5% (SD 8.0%) compared with the flipped group of 72.8% (SD 12.9%). There was no significant difference between the groups (P = .532). For regular orthodontic questions, the conventional group had a mean examination result of 64.8% (SD: 19.9%) compared with 78.3% (SD: 21.7%). There was no significant difference between the groups (P = .083). Thematic analysis identified the following themes: ways in which videos encourages more effective learning, improved engagement, awareness of learning needs and proposed teaching/curriculum changes. The overarching theoretical perspective was facilitating an experiential learning cycle using flipped classroom teaching. CONCLUSIONS: In the context of this investigation, the flipped classroom method of teaching resulted in comparable examination performance and improved levels of satisfaction.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Emergências , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Currículo , Educação em Odontologia/métodos , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Ensino , Reino Unido
16.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 24(1): 103-108, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31618494

RESUMO

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Higher education in the European Union states has undergone a major reform towards harmonisation following the "Bologna Declaration." The aim of this paper is to evaluate the implementation of the Bologna Process in Dental Education following its 20th anniversary and identify commonalities and differences in the way dental programmes are delivered in the EU. METHODS: According to the aim of this study, an Internet search, based on the EU Manual published in 2015, was undertaken and included representative university/dental faculty websites from each EU member state. The search was focused on the type of the under- and postgraduate dental programmes (cycles), the awarded undergraduate degrees (bachelor, master, doctorate), duration of undergraduate study programmes, awarded ECTS credits and the necessity of mandatory postgraduate practical training. Results were collated, and descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken. RESULTS: The search identified 26 EU states out of a total of 28 as providers of dental education. Two of the 26 countries offer a bachelor's degrees (Bachelor of Dental Surgery); five countries offer a combined bachelor's and master's degree; and ten countries still award the doctor's degree for the undergraduate education. Finally, three countries award diploma for the graduating dentist. CONCLUSIONS: Two decades after the launch, noticeable differences in the structure and duration of undergraduate dental programmes persist and these may be attributed to curricular structure and university regulations in individual EU countries.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Estudantes , União Europeia , Humanos
17.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 24(1): 121-125, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31631472

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: WhatsApp is an instant multimedia messaging and social media software which can be used for multiple purposes such as data, text, photographs and document transfer. Due to its versatility and multiple utilities, WhatsApp has been used within the educational setting in medicine and dentistry, proving a positive attitude of students towards its use. AIM: To compare the reception time and the response time of WhatsApp with the traditional electronic email within the dental educational environment. METHOD: A two-group comparative study was designed. Four multiple choice questions were sent via WhatsApp (group WA) and via electronic mail (group eM) to dental students. Data collected focused on the reception time and response time of students. Specifications of WhatsApp were used to collect data whilst an email tracker was used for the eM group. Excel software and Stata/IC version 15.1 software were used for data analysis. RESULTS: Seventy-four dental students from the University x (anonymised for reviewing purposes) dental school agreed to take part in this experience. However, 59 provided their responses (80%). Forty-four were females, and 15 were males. Twenty-seven participants were randomly allocated to the WA group and 32 to the eM group. The statistical analysis revealed a significant difference between groups: Reception time, P: .0286 value and response time, P: .0448 value indicating that the WA group was significantly faster in terms of reception and response time. CONCLUSION: This pilot study suggests that WhatsApp is more efficient in terms of reception and response time than electronic emails.


Assuntos
Educação em Odontologia , Correio Eletrônico , Mensagem de Texto , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Projetos Piloto , Estudantes de Odontologia
18.
Int Endod J ; 53(2): 276-284, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31519031

RESUMO

AIM: To understand whether the self-efficacy of undergraduates is associated with the extent of the endodontic education they received. METHODOLOGY: Data were obtained from three undergraduate endodontic programmes in two universities: Aarhus University (AU), Denmark and the Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam (ACTA), the Netherlands. Just before their graduations in 2016 or 2017, students completed a questionnaire that contained the Endodontic General Self-Efficacy Scale and questions on how they valued the education they received in Endodontics. The information on the number and type of root canal treatments participants had performed on patients was collected from dental clinic management systems. Data were ana-lysed using non-parametric tests and multiple regression analyses. RESULTS: The median number of treated root canals on patients per student was 5 in the standard programme at ACTA, 10 in AU, and 14.5 in the extended programme at ACTA. Students' self-efficacy increased with the number of treated root canals; however, retreatments and root canal treatments in molars were negatively associated with self-efficacy. All students wanted more experience in performing root canal treatment on patients. CONCLUSIONS: The endodontic self-efficacy of students from the standard programmes of the two participating universities was comparable. Students' self-efficacy was influenced mostly by their clinical experience when performing root canal treatment. It seems that the more root canal treatments students perform on patients, the greater their self-efficacy is at graduation. However, treating difficult cases (molars and retreatments) might reduce their self-efficacy.


Assuntos
Endodontia , Estudantes de Odontologia , Dinamarca , Educação em Odontologia , Humanos , Países Baixos , Tratamento do Canal Radicular , Autoeficácia
19.
Eur J Dent Educ ; 24(1): 5-16, 2020 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31278815

RESUMO

INTRODUCTION: Virtual reality-based platforms are becoming increasingly popular in education. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of undergraduate dental students with the introduction of the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) within the pre-clinical curriculum in the direct restoration module of the operative dentistry course using manual and digital methods. METHODS: Thirty-two randomly selected year 2 undergraduate students were divided into two groups: group 1, exposed to the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) and group 2, no exposure to VR. All students were then evaluated in carrying out a Class I preparation in a single-blinded fashion. All preparations were evaluated by three assessors using a traditional manual approach and a digital software. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using chi-square test (alpha = 0.05). RESULTS: The number of students who performed satisfactory preparations was more in group 1 (12/16), compared to group 2 (7/16). The percentage of satisfactory domains was significantly higher in group 1, compared to group 2, both in the manual evaluation (83.9% (94/112) and 59.8% (67/112) in groups 1 and 2, respectively) and in the digital evaluation (85.7% (96/112) and 55.4% (62/112) in groups 1 and 2, respectively) (P < .05). There was no significant difference between the manual and digital methods of evaluation with regard to the percentage of satisfactory or unsatisfactory preparations (P > .05). CONCLUSIONS: The use of the Moog Simodont dental trainer (VR) significantly improved the satisfactory performance of students. The virtual reality simulator may be a valuable adjunct in the undergraduate direct restorations course and for remedial student.


Assuntos
Estudantes de Odontologia , Realidade Virtual , Competência Clínica , Simulação por Computador , Dentística Operatória , Educação em Odontologia , Humanos , Interface Usuário-Computador
20.
Dent Clin North Am ; 64(1): 229-240, 2020 01.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-31735228

RESUMO

General dentists usually serve as first-line providers for pediatric patients and the gateway to their oral health. Even though general dentists are trained to be able to treat children, dental education instruction can vary greatly. These differences heavily influence the individual practitioner's knowledge base and comfort level in providing care to this vulnerable population. It is important for general dentists to be able to identify the presence of pediatric oral lesions. This article provides an overview of common pediatric oral lesions that general dentists may encounter in everyday practice.


Assuntos
Assistência Odontológica para Crianças , Odontopediatria , Atitude do Pessoal de Saúde , Criança , Odontólogos , Educação em Odontologia , Odontologia Geral , Humanos , Saúde Bucal , Padrões de Prática Odontológica , Populações Vulneráveis
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