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1.
J Vet Med Educ ; 48(1): 14-20, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33594954

RESUMO

Numerous educational studies have shown that passive learning methods are frequently associated with disappointing learning outcomes, yet many faculty instructors continue to rely on passive didactic lectures. This article describes the creation of an active learning teaching approach-referred to as the collaborative, case-based classroom-that combines three pedagogical strategies: peer-assisted learning, case-based learning, and just-in-time teaching. Data from student surveys of a third-year cardiology elective showed a preference for this teaching approach compared with a case-based lecture. Six major themes emerged from survey analysis: engagement/interactivity, instructional benefit, clinical reasoning, clinical relevance, peer-assisted learning, and timely feedback. Although detailed here in the context of a cardiology elective, the collaborative, case-based classroom is a teaching approach that could be modified to fit a variety of other teaching environments.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Animais , Docentes , Humanos , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Estudantes , Ensino
2.
J Vet Med Educ ; 48(1): 8-13, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33594955

RESUMO

The veterinary workplace consists of different professionals working together in inter-professional teams. Previous work has explored the benefits of effective veterinary teamwork for multiple stakeholders. In this teaching tip article, we outline the underlying educational theories and tips for developing inter-professional teaching to foster students' appreciation of the different roles and responsibilities of veterinarians and veterinary nurses/vet techs. Inter-professional education (IPE) requires students to learn with, about, and from each other and implies recognition of social learning as an underpinning approach. It involves developing learning opportunities to address students' potential misunderstandings of each other's motivations, to allow them to explore issues present in the other profession's practice, and to clarify sometimes overlapping roles and responsibilities. Students are given opportunities to explore the complexity of inter-professional teamwork in a safe environment using real-life topics as context for their collaboration. Two veterinary examples of IPE at the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) are provided to explore different teaching methods and topics that have proved successful in our context: dentistry and directed learning scenarios. We describe how RVC has developed an IPE team consisting of faculty members who champion IPE, which has, in turn, inspired students to create a student-led IPE club, hosting extracurricular educational events. This is an example of an effective student-teacher partnership. A number of challenges exist in embedding IPE, but the benefits it offers in integrating clinical and professional elements of the curricula make it worthy of consideration.


Assuntos
Técnicos em Manejo de Animais , Educação Profissionalizante , Educação em Veterinária , Médicos Veterinários , Animais , Currículo , Humanos , Relações Interprofissionais
3.
J Vet Med Educ ; 48(1): 27-32, 2021 Feb.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33594956

RESUMO

Audience response devices are useful tools that can improve student engagement and learning during instructional sessions. The purpose of this article is to describe our experience with a new cloud-based application known as Top Hat, which includes audience response tools in its application suite. The software was used in a multi-specialty, multi-instructor medicine and surgery course in the third year of a veterinary curriculum. In addition to standard multiple-choice and short-answer questions, Top Hat has several unique question types and methods of displaying the responses given. These include displaying free-text responses in a word cloud format and a "click-on-target" question type that allows students to indicate their response by clicking on a location within an image. Responses for this latter question type are displayed in a heat map format. A discussion tool is also available, which allows students to respond, read other students' responses in real time, and then reply again if warranted. This feature also supports drawing-based responses. The variety of question types was very useful in keeping students engaged during teaching sessions, giving this application several advantages over systems that are limited to multiple-choice questions only. In addition, the application allowed rapid identification of areas of student knowledge and misunderstandings, which facilitated the direction of further discussion and clarification of important learning issues.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Animais , Currículo , Avaliação Educacional , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Software , Estudantes , Ensino
4.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(5): 647-658, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33231517

RESUMO

Veterinary educators strive to prepare graduates for a variety of career options with the skills and knowledge to use and contribute to research as part of their lifelong practice of evidence-based veterinary medicine (EBVM). In the veterinary curriculum, students should receive a grounding in research and EBVM, as well as have the opportunity to consider research as a career. Seeing a lack of a cohesive body of information that identified the options and the challenges inherent to embedding such training in veterinary curricula, an international group was formed with the goal of synthesizing evidence to help curriculum designers, course leaders, and teachers implement educational approaches that will inspire future researchers and produce evidence-based practitioners. This article presents a literature review of the rationale, issues, and options for research and EBVM in veterinary curricula. Additionally, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 11 key stakeholders across the eight Council for International Veterinary Medical Education (CIVME) regions. Emergent themes from the literature and interviews for including research and EBVM skills into the curriculum included societal need, career development, and skills important to clinical professional life. Approaches included compulsory as well as optional learning opportunities. Barriers to incorporating these skills into the curriculum were grouped into student and faculty-/staff-related issues, time constraints in the curriculum, and financial barriers. Having motivated faculty and contextualizing the teaching were considered important to engage students. The information has been summarized in an online "toolbox" that is freely available for educators to inform curriculum development.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Animais , Currículo , Docentes , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Estudantes
5.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(5): 619-631, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33231519

RESUMO

Limitations in workforce size and access to resources remain perennial challenges to greater progress in academic veterinary medicine and engagement between human and veterinary medicine (One Health). Ongoing resource constraints occur in part due to limited public understanding of the role veterinarians play in improving human health. One Health interactions, particularly through interdisciplinary collaborations in biomedical research, present constructive opportunities to inform resource policies and advance health care. To this end, inter-institutional partnerships between individual veterinary medical education programs (VMEPs) and several National Institutes of Health (NIH) intramural research programs have created synergies beyond those provided by individual programs. In the NIH Comparative Biomedical Scientist Training Program (CBSTP), interdisciplinary cross-training of veterinarians consisting of specialty veterinary medicine coupled with training in human disease research leading to a PhD, occurs collaboratively on both VMEP and NIH campuses. Pre-doctoral veterinary student research opportunities have also been made available. Through the CBSTP, NIH investigators and national biomedical science policy makers gain access to veterinary perspective and expertise, while veterinarians obtain additional opportunities for NIH-funded research training. CBSTP Fellows serve as de facto ambassadors enhancing visibility for the profession while in residence at NIH, and subsequently through a variety of university, industry, and government research appointments, as graduates. Thus, the CBSTP represents an inter-institutional opportunity that not only addresses critical needs for veterinarian-scientists in the biomedical workforce, but also simultaneously exposes national policy makers to veterinarian-scientists' specialized training, leading to more effective realization of One Health goals to benefit human and animal health.


Assuntos
Pesquisa Biomédica , Educação em Veterinária , Saúde Única , Médicos Veterinários , Animais , Objetivos , Humanos , National Institutes of Health (U.S.) , Estados Unidos
6.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(5): 555-569, 2020 Oct.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33231520

RESUMO

Local peer observation of teaching is considered an important mechanism for instructors to improve the quality and effectiveness of their teaching, but there is an absence of uniformity to establish a best practice for this process in veterinary curricula. The Regional Teaching Academy (RTA) of the Consortium of Western Colleges of Veterinary Medicine is comprised of educational advocates from five western veterinary colleges with a common goal of enhancing the quality and effectiveness of education in veterinary medical curricula. Members of the RTA recognized this deficit in best practices for local peer observation (LPO) and formed a working group called "Local Peer Observation of Teaching." The goal was to meet a critical need for the enhancement of individual teaching skills by using a scholarly approach to develop robust methods for peer observation of teaching. Two rubric-based instruments were developed: one for large-group/didactic settings, and the second for small-group/clinical settings. Each is accompanied by pre- and post-observation worksheets which are considered instrumental to success. Results of a qualitative survey of instrument users' experiences are shared. Both observers and observees view the experiential learning from faculty peer colleagues very positively and the meaningful feedback is appreciated and incorporated by observees. Suggestions for implementation of the peer observation process are discussed, considering strengths and challenges. The purpose of this article is to describe in depth, the development process and output of the efforts of the Local Peer Observation of Teaching working group as a potential best practice guideline for peer observation.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Animais , Currículo , Docentes , Humanos , Grupo Associado , Aprendizagem Baseada em Problemas , Ensino
7.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(4): 482-487, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33151116

RESUMO

Pain recognition and treatment in companion animals are important aspects of veterinary medicine, yet the teaching of these concepts may not be adequate at all academic institutions. This study was designed to evaluate veterinary students' ability to recall signs of pain and specific analgesic drugs in dogs and cats. We hypothesized that students in the fourth, or final, year of their veterinary curriculum would have a better understanding of pain recognition and be able to recall more analgesic options. A brief, voluntary, and anonymous open question survey was made available to all veterinary students, years 1 to 4, at our institution. The questions included, "How does a cat/dog show signs of pain?" and "What pain medications are used in cats/dogs?" Survey responses were collated according to the students' year in the curriculum, and the most common responses for signs of pain and analgesic medications recalled by the students in both the cat and dog were compared for significant differences. Results showed that students in the class of 2017 (seniors) had no superior recall of analgesic medications or recognition of pain in cats or dogs compared to the other classes. Vocalization was the most common sign of pain recalled with at least 50% responses from all classes. Carprofen was the most commonly recalled analgesic for dogs (the difference between classes, p = .04). Meloxicam was the most commonly recalled analgesic for cats (the difference among classes, p < .001). Based on these results, areas of improvement were identified for our analgesic curriculum.


Assuntos
Doenças do Gato , Doenças do Cão , Educação em Veterinária , Analgésicos/uso terapêutico , Animais , Doenças do Gato/diagnóstico , Doenças do Gato/tratamento farmacológico , Gatos , Cães , Humanos , Dor/diagnóstico , Dor/tratamento farmacológico , Dor/veterinária , Estudantes
8.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(4): 408-413, 2020 Jul.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33151118

RESUMO

Worldwide growth in global mobility has transformed the way we communicate, trade, and approach global issues. The rise of global migration and distribution comes with a higher probability of transmitted disease, human-wildlife conflict, and food safety issues. No longer viewed as isolated incidents, the occurrence of global health threats in one part of the globe is now a concern throughout the world. Our society needs globally conscious veterinarians who are dedicated to affecting world change through the improvement of animal and human health; veterinarians who are prepared to collaborate, exchange, and engage with the world around them. Higher education institutions for veterinary medicine have the responsibility to prepare their students to become agents of change within society and rewrite the narrative on global health. This article highlights the intentional approach that Purdue University College of Veterinary Medicine took to address the need for more globally conscious veterinarians. The article provides examples of administrative structures, funding sources, global engagement opportunities, methods to increase student awareness of opportunities, and student support. Finally, we describe the impact of this approach in increasing student participation in global engagement.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Médicos Veterinários , Medicina Veterinária , Animais , Humanos , Estudantes , Estados Unidos , Universidades
9.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(s1): 39-47, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33074076

RESUMO

Veterinary education establishments (VEEs) and veterinary statutory bodies (VSBs) play key roles in ensuring the effectiveness of veterinary professionals and delivery of competent national veterinary services (VS). Recognizing the need to address the quality of veterinary education and the role of VSBs for its member countries/territories (Members), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) has organized conferences, workshops, and ad hoc groups leading to the development of recommendations and guidelines and the introduction of active programmers on veterinary education. In Asia and the Pacific region, veterinary education and practice as well as regulatory approach among Members vary considerably, and limited information is currently available publicly. In 2018, the OIE organized a workshop for VEEs and VSBs in Asia and the Pacific region, for which participants completed a questionnaire regarding each country's situation relating to veterinary education, regulations, and professionals. The questionnaire results showed that most Members and Observers (Members/Observers) in Asia had at least one VEE and that the OIE guidelines for VEEs are widely used. Similarly, most Members/Observers in Asia had a VSB or equivalent authority that oversees the quality and competence of veterinarians. Some challenges were also revealed, including variations in the roles, responsibilities, and level of autonomy of VSBs and weak collaboration/coordination among the key in-country/territory stakeholders of veterinary education. The OIE offers Members recommendations and guidelines as well as several programs and activities aiming to strengthen the VS, VEEs, and VSBs, including the evaluation of veterinary services' performance, the VEE and VSB twinning projects, and conferences and workshops.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Médicos Veterinários , Medicina Veterinária , Animais , Ásia , Saúde Global , Humanos
10.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(s1): 92-98, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33074077

RESUMO

As part of an OIE Veterinary Education Twinning Project linking The University of Queensland, Australia and Nong Lam University, Vietnam, the limited access to animal and clinical resources was identified as an impediment to high quality veterinary education at Nong Lam University. However, student focused, simulated learning spaces, which have been widely adopted in veterinary training, are a cost-effective opportunity to provide initial clinical skills to students in countries where resourcing is constrained. In clinical skills training facilities, students use models and simulators to practice their clinical skills to develop the confidence, competence and muscle memory to enter the clinical phase of their training. While high-fidelity veterinary simulators and models are expensive, effective models for foundational clinical skills development can be built in-house for students to practice their skills authentically. This article outlines the cost effective establishment of a veterinary clinical skills training facility at Nong Lam University.


Assuntos
Competência Clínica , Educação em Veterinária , Animais , Austrália , Países em Desenvolvimento , Humanos , Estudantes
11.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(s1): 20-29, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33074078

RESUMO

The World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) provides the requirements needed for graduating veterinary professionals to be competent in the delivery of animal health services. However, significant differences in veterinary curricula across countries-attributable to differing animal health priorities and predominant types of veterinary practice-provide a challenge for veterinary schools to address these competencies adequately. As part of the OIE's veterinary education establishment Twinning Project activities, the College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences (CVMBS) of Sokoine University of Agriculture (SUA) in Tanzania undertook a curriculum mapping and gap analysis to assess the extent to which the veterinary curriculum addresses OIE's 'Day 1 Competencies' for graduating veterinarians. Results of the analysis indicated that all the OIE's Day 1 Competencies (general, specific, and advanced) are addressed to some degree by the courses present in the curriculum. However, gaps in the depth and breadth of instruction were found for a number of competencies in all three categories. These findings indicate a need for addressing the gaps in the next curriculum review. This will allow the development of a stronger curriculum that will efficiently meet the national and international animal health requirements.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Médicos Veterinários , Medicina Veterinária , Animais , Currículo , Saúde Global , Humanos , Tanzânia
12.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(s1): 74-82, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33074080

RESUMO

Curriculum mapping provides a systematic approach for analyzing the conformity of an educational program with a given set of standards. The Chiang Mai University Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and the University of Minnesota College of Veterinary Medicine joined together in an educational twinning project to map their Doctor of Veterinary Medicine curricula against core competencies identified by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) as critically important for Day 1 veterinary graduates to meet the needs for global public good services. Details of curriculum coverage for each specific and advanced competency were collected through a review of syllabi and course descriptions, followed by in-depth interviews of key faculty members. The depth of coverage of each competency was estimated by the tabulating the number of hours assigned. The teaching methods and levels of learning were also captured. While the overall design of the curricula conformed to the OIE Guidelines for Veterinary Education Core Curricula, the mapping process identified variability in the depth and breadth of coverage on individual competencies. Coverage of the Day 1 Specific Competencies was greater early in the curricula. More gaps existed in terms of the Advanced Competencies than the specific core competencies. Discussion of the identified gaps with faculty members led to opportunities for strengthening the curricula by adjustments of individual courses throughout the curricula. Documentation of teaching methods also led to professional development of new pedagogical skills and redesign of the teaching methods for particular subjects.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Animais , Currículo , Docentes , Saúde Global , Humanos , Aprendizagem
13.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(s1): 99-100, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33074081

RESUMO

Veterinary medicine is a global public good. A robust system of both public and private veterinary services is essential to protect animal health. Improved animal health leads to global food security and reduces poverty by increasing productivity, controlling transboundary diseases and expanding access to international markets. The quality of veterinary services is directly related to the quality of veterinary medical education, therefore, it is incumbent upon the entire global veterinary medical profession to support programs that improve education around the world.


Assuntos
Educação Médica , Educação em Veterinária , Medicina Veterinária , Animais , Saúde Global , Saúde Pública
14.
J Vet Med Educ ; 47(s1): 8-19, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33074082

RESUMO

The University of Gondar College of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Sciences (UoG-CVMASc) and the Ohio State University College of Veterinary Medicine (OSU-CVM) developed an objective methodology to assess the curriculum of veterinary institutions and implement changes to create a curriculum that is harmonized with OIE standards while also covering the needs and realities of Gondar and Ethiopia. The process, developed under the sponsorship of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Veterinary Education Twinning Programme, is outlined in this article with the hope that it can be applied by other countries wishing to improve national veterinary services (VS) through the improvement of their academic programs. The plan created by the UoG-OSU Twinning team consisted of an in-depth curriculum assessment and development process, which entailed three consecutive stages. Stage 1 (Curriculum Assessment) included the design and development of an Evaluation Tool for OIE Day 1 Graduating Veterinarian Competencies in recent graduates, and the mapping and evaluation of the current UoG-CVMASc curriculum based on the OIE Veterinary Education Core Curriculum. Stage 2 (Curriculum Development) consisted of the identification and prioritization of possible solutions to address identified curriculum gaps as well as the development of an action plan to revise and update the curriculum. Finally, Stage 3 (Curriculum Implementation) focused on the process to launch the new curriculum. In September 2017, 53 first-year students started the professional program at the UoG-CVMASc as the first cohort to be accepted into the newly developed OIE Harmonized Curriculum, the first of its kind in Africa.


Assuntos
Educação em Veterinária , Médicos Veterinários , Medicina Veterinária , Animais , Currículo , Etiópia , Humanos , Faculdades de Medicina Veterinária
15.
BMC Infect Dis ; 20(1): 743, 2020 Oct 09.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33036559

RESUMO

BACKGROUND: Chagas disease is a zoonotic infection caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, which affects an estimated 8-11 million people globally. Chagas disease is almost always associated with poverty in rural areas and disproportionately impacts immigrants from Latin America living in the United States. Approximately 20-30% of people who are infected with Chagas disease will develop a chronic form of the infection that can be fatal if left untreated. Chagas disease is vastly underestimated in the United States, often goes undiagnosed and is not well understood by most U.S. healthcare providers. One of the most important ways at reducing barriers to improving diagnostics of Chagas disease in the U.S. is giving healthcare providers the most up-to-date information and access to leading experts. METHODS: An online webinar was conducted for healthcare providers, veterinarians and public health professionals using Chagas disease expert panelists. Pre and post tests were administered to participants (n = 57) to determine the efficacy in raising awareness and to determine key focus areas for improving knowledge. A Wilcoxon rank-sum was used for non-parametric variables equivalent and for questions that assessed knowledge the McNemar's Chi-Square test was used. RESULTS: There were statistically significant learning increases in multiple categories including transmission (p = <.001), clinical presentation (p = 0.016), diagnostics (p = <.001), and treatment (p = <.001). CONCLUSION: Providing easily accessible learning opportunities using validated testing and evaluations should be further developed for rural healthcare providers in the U.S. as well as healthcare providers serving under represented populations such as immigrants. There is a clear lack of knowledge and awareness surrounding Chagas disease in the United States and just by raising awareness and providing education on the topic, lives will be saved.


Assuntos
Doença de Chagas/diagnóstico , Doença de Chagas/epidemiologia , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Pessoal de Saúde/educação , Trypanosoma cruzi , Animais , Doença de Chagas/parasitologia , Educação em Veterinária , Emigrantes e Imigrantes , Feminino , Humanos , Aprendizagem , Masculino , Pobreza , Estados Unidos/epidemiologia , Zoonoses/diagnóstico
16.
Vet Rec ; 187(7): 277-278, 2020 10 03.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-33008983
17.
Vet Rec ; 187(5): 195-196, 2020 09 05.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32887829
18.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 23(9): 1281-1288, 2020 Sep.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32913169

RESUMO

Aims: This study aimed to obtain data on the knowledge, behavior, and immunization status of veterinary students about rabies. Methods and Materials: The population of this descriptive study consisted of all the 770 students of a veterinary faculty (response rate 85.7%; n = 660). A survey was conducted querying the knowledge and behaviors of the participants about rabies. Results: Of the surveyed students 28.6% (n = 189) stated that they were exposed to animal bites at least once, and 50.3% (n = 95) of these students stated that they were vaccinated following the exposure. Of the participants, 23.6% (n = 156) indicated that they received protective rabies treatment (prophylactic vaccination). About 32.9% (n = 217) of the students taking part in the study had pets at home. Around 70.7% (n = 153) of these students stated that their animals were vaccinated against rabies. A significant relationship was found between having a pet and being bitten by an animal (P < 0.001). 50.5% (n = 333) of the students who participated in the study were competent in knowledge, while 48.3% were competent in behavior. Students competent in knowledge or behavior were considerably more in the clinical classes compared to preclinical classes. A significant relationship in favor of men was found between the sexes concerning both knowledge and behavior levels. Conclusions: The study revealed deficiencies in the students' awareness levels regarding rabies. Ascertaining a sufficient amount of theory and practice courses on rabies in the veterinary faculty curriculum, starting from earlier classes will contribute to the knowledge and behaviors of the students.


Assuntos
Antibioticoprofilaxia/estatística & dados numéricos , Conhecimentos, Atitudes e Prática em Saúde , Vacinas Antirrábicas/administração & dosagem , Raiva/prevenção & controle , Estudantes de Ciências da Saúde/psicologia , Vacinação/estatística & dados numéricos , Adulto , Animais , Mordeduras e Picadas , Cães , Educação em Veterinária , Docentes , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Raiva/veterinária , Faculdades de Medicina Veterinária , Estudantes de Ciências da Saúde/estatística & dados numéricos , Inquéritos e Questionários , Turquia
19.
Vet Rec ; 187(4): 157, 2020 08 22.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32826377
20.
PLoS One ; 15(8): e0235866, 2020.
Artigo em Inglês | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-32813747

RESUMO

OBJECTIVES: As an important public health concern, antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is related to lack of knowledge among healthcare professionals. Since the Global Action Plan on AMR highlights the importance of training all healthcare professionals, it is essential to focus our attention on the education related to judicious antimicrobial use. The current study was the first attempt in southeastern Europe to quantify the knowledge about antimicrobial usage and biosecurity measure among veterinary students. METHODS: This questionnaire-based study was performed between April and May of 2019 on 213 veterinary students of the University of Novi Sad, Serbia and the University of Zagreb, Croatia. RESULTS: Veterinary students appeared to be little aware of antimicrobial use in veterinary medicine contribution to overall AMR since only 56.8% have chosen strong contribution as the answer. Of the students surveyed, only 22.1%/35.7% of them strongly agreed/agreed that the amount of teaching time for pharmacology was about right. Students who denied having good knowledge of the pharmacology of antimicrobials showed higher knowledge about systemic use of antimicrobials in different clinical scenarios (p = 0.002). High importance of some antimicrobials for human medicine was not recognized by surveyed students. Only 8.5% of them identified gentamicin correctly, as first-line therapy. Students expected to graduate later were more likely to identify the importance of rating antimicrobials correctly than those who thought they would graduate earlier (p = 0.002). More than half of students gave correct answer at scenario regarding a dog with recurrent pyoderma by choosing culture and susceptibility (C & S) testing. Our students who think they will graduate sooner have higher knowledge level on C & S testing sample submission for range of clinical scenarios (p = 0.004). Moreover, appropriate use of PPE (personal protective equipment) procedure and biosecurity measure were reported for two thirds of our students in case of only for two clinical scenarios. CONCLUSION: This study reveals that among veterinary students from Croatia and Serbia improved undergraduate education is needed on the AMR with emphasis on antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) and appropriate biosecurity.


Assuntos
Gestão de Antimicrobianos , Educação em Veterinária , Adulto , Anti-Infecciosos/uso terapêutico , Gestão de Antimicrobianos/métodos , Croácia , Educação em Veterinária/métodos , Feminino , Humanos , Masculino , Sérvia , Estudantes , Médicos Veterinários , Drogas Veterinárias/uso terapêutico , Adulto Jovem
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